Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Changes in potential North Sea spawning grounds of plaice (Pleuronectes platessa L.) based on early life stage connectivity to nursery habitats
    Hufnagl, M. ; Peck, M.A. ; Nash, R.D.M. ; Pohlmann, T. ; Rijnsdorp, A.D. - \ 2013
    Journal of Sea Research 84 (2013). - ISSN 1385-1101 - p. 26 - 39.
    western wadden sea - irish sea - juvenile plaice - climate-change - concentration hypothesis - vertical-distribution - circulation model - southern bight - history stages - class strength
    We explored the hypothesis that spawning ground locations of North Sea plaice reflect the locations of nursery grounds using drift scenarios based on a baroclinic, shallow-water circulation model (HAMSOM). The transport of pelagic eggs and larvae was simulated each year from 1975 to 2006 using in situ forcing, temperature-dependent development and stage-specific behaviour of eggs and larvae. This long-term simulation period also allowed us to explore climate effects. A release position was considered a potential and suitable spawning site if larvae from that area reached coastal nurseries after the onset of metamorphosis. In general, larvae were transported in an anti-clockwise direction and settled in nurseries that were relatively close to the release positions. Spawning locations that were offshore were poorly connected to nursery grounds while those closer to the shore had higher connectivity. Simulated suitable spawning locations broadly agreed with the main centres of egg production (English Channel, Southern Bight, German Bight), except for the known spawning grounds south of Dogger Bank. Over the 31-year simulation period, positive and negative trends in transport success were found for the western and eastern parts of the North Sea, respectively. Changes in the west (Flamborough Head) were mainly due to changes in water circulation patterns whereas those in the east (northern German Bight) were induced by changes in both currents and water temperature. The implications of these findings, and the significant correlation between changes in drift and recruitment, suggest that climate-driven changes in the suitability of nursery grounds will directly affect the distribution and productivity of plaice in the North Sea.
    Dietary overlap between the potential competitors herring, sprat and anchovy in the North Sea
    Raab, K.E. ; Nagelkerke, L.A.J. ; Boeree, C. ; Rijnsdorp, A.D. ; Temming, A. ; Dickey-Collas, M. - \ 2012
    Marine Ecology Progress Series 470 (2012). - ISSN 0171-8630 - p. 101 - 111.
    engraulis-encrasicolus l. - central baltic sea - clupea-harengus - feeding-behavior - intraguild predation - trophic interactions - population-dynamics - mediterranean sea - fish eggs - irish sea
    European anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus increased its abundance and distribution in the North Sea during the mid-1990s and may consume similar zooplankton to and/or compete with other occupants of the North Sea like herring Clupea harengus and sprat Sprattus sprattus. The diets of adult anchovy, sprat and juvenile herring of comparable sizes, sampled close in time and space, were compared to understand how the 3 species prey on zooplankton and establish whether their diets overlap or not. Anchovy was found to be more generalist, consuming a higher diversity of prey items. Herring was more specialized, with low diversity of food items. Sprat was intermediate between anchovy and herring. The dietary overlap between anchovy and sprat was highest, followed by herring and sprat before anchovy and herring. The mean weight of stomach contents did not differ between species. We conclude that of the 3 species, anchovy is likely to be the least affected by changing plankton communities.
    Anchovy Engraulis encrasicolus diet in the North and Baltic Seas
    Raab, K.E. ; Nagelkerke, L.A.J. ; Boerée, L.A.J. ; Rijnsdorp, A.D. ; Temming, A. ; Dickey-Collas, M. - \ 2011
    Journal of Sea Research 65 (2011)1. - ISSN 1385-1101 - p. 131 - 140.
    herring clupea-harengus - cod gadus-morhua - haddock melanogrammus-aeglefinus - whiting merlangius-merlangus - long-term changes - intraguild predation - feeding-behavior - irish sea - sprattus-sprattus - mediterranean sea
    The diet of anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus) in the North and Baltic Seas was studied using stomach analysis from four sampling events in different areas. Zooplanktivory was confirmed; the most frequent prey items (in over 40% of stomachs) were copepods, malacostracan larvae and fish larvae. In the Baltic Sea, Paracalanus spp. and Pseudocalanus spp. were important in relative terms; in the German Bight, Temora spp. dominated the stomach contents. Relative abundances of prey items varied with area more than absolute abundance or presence absence of items. Moreover, the level of resolution of prey categories influenced which prey categories were considered to be most important in driving variability in stomach content. Anchovy diet is broad across the seasons, years and areas sampled, suggesting that it is not a specialist feeder in the North Sea. The similarity of diet between anchovy and other clupeids, as well as anchovy consumption of larval fish, makes the new increased anchovy population a potential intraguild predator of commercial species like herring.
    Spatial patterns of infauna, epifauna and demersal fish communities in the North Sea.
    Reiss, H. ; Degraer, S. ; Duineveld, G.C.A. ; Craeymeersch, J.A.M. - \ 2010
    ICES Journal of Marine Science 67 (2010). - ISSN 1054-3139 - p. 278 - 293.
    species-diversity - sampling effort - irish sea - classification - circulation - model - assemblages - density - biodiversity - verification
    Understanding the structure and interrelationships of North Sea benthic invertebrate and fish communities and their underlying environmental drivers is an important prerequisite for conservation and spatial ecosystem management on scales relevant to ecological processes. Datasets of North Sea infauna, epifauna, and demersal fish (1999–2002) were compiled and analysed to (i) identify and compare spatial patterns in community structure, and (ii) relate these to environmental variables. The multivariate analyses revealed significantly similar large-scale patterns in all three components with major distinctions between a southern community (Oyster Ground and German Bight), an eastern Channel and southern coastal community, and at least one northern community (>50 m deep). In contrast, species diversity patterns differed between the components with a diversity gradient for infauna and epifauna decreasing from north to south, and diversity hotspots of demersal fish, e.g. near the major inflows of Atlantic water. The large-scale hydrodynamic variables were the main drivers for the structuring of communities, whereas sediment characteristics appeared to be less influential, even for the infauna communities. The delineation of ecologically meaningful ecosystem management units in the North Sea might be based on the structure of the main faunal ecosystem components
    Fecundity, atresia, and spawning strategies of Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus)
    Damme, C.J.G. van; Dickey-Collas, M. ; Rijnsdorp, A.D. ; Kjesdu, O.S. - \ 2009
    Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 66 (2009)12. - ISSN 0706-652X - p. 2130 - 2141.
    north-sea - reproductive strategies - potential fecundity - gadus-morhua - rapid method - irish sea - cod - populations - maturation - weight
    Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) have contrasting spawning strategies, with apparently genetically similar fish “choosing” different spawning seasons, different egg sizes, and different spawning areas. In the North Sea, both autumn- and winter-spawning herring share the same summer feeding area but have different spawning areas. Females of both spawning types start their oocyte development in April–May. Oocyte development is influenced by the body energy content; during the maturation cycle, fecundity is down-regulated through atresia in relation to the actual body condition. Hence, fecundity estimates must account for the relative time of sampling. The down-regulation over the whole maturation period is approximately 20% in autumn- and 50% in winter-spawning herring. The development of the oocytes is the same for both spawning strategies until autumn when autumn spawners spawn a larger number of small eggs. In winter spawners, oocyte development and down-regulation of fecundity continues, resulting in larger eggs and lower number spawned. In theory, autumn and winter spawners could therefore switch spawning strategies, indicating a high level of reproductive plasticity
    Variability in transport of fish eggs and larvae. III. Effects of hydrodynamics and larval behaviour on recruitment in plaice
    Bolle, L.J. ; Dickey-Collas, M. ; Beek, J.K.L. van; Erftemeijer, P.L.A. ; Witte, J.IJ. ; Rijnsdorp, A.D. - \ 2009
    Marine Ecology Progress Series 390 (2009). - ISSN 0171-8630 - p. 195 - 211.
    pleuronectes-platessa l. - southeastern north-sea - life-history stages - sole solea-solea - irish sea - wadden sea - southern bight - class strength - temperature - flatfish
    Transport of plaice eggs and larvae in the southern North Sea was modelled using a finite-volume advection-dispersion model with high spatial and temporal resolution. Hydrodynamic forcing was based on actual river discharge and meteorological data for a 7 mo period in the winter and spring of 1989 and 1996 to 2003. Egg and larval development was linked to temperature and each developmental stage had its own physical and behavioural properties. Two hypotheses on transport mechanisms in the late larval stages were compared: passive drift versus selective tidal stream transport (triggered by environmental cues). Modelled larval stage durations closely corresponded to empirical estimates based on otolith daily ring counts. Close correspondence was also observed between model results and survey data on settlement in the western Wadden Sea, especially for the abundance of the strong 1996 year-class and the early settlement of the 2002 year-class. Transport patterns and the proportion of larvae reaching inshore nurseries varied substantially between years. Recruitment was negatively correlated with the distance over which eggs and larvae were transported, probably because of a breakdown in connectivity between spawning and nursery areas with increased transport rates. In conclusion, meteorologically driven variability in the hydrodynamics of the southern North Sea greatly affects the transport patterns of plaice eggs and larvae and may play an important role in determining recruitment variability and spatial connectivity.
    Variability in transport of fish eggs and larvae. II. Effects of hydrodynamics on the transport of Downs herring larvae
    Dickey-Collas, M. ; Bolle, L.J. ; Beek, J.K.L. van; Erftemeijer, P.L.A. - \ 2009
    Marine Ecology Progress Series 390 (2009). - ISSN 0171-8630 - p. 183 - 194.
    clupea-harengus larvae - north-sea - vertical movements - blackwater estuary - class strength - irish sea - atlantic - growth - behavior - environment
    A 10-layered, finite-volume advection-dispersion model with real-time meteorological and freshwater runoff drivers investigated the interannual differences in the transport of Downs herring Clupea harengus L. larvae in the southern North Sea. Simulations were carried out for the winters of 1989 and 1996 to 2003. As they grew, the concentrations of herring larvae developed vertical behaviour. Meteorological forcing transported Downs herring larvae to the nursery grounds in the eastern North Sea with large interannual differences. Diel vertical movement was relatively unimportant in the transport of larvae in the hydrographically mixed southern North Sea. Year classes with less transport of larvae from the hatching area (which was generally warmer) were associated with greater abundances of young Downs herring in the ICES International Bottom Trawl Survey. This implies that retention, rather than dispersal or delivery of larvae to nursery grounds, is associated with the determination of year class strength in Downs herring.
    A reanalysis of North Sea plaice spawning-stock biomass using the annual egg production method
    Damme, C.J.G. van; Bolle, L.J. ; Fossum, P. ; Kraus, G. ; Dickey-Collas, M. - \ 2009
    ICES Journal of Marine Science 66 (2009)9. - ISSN 1054-3139 - p. 1999 - 2011.
    pleuronectes-platessa l - herring clupea-harengus - gadus-morhua l. - solea-solea l. - irish sea - fecundity regulation - english-channel - fish community - oocyte growth - fisheries
    Uncertainty about the quality of current virtual population analysis-based stock assessment for North Sea plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) has led to various abundance indices. We compared biomass estimates from the annual egg production (AEP) method with current stock assessments based on catch-at-age to validate the current and historical perception of exploitation. The AEP method was also used to investigate the dynamics of the spatial components of plaice in the North Sea. We corrected for fecundity down-regulation and changes in sex ratio. Estimates from both methods were similar in trend and absolute biomass. On the Dogger Bank, there was a dramatic decline in biomass from 1948 and 1950 to 2004, and in the Southern Bight, the stock appeared to increase from 1987 and 1988 to 2004, although not reaching the historically high levels of 1948 or 1950. The timing of spawning of North Sea plaice does not appear to have changed throughout the period of high exploitation. We conclude that the AEP method is a useful way to hindcast the spatial dynamics of heavily exploited flatfish stocks
    Mapping the spawning grounds of North Sea cod (Gadus morhua) by direct and indirect means
    Fox, C.J. ; Taylor, M. ; Dickey-Collas, M. ; Fossum, P. ; Kraus, G. ; Rohlf, N. ; Damme, C.J.G. van; Bolle, L.J. - \ 2008
    Proceedings of the Royal Society. B: Biological Sciences 275 (2008)1642. - ISSN 0962-8452 - p. 1543 - 1548.
    irish sea - biological identifications - dna barcodes - atlantic - l. - distributions - abundance - eggs - west
    Despite recent evidence for sub-stock structuring, North Sea cod are assessed as a single unit. As a consequence, knowledge of sub-stock trends is poor. In particular, there are no recent evaluations of which spawning grounds are active. Here we report results from the first ichthyoplankton survey to cover the whole North Sea. Also, this survey, conducted in 2004, was the first to make extensive use of DNA-based molecular methods to unambiguously identify early developmental stage cod eggs. We compare the findings from the plankton survey with estimated egg production inferred from the distribution of mature cod in contemporaneous trawl surveys. Results from both approaches were in general agreement and showed hot spots of egg production around the southern and eastern edges of the Dogger Bank, in the German Bight, the Moray Firth and to the east of the Shetlands. These areas broadly coincide with known spawning locations from the period 1940 to 1970. We were, however, unable to directly detect significant numbers of cod eggs at the historic spawning ground off Flamborough (northeast coast of England). The results demonstrate that most of the major spawning grounds of cod in the North Sea are still active but that some localized populations may have been reduced to the point where it is now difficult to detect the presence of eggs in the plankton.
    Effects of climate change on growth of 0-group sole and plaice
    Teal, L.R. ; Leeuw, J.J. de; Veer, H.W. van der; Rijnsdorp, A.D. - \ 2008
    Marine Ecology Progress Series 358 (2008). - ISSN 0171-8630 - p. 219 - 230.
    vissen - klimaatverandering - gewichtstoename - mariene gebieden - noordzee - fishes - climatic change - weight gain - marine areas - north sea - north-sea plaice - pleuronectes-platessa l - western wadden sea - long-term changes - flounder platichthys-flesus - juvenile plaice - individual growth - regime shifts - irish sea - flatfish
    The effect of rising seawater temperature on growth of 0-group sole Solea solea and plaice Pleuronectes platessa in the southeastern North Sea was investigated for the period 1970 to 2004 using annual autumn pre-recruit survey data and frequent surveys on a nursery ground. Autumn length showed an increasing trend in sole but not in plaice. Increasing winter temperatures significantly increased the growing period of sole, a warm-water species that spawns in spring, but not of plaice, a temperate species that spawns in winter. Growth rate increased with higher summer temperatures in sole and to a lesser degree in plaice. Compared to experimental growth rates at ambient temperatures and unlimited food, observed growth rates were close to experimental values until mid-June but were much lower in July to September, suggesting food limitation in summer. The higher temperatures observed since 1989 positively affected the quality of the shallow coastal waters as a nursery area for sole but not for plaice. A further increase may negatively affect the nursery quality if the production rate of benthic food cannot meet the increase in energy requirements of 0-group flatfish.
    The effect of rising seawater temperature on growth of 0-group sole Solea solea and plaice Pleuronectes platessa in the southeastern North Sea was investigated for the period 1970 to 2004 using annual autumn pre-recruit survey data and frequent surveys on a nursery ground. Autumn length showed an increasing trend in sole but not in plaice. Increasing winter temperatures significantly increased the growing period of sole, a warm-water species that spawns in spring, but not of plaice, a temperate species that spawns in winter. Growth rate increased with higher summer temperatures in sole and to a lesser degree in plaice. Compared to experimental growth rates at ambient temperatures and unlimited food, observed growth rates were close to experimental values until mid-June but were much lower in July to September, suggesting food limitation in summer. The higher temperatures observed since 1989 positively affected the quality of the shallow coastal waters as a nursery area for sole but not for plaice. A further increase may negatively affect the nursery quality if the production rate of benthic food cannot meet the increase in energy requirements of 0-group flatfish.
    Reference material for radionuclides in sediment IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon sediment)
    Povinec, P.P. ; Pham, M.K. ; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.A. ; Barci-Funel, G. ; Bojanowski, R. ; Boshkova, T. ; Burnett, W.C. ; Carvalho, F. ; Chapeyron, B. ; Cunha, I.L. ; Dahlgaard, H. ; Galabov, N. ; FiField, L.K. ; Gastaud, J. ; Geering, J.J. ; Gomez, I.F. ; Green, N. ; Hamilton, T. ; Ibanez, F.L. ; Ibn Majah, M. ; John, M. ; Kanisch, G. ; Kenna, T.C. ; Kloster, M. ; Korun, M. ; Liong Wee Kwong, L. ; Rosa, J. la; Lee, S.H. ; Levy-Palomo, I. ; Malatova, M. ; Maruo, Y. ; Mitchell, P. ; Murciano, I.V. ; Nelson, R. ; Nouredine, A. ; Oh, J.S. ; Origioni, B. ; Petit, G. le; Petterson, H.B.L. ; Reineking, A. ; Smedley, P.A. ; Suckow, A. ; Struijs, T.D.B. van der; Voors, P.I. ; Yoshimizu, K. ; Wyse, E. - \ 2007
    Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry 273 (2007)2. - ISSN 0236-5731 - p. 383 - 393.
    certified reference material - pacific-ocean - irish sea - seawater - water - pu
    A reference material designed for the determination of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in sediment, IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon sediment), is described and the results of certification are presented. The material has been certified for 8 radionuclides (40K, 60Co, 155Eu, 230Th, 238U, 238Pu, 239+240Pu and 241Am). Information values are given for 12 radionuclides (90Sr, 137Cs, 210Pb (210Po), 226Ra, 228Ra, 232Th, 234U, 235U, 239Pu, 240Pu and 241Pu). Less reported radionuclides include 228Th, 236U, 239Np and 242Pu. The reference material may be used for quality management of radioanalytical laboratories engaged in the analysis of radionuclides in the environment, as well as for the development and validation of analytical methods and for training purposes. The material is available from IAEA in 100 g units.
    Management recommendations for the sustainable exploitation of mussel seed in the Irish Sea
    Maguire, J.A. ; Knights, T. ; Burnell, G. ; Smaal, A.C. - \ 2007
    Galway : Marine Institute (Marine environment and health series no. 31) - 83
    mossels - zaden - vis vangen - schaal- en schelpdierenvisserij - visserijbeheer - hulpbronnengebruik - duurzaamheid (sustainability) - ierse zee - zeevisserij - mussels - seeds - fishing - shellfish fisheries - fishery management - resource utilization - sustainability - irish sea - marine fisheries
    Prey selection by North Sea herring (Clupea harengus) with special reference to fish eggs
    Segers, F.H.I.D. ; Dickey-Collas, M. ; Rijnsdorp, A.D. - \ 2007
    ICES Journal of Marine Science 64 (2007)1. - ISSN 1054-3139 - p. 60 - 68.
    cod gadus-morhua - plaice pleuronectes-platessa - baltic sea - irish sea - sprattus-sprattus - predation - size - food - climate - zooplankton
    The herring stock in the North Sea in recent years has recovered to a relatively high biomass, and here we investigate prey selection of individual North Sea herring when population numbers are high. The diet composition, and specifically pelagic fish eggs, was investigated in February 2004. Samples of herring from the International Bottom Trawl Survey were used for stomach analysis, and ichthyoplankton samples from the southern North Sea were used to investigate selection. Crustaceans were the main diet component. The average diameter of the fish eggs recovered from the stomachs was significantly larger than that of the eggs collected in the field. In addition, the frequency at which the latest developmental stages occurred in the herring stomachs was significantly different from the frequency at which these stages were found in the field. This shows selective foraging. There was a relationship between the amount of food and the number of eggs in a herring stomach: the fullest stomachs tended to contain fewer fish eggs. This suggests that herring forage on eggs when other prey are not available. Hence, it is likely that the dynamics of multiple trophic levels influence the ecological impact of a large herring stock on the North Sea ecosystem.
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