Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    After the facts: Producing, using and contesting knowledge in two spatial-environmental conflicts in the Netherlands
    Roth, Dik ; Köhne, Michiel ; Rasch, Elisabet Dueholm ; Winnubst, Madelinde - \ 2020
    Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space (2020). - ISSN 2399-6544
    Citizen protest - flood risk management - knowledge - knowledge actors - shale gas

    While the problematic role of knowledge in controversial policy processes is widely acknowledged, relatively little is known about how protesting citizen groups involved in such controversies construct, mobilize and use knowledge. This article explores these issues in two conflicts about planned interventions in the Netherlands. The first case, about energy policies, concerns protests against plans for shale gas extraction. In the second case, concerning flood risk management, citizens organized protests against a planned ‘bypass’ of the River Waal. To better understand the role of citizen groups as knowledge actors, we analyse how these groups organized and strategized their protests and produced, used and contested knowledge to claim voice in decision-making. The study shows the key role of citizen groups as knowledge actors in contested planning processes, and of their knowledge strategies in internally divided communities. It also shows the importance of the source and type of knowledge and how it is constructed, mobilized and used in various stages of resistance against policy plans.

    A European questionnaire-based study on population awareness and risk perception of antimicrobial resistance
    Alexa Oniciuc, Elena Alexandra ; Likotrafiti, Eleni ; Garre, Alberto ; Ruiz, Lorena ; Prieto, Miguel ; Alvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino - \ 2019
    FEMS Microbiology Letters 366 (2019)17. - ISSN 0378-1097
    antibiotics - antimicrobial resistance - awareness - consumption - knowledge - risk perception

    To tackle antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is of outmost importance for the general population to understand the severity and the relevance of different routes of transmission. Respondents of different age groups, educational and occupational backgrounds, area of living, diet and household composition participated in an online survey with questions concerning socio-demographics, personal use of antibiotics, awareness, general knowledge, sources of information, behavior and attitude toward antibiotics, and risk perception on antibiotics and AMR. Descriptive and logistic regression analyses were carried out. A total of 1252 respondents, mainly from EU, participated in the survey. About 57.7% declared they consumed antibiotics in the last year and some misguided behaviors were identified, especially for those not having a food- or health-related background, who more frequently failed in giving the right answer to uncontroversial true/false questions (ANOVA, P < 0.05). The youngest respondents were less confident on the information received from traditional media (OR = 0.425), the national government (OR = 0.462), and consumer organizations (OR = 0.497), while they frequently obtained information from social networks and online media, which could therefore be exploited as a channel for educational campaigns targeting this population group. New measures, strategies and policy agenda at a European level aimed at improving awareness on AMR among targeted community groups must be taken into consideration.

    Room for manoeuvre: User participation in water resources management in Burkina Faso
    Daré, Williams ; Venot, Jean Philippe - \ 2018
    Development Policy Review 36 (2018)2. - ISSN 0950-6764 - p. 175 - 189.
    companion modelling - Integrated Water Resources Management - knowledge - participation - power - West Africa

    Participation in natural resources management is widely promoted in sub-Saharan Africa, but faces mounting criticism from social science scholars who rarely engage with it in practice. We use the notion of room for manoeuvre to reflect on a multi-level participatory approach designed to support the Burkinabè Integrated Water Resources Management policy and propose ways of engaging constructively with local users and policy-makers. Within an “invited space” of participation, water users’ room for manoeuvre was enhanced through the acquisition of new knowledge on the legal Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) framework. This allowed them to interact with decision-makers and to extend their networks. Power imbalances were discussed, but this did not lead to modifying existing power structures that hinge on broader societal dynamics.

    How are facts and opinions formed and related?
    Vries, J.R. de - \ 2018
    Wageningen : WURcast
    knowledge - public opinion
    Knowledge production at boundaries : an inquiry into collaborations to make management plans for European fisheries
    Stange, Kari - \ 2017
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Jan van Tatenhove, co-promotor(en): Judith van Leeuwen. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463430623 - 160
    fishery management - european union - stakeholders - european union countries - fishery policy - multi-stakeholder processes - knowledge - knowledge transfer - environmental policy - fisheries - companies - europe - visserijbeheer - europese unie - stakeholders - landen van de europese unie - visserijbeleid - multi-stakeholder processen - kennis - kennisoverdracht - milieubeleid - visserij - kapitaalvennootschappen - europa

    This thesis addresses how knowledge is used and produced in stakeholder-led collaborations to make long-term management plans for European fishery management. Boundary object theory is applied and developed to explain how stakeholders from the fishing industry interact with each other, and with fishery scientists and managers, in initiatives to produce management plans. Using a qualitative case study approach, two initiatives were investigated in-depth: the North Sea Advisory Council’s development of a long-term management plan for North Sea Nephrops fisheries, and the Pelagic Advisory Council’s development of a long-term management plan for a new boarfish fishery in the Northeast Atlantic. A conceptual framework with emphasis on boundary spaces was developed to analyse knowledge exchange and the interaction between actors, objects and activities. The findings point to the importance of entry points for actors to become directly involved in knowledge-production processes. Direct stakeholder engagement in management plan production created a sense of ownership of the problems identified and triggered solution-oriented ways of working. The findings highlight the multiple roles played by fishery scientists in the diverse settings where management plans for European fisheries are produced, and draw attention to the need for clear procedures to ensure that different roles are acted out transparently.

    The politics of environmental knowledge
    Turnhout, E. - \ 2016
    Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789462573796 - 20
    milieuwetenschappen - milieu - kennis - biodiversiteit - ecosysteemdiensten - natuurbescherming - politiek - environmental sciences - environment - knowledge - biodiversity - ecosystem services - nature conservation - politics
    Kansen voor regionale innovatieprojecten, verkenning voor de vollegrondsgroentesector in Zuidoost Nederland
    Haan, J.J. de; Verhoeven, J.T.W. ; Wolf, P.L. de - \ 2016
    Wageningen : Stichting DLO (PPO/PRI-rapport 3750302800 ) - 26
    akkerbouw - groenteteelt - groenten - kleine landbouwbedrijven - limburg - ondernemerschap - innovaties - kennisoverdracht - kennissystemen - kennis van boeren - kennis - subsidies - arable farming - vegetable growing - vegetables - small farms - limburg - entrepreneurship - innovations - knowledge transfer - knowledge systems - farmers' knowledge - knowledge - subsidies
    The Dutch province of Limburg has asked Wageningen UR to develop an initial knowledge- and innovation agenda for the outdoor vegetable production sector, including three concrete project ideas for the POP3 framework. Besides this, Wageningen UR was asked to evaluate three innovation projects with farmers and SMEs to make recommendations to optimise the POP3 framework. Recommendations for POP3 Based on experiences in three different subsidy projects, recommendations are formulated for POP3. The main conclusion is that subsidy schemes do not match with the situation of agricultural businesses and small SMEs, although the schemes aim to support such companies with innovation. It is recommended to leave the ownership of the innovation with the companies, but without the full project management responsibility. Moreover, it is important to make the conditions more suitable for small enterprises, e.g. the minimum subsidy sum and the required contribution in cash. Second problem is the inflexibility of subsidy schemes, limiting the dynamics of innovation projects or forcing them to start procedures for acceptance of changes in the plan and budgeting. It is recommended to make schemes more flexible, e.g. asking less detailed plans and creating more room for changes in partners, activities and budgets. Third problem is the limitation for consortium partners to get their full costs paid, affecting research and advisory partners. This is often solved through very complicated constructions (outsourcing, secondary partnership), causing inequalities in the project (some partners are fully paid, others are not). Recommendation: allow projects to involve the right partners for the project, with the possibility to pay real costs and without complicated constructions. Last common problem is the artificial distinction between knowledge development and knowledge use/uptake, causing problems within projects when necessary research activities are not accepted by the subsidy scheme. Recommendation: allow projects to do all activities they believe are necessary for the innovation process.
    "Geld voor natuuronderzoek komt beschikbaar voor de belangrijkste beheeronderwerpen"
    Arts, Bas - \ 2016
    nature management - financing - scientific research - scientists - nature conservation policy - knowledge - forest administration
    Het lijkt er op dat de grote beheerorganisaties zich een beetje terugtrekken en niet meer mee doen aan de cofinanciering van onderzoek voor natuur. Onderzoek is te duur voor hen, zeggen ze. Nu bepalen dus de onderzoekers welke onderwerpen het meest belangrijk zijn. Klopt dit, ervaren mensen dat zo? Vinden ze dat er voldoende sturing is van het onderzoek op onderwerpen waar beheerders mee zitten? Komt het geld voor natuuronderzoek beschikbaar voor de belangrijkste beheeronderwerpen?
    Proeftuinen voor Wageningse waterkennis
    Verdonschot, Ralf - \ 2016
    water management - streams - knowledge - polder boards - biodiversity - floodplains
    Designing hybrid learning configurations at the interface between school and workplace
    Cremers, P.H.M. - \ 2016
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Martin Mulder; Arjen Wals, co-promotor(en): Renate Wesselink. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789462576322 - 156
    intermediate vocational training - education - education programmes - higher education - organization of education - practical education - postsecondary education - vocational training - firms - companies - knowledge transfer - knowledge - netherlands - middelbaar beroepsonderwijs - onderwijs - onderwijsprogramma's - hoger onderwijs - onderwijsorganisatie - praktijkonderwijs - vervolgonderwijs - beroepsopleiding - firma's - kapitaalvennootschappen - kennisoverdracht - kennis - nederland

    In today’s knowledge society there is a demand for professionals who are able to create knowledge across boundaries of disciplines, professions and perspectives. Increasingly, challenges have to be addressed by experts from different fields who collaborate across different contexts. In addition, given the fast pace with which society changes, experts must continually construct and reconstruct their expertise in a process of lifelong learning. Institutions for higher and vocational education are challenged to educate these ‘knowledge workers’. They are responding, among others, by developing novel hybrid practices at the interface between school and workplace, the so-called hybrid learning configurations. By connecting education, research and professional practice they aim to address complex problems in society by fostering interprofessional collaboration and learning. We define a hybrid learning configuration (HLC) as ‘a social practice around illdefined, authentic tasks or issues whose resolution requires transboundary learning by transcending disciplines, traditional structures and sectors, and forms of learning’.

    While many educational institutions and other organizations are co-developing and experimenting with HLCs, the process followed is often one of trial and error. Practical expertise is becoming available but only in an ad hoc and fragmented way. Although research on situated and social learning offers relevant theories and concepts that are useful when designing an HLC, not much research has addressed the design of HLCs in a comprehensive way. This PhD research aims to address this lacuna. We investigate HLCs from an educational design research (EDR) perspective, which involves framing the HLC as a complex intervention. We are interested not only in the features or designed elements of such interventions, but also in the underlying principles or conjectures that are embodied in those features. In addition, we intend to provide support for interprofessional HLC design teams, which consist of, for instance, educational consultants, researchers, lecturers and other practitioners. In order to address these aims we studied six HLCs in the context of Dutch higher vocational education. One of the cases is a joint project of two Dutch institutions for senior secondary vocational educational (which are called ‘MBO’ in Dutch) and two universities of applied sciences (‘HBO’ in Dutch) in collaboration with two companies. The other cases are HLCs in different settings within the context of a university of applied sciences in the Netherlands.

    The aims mentioned above led to the following general research questions: 1. Which heuristics can underpin the design of a hybrid learning configuration? 2. In which ways can interprofessional teams be supported when designing hybrid learning configurations? Chapters 2 and 3 address the first research question and chapters 4 and 5 address the second question.

    Design principles for HLCs

    Chapter 2 focuses on the HLC as a whole. The central research question is: “Which set of principles can underpin the design of a hybrid learning configuration for educating the knowledge worker?” Based on a literature search and designers’ craft knowledge, a set of initial design principles was developed for an HLC at the interface between school and workplace. The intention was that four learning processes would be enabled by the HLC: self-directed learning, authentic learning, the development of a professional identity and collaborative creation of knowledge across the boundaries of disciplines, professions and perspectives.

    These initial design principles were evaluated from the perspective of the participants by analysing interview data from students, lecturers, educational consultants and business representatives. This resulted in the following set of seven refined principles that underpin the design of an HLC: fostering authenticity; creating a learning community; utilizing diversity; inter-linking of working and learning; facilitating reflexivity; enabling organization; enabling ecology. These principles can be used as heuristics for guiding the design and development of hybrid learning configurations in contexts that have similar goals and aligned tenets.

    Fostering self-directed lifelong learning in HLCs

    Chapter 3 elaborates further on the design principle ‘facilitating reflexivity’. Since knowledge workers have to redefine and reconstruct their own expertise in an on-going fashion, they should be able to reflect on and pro-actively develop their professional competence. This capacity for self-directed lifelong learning is an essential asset for them and should therefore be developed or enhanced in an HLC. The main research question in this chapter is: “Which design guidelines underpin an intervention that would foster students’ capacity for self-directed lifelong learning while working on ill-structured, authentic professional tasks?”

    An intervention was designed, implemented and evaluated during two iterations of a hybrid learning configuration, which was embedded in a one-semester elective course at a university of applied sciences in the Netherlands. Evaluation methods included interviews with students and the course facilitator, questionnaires, and students’ logs and reports. This resulted in the following five intervention design guidelines: provide opportunities to engage in two or more cycles of self-directed learning; provide educational support; pay attention to emotional and motivational aspects; treat self-directed lifelong learning as a social learning process; position self-directed lifelong learning as a self-evident and integrated part of the course.

    The intervention appeared to be usable and effective. At a basic level, the students developed their capacity for self-directed lifelong learning. We concluded that further research is needed to investigate conditions for realizing higher levels of proficiency in self-directed lifelong learning throughout the curriculum and beyond.

    Utilization of design principles for HLCs

    The focus of chapter 4 is the utilization of the set of design principles that was generated in chapter 2. Research has shown that while knowledge of design heuristics can increase the efficiency and effectiveness of design work, design teams often have difficulty articulating the rationale for their design. In addition, it is important to facilitate ideation and nourish creative spirit while utilizing the design heuristics to create a novel learning environment. In this study we explored an intervention for supporting the creative utilization of the set of design principles for HLC. The intervention was based on boundary-crossing theory and design thinking methods, with a particular focus on prototyping. It consisted of a ‘guidebook’ in which the design principles were explained, and a workshop. The corresponding research question was: “What is the perceived effectiveness of a boundarycrossing intervention (based on a set of research-based design principles) for (re)designing hybrid learning configurations?”

    Four design teams of different HLCs in the context of a university of applied sciences used the guidebook and attended the workshop while (re)designing their HLC. The intervention was evaluated by way of questionnaires that were filled out by members of the design teams. The results show that the design teams perceived this intervention as being relevant, consistent, practical and effective. The intervention appeared to provide a conceptual framework for understanding and designing features of a hybrid learning configuration and a vocabulary to communicate design ideas. It, thereby, supported the creative utilization of the design principles. Further research could explore other, complementary ways of facilitating the design of hybrid learning configurations.

    Cross-boundary learning during the design and implementation of an HLC

    Chapter 5 concerns cross-boundary collaboration and learning processes within an interprofessional design team of an HLC. These teams often consist of actors from different educational institutions and other organizations, such as companies or (non) governmental institutions. When team members bring their different perspectives into the collaboration, they are likely to experience boundaries. Boundaries can be defined as ‘discontinuities in action or interaction’. They can hinder cooperation, but they can also provide opportunities for learning. This led to the following research question: “In which ways could a better understanding of boundaries enhance learning?”

    In this study, transcripts of interviews with members of an HLC-design team were analysed using concepts of boundary crossing theory. This theoretical framework provided a lens through which different ways of boundary crossing, learning mechanisms and processes became visible. We established that boundaries are highly personal and subjective constructs. We found that if boundaries are detected and if the related practices are made explicit, this allows for further analysis of these boundaries. Our analysis yielded a number of possible ways to enhance trans-boundary learning in HLC design teams. We also concluded that boundary objects and brokers can play an important role in transboundary learning processes.

    Conclusions in a broader perspective

    In chapter 6 we frame our conclusions from the four studies in a broader perspective. The first aim of our research was the development of heuristics for the design of HLCs. Given this aim, we developed a set of design principles for an HLC and guidelines for an intervention that fosters the capacity for self-directed lifelong learning. We positioned these principles and guidelines in a ‘conjecture map’ (Sandoval 2014), which shows the relationships between design heuristics, their embodiment in features of an intervention, the intended mediating processes, and the desired outcomes. Our overall conclusion is that framing the set of design principles or guidelines in multiple conjecture maps, rather than representing them as causal chains of design propositions, can provide guidance and support for designing and researching complex educational interventions such as HLCs.

    Our second aim was to provide support or ‘design knowledge’ for interprofessional HLC design teams. We addressed that aim by developing and testing an intervention that supported the creative utilization of a set of design principles for HLC. In addition, we provided guidance for enhancing learning across boundaries that could be experienced in an interprofessional design team. We positioned this design knowledge in a broader framework, the ‘ecological framework for conceptualizing teacher knowledge for technology-enhanced learning design’. This framework seems to be useful in contexts beyond technology-enhanced learning, and, so, we consider it relevant to the design of HLCs. We conclude that design teams of HLCs can be supported by using an appropriate framework for design knowledge and by adjusting or expanding this framework for the design of complex interventions by interprofessional design teams.

    Further research and practical implications

    Our studies led us to the following recommendations. While we focused mainly on learning processes that should occur within HLCs, further research could be directed towards the students’ learning outcomes. Moreover, our findings suggest that selfdirected lifelong learning should be developed and practiced throughout an education programme. To achieve this, curricula in higher education should offer opportunities for students to experiment and follow their own path, alongside prescribed activities with fixed learning outcomes. In the six HLCs that we studied, student learning was foregrounded. However, an HLC also involves other stakeholder types, such as lecturers, researchers, citizens, and entrepreneurs. Therefore, further research could shed light on supporting and evaluating multi-stakeholder learning processes and learning outcomes of all types of stakeholders. Our research on supporting interprofessional design teams focused on the utilization of design knowledge in early stages of (re)design of an HLC. Further research and development could yield ways of support in further stages of the design. In light of this we recommend crossing the boundaries of areas of design science outside the educational context. This will allow us to learn from each other and capitalize on what is already known.

    In our study, design principles for HLC were ‘reified’ and disseminated by way of a guidebook. Further investigations could reveal other ways of documenting and communicating design knowledge, for instance via the construction of a database containing principles or guidelines and their associated features in different contexts. Boundary crossing theory appeared to provide a lens through which boundaries and related learning processes became visible. The elements of boundary crossing theory can be translated into guidelines or tools for enhancing cross-boundary learning in interprofessional HLC design teams and, perhaps, for other types of ‘hybrid teams’ as well.

    This thesis intends to contribute to the knowledge base for designing hybrid learning configurations. This is done with the intention that this contribution will be utilized and developed further by researchers and practitioners who are committed to educating future professionals in an ever-changing world.

    Geleerde lessen ontwikkeling kennis- en innovatiesystemen in 7 Greenportregio’s: syntheserapportage 2012-2015
    Geerling-Eiff, F.A. ; Dijkshoorn-Dekker, M.W.C. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : LEI Wageningen UR - 58
    kennisoverdracht - kennis - kennisvalorisatie - kennismanagement - nederland - knowledge transfer - knowledge - knowledge exploitation - knowledge management - netherlands
    Het rapport ‘Geleerde lessen ontwikkeling kennis- en innovatiesystemen in 7 Greenportregio’s: syntheserapportage 2012-2015’ is een publicatie van onderzoeksthema Methodieken Kennisoverdracht. Het thema levert bouwstenen voor het verbeteren van kennisvalorisatie, het tot waarde brengen van kennis, middels integrale kennisketens en een effectieve en efficiënte inzet van kennismiddelen door en voor kennispartners en ondernemers in Greenportregio’s. Dit met als doel dat de keten van kennis naar kunde, naar kassa structureel wordt.
    Management Summary: Geleerde lessen ontwikkeling kennis- en innovatiesystemen in 7 Greenportregio’s
    Geerling-Eiff, F.A. ; Dijkshoorn-Dekker, M.W.C. - \ 2015
    Wageningen : LEI Wageningen UR - 9
    kennisoverdracht - kennis - kennisvalorisatie - kennismanagement - nederland - knowledge transfer - knowledge - knowledge exploitation - knowledge management - netherlands
    De management summary ‘Geleerde lessen ontwikkeling kennis- en innovatiesystemen in 7 Greenportregio’s’ is een publicatie van onderzoeksthema Methodieken Kennisoverdracht. Het thema levert bouwstenen voor het verbeteren van kennisvalorisatie, het tot waarde brengen van kennis, middels integrale kennisketens en een effectieve en efficiënte inzet van kennismiddelen door en voor kennispartners en ondernemers in Greenportregio’s. Dit met als doel dat de keten van kennis naar kunde, naar kassa structureel wordt.
    Natalia Moreno: 'Inzicht in cel die bol gaat vormen'
    Dwarswaard, A. ; Moreno Pachón, N.M. - \ 2015
    BloembollenVisie (2015)301. - ISSN 1571-5558 - p. 18 - 18.
    bloembollen - lelies - landbouwkundig onderzoek - tulpen - kennis - ornamental bulbs - lilies - agricultural research - tulips - knowledge
    Bijna twee jaar geleden werd prof.dr.ir. Richard Immink voor een dag in de week benoemd tot 'bollenprof'. Samen met twee assistenten in opleiding voert hij fundamenteel onderzoek uit aan tulp en lelie. Tijd voor een tussenbalans in drie afleveringen. In deze derde aflevering licht assistent in opleiding Natalia Moreno toe waarom het moment waarop een cel besluit bolletjes te gaan vormen zo belangrijk is.
    Factors impeding the acceptability and use of malaria preventive measures: implications for malaria elimination in eastern Rwanda
    Ingabire, C.M. ; Rulisa, A. ; Kempen, L. van; Muvunyi, C. ; Koenraadt, C.J.M. ; Vugt, M. van; Mutesa, L. ; Borne, B. van den; Alaii, J. - \ 2015
    Malaria Journal 14 (2015). - ISSN 1475-2875
    management - knowledge - district - uganda
    Background Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN), indoor residual spraying (IRS) and malaria case treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) have been proven to significantly reduce malaria, but may not necessarily lead to malaria elimination. This study explored factors hindering the acceptability and use of available malaria preventive measures to better inform area specific strategies that can lead to malaria elimination. Methods Nine focus group discussions (FGD) covering a cross-section of 81 lay community members and local leaders were conducted in Ruhuha, Southern Eastern Rwanda in December 2013 to determine: community perceptions on malaria disease, acceptability of LLIN and IRS, health care-seeking behaviours and other malaria elimination strategies deployed at household and environmental levels. Discussions were recorded in Kinyarwanda, transcribed into English and coded using Nvivo 10 software. Results Participants ranked malaria as the top among five common diseases in the Ruhuha sector. Participants expressed comprehensive knowledge and understanding of malaria transmission and symptoms. The concept of malaria elimination was acknowledged, but challenges were reported. Sleeping under a bed net was negatively affected by increase of bedbugs (and the associated irritability) as well as discomfortable warmness particularly during the dry season. These two factors were reported as common hindrances of the use of LLIN. Also, widespread use of LLIN in constructing chicken pens or as fences around vegetable gardens was reported. Participants also reported that IRS appeared to lead to an increase in number of mosquitoes and other household bugs rather than kill them. Prompt health centre utilization among participants with presumed malaria was reported to be common particularly among subscribers to the subsidized community-based health insurance (CBHI) scheme. In contrast, the lack of CBHI and/or perceptions that health centre visits were time consuming were common reasons for the use of over-the-counter medicines for malaria management. Conclusion In this study, identification of behavioural determinants in relation to LLIN use, IRS acceptability and health care seeking is a critical step in the development of effective, targeted interventions aiming to further reduce malaria transmission and elimination in the area.
    Ethics, Risk and Benefits Associated with Different Applications of Nanotechnology: a Comparison of Expert and Consumer Perceptions of Drivers of Societal Acceptance
    Gupta, N. ; Fischer, A.R.H. ; Frewer, L.J. - \ 2015
    NanoEthics 9 (2015)2. - ISSN 1871-4757 - p. 93 - 108.
    repertory grid methodology - food-production - united-states - public acceptance - gm foods - attitudes - trust - technologies - knowledge - science
    Examining those risk and benefit perceptions utilised in the formation of attitudes and opinions about emerging technologies such as nanotechnology can be useful for both industry and policy makers involved in their development, implementation and regulation. A broad range of different socio-psychological and affective factors may influence consumer responses to different applications of nanotechnology, including ethical concerns. A useful approach to identifying relevant consumer concerns and innovation priorities is to develop predictive constructs which can be used to differentiate applications of nanotechnology in a way which is meaningful to consumers. This requires elicitation of attitudinal constructs from consumers, rather than measuring attitudes assumed to be important by the researcher. Psychological factors influencing societal responses to 15 applications of nanotechnology drawn from different application areas (e.g. medicine,agriculture and environment, food, military, sports, and cosmetics) were identified using repertory grid method in conjunction with generalised Procrustes analysis. The results suggested that people differentiate nanotechnology applications based on the extent to which they perceive them to be beneficial, useful,necessary and important. The benefits may be offset by perceived risks focusing on fear and ethical concerns. Compared to an earlier expert study on societal acceptance of nanotechnology, consumers emphasised ethical issues compared to experts but had less concern regarding potential physical contact with the product and time to market introduction. Consumers envisaged fewer issues with several applications compared to experts, in particular food applications.
    Knowledge with impact
    LEI Wageningen UR, - \ 2015
    LEI Wageningen UR
    onderzoeksinstituten - universiteiten - kennis - onderzoek - economie - landbouw - economisch beleid - agrarische economie - nederland - research institutes - universities - knowledge - research - economics - agriculture - economic policy - agricultural economics - netherlands
    Kennis voor impact
    LEI Wageningen UR, - \ 2015
    LEI Wageningen UR
    onderzoeksinstituten - universiteiten - kennis - economie - landbouw - economisch beleid - agrarische economie - nederland - onderzoek - research institutes - universities - knowledge - economics - agriculture - economic policy - agricultural economics - netherlands - research
    Organising a safe space for navigating social-ecological transformations to sustainability
    Pereira, L. ; Karpouzoglou, T.D. ; Doshi, S. ; Frantzeskaki, N. - \ 2015
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 12 (2015)6. - ISSN 1660-4601 - p. 6027 - 6044.
    transitions - innovation - framework - systems - perspective - governance - complexity - knowledge - responses - pathways
    The need for developing socially just living conditions for the world’s growing population whilst keeping human societies within a ‘safe operating space’ has become a modern imperative. This requires transformative changes in the dominant social norms, behaviours, governance and management regimes that guide human responses in areas such as urban ecology, public health, resource security (e.g., food, water, energy access), economic development and biodiversity conservation. However, such systemic transformations necessitate experimentation in public arenas of exchange and a deepening of processes that can widen multi-stakeholder learning. We argue that there is an emergent potential in bridging the sustainability transitions and resilience approaches to create new scientific capacity that can support large-scale social-ecological transformations (SETs) to sustainability globally, not just in the West. In this article, we elucidate a set of guiding principles for the design of a ‘safe space’ to encourage stronger interactions between these research areas and others that are relevant to the challenges faced. We envisage new opportunities for transdisciplinary collaboration that will develop an adaptive and evolving community of practice. In particular, we emphasise the great opportunity for engaging with the role of emerging economies in facilitating safe space experimentation.
    Consumer-Related Food Waste: Causes and Potential for Action
    Aschemann-Witzel, J. ; Hooge, I.E. de; Amani, P. ; Bech-Larsen, T. ; Oostindjer, M. - \ 2015
    Sustainability 7 (2015). - ISSN 2071-1050 - p. 6457 - 6477.
    climate-change - behavior - consumption - households - separation - emissions - knowledge - attitude - impacts - system
    In the past decade, food waste has received increased attention on both academic and societal levels. As a cause of negative economic, environmental and social effects, food waste is considered to be one of the sustainability issues that needs to be addressed. In developed countries, consumers are one of the biggest sources of food waste. To successfully reduce consumer-related food waste, it is necessary to have a clear understanding of the factors influencing food waste-related consumer perceptions and behaviors. The present paper presents the results of a literature review and expert interviews on factors causing consumer-related food waste in households and supply chains. Results show that consumers’ motivation to avoid food waste, their management skills of food provisioning and food handling and their trade-offs between priorities have an extensive influence on their food waste behaviors. We identify actions that governments, societal stakeholders and retailers can undertake to reduce consumer-related food waste, highlighting that synergistic actions between all parties are most promising. Further research should focus on exploring specific food waste contexts and interactions more in-depth. Experiments and interventions in particular can contribute to a shift from analysis to solutions.
    The perceived impact of the National Health Service on personalised nutrition service delivery among the UK public
    Fallaize, R. ; Macready, A.L. ; Butler, L.T. ; Ellis, J.A. ; Berezowska, A. ; Fischer, A.R.H. ; Walsh, M.C. ; Gallagher, C. ; Stewart-Knox, B.J. ; Kuznesof, S. ; Frewer, L.J. ; Gibney, M.J. ; Lovegrove, J.A. - \ 2015
    The British journal of nutrition 113 (2015)8. - ISSN 0007-1145 - p. 1271 - 1279.
    nutrigenomics - communication - disease - information - consumer - medicine - intervention - acceptance - knowledge - attitudes
    Personalised nutrition (PN) has the potential to reduce disease risk and optimise health and performance. Although previous research has shown good acceptance of the concept of PN in the UK, preferences regarding the delivery of a PN service (e.g. online v. face-to-face) are not fully understood. It is anticipated that the presence of a free at point of delivery healthcare system, the National Health Service (NHS), in the UK may have an impact on end-user preferences for deliverances. To determine this, supplementary analysis of qualitative data obtained from focus group discussions on PN service delivery, collected as part of the Food4Me project in the UK and Ireland, was undertaken. Irish data provided comparative analysis of a healthcare system that is not provided free of charge at the point of delivery to the entire population. Analyses were conducted using the ‘framework approach’ described by Rabiee (Focus-group interview and data analysis. Proc Nutr Soc 63, 655-660). There was a preference for services to be led by the government and delivered face-to-face, which was perceived to increase trust and transparency, and add value. Both countries associated paying for nutritional advice with increased commitment and motivation to follow guidelines. Contrary to Ireland, however, and despite the perceived benefit of paying, UK discussants still expected PN services to be delivered free of charge by the NHS. Consideration of this unique challenge of free healthcare that is embedded in the NHS culture will be crucial when introducing PN to the UK.
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