Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Socio-economic status and ethnicity are independently associated with dietary patterns: the HELIUS-Dietary Patterns study
    Dekker, L.H. ; Nicolau, M. ; Dam, R.M. van; Vries, J.H.M. de - \ 2015
    Food and Nutrition Research 59 (2015). - ISSN 1654-661X - 12 p.
    cardiovascular-disease - food-consumption - british adults - united-states - random sample - risk-factors - life-style - health - netherlands - europe
    Background: Differences in dietary patterns between ethnic groups have often been observed. These differences may partially be a reflection of differences in socio-economic status (SES) or may be the result of differences in the direction and strength of the association between SES and diet. Objective: We aimed to examine ethnic differences in dietary patterns and the role of socio-economic indicators on dietary patterns within a multi-ethnic population. Design: Cross-sectional multi-ethnic population-based study. Setting: Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Subjects: Principal component analysis was used to identify dietary patterns among Dutch (n1,254), South Asian Surinamese (n425), and African Surinamese (n784) participants. Levels of education and occupation were used to indicate SES. Linear regression analysis was used to examine the association between ethnicity and dietary pattern scores first and then between socio-economic indicators and dietary patterns within and between ethnic groups. Results: ‘Noodle/rice dishes and white meat’, ‘red meat, snacks, and sweets’ and ‘vegetables, fruit and nuts’ patterns were identified. Compared to the Dutch origin participants, Surinamese more closely adhered to the ‘noodle/rice dishes and white meat’ pattern which was characterized by foods consumed in a ‘traditional Surinamese diet’. Closer adherence to the other two patterns was observed among Dutch compared to Surinamese origin participants. Ethnic differences in dietary patterns persisted within strata of education and occupation. Surinamese showed greater adherence to a ‘traditional’ pattern independent of SES. Among Dutch participants, a clear socio-economic gradient in all dietary patterns was observed. Such a gradient was only present among Surinamese dietary oatterns to the ‘vegetables, fruit and nuts’ pattern. Conclusions: We found a selective change in the adherence to dietary patterns among Surinamese origin participants, presumably a move towards more vegetables and fruits with higher SES but continued fidelity to the traditional diet.
    Patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting exhibit poor pre-operative intakes of fruit, vegetables, dietary fibre, fish and vtiman D
    Ruiz-Nunez, B. ; Hurk, Y.A.C. van den; Vries, J.H.M. de - \ 2015
    The British journal of nutrition 113 (2015). - ISSN 0007-1145 - p. 1466 - 1476.
    cardiovascular-disease risk - low-grade inflammation - heart-disease - fatty-acids - eicosapentaenoic acid - gut microbiota - brain-function - life-style - metaanalysis - consumption
    CHD may ensue from chronic systemic low-grade inflammation. Diet is a modifiable risk factor for both, and its optimisation may reduce post-operative mortality, atrial fibrillation and cognitive decline. In the present study, we investigated the usual dietary intakes of patients undergoing elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), emphasising on food groups and nutrients with putative roles in the inflammatory/anti-inflammatory balance. From November 2012 to April 2013, we approached ninety-three consecutive patients (80 % men) undergoing elective CABG. Of these, fifty-five were finally included (84 % men, median age 69 years; range 46–84 years). The median BMI was 27 (range 18–36) kg/m2. The dietary intake items were fruits (median 181 g/d; range 0–433 g/d), vegetables (median 115 g/d; range 0–303 g/d), dietary fibre (median 22 g/d; range 9–45 g/d), EPA+DHA (median 0·14 g/d; range 0·01–1·06 g/d), vitamin D (median 4·9 µg/d; range 1·9–11·2 µg/d), saturated fat (median 13·1 % of energy (E%); range 9–23 E%) and linoleic acid (LA; median 6·3 E%; range 1·9–11·3 E%). The percentages of patients with dietary intakes below recommendations were 62 % (fruits; recommendation 200 g/d), 87 % (vegetables; recommendation 150–200 g/d), 73 % (dietary fibre; recommendation 30–45 g/d), 91 % (EPA+DHA; recommendation 0·45 g/d), 98 % (vitamin D; recommendation 10–20 µg/d) and 13 % (LA; recommendation 5–10 E%). The percentages of patients with dietary intakes above recommendations were 95 % (saturated fat; recommendation <10 E%) and 7 % (LA). The dietary intakes of patients proved comparable with the average nutritional intake of the age- and sex-matched healthy Dutch population. These unbalanced pre-operative diets may put them at risk of unfavourable surgical outcomes, since they promote a pro-inflammatory state. We conclude that there is an urgent need for intervention trials aiming at rapid improvement of their diets to reduce peri-operative risks.
    Dietary supplement use and colorectal cancer risk: A systematic review and meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies
    Heine-Bröring, R.C. ; Winkels, R.M. ; Renkema, J.M.S. ; Kragt, L. ; Orten-Luiten, A.C.B. van; Tigchelaar, E.F. ; Chan, D.S.M. ; Norat, T. ; Kampman, E. - \ 2015
    International Journal of Cancer 136 (2015)10. - ISSN 0020-7136 - p. 2388 - 2401.
    beta-carotene supplementation - base-line characteristics - iowa womens health - combined folic-acid - colon-cancer - vitamin-d - multivitamin use - united-states - life-style - randomized-trial
    Use of dietary supplements is rising in countries where colorectal cancer is prevalent. We conducted a systematic literature review and meta-analyses of prospective cohort studies on dietary supplement use and colorectal cancer risk. We identified relevant studies in Medline, Embase and Cochrane up to January 2013. Original and peer-reviewed papers on dietary supplement use and colorectal cancer, colon cancer, or rectal cancer incidence were included. “Use-no use”(U-NU), “highest-lowest”(H-L) and “dose-response”(DR) meta-analyses were performed. Random-effects models were used to estimate summary estimates. In total, 24 papers were included in the meta-analyses. We observed inverse associations for colorectal cancer risk and multivitamin (U-NU: RR¿=¿0.92; 95% CI: 0.87,0.97) and calcium supplements (U-NU: RR¿=¿0.86; 95% CI: 0.79,0.95; H-L: RR¿=¿0.80; 95% CI: 0.70,0.92; DR: for an increase of 100 mg/day, RR¿=¿0.96; 95% CI: 0.94,0.99). Inconsistent associations were found for colon cancer risk and supplemental vitamin A and vitamin C, and for colorectal cancer risk and supplemental vitamin D, vitamin E, garlic and folic acid. Meta-analyses of observational studies suggest a beneficial role for multivitamins and calcium supplements on colorectal cancer risk, while the association with other supplements and colorectal cancer risk is inconsistent. Residual confounding of lifestyle factors might be present. Before recommendations can be made, an extensive assessment of dietary supplement use and a better understanding of underlying mechanisms is needed.
    The Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES) project-design, population and data harmonization of a large-scale, international study
    Boffetta, P. ; Bobak, M. ; Borsch-Supan, A. ; Brenner, H. ; Eriksson, S. ; Grodstein, F. ; Jansen, E. ; Jenab, M. ; Juerges, H. ; Kampman, E. ; Kee, F. ; Kuulasmaa, K. ; Park, Y. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Duijn, C. van; Wilsgaard, T. ; Wolk, A. ; Trichopoulos, D. ; Bamia, C. ; Trichopoulou, A. - \ 2014
    European Journal of Epidemiology 29 (2014)12. - ISSN 0393-2990 - p. 929 - 936.
    osteoporotic fractures - cardiovascular-disease - life-style - epidemiology - mortality - women - diet - consumption - disability - cancer
    There is a public health demand to prevent health conditions which lead to increased morbidity and mortality among the rapidly-increasing elderly population. Data for the incidence of such conditions exist in cohort studies worldwide, which, however, differ in various aspects. The Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES) project aims at harmonizing data from existing major longitudinal studies for the elderly whilst focussing on cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, cancer, fractures and cognitive impairment in order to estimate their prevalence, incidence and cause-specific mortality, and identify lifestyle, socioeconomic, and genetic determinants and biomarkers for the incidence of and mortality from these conditions. A survey instrument assessing ageing-related conditions of the elderly will be also developed. Fourteen cohort studies participate in CHANCES with 683,228 elderly (and 150,210 deaths), from 23 European and three non-European countries. So far, 287 variables on health conditions and a variety of exposures, including biomarkers and genetic data have been harmonized. Different research hypotheses are investigated with meta-analyses. The results which will be produced can help international organizations, governments and policy-makers to better understand the broader implications and consequences of ageing and thus make informed decisions.
    Favourable effects of consuming a Palaeolithic-type diet on characteristics of the metabolic syndrome: a randomized controlled pilot-study
    Boers, I. ; Muskiet, F.A.J. ; Berkelaar, E. ; Schut, E. ; Penders, R. ; Hoenderdos, K. ; Jong, M.C. de; Wichers, H.J. - \ 2014
    Lipids in Health and Disease 13 (2014). - ISSN 1476-511X - 13 p.
    obese postmenopausal women - mediterranean-like diet - ischemic-heart-disease - hunter-gatherer - cardiovascular-disease - life-style - macronutrient - 21st-century - metaanalysis - individuals
    Background The main goal of this randomized controlled single-blinded pilot study was to study whether, independent of weight loss, a Palaeolithic-type diet alters characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. Next we searched for outcome variables that might become favourably influenced by a Paleolithic-type diet and may provide new insights in the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the metabolic syndrome. In addition, more information on feasibility and designing an innovative dietary research program on the basis of a Palaeolithic-type diet was obtained. Methods Thirty-four subjects, with at least two characteristics of the metabolic syndrome, were randomized to a two weeks Palaeolithic-type diet (n¿=¿18) or an isoenergetic healthy reference diet, based on the guidelines of the Dutch Health Council (n¿=¿14). Thirty-two subjects completed the study. Measures were taken to keep bodyweight stable. As primary outcomes oral glucose tolerance and characteristics of the metabolic syndrome (abdominal circumference, blood pressure, glucose, lipids) were measured. Secondary outcomes were intestinal permeability, inflammation and salivary cortisol. Data were collected at baseline and after the intervention. Results Subjects were 53.5 (SD9.7) year old men (n¿=¿9) and women (n¿=¿25) with mean BMI of 31.8 (SD5.7) kg/m2. The Palaeolithic-type diet resulted in lower systolic blood pressure (-9.1 mmHg; P¿=¿0.015), diastolic blood pressure (-5.2 mmHg; P¿=¿0.038), total cholesterol (-0.52 mmol/l; P¿=¿0.037), triglycerides (-0.89 mmol/l; P¿=¿0.001) and higher HDL-cholesterol (+0.15 mmol/l; P¿=¿0.013), compared to reference. The number of characteristics of the metabolic syndrome decreased with 1.07 (P¿=¿0.010) upon the Palaeolithic-type diet, compared to reference. Despite efforts to keep bodyweight stable, it decreased in the Palaeolithic group compared to reference (-1.32 kg; P¿=¿0.012). However, favourable effects remained after post-hoc adjustments for this unintended weight loss. No changes were observed for intestinal permeability, inflammation and salivary cortisol. Conclusions We conclude that consuming a Palaeolithic-type diet for two weeks improved several cardiovascular risk factors compared to a healthy reference diet in subjects with the metabolic syndrome.
    Reprint of: A parallel randomized trial on the effect of a healthful diet on inflammageing and its consequences in European elderly people: Design of the NU-AGE dietary intervention study
    Berendsen, A.M. ; Santoro, A. ; Pini, E. ; Cevenini, E. ; Ostan, R. ; Pietruszka, B. ; Rolf, K. ; Cano, N. ; Caille, A. ; Lyon-Belgy, N. ; Fairweather-Tait, S. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Franceschi, C. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de - \ 2014
    Mechanisms of Ageing and Development 136-137 (2014). - ISSN 0047-6374 - p. 14 - 21.
    cardiovascular risk-factors - mediterranean diet - vitamin-d - metabolic syndrome - older-adults - nutritional-status - blood-pressure - fatty-acids - weight-loss - life-style
    Background The proportion of European elderly is expected to increase to 30% in 2060. Combining dietary components may modulate many processes involved in ageing. So, it is likely that a healthful diet approach might have greater favourable impact on age-related decline than individual dietary components. This paper describes the design of a healthful diet intervention on inflammageing and its consequences in the elderly. Methods The NU-AGE study is a parallel randomized one-year trial in 1250 apparently healthy, independently living European participants aged 65–80 years. Participants are randomised into either the diet group or control group. Participants in the diet group received dietary advice aimed at meeting the nutritional requirements of the ageing population. Special attention was paid to nutrients that may be inadequate or limiting in diets of elderly, such as vitamin D, vitamin B12, and calcium. C-reactive protein is measured as primary outcome. Discussion The NU-AGE study is the first dietary intervention investigating the effect of a healthful diet providing targeted nutritional recommendations for optimal health and quality of life in apparently healthy European elderly. Results of this intervention will provide evidence on the effect of a healthful diet on the prevention of age related decline.
    Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations
    Dillen, S.M.E. van; Noordman, J. ; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J. - \ 2014
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 68 (2014). - ISSN 0954-3007 - p. 50 - 56.
    cardiovascular risk-management - community family-practice - life-style - general-practitioners - counseling practices - communication styles - information-sources - guidance practices - health-promotion - national-survey
    Background/Objective: To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses’ (PNs’) advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. Subjects/Methods: A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were selected. An observational checklist was developed to assess frequency and content. Personalization of advices was scored, as also the guidelines on which PNs based their advices. Content analysis was used to identify different categories of advices. Results: About one quarter of advices concerned weight, over two-thirds nutrition and one-third physical activity. Lose weight, eat less fat and be more physically active in general were the main categories for each type of advice. Despite high clarity of advices, lower scores were found for specificity and personalization. Very few nutrition advices were provided in combination with physical activity advices. Conclusions: Weight advices often related to the patient’s complaint. PNs seldom set a concrete weight goal. Although benefits of physical activity were discussed, often no practical advices were provided about how to achieve this. Integrated lifestyle advice was not common: advices about nutrition and physical activity were fragmented throughout the consultation. Obesity prevention needs more emphasis in PNs’ educational programs.
    The role of genes in talking about overweight: An analysis of discourse on genetics, overweight and health risks in relation to nutrigenomics
    Komduur, R.H. ; Molder, H. te - \ 2014
    Public Understanding of Science 23 (2014)8. - ISSN 0963-6625 - p. 886 - 902.
    technology-assessment - quit smoking - life-style - obesity - susceptibility - understandings - information - motivation - disease - smokers
    This study examines whether the assumptions embedded in nutrigenomics, especially the alleged relation between information about personal health risks and healthy behaviour, match how people account for the relation between food, health and genes in everyday life. We draw on discourse analysis to study accounts of overweight in six group interviews with people who are and who are not overweight. The results show potentially contradictory normative orientations towards behavioural explanations of (over)weight. Overt gene accounts are interactionally problematic (in contrast to more indirect accounts such as ‘build’), indicating that participants treat ‘behaviour’ as the normatively appropriate explanation for overweight. At the same time, however, healthy behaviour is an accountable matter, i.e. it is dealt with in interaction as behaviour that is not self-evidently right but requires an explanation. It is discussed how bringing these interactional concerns to the surface is essential for understanding future users’ response to nutrigenomics and emergent technologies more in general
    Joint Association of Dietary Pattern and Physical Activity Level with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Chinese Men: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Wang, D. ; He, Y. ; Li, Y.P. ; Luan, D.C. ; Zhai, F.Y. ; Yang, X.G. ; Ma, G.S. - \ 2013
    PLoS ONE 8 (2013)6. - ISSN 1932-6203
    diabetes prevention program - impaired glucose-tolerance - life-style - metabolic syndrome - blood-pressure - attributable risk - plasma biomarkers - us adults - population - hypertension
    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the joint associations of physical activity level (PAL) and dietary patterns in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among Chinese men. The study population consisted of 13 511 Chinese males aged 18-59 years from the 2002 China National Nutrition and Health Survey. Based on dietary data collected by a food frequency questionnaire, four dietary patterns were identified and labeled as "Green Water'' (high consumption of rice, vegetables, seafood, pork, and poultry), "Yellow Earth'' (high consumption of wheat flour products and starchy tubers), "New Affluent'' (high consumption of animal sourced foods and soybean products), and "Western Adopter'' (high consumption of animal sourced foods, cakes, and soft drinks). From the information collected by a 1-year physical activity questionnaire, PAL was calculated and classified into 4 categories: sedentary, low active, active, and very active. As compared with their counterparts from the New Affluent pattern, participants who followed the Green Water pattern had a lower likelihood of abdominal obesity (AO; 50.2%), hypertension (HT; 37.9%), hyperglycemia (HG; 41.5%), elevated triglyceride (ETG; 14.5%), low HDL (LHDL; 39.8%), and metabolic syndrome (MS; 51.9%). When compared to sedentary participants, the odds ratio of participants with very active PAL was 0.62 for AO, 0.85 for HT, 0.71 for HG, 0.76 for ETG, 0.74 for LHDL, and 0.58 for MS. Individuals who followed both very active PAL and the Green Water pattern had a lower likelihood of CVD risk factors (AO: 65.8%, HT: 39.1%, HG: 57.4%, ETG: 35.4%, LHDL: 56.1%, and MS: 75.0%), compared to their counterparts who followed both sedentary PAL and the New Affluent pattern. In addition, adherence to both healthy dietary pattern and very active PAL presented a remarkable potential for CVD risk factor prevention.
    Effects of chocolate supplementation on metabolic and cardiovascular parameters in ApoE3L mice fed a high-cholesterol atherogenic diet
    Yakala, G.K. ; Wielinga, P.Y. ; Suarez, M. ; Bunschoten, A. ; Golde, J.M. ; Arola, L. ; Keijer, J. ; Kleemann, R. ; Kooistra, T. ; Heeringa, P. - \ 2013
    Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 57 (2013)11. - ISSN 1613-4125 - p. 2039 - 2048.
    e-asterisk-3-leiden transgenic mice - coronary-heart-disease - kusanagi-hypercholesterolemic rabbits - reduce plasma-cholesterol - lipid-peroxidation - life-style - atherosclerosis - health - polyphenols - prevention
    SCOPE: Dietary intake of cocoa and/or chocolate has been suggested to exhibit protective cardiovascular effects although this is still controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chocolate supplementation on metabolic and cardiovascular parameters. METHODS AND RESULTS: Four groups of ApoE*3Leiden mice were exposed to the following diet regimens. Group 1: cholesterol-free control diet (CO). Group 2: high-dose (1.0% w/w) control cholesterol (CC). Group 3: CC supplemented chocolate A (CCA) and Group 4: CC supplemented chocolate B (CCB). Both chocolates differed in polyphenol and fiber content, CCA had a relatively high-polyphenol and low-fiber content compared to CCB. Mice fed a high-cholesterol diet showed increased plasma-cholesterol and developed atherosclerosis. Both chocolate treatments, particularly CCA, further increased plasma-cholesterol and increased atherosclerotic plaque formation. Moreover, compared to mice fed a high-cholesterol diet, both chocolate-treated groups displayed increased liver injury. Mice on high-cholesterol diet had elevated plasma levels of sVCAM-1, sE-selectin and SAA, which was further increased in the CCB group. Similar effects were observed for renal inflammation markers. CONCLUSION: The two chocolate preparations showed unfavorable, but different effects on cardiometabolic health in E3L mice, which dissimilarities may be related to differences in chocolate composition. We conclude that discrepancies reported on the effects of chocolate on cardiometabolic health may at least partly be due to differences in chocolate composition.
    The association between dietary energy density and type 2 diabetes in Europe: results form the EPIC-InterAct Study
    The InterAct Consortium, A. ; Groenendijk-van Woudenbergh, G.J. ; Feskens, E.J.M. - \ 2013
    PLoS ONE 8 (2013)5. - ISSN 1932-6203 - 10 p.
    impaired glucose-tolerance - life-style - metabolic syndrome - glycemic load - united-states - weight change - us adults - risk - women - mellitus
    Background Observational studies implicate higher dietary energy density (DED) as a potential risk factor for weight gain and obesity. It has been hypothesized that DED may also be associated with risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but limited evidence exists. Therefore, we investigated the association between DED and risk of T2D in a large prospective study with heterogeneity of dietary intake. Methodology/Principal Findings A case-cohort study was nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC) study of 340,234 participants contributing 3.99 million person years of follow-up, identifying 12,403 incident diabetes cases and a random subcohort of 16,835 individuals from 8 European countries. DED was calculated as energy (kcal) from foods (except beverages) divided by the weight (gram) of foods estimated from dietary questionnaires. Prentice-weighted Cox proportional hazard regression models were fitted by country. Risk estimates were pooled by random effects meta-analysis and heterogeneity was evaluated. Estimated mean (sd) DED was 1.5 (0.3) kcal/g among cases and subcohort members, varying across countries (range 1.4–1.7 kcal/g). After adjustment for age, sex, smoking, physical activity, alcohol intake, energy intake from beverages and misreporting of dietary intake, no association was observed between DED and T2D (HR 1.02 (95% CI: 0.93–1.13), which was consistent across countries (I2 = 2.9%). Conclusions/Significance In this large European case-cohort study no association between DED of solid and semi-solid foods and risk of T2D was observed. However, despite the fact that there currently is no conclusive evidence for an association between DED and T2DM risk, choosing low energy dense foods should be promoted as they support current WHO recommendations to prevent chronic diseases.
    A parallel randomized trial on the effect of a healthful diet on inflammageing and its consequences in European elderly people: Design of the NU-AGE dietary intervention study
    Berendsen, A.M. ; Santoro, A. ; Pini, E. ; Cevenini, E. ; Ostan, R. ; Pietruszka, B. ; Rolf, K. ; Cano, R. ; Caille, A. ; Lyon-Belgy, N. ; Fairweather-Tait, S. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Franceschi, C. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de - \ 2013
    Mechanisms of Ageing and Development 134 (2013)11-12. - ISSN 0047-6374 - p. 523 - 530.
    cardiovascular risk-factors - mediterranean diet - vitamin-d - metabolic syndrome - older-adults - nutritional-status - blood-pressure - fatty-acids - weight-loss - life-style
    Background The proportion of European elderly is expected to increase to 30% in 2060. Combining dietary components may modulate many processes involved in ageing. So, it is likely that a healthful diet approach might have greater favourable impact on age-related decline than individual dietary components. This paper describes the design of a healthful diet intervention on inflammageing and its consequences in the elderly. Methods The NU-AGE study is a parallel randomized one-year trial in 1250 apparently healthy, independently living European participants aged 65–80 years. Participants are randomised into either the diet group or control group. Participants in the diet group received dietary advice aimed at meeting the nutritional requirements of the ageing population. Special attention was paid to nutrients that may be inadequate or limiting in diets of elderly, such as vitamin D, vitamin B12, and calcium. C-reactive protein is measured as primary outcome. Discussion The NU-AGE study is the first dietary intervention investigating the effect of a healthful diet providing targeted nutritional recommendations for optimal health and quality of life in apparently healthy European elderly. Results of this intervention will provide evidence on the effect of a healthful diet on the prevention of age related decline.
    Protein intake in relation to risk of hypertension and microalbuminuria in patients with type 1 diabetes: the EURODIAB Prospective Complications Study
    Altorf-van der Kuil, W. ; Engberink, M.F. ; Ijpma, I. ; Verberne, L.D.M. ; Geleijnse, J.M. ; Toeller, M. ; Chaturvedi, N. ; Fuller, J.H. ; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S. - \ 2013
    Journal of Hypertension 31 (2013)6. - ISSN 0263-6352 - p. 1151 - 1159.
    randomized controlled-trials - coronary-heart-disease - low-fat diet - blood-pressure - iddm complications - epidemiologic evidence - urinary albumin - dairy-products - life-style - nephropathy
    Background & aims A carbohydrate (CHO) drink given preoperatively changes the fasted state into a fed state. The ESPEN guidelines for perioperative care include preoperative CHO loading and re-establishment of oral feeding as early as possible after surgery. An intestinal ischaemia reperfusion (IR) animal model was used to investigate whether preoperative CHO loading increases spontaneous postoperative food intake, intestinal barrier function and the catabolic response. Methods Male Wistar rats (n = 65) were subjected to 16 h fasting with ad libitum water and: A) sham laparotomy (Sham fasted, n = 24); B) intestinal ischaemia (IR fasted, n = 27); and C) intestinal ischaemia with preoperatively access to a CHO drink (IR CHO, n = 14). Spontaneous food intake, intestinal barrier function, insulin sensitivity, intestinal motility and plasma amino acids were measured after surgery. Results The IR CHO animals started eating significantly earlier and also ate significantly more than the IR fasted animals. Furthermore, preoperative CHO loading improved the intestinal barrier function, functional enterocyte metabolic mass measured by citrulline and reduced muscle protein catabolism, as indicated by normalization of the biomarker 3-methylhistidine. Conclusions Preoperative CHO loading improves food intake, preserves the GI function and reduces the catabolic response in an IR animal model. These findings suggest that preoperative CHO loading preserves the intestinal function in order to accelerate recovery and food intake. If this effect is caused by overcoming the fasted state or CHO loading remains unclear
    Validation of the Diet Quality Index for Adolescents by comparison with biomarkers, nutrient and food intakes: the HELENA study
    Vyncke, K. ; Cruz Fernandez, E. ; Fajo-Pascual, M. ; Cuenca-Garcia, M. ; Keyzer, W. de; Gonzalez-Gross, M. ; Moreno, L.A. ; Beghin, L. ; Geelen, A. - \ 2013
    The British journal of nutrition 109 (2013). - ISSN 0007-1145 - p. 2067 - 2078.
    healthy eating index - fatty-acid-composition - life-style - european adolescents - adipose-tissue - great fat - vitamin-d - nutrition - plasma - blood
    Food-based dietary guidelines (FBDG) aim to address the nutritional requirements at population level in order to prevent diseases and promote a healthy lifestyle. Diet quality indices can be used to assess the compliance with these FBDG. The present study aimed to investigate whether the newly developed Diet Quality Index for Adolescents (DQI-A) is a good surrogate measure for adherence to FBDG, and whether adherence to these FBDG effectively leads to better nutrient intakes and nutritional biomarkers in adolescents. Participants included 1804 European adolescents who were recruited in the Healthy Lifestyle in Europe by Nutrition in Adolescence (HELENA) Study. Dietary intake was assessed by two, non-consecutive 24 h recalls. A DQI-A score, considering the components' dietary quality, diversity and equilibrium, was calculated. Associations between the DQI-A and food and nutrient intakes and blood concentration biomarkers were investigated using multilevel regression analysis corrected for centre, age and sex. DQI-A scores were associated with food intake in the expected direction: positive associations with nutrient-dense food items, such as fruits and vegetables, and inverse associations with energy-dense and low-nutritious foods. On the nutrient level, the DQI-A was positively related to the intake of water, fibre and most minerals and vitamins. No association was found between the DQI-A and total fat intake. Furthermore, a positive association was observed with 25-hydroxyvitamin D, holo-transcobalamin and n-3 fatty acid serum levels. The present study has shown good validity of the DQI-A by confirming the expected associations with food and nutrient intakes and some biomarkers in blood
    The Association between dietary flavonoid and lignan intakes and incident type 2 diabetes in European populations
    Zamora-Ros, R. ; Forouhi, N.G. ; Buijsse, B. ; Schouw, Y.T. van der; Boeing, H. ; Feskens, E.J.M. - \ 2013
    Diabetes Care 36 (2013)12. - ISSN 0149-5992 - p. 3961 - 3970.
    insulin sensitivity - risk-factors - food sources - life-style - us men - nutrition - cancer - women - cohort - polyphenols
    OBJECTIVE To study the association between dietary flavonoid and lignan intakes, and the risk of development of type 2 diabetes among European populations. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-InterAct case-cohort study included 12,403 incident type 2 diabetes cases and a stratified subcohort of 16,154 participants from among 340,234 participants with 3.99 million person-years of follow-up in eight European countries. At baseline, country-specific validated dietary questionnaires were used. A flavonoid and lignan food composition database was developed from the Phenol-Explorer, the U.K. Food Standards Agency, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture databases. Hazard ratios (HRs) from country-specific Prentice-weighted Cox regression models were pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS In multivariable models, a trend for an inverse association between total flavonoid intake and type 2 diabetes was observed (HR for the highest vs. the lowest quintile, 0.90 [95% CI 0.77–1.04]; P value trend = 0.040), but not with lignans (HR 0.88 [95% CI 0.72–1.07]; P value trend = 0.119). Among flavonoid subclasses, flavonols (HR 0.81 [95% CI 0.69–0.95]; P value trend = 0.020) and flavanols (HR 0.82 [95% CI 0.68–0.99]; P value trend = 0.012), including flavan-3-ol monomers (HR 0.73 [95% CI 0.57–0.93]; P value trend = 0.029), were associated with a significantly reduced hazard of diabetes. CONCLUSIONS Prospective findings in this large European cohort demonstrate inverse associations between flavonoids, particularly flavanols and flavonols, and incident type 2 diabetes. This suggests a potential protective role of eating a diet rich in flavonoids, a dietary pattern based on plant-based foods, in the prevention of type 2 diabetes
    Associations between smoking, components of metabolic syndrome and lipoprotein particle size
    Slagter, S.N. ; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V. ; Vonk, J.M. ; Boezen, H.M. ; Dullaart, R.P.F. ; Muller Kobold, A.C. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Beek, A.P. van; Klauw, M.M. van der; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R. - \ 2013
    BMC Medicine 11 (2013). - ISSN 1741-7015
    coronary-heart-disease - apparently healthy-men - body-fat distribution - apolipoprotein-a-i - cigarette-smoking - life-style - insulin-resistance - blood-pressure - risk-factors - myocardial-infarction
    Background: The clustering of metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors is known as metabolic syndrome (MetS). The risk of having MetS is strongly associated with increased adiposity and can be further modified by smoking behavior. Apolipoproteins (apo) associated with low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) may be altered in MetS. This study aimed to examine the association between smoking and the following parameters: MetS and its components, levels of apolipoproteins and estimated lipoprotein particle size, separately for men and women, and in different body mass index (BMI) classes. Methods: We included 24,389 men and 35,078 women aged between 18 and 80 years who participated in the LifeLines Cohort Study between December 2006 and January 2012; 5,685 men and 6,989 women were current smokers. Participants were categorized into three different body mass index (BMI) classes (BMI = 30 kg/m(2)). MetS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program's Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP:ATPIII) criteria. Blood pressure, anthropometric and lipid measurements were rigorously standardized, and the large sample size enabled a powerful estimate of quantitative changes. The association between smoking and the individual MetS components, and apoA1 and apoB, was tested with linear regression. Logistic regression was used to examine the effect of smoking and daily tobacco smoked on risk of having MetS. All models were age adjusted and stratified by sex and BMI class. Results: Prevalence of MetS increased with higher BMI levels. A total of 64% of obese men and 42% of obese women had MetS. Current smoking was associated with a higher risk of MetS in both sexes and all BMI classes (odds ratio 1.7 to 2.4 for men, 1.8 to 2.3 for women, all P values
    Red and processed meat intake and risk of colorectal adenomas: a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies
    Aune, D. ; Chan, D.S.M. ; Vieira, A. ; Navarro Rosenblatt, D. ; Vieira, R. ; Greenwood, D.C. ; Kampman, E. ; Norat, T. - \ 2013
    Cancer Causes and Control 24 (2013)4. - ISSN 0957-5243 - p. 611 - 627.
    dose-response metaanalysis - heterocyclic amines - dietary factors - life-style - hyperplastic polyps - carcinoma sequence - cigarette-smoking - burgundy france - dairy-products - sigmoid colon
    Background Current evidence indicates that red and processed meat intake increases the risk of colorectal cancer; however, the association with colorectal adenomas is unclear. Objective To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of epidemiological studies of red and processed meat intake and risk of colorectal adenomas as part of the Continuous Update Project of the World Cancer Research Fund. Design PubMed and several other databases were searched for relevant studies from their inception up to 31 December 2011. Summary relative risks (RRs) were estimated using a random effects model. Results Nineteen case–control studies and seven prospective studies were included in the analyses. The summary RR per 100 g/day of red meat was 1.27 (95 % CI 1.16–1.40, I2 = 5 %, n = 16) for all studies combined, 1.20 (95 % CI 1.06–1.36, I2 = 0 %, n = 6) for prospective studies, and 1.34 (95 % CI 1.12–1.59, I2 = 31 %, n = 10) for case–control studies. The summary RR per 50 g/day of processed meat intake was 1.29 (95 % CI 1.10–1.53, I2 = 27 %, n = 10) for all studies combined, 1.45 (95 % CI 1.10–1.90, I2 = 0 %, n = 2) for prospective studies, and 1.23 (95 % CI 0.99–1.52, I2 = 37 %, n = 8) for case–control studies. There was evidence of a nonlinear association between red meat (pnonlinearity <0.001) and processed meat (pnonlinearity = 0.01) intake and colorectal adenoma risk. Conclusion These results indicate an elevated risk of colorectal adenomas with intake of red and processed meat, but further prospective studies are warranted
    Replacement of meat and dairy by plant-derived foods: estimated effects on land use, iron and SFA intakes in young Dutch adult females
    Temme, E.H.M. ; Voet, H. van der; Thissen, J.T.N.M. ; Verkaik-Kloosterman, J. ; Donkersgoed, G. van; Nonhebel, S. - \ 2013
    Public Health Nutrition 16 (2013)10. - ISSN 1368-9800 - p. 1900 - 1907.
    consumption patterns - life-style - climate-change - consumers - health - diet - requirements - perspectives - vegetarians - energy
    Objective: Reduction in the current high levels of meat and dairy consumption may contribute to environmental as well as human health. Since meat is a major source of Fe, effects on Fe intake need to be evaluated, especially in groups vulnerable to negative Fe status. In the present study we evaluated the effects of replacing meat and dairy foods with plant-based products on environmental sustainability (land requirement) and health (SFA and Fe intakes) in women. Design: Data on land requirements were derived from existing calculation methods. Food composition data were derived from the Dutch Food Composition Table 2006. Data were linked to the food consumption of young Dutch women. Land requirements and nutrient intakes were evaluated at baseline and in two scenarios in which 30% (Scenario_30 %) or 100% (Scenario_100 %) of the dairy and meat consumption was randomly replaced by the same amount of plant-based dairy- and meat-replacing foods. Setting: The Netherlands. Subjects: Three hundred and ninety-eight young Dutch females. Results: Replacement of meat and dairy by plant-based foods benefited the environment by decreasing land use. The intake of SFA decreased considerably compared with the baseline situation. On average, total Fe intake increased by 2?5 mg/d, although most of the Fe intake was from a less bioavailable source. Conclusions: Replacement of meat and dairy foods by plant-based foods reduced land use for consumption and SFA intake of young Dutch females and did no compromise total Fe intake.
    Dietary glycemic index, glycemic load, and digestible carbohydrate intake are not associated with risk op type 2 diabetes in eight European countries
    Sluijs, I. van der; Beulens, J.W.J. ; Schouw, Y.T. van der; Buckland, G. ; Kuijsten, A. ; Schulze, M.B. ; Amiano, P. ; Ardanaz, E. ; Balkau, B. ; Boeing, H. ; Gavrila, D. ; Feskens, E.J.M. - \ 2013
    The Journal of Nutrition 143 (2013)1. - ISSN 0022-3166 - p. 93 - 99.
    fiber intake - energy-intake - life-style - nutrition - cancer - women - mellitus - cohort - prevention - disease
    The association of glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL) with the risk of type 2 diabetes remains unclear. We investigated associations of dietary GI, GL, and digestible carbohydrate with incident type 2 diabetes. We performed a case-cohort study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition Study, including a random subcohort (n = 16,835) and incident type 2 diabetes cases (n = 12,403). The median follow-up time was 12 y. Baseline dietary intakes were assessed using country-specific dietary questionnaires. Country-specific HR were calculated and pooled using random effects meta-analysis. Dietary GI, GL, and digestible carbohydrate in the subcohort were (mean +/- SD) 56 +/- 4, 127 +/- 23, and 226 +/- 36 g/d, respectively. After adjustment for confounders, GI and GL were not associated with incident diabetes [HR highest vs. lowest quartile (HRQ4) for GI: 1.05 (95% CI = 0.96, 1.16); HRQ4 for GL: 1.07 (95% CI = 0.95, 1.20)]. Digestible carbohydrate intake was not associated with incident diabetes [HRQ4: 0.98(95% CI = 0.86, 1.10)]. In additional analyses, we found that discrepancies in the GI value assignment to foods possibly explain differences in GI associations with diabetes within the same study population. In conclusion, an expansion of the GI tables and systematic GI value assignment to foods may be needed to improve the validity of GI values derived in such studies, after which GI associations may need reevaluation. Our study shows that digestible carbohydrate intake is not associated with diabetes risk and suggests that diabetes risk with high-GI and -GL diets may be more modest than initial studies suggested. J. Nutr. 143: 93-99, 2013.
    Unhealthy dietary patterns associated with inflammation and endothelial dysfunction in type 1 diabetes: The EURODIAB study
    Bussel, B.C.T. van; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S. ; Henry, R.M.A. ; Schalkwijk, C.G. ; Ferreira, I. ; Chaturvedi, N. ; Toeller, M. ; Fuller, J.H. ; Stehouwer, C.D.A. - \ 2013
    Nutrition, Metabolism & Cardiovascular Diseases 23 (2013)8. - ISSN 0939-4753 - p. 758 - 764.
    iddm complications - microvascular complications - metabolic syndrome - risk-factors - life-style - determinants - markers - mortality - disease - protein
    Background and aims - A healthy diet has been inversely associated with endothelial dysfunction (ED) and low-grade inflammation (LGI). We investigated the association between nutrient consumption and biomarkers of ED and LGI in type 1 diabetes. Methods and results - We investigated 491 individuals. Nutrient consumption and lifestyle risk factors were measured in 1989 and 1997. Biomarkers of ED (von Willebrand factor, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and soluble endothelial selectin) and LGI (C-reactive protein, interleukin 6 and tumour necrosis factor a) were measured in 1997 and averaged into Z-scores. The nutrient residual method was used to adjust individual nutrient intake for energy intake. Data were analysed with generalised estimation equations. We report increments/decrements in nutrient consumption, averaged over time, per +1 standard deviation (SD) of 1997 ED or LGI Z-scores, after adjustment for sex, age, duration of diabetes, investigation centre, body mass index, energy intake, smoking behaviour, alcohol consumption, and each of the other nutrients. One SD elevation in ED Z-score was associated with a diet lower in fibre [ß(95%CI);-0.09(-0.18;-0.004)], polyunsaturated fat [-0.18(-0.31;-0.05)] and vegetable protein [-0.10(-0.20;-0.001)]. For the LGI Z-score results showed associations with fibre [-0.09(-0.17;-0.01)], polyunsaturated fat [-0.14(-0.24;-0.03)] and cholesterol [0.10(0.01; 0.18)]. Conclusion - In type 1 diabetes, consumption of less fibre, polyunsaturated fat and vegetable protein, and more cholesterol over the study period was associated with more ED and LGI. Following dietary guidelines in type 1 diabetes may reduce cardiovascular disease risk by favourably affecting ED and LGI.
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