Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    We will mail you new results for this query: keywords==marine strategy framework directive
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Assessing the State of Demersal Fish to Address Formal Ecosystem Based Management Needs: Making Fisheries Independent Trawl Survey Data ‘Fit for Purpose’
Moriarty, Meadhbh ; Greenstreet, Simon P.R. ; Rasmussen, Jens ; Boois, Ingeborg De - \ 2019
Frontiers in Marine Science 6 (2019). - ISSN 2296-7745 - 10 p.
Data quality - data quality audit - marine strategy framework directive - Common fisheries policy - data management - ecoystem-based management
In Europe, introduction of the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD) represents formal, legally-binding, adoption of ecosystem-based management (EBM) across most European waters. Member States of the European Union have invariably nominated their groundfish surveys as part of the marine monitoring programmes required under the MSFD. Groundfish surveys were originally intended to provide fisheries independent abundance indices for commercially valuable species to support fisheries stock assessments and fisheries management. However, early studies, primarily intended to make the case for the need for EBM, exposed these data to a broader range of uses and highlighted various data quality issues. Individual scientists, pursuing personal research agendas, addressed these as each thought best. This informal approach to assuring data quality is not sufficient to support formal assessments of fish species status and fish community status required under legally-mandated EBM, such as the MSFD, because quality audit, formal logging of issues identified, and remedial measures taken, is often lacking. Groundfish survey data, needed to implement legally-mandated EBM, should be subjected to a formal Quality Assurance–Quality Audit (QAQA) process to ensure that they are properly fit for purpose. This paper describes a QAQA process applied European groundfish survey data to ensure their adequacy to support MSFD needs and considers how this process might be taken forward in the future
Plastic ingestion by harbour porpoises Phocoena phocoena in the Netherlands: Establishing a standardised method
Franeker, Jan A. van; Bravo Rebolledo, Elisa L. ; Hesse, Eileen ; IJsseldijk, Lonneke L. ; Kühn, Susanne ; Leopold, Mardik ; Mielke, Lara - \ 2018
Ambio 47 (2018)4. - ISSN 0044-7447 - p. 387 - 397.
harbour porpoise - marine litter monitoring - marine strategy framework directive - MSFD - North Sea - Phocoena phocoena - Plastic ingestion
Stomach contents of harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) collected in the Netherlands between 2003 and 2013 were inspected for the presence of plastic and other man-made litter. In 654 stomach samples the frequency of occurrence of plastic litter was 7% with less than 0.5% additional presence of nonsynthetic
man-made litter. However, we show that when a dedicated standard protocol for the detection of litter is followed, a considerably higher percentage (15% of 81
harbour porpoise stomachs from the period 2010–2013) contained plastic litter. Results thus strongly depended on methods used and time period considered. Occurrence of litter in the stomach was correlated to the presence of other
non-food remains like stones, shells, bog-wood, etc., suggesting that litter was often ingested accidentally when the animals foraged close to the bottom. Most
items were small and were not considered to have had a major health impact. No evident differences in ingestion were found between sexes or age groups, with the exception that neonates contained no litter. Polyethylene and polypropylene were the most common plastic types encountered. Compared to earlier literature on the harbour porpoise and related species, our results suggest higher
levels of ingestion of litter. This is largely due to the lack of dedicated protocols to investigate marine litter ingestion in previous studies. Still, the low frequency of ingestion, and minor number and mass of litter items found in harbour
porpoises in the relatively polluted southern North Sea indicates that the species is not a strong candidate for annual monitoring of marine litter trends under the EU marine strategy framework directive. However, for longerterm
comparisons and regional differences, with proper dedicated protocols applied, the harbour porpoise has specific use in quantifying litter presence in the, for that specific objective, poorly studied benthic marine habitat.
Towards ecosystem-based management : identifying operational food-web indicators for marine ecosystems
Tam, Jamie C. ; Link, Jason S. ; Rossberg, Axel G. ; Rogers, Stuart I. ; Levin, Philip S. ; Rochet, Marie-Joelle ; Bundy, Alida ; Belgrano, Andrea ; Libralato, Simone ; Tomczak, Maciej ; Wolfshaar, K.E. van de; Pranovi, Fabio ; Gorokhova, Elena ; Large, Scott I. ; Niquil, Nathalie ; Greenstreet, Simon P.R. ; Druon, Jean-Noel ; Lesutiene, Jurate ; Johansen, Marie ; Preciado, Izaskun ; Patricio, Joana ; Palialexis, Andreas ; Tett, Paul ; Johansen, Geir O. ; Houle, Jennifer ; Rindorf, Anna - \ 2017
ICES Journal of Marine Science 74 (2017)7. - ISSN 1054-3139 - p. 2040 - 2052.
ecoystem-based management - Good environmental status - Indicator selection - integrated ecosystem assessment - marine strategy framework directive
Modern approaches to Ecosystem-Based Management and sustainable use of marine resources must account for the myriad of pressures (interspecies, human and environmental) affecting marine ecosystems. The network of feeding interactions between co-existing species and populations (food webs) are an important aspect of all marine ecosystems and biodiversity. Here we describe and discuss a process to evaluate the selection of operational food-web indicators for use in evaluating marine ecosystem status. This process brought together experts in food-web ecology, marine ecology, and resource management, to identify available indicators that can be used to inform marine management. Standard evaluation criteria (availability and quality of data, conceptual basis, communicability, relevancy to management) were implemented
to identify practical food-web indicators ready for operational use and indicators that hold promise for future use in policy and management. The major attributes of the final suite of operational food-web indicators were structure and functioning. Indicators that represent resilience of the marine ecosystem were less developed. Over 60 potential food-web indicators were evaluated and the final selection of operational food-web indicators includes: the primary production required to sustain a fishery, the productivity of seabirds (or charismatic megafauna), zooplankton indicators, primary productivity, integrated trophic indicators, and the biomass of trophic guilds. More efforts
should be made to develop thresholds-based reference points for achieving Good Environmental Status. There is also a need for international
collaborations to develop indicators that will facilitate management in marine ecosystems used by multiple countries.
Fishing impact and environmental status in European seas: a diagnosis from stock assessments and ecosystem indicators
Gascuel, Didier ; Coll, Marta ; Fox, Clive ; Guénette, Sylvie ; Guitton, Jérome ; Kenny, Andrew ; Knittweis, Leyla ; Nielsen, J.R. ; Piet, Gerjan ; Raid, Tiit ; Travers-Trolet, Morgane ; Shephard, Samuel - \ 2016
Fish and Fisheries 17 (2016)1. - ISSN 1467-2960 - p. 31 - 55.
Ecosystem approach to fisheries management - ecoystem indicators - good environmental status - marine strategy framework directive - stock assessment - trophic level
Stock-based and ecosystem-based indicators are used to provide a new diagnosis of the fishing impact and environmental status of European seas. In the seven European marine ecosystems covering the Baltic and the North-east Atlantic, (i) trends in landings since 1950 were examined; (ii) syntheses of the status and trends in fish stocks were consolidated at the ecosystem level; and (iii) trends in ecosystem indicators based on landings and surveys were analysed. We show that yields began to decrease everywhere (except in the Baltic) from the mid-1970s, as a result of the over-exploitation of some major stocks. Fishermen adapted by increasing fishing effort and exploiting a wider part of the ecosystems. This was insufficient to compensate for the decrease in abundance of many stocks, and total landings have halved over the last 30 years. The highest fishing impact took place in the late 1990s, with a clear decrease in stock-based and ecosystem indicators. In particular, trophic-based indicators exhibited a continuous decreasing trend in almost all ecosystems. Over the past decade, a decrease in fishing pressure has been observed, the mean fishing mortality rate of assessed stocks being almost halved in all the considered ecosystems, but no clear recovery in the biomass and ecosystem indicators is yet apparent. In addition, the mean recruitment index was shown to decrease by around 50% in all ecosystems (except the Baltic). We conclude that building this kind of diagnosis is a key step on the path to implementing an ecosystem approach to fisheries management.
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