Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Spatial and temporal variability of soil N2O and CH4 fluxes along a degradation gradient in a palm swamp peat forest in the Peruvian Amazon
    Hergoualc’h, Kristell ; Dezzeo, Nelda ; Verchot, Louis V. ; Martius, Christopher ; Lent, Jeffrey van; Aguila-Pasquel, Jhon del; López Gonzales, Mariela - \ 2020
    Global Change Biology 26 (2020)10. - ISSN 1354-1013 - p. 7198 - 7216.
    GHG emissions - Mauritia flexuosa swamp forests - methane - nitrous oxide - peatland - Peru - tropical

    Mauritia flexuosa palm swamp, the prevailing Peruvian Amazon peatland ecosystem, is extensively threatened by degradation. The unsustainable practice of cutting whole palms for fruit extraction modifies forest's structure and composition and eventually alters peat-derived greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. We evaluated the spatiotemporal variability of soil N2O and CH4 fluxes and environmental controls along a palm swamp degradation gradient formed by one undegraded site (Intact), one moderately degraded site (mDeg) and one heavily degraded site (hDeg). Microscale variability differentiated hummocks supporting live or cut palms from surrounding hollows. Macroscale analysis considered structural changes in vegetation and soil microtopography as impacted by degradation. Variables were monitored monthly over 3 years to evaluate intra- and inter-annual variability. Degradation induced microscale changes in N2O and CH4 emission trends and controls. Site-scale average annual CH4 emissions were similar along the degradation gradient (225.6 ± 50.7, 160.5 ± 65.9 and 169.4 ± 20.7 kg C ha−1 year−1 at the Intact, mDeg and hDeg sites, respectively). Site-scale average annual N2O emissions (kg N ha−1 year−1) were lower at the mDeg site (0.5 ± 0.1) than at the Intact (1.3 ± 0.6) and hDeg sites (1.1 ± 0.4), but the difference seemed linked to heterogeneous fluctuations in soil water-filled pore space (WFPS) along the forest complex rather than to degradation. Monthly and annual emissions were mainly controlled by variations in WFPS, water table level (WT) and net nitrification for N2O; WT, air temperature and net nitrification for CH4. Site-scale N2O emissions remained steady over years, whereas CH4 emissions rose exponentially with increased precipitation. While the minor impact of degradation on palm swamp peatland N2O and CH4 fluxes should be tested elsewhere, the evidenced large and variable CH4 emissions and significant N2O emissions call for improved modeling of GHG dynamics in tropical peatlands to test their response to climate changes.

    Antimethanogenic effects of nitrate supplementation in cattle : A meta-analysis
    Feng, X.Y. ; Dijkstra, J. ; Bannink, A. ; Gastelen, S. van; France, J. ; Kebreab, E. - \ 2020
    Journal of Dairy Science (2020). - ISSN 0022-0302
    beef - dairy - meta-analysis - methane - nitrate
    Supplementing a diet with nitrate is regarded as an effective and promising methane (CH4) mitigation strategy by competing with methanogens for available hydrogen through its reduction of ammonia in the rumen. Studies have shown major reductions in CH4 emissions with nitrate supplementation, but with large variation in response. The objective of this study was to quantitatively investigate the effect of dietary nitrate on enteric CH4 production and yield and evaluate the variables with high potential to explain the heterogeneity of between-study variability using meta-analytical models. A data set containing 56 treatments from 24 studies was developed to conduct a meta-analysis. Dry matter (DM) intake, nitrate dose (g/kg of DM), animal body weight, roughage proportion of diet, dietary crude protein and neutral detergent fiber content, CH4 measurement technique, and type of cattle (beef or dairy) were considered as explanatory variables. Average DM intake and CH4 production for dairy cows (16.2 ± 2.93 kg/d; 311 ± 58.8 g/d) were much higher than for beef cattle (8.1 ± 1.57 kg/d; 146 ± 50.9 g/d). Therefore, a relative mean difference was calculated and used to conduct random-effect and mixed-effect model analysis to eliminate the large variations between types of animal due to intake. The final mixed-effect model for CH4 production (g of CH4/d) had 3 explanatory variables and included nitrate dose, type of cattle, and DM intake. The final mixed-effect model for CH4 yield (g of CH4/kg of DM intake) had 2 explanatory variables and included nitrate dose and type of cattle. Nitrate effect sizes on CH4 production (dairy: −20.4 ± 1.89%; beef: −10.1 ± 1.52%) and yield (dairy: −15.5 ± 1.15%; beef: −8.95 ± 1.764%) were significantly different between the 2 types of cattle. When data from slow-release nitrate sources were removed from the analysis, there was no significant difference in type of cattle anymore for CH4 production and yield. Nitrate dose enhanced the mitigating effect of nitrate on CH4 production and yield by 0.911 ± 0.1407% and 0.728 ± 0.2034%, respectively, for every 1 g/kg of DM increase from its mean dietary inclusion (16.7 g/kg of DM). An increase of 1 kg of DM/d in DM intake from its mean dietary intake (11.1 kg of DM/d) decreased the effect of nitrate on CH4 production by 0.691 ± 0.2944%. Overall, this meta-analysis demonstrated that nitrate supplementation reduces CH4 production and yield in a dose-dependent manner, and that elevated DM intake decreases the effect of nitrate supplementation on CH4 production. Furthermore, the stronger antimethanogenic effect on CH4 production and yield in dairy cows than in beef steers could be related to use of slow-release nitrate in beef cattle.
    Can greenhouse gases in breath be used to genetically improve feed efficiency of dairy cows?
    Difford, G.F. ; Løvendahl, P. ; Veerkamp, R.F. ; Bovenhuis, H. ; Visker, M.H.P.W. ; Lassen, J. ; Haas, Y. de - \ 2020
    Journal of Dairy Science 103 (2020)3. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. 2442 - 2459.
    breath gas measurement - carbon dioxide - feed efficiency - methane - residual feed intake

    There is considerable interest in improving feed utilization of dairy cattle while limiting losses to the environment (i.e., greenhouse gases, GHG). To breed for feed-efficient or climate-friendly cattle, it is first necessary to obtain accurate estimates of genetic parameters and correlations of feed intake, greenhouse gases, and production traits. Reducing dry matter take (DMI) requirements while maintaining production has high economic value to farmers, but DMI is costly to record and thus limited to small research or nucleus herds. Conversely, enteric methane (CH4) currently has no economic value, is also costly to record, and is limited to small experimental trials. However, breath gas concentrations of methane (CH4c) and carbon dioxide (CO2c) are relatively cheap to measure at high throughput under commercial conditions by installing sniffers in automated milking stations. The objective of this study was to assess the genetic correlations between DMI, body weight (BW), fat- and protein-corrected milk yield (FPCM), and GHG-related traits: CH4c and CO2c from Denmark (DNK) and the Netherlands (NLD). A second objective was to assess the genetic potential for improving feed efficiency and the added benefits of using CH4c and CO2c as indicators. Feed intake data were available on 703 primiparous cows in DNK and 524 in NLD; CH4c and CO2c records were available on 434 primiparous cows in DNK and 656 in NLD. The GHG-related traits were heritable (e.g., CH4c h2: DNK = 0.26, NLD = 0.15) but were differentially genetically correlated with DMI and feed efficiency in both magnitude and sign, depending on the population and the definition of feed efficiency. Across feed efficiency traits and DMI, having bulls with 100 daughters with FPCM, BW, and GHG traits resulted in sufficiently high accuracy to almost negate the need for DMI records. Despite differences in genetic correlation structure, the relatively cheap GHG-related traits showed considerable potential for improving the accuracy of breeding values of highly valuable feed intake and feed efficiency traits.

    Isolipidic replacement of krabok oil by whole krabok seed reduces in vitro methanogenesis, but negatively affects fermentation
    Panyakaew, Paiwan ; Schonewille, J.T. ; Cone, John W. ; Pellikaan, Wilbert F. ; Fievez, Veerle ; Yuangklang, Chalermpon ; Hendriks, Wouter H. - \ 2020
    Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition 104 (2020)2. - ISSN 0931-2439 - p. 453 - 461.
    in vitro - Krabok oil - krabok seed - medium-chain fatty acids - methane

    The background of the current in vitro study involves the issue of methane (CH4) production inherent to rumen fermentation. One of the dietary strategies to reduce enteric CH4 production by ruminants involves the supplementation of medium-chain fatty acids in diets. As such, oils containing high amounts of MCFA, such as coconut, palm kernel and krabok oil, are of much interest to formulate energy efficient and environmentally friendly rations for ruminants. Krabok oil (KO) reduces methanogenesis, but the appropriate inclusion level of dietary KO is unclear. We therefore investigated the dose–response relationship between krabok oil and CH4 production. In practice, the use of whole krabok seed (WKS), instead of KO, is easier, but the efficacy of WKS to inhibit methanogenesis was hitherto unknown. Thus, we also investigated whether WKS provides an alternative tool to inhibit CH4 production. The experimental substrates contained either KO, WKS, the residue of WKS after fat extraction residue (FER) or FER + KO. Appropriate amounts of WKS or its derivatives were added to a basal substrate so as to attain either a low, medium or high content of KO, that is, 37–46, 90–94 and 146–153 g/kg dry matter respectively. The experimental substrates were formulated to keep the amounts of incubated fat-free OM, crude protein, neutral detergent fibre and acid detergent fibre constant in order to avoid biased results through potential differences in fermentability between WKS and its derivatives, and the basal substrate. The latter resembled the ingredient composition of a total mixed ration commonly used in Thai dairy cows. Fully automated gas production (GP) equipment was used to measure gas- and CH4 production. Irrespective of the type of substrate (p ≥.115), both the absolute (ml/g fat-free OM) and relative (% of total GP) CH4 production was reduced at the highest inclusion level of WKS or its derivatives (p ≤.019). Total GP (ml/g fat-free OM), however, was reduced after incubation of FER, FER + KO, and WKS, but not KO, at the highest inclusion level of the respective substrates (p =.019). Volatile fatty acids were likewise affected (p ≤.001). Krabok oil can inhibit CH4 production but only when the dietary KO content is at least 9.4% (DM). Supplementation of KO in the form of WKS, however, is considered not opportune because the fat extracted residue of WKS is poorly degraded during fermentation.

    Soil greenhouse gas emissions from inorganic fertilizers and recycled oil palm waste products from Indonesian oil palm plantations
    Rahman, Niharika ; Bruun, Thilde Bech ; Giller, Ken E. ; Magid, Jakob ; Ven, Gerrie W.J. van de; Neergaard, Andreas de - \ 2019
    Global change biology Bioenergy 11 (2019)9. - ISSN 1757-1693 - p. 1056 - 1074.
    methane - nitrogen fertilizer - nitrous oxide - nutrient management - organic amendment - plant residue

    A continuous rise in the global demand for palm oil has resulted in the large-scale expansion of oil palm plantations and generated environmental controversy. Efforts to increase the sustainability of oil palm cultivation include the recycling of oil mill and pruning residues in the field, but this may increase soil methane (CH4) emissions. This study reports the results of yearlong field-based measurements of soil nitrous oxide (N2O) and CH4 emissions from commercial plantations in North Sumatra, Indonesia. One experiment investigated the effects of soil-water saturation on N2O and CH4 emissions from inorganic fertilizers and organic amendments by simulating 25 mm rainfall per day for 21 days. Three additional experiments focused on emissions from (a) inorganic fertilizer (urea), (b) combination of enriched mulch with urea and (c) organic amendments (empty fruit bunches, enriched mulch and pruned oil palm fronds) applied in different doses and spatial layouts (placed in inter-row zones, piles, patches or bands) for a full year. The higher dose of urea led to a significantly higher N2O emissions with the emission factors ranging from 2.4% to 2.7% in the long-term experiment, which is considerably higher than the IPCC standard of 1%. Organic amendments were a significant source of both N2O and CH4emissions, but N2O emissions from organic amendments were 66%–86% lower than those from inorganic fertilizers. Organic amendments applied in piles emitted 63% and 71% more N2O and CH4, respectively, than when spread out. With twice the dose of organic amendments, cumulative emissions were up to three times greater. The (simulated) rainwater experiment showed that the increase in precipitation led to a significant increase in N2O emissions significantly, suggesting that the time of fertilization is a critical management option for reducing emissions. The results from this study could therefore help guide residue and nutrient management practices to reduce emissions while ensuring better nutrient recycling for sustainable oil palm production systems.

    Are dietary strategies to mitigate enteric methane emission equally effective across dairy cattle, beef cattle, and sheep?
    Gastelen, Sanne van; Dijkstra, Jan ; Bannink, André - \ 2019
    Journal of Dairy Science 102 (2019)7. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. 6109 - 6130.
    dietary strategy - in vivo measurement - methane - ruminant

    The digestive physiology of ruminants is sufficiently different (e.g., with respect to mean retention time of digesta, digestibility of the feed offered, digestion, and fermentation characteristics)that caution is needed before extrapolating results from one type of ruminant to another. The objectives of the present study were (1)to provide an overview of some essential differences in rumen physiology between dairy cattle, beef cattle, and sheep that are related to methane (CH 4 )emission; and (2)to evaluate whether dietary strategies to mitigate CH 4 emission with various modes of action are equally effective in dairy cattle, beef cattle, and sheep. A literature search was performed using Web of Science and Scopus, and 94 studies were selected from the literature. Per study, the effect size of the dietary strategies was expressed as a proportion (%)of the control level of CH 4 emission, as this enabled a comparison across ruminant types. Evaluation of the literature indicated that the effectiveness of forage-related CH 4 mitigation strategies, including feeding more highly digestible grass (herbage or silage)or replacing different forage types with corn silage, differs across ruminant types. These strategies are most effective for dairy cattle, are effective for beef cattle to a certain extent, but seem to have minor or no effects in sheep. In general, the effectiveness of other dietary mitigation strategies, including increased concentrate feeding and feed additives (e.g., nitrate), appeared to be similar for dairy cattle, beef cattle, and sheep. We concluded that if the mode of action of a dietary CH 4 mitigation strategy is related to ruminant-specific factors, such as feed intake or rumen physiology, the effectiveness of the strategy differs across ruminant types, whereas if the mode of action is associated with methanogenesis-related fermentation pathways, the strategy is effective across ruminant types. Hence, caution is needed when translating effectiveness of dietary CH 4 mitigation strategies across different ruminant types or production systems.

    Enteric methane emission from Jersey cows during the spring transition from indoor feeding to grazing
    Szalanski, Marcin ; Kristensen, Troels ; Difford, Gareth ; Lassen, Jan ; Buitenhuis, Albert J. ; Pszczola, Marcin ; Løvendahl, Peter - \ 2019
    Journal of Dairy Science 102 (2019)7. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. 6319 - 6329.
    dairy - genotype by environment interaction - grazing - Jersey - methane

    Organic dairy cows in Denmark are often kept indoors during the winter and outside at least part time in the summer. Consequently, their diet changes by the season. We hypothesized that grazing might affect enteric CH 4 emissions due to changes in the nutrition, maintenance, and activity of the cows, and they might differentially respond to these factors. This study assessed the repeatability of enteric CH 4 emission measurements for Jersey cattle in a commercial organic dairy herd in Denmark. It also evaluated the effects of a gradual transition from indoor winter feeding to outdoor spring grazing. Further, it assessed the individual-level correlations between measurements during the consecutive feeding periods (phenotype × environment, P × E) as neither pedigrees nor genotypes were available to estimate a genotype by environment effect. Ninety-six mixed-parity lactating Jersey cows were monitored for 30 d before grazing and for 24 d while grazing. The cows spent 8 to 11 h grazing each day and had free access to an in-barn automatic milking system (AMS). For each visit to the AMS, milk yield was recorded and logged along with date and time. Monitoring equipment installed in the AMS feed bins continuously measured enteric CH 4 and CO 2 concentrations (ppm) using a noninvasive “sniffer” method. Raw enteric CH 4 and CO 2 concentrations and their ratio (CH 4 :CO 2 ) were derived from average concentrations measured during milking and per day for each cow. We used mixed models equations to estimate variance components and adjust for the fixed and random effects influencing the analyzed gas concentrations. Univariate models were used to precorrect the gas measurements for diurnal variation and to estimate the direct effect of grazing on the analyzed concentrations. A bivariate model was used to assess the correlation between the 2 periods (in-barn vs. grazing) for each gas concentration. Grazing had a weak P × E interaction for daily average CH 4 and CO 2 gas concentrations. Bivariate repeatability estimates for average CH 4 and CO 2 concentrations and CH 4 :CO 2 were 0.77 to 0.78, 0.73 to 0.80, and 0.26, respectively. Repeatability for CH 4 :CO 2 was low (0.26) but indicated some between-animal variation. In conclusion, grazing does not create significant shifts compared with indoor feeding in how animals rank for average CH 4 and CO 2 concentrations and CH 4 :CO 2 . We found no evidence that separate evaluation is needed to quantify enteric CH 4 and CO 2 emissions from Jersey cows during in-barn and grazing periods.

    Influence of Atmospheric Transport on Estimates of Variability in the Global Methane Burden
    Pandey, Sudhanshu ; Houweling, Sander ; Krol, Maarten ; Aben, Ilse ; Nechita-Banda, Narcisa ; Thoning, Kirk ; Röckmann, Thomas ; Yin, Yi ; Segers, Arjo ; Dlugokencky, Edward J. - \ 2019
    Geophysical Research Letters 46 (2019)4. - ISSN 0094-8276 - p. 2302 - 2311.
    atmospheric burden - atmospheric transport - CH emissions - interhemispheric difference - methane - TM5

    We quantify the impact of atmospheric transport and limited marine boundary layer sampling on changes in global and regional methane burdens estimate using tracer transport model simulations with annually repeating methane emissions and sinks but varying atmospheric transport patterns. We find the 1σ error due to this transport and sampling effect on annual global methane increases to be 1.11 ppb/year and on zonal growth rates to be 3.8 ppb/year, indicating that it becomes more critical at smaller spatiotemporal scales. We also find that the trends in inter-hemispheric and inter-polar difference of methane are significantly influenced by the effect. Contrary to a negligible trend in the inter-hemispheric difference of measurements, we find, after adjusting for the transport and sampling, a trend of 0.37 ± 0.06 ppb/year. This is consistent with the emission trend from a 3-D inversion of the measurements, suggesting a faster increase in emissions in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere.

    Methaan? De brand erin
    Melse, R.W. ; Groenestein, C.M. - \ 2019
    biobased economy - methane - oxidation - manures - livestock farming
    Bij de opslag van mest in de melkveehouderij komt methaan vrij.
    Per liter melk verdwijnt op dit moment ongeveer 13 gram van dit sterke
    broeikasgas de lucht in. Op de boerderij van Peter van Roessel loopt een
    opmerkelijke proef om die emissie terug te dringen.
    Is rumination time an indicator of methane production in dairy cows?
    Zetouni, L. ; Difford, G.F. ; Lassen, J. ; Byskov, M.V. ; Norberg, E. ; Løvendahl, P. - \ 2018
    Journal of Dairy Science 101 (2018)12. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. 11074 - 11085.
    dairy cow - dry matter intake - methane - rumination time

    As long as large-scale recording of expensive-to-measure and labor-consuming traits, such as dry matter intake (DMI) and CH4 production (CH4P), continues to be challenging in practical conditions, alternative traits that are already routinely recorded in dairy herds should be investigated. An ideal indicator trait must, in addition to expressing genetic variation, have a strong correlation with the trait of interest. Our aim was to estimate individual level and phenotypic correlations between rumination time (RT), CH4P, and DMI to determine if RT could be used as an indicator trait for CH4P and DMI. Data from 343 Danish Holstein cows were collected at the Danish Cattle Research Centre for a period of approximately 3 yr. The data set consisted of 14,890 records for DMI, 15,835 for RT, and 6,693 for CH4P. Data were divided in primiparous cows only (PC) and all cows (MC), and then divided in lactation stage (early, mid, late, and whole lactation) to analyze the changes over lactation. Linear mixed models, including an animal effect but no pedigree, were used to estimate the correlations among traits. Phenotypic and individual level correlations between RT and both CH4P and DMI were close to zero, regardless of lactation stage and data set (PC or MC). However, CH4P and DMI were highly correlated, both across lactation stages and data sets. In conclusion, RT is unsuitable to be used as an indicator trait for either CH4P or DMI. Our study failed to validate RT as a useful indicator trait for both CH4P and DMI, but more studies with novel phenotypes can offer different approaches to select and incorporate important yet difficult to record traits into breeding goals and selection indexes.

    Short communication: Antimethanogenic effects of 3-nitrooxypropanol depend on supplementation dose, dietary fiber content, and cattle type
    Dijkstra, J. ; Bannink, A. ; France, J. ; Kebreab, E. ; Gastelen, S. van - \ 2018
    Journal of Dairy Science 101 (2018)10. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. 9041 - 9047.
    3-nitrooxypropanol - cattle - methane

    3-Nitrooxypropanol (NOP) is a promising methane (CH4) inhibitor. Recent studies have shown major reductions in CH4 emissions from beef and dairy cattle when using NOP but with large variation in response. The objective of this study was to quantitatively evaluate the factors that explain heterogeneity in response to NOP using meta-analytical approaches. Data from 11 experiments and 38 treatment means were used. Factors considered were cattle type (dairy or beef), measurement technique (GreenFeed technique, C-Lock Inc., Rapid City, SD; sulfur hexafluoride tracer technique; and respiration chamber technique), dry matter (DM) intake, body weight, NOP dose, roughage proportion, dietary crude protein content, and dietary neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content. The mean difference (MD) in CH4 production (g/d) and CH4 yield (g/kg of DM intake) was calculated by subtracting the mean of CH4 emission for the control group from that of the NOP-supplemented group. Forest plots of standardized MD indicated variable effect sizes of NOP across studies. Compared with beef cattle, dairy cattle had a much larger feed intake (22.3 ± 4.13 vs. 7.3 ± 0.97 kg of DM/d; mean ± standard deviation) and CH4 production (351 ± 94.1 vs. 124 ± 44.8 g/d). Therefore, in further analyses across dairy and beef cattle studies, MD was expressed as a proportion (%) of observed control mean. The final mixed-effect model for relative MD in CH4 production included cattle type, NOP dose, and NDF content. When adjusted for NOP dose and NDF content, the CH4-mitigating effect of NOP was less in beef cattle (−22.2 ± 3.33%) than in dairy cattle (−39.0 ± 5.40%). An increase of 10 mg/kg of DM in NOP dose from its mean (123 mg/kg of DM) enhanced the NOP effect on CH4 production decline by 2.56 ± 0.550%. However, a greater dietary NDF content impaired the NOP effect on CH4 production by 1.64 ± 0.330% per 10 g/kg DM increase in NDF content from its mean (331 g of NDF/kg of DM). The factors included in the final mixed-effect model for CH4 yield were −17.1 ± 4.23% (beef cattle) and −38.8 ± 5.49% (dairy cattle), −2.48 ± 0.734% per 10 mg/kg DM increase in NOP dose from its mean, and 1.52 ± 0.406% per 10 g/kg DM increase in NDF content from its mean. In conclusion, the present meta-analysis indicates that a greater NOP dose enhances the NOP effect on CH4 emission, whereas an increased dietary fiber content decreases its effect. 3-Nitrooxypropanol has stronger antimethanogenic effects in dairy cattle than in beef cattle.

    In vitro methane and gas production with inocula from cows and goats fed an identical diet
    Mengistu, Genet ; Hendriks, Wouter H. ; Pellikaan, Wilbert F. - \ 2018
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 98 (2018)4. - ISSN 0022-5142 - p. 1332 - 1338.
    browse species - cow - gas production - goat - inocula - methane
    BACKGROUND: Fermentative capacity among ruminants can differ depending on the type of ruminant species and the substrate fermented. The aim was to compare in vitro cow and goat rumen inocula in terms of methane (CH4) and gas production (GP), fermentation kinetics and 72 h volatile fatty acids (VFA) production using the browse species Acacia etbaica, Capparis tomentosa, Dichrostachys cinerea, Rhus natalensis, freeze-dried maize silage and grass silage, and a concentrate as substrates. RESULTS: Total GP, CH4 and VFA were higher (P ≤ 0.008) in goat inoculum than cows across substrates. The half-time for asymptotic GP was lower (P < 0.0001) in phase 1 and higher (P < 0.012) in phase 2, and the maximum rate of GP was higher (P < 0.0001) in phase 1 and phase 3 (P < 0.0001) in goats compared to cows. Methane production and as a percentage of total GP was higher (P < 0.0001) and the half-time tended (P = 0.059) to be at a later time for goats compared to cows. CONCLUSION: Goat inoculum showed higher fermentative activity with a concomitant higher CH4 production compared to cows. This difference highlights the ability of goats to better utilise browse species and other roughage types.
    In vitro gas and methane production of silages from whole-plant corn harvested at 4 different stages of maturity and a comparison with in vivo methane production
    Macome, Felicidade ; Pellikaan, W.F. ; Hendriks, W.H. ; Dijkstra, J. ; Hatew, Bayissa ; Schonewille, J.T. ; Cone, J.W. - \ 2017
    Journal of Dairy Science 100 (2017)11. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. 8895 - 8905.
    methane - corn silages - Maturity - in vitro - In vivo
    The current study investigated the relationship between in vitro and in vivo CH4 production by cows fed corn silage (CS)-based rations. In vivo CH4 production was measured in climate respiration chambers using 8 rumen-cannulated Holstein-Friesian cows. In vitro CH4 production was measured using rumen fluid from the 8 cows that were fully adapted to their respective experimental rations. The animals were grouped in 2 blocks, and randomly assigned to 1 of the 4 total mixed rations (TMR) that consisted of 75% experimental CS, 20% concentrate, and 5% wheat straw [dry matter (DM) basis]. The experimental CS were prepared from whole-plant corn that was harvested at either a very early (25% DM), early (28% DM), medium (32% DM), or late (40% DM) stage of maturity. The 4 experimental TMR and the corresponding CS served as substrate in 2 separate in vitro runs (each run representing 1 block of 4 animals) using rumen fluid from cows fed the TMR in question. No relationship was found between in vivo CH4 production and in vitro CH4 production measured at various time points between 2 and 48 h. None of the in vitro gas production (GP) and CH4 production parameters was influenced by an interaction between substrate and origin of rumen fluid. In vitro measured 48-h GP was not affected by the maturity of whole-plant corn, irrespective whether CS alone or as part of TMR was incubated in adapted rumen inoculum. Incubation of the experimental TMR did not affect the kinetics parameters associated with gas or CH4 production, but when CS alone was incubated the asymptote of GP of the soluble fraction was slightly decreased with increasing maturity of CS at harvest. In vitro CH4 production expressed as a percent of total gas was not affected by the maturity of whole-plant corn at harvest. Several in vitro parameters were significantly affected (GP) or tended to be affected (CH4) by diet fed to donor cows. It was concluded that the current in vitro technique is not suitable to predict in vivo CH4 production from CS-based rations.
    Reductie van ammoniak- en methaanemissie via het voerspoor : onderzoek naar de wisselwerking tussen de excretie van Totaal Ammoniakaal Stikstof (TAN) en de emissie van enterisch methaan (CH4) op de Koeien&Kansen praktijkbedrijven in de periode 2010-2013
    Spek, J.W. ; Klop, A. ; Šebek, L.B. - \ 2017
    Wageningen : Wageningen UR Livestock Research (Rapport / Koeien en kansen nr. 79) - 19
    ammoniakemissie - methaan - emissiereductie - rundveevoeding - ammonia emission - methane - emission reduction - cattle feeding
    Assessing methane emission from dairy cows : modeling and experimental approaches on rumen microbial metabolism
    Lingen, Henk J. - \ 2017
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): W.H. Hendriks, co-promotor(en): J. Dijkstra; A. Bannink; C.M. Plugge. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463431590 - 207
    dairy cows - methane - emission - microbial degradation - rumen metabolism - rumen fermentation - models - fatty acids - biochemical pathways - animal nutrition - nutrition physiology - melkkoeien - methaan - emissie - microbiële afbraak - pensmetabolisme - pensfermentatie - modellen - vetzuren - biochemische omzettingen - diervoeding - voedingsfysiologie

    Methane (CH4) is a greenhouse gas (GHG) with a global warming potential of 28 CO2 equivalents. The livestock sector was estimated to emit 7.1 gigatonnes of CO2 equivalents, which is approximately 14.5% of total global anthropogenic GHG emissions. Enteric CH4 production is the main source of GHG emissions from dairy cattle, representing 46% of the global GHG emissions in dairy supply chains. Dairy production has great value in view of the ability of ruminants to effectively turn human inedible biomass into human edible food and to produce food from non-arable land. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop strategies to decrease dairy cattle enteric CH4 emission. Evaluation of these strategies requires meticulous quantification and increased understanding of anaerobic fermentation and methanogenesis in the rumen ecosystem. The overall aim of this PhD research was, therefore, to quantitatively evaluate enteric CH4 emission from dairy cows as affected by feeding and rumen microbial metabolism.

    A meta-analysis was performed to quantify relationships between enteric CH4 yield (per unit of feed and unit of milk) and milk FA profile in dairy cattle and to develop equations to predict CH4 yield based on milk FA profile of cows fed a wide variety of diets. Various milk FA concentrations were significantly or tended to be positively or negatively related to CH4 yield per unit of feed or milk. Mixed model multiple regression resulted in various milk FA included in optimal equations to predict CH4 yield per unit of feed and per unit of milk. These regression equations indicated a moderate potential for using milk FA profile to predict CH4 yield.

    For the development of a mechanistic model of CH4 production in the rumen, the thermodynamic control of pH2 on reaction rates of specific fermentation pathways, NADH oxidation and methanogenesis was theoretically explored. This control was determined using the thermodynamic potential factor (FT), which is a dimensionless factor that corrects a predicted kinetic reaction rate for the thermodynamic control exerted. The thermodynamic feasibility of these microbial conversions showed that the control of pH2 on individual VFA produced and associated yield of H2 and CH4 cannot be explained without considering NADH oxidation, with a considerable effect of pH.

    For obtaining experimental support of the conclusions drawn from the theoretical exploration, diurnal patterns of gaseous and dissolved metabolite concentrations in the bovine rumen, H2 and CH4 emitted, and the rumen microbiota were monitored. In addition, the effect of dietary inclusion of linseed oil on these patterns was assessed. An in vivo experiment with rumen cannulated dairy cows was performed to study the anaerobic metabolism and the microbiota composition in the rumen. A 100-fold increase in pH2 in the rumen headspace was observed at 0.5 h after feeding, followed by a decline. Qualitatively similar patterns after feeding were observed for H2 and CH4 emission, ethanol and lactate concentrations, and propionate molar proportion, whereas an opposite pattern was seen for acetate molar proportion. Associated with these patterns, a temporal biphasic change in the microbial composition was observed as based on 16S ribosomal RNA with certain taxa specifically associated with each phase. Bacterial concentrations were affected by time and increased by linseed oil supplementation. Archaeal concentrations tended to be affected by time and were not affected by diet, despite linseed oil supplementation tending to decrease the partial pressure and emission of CH4 and tending to increase propionate molar proportion. The various diurnal profiles that were monitored support the key role of the NAD+ to NADH ratio in rumen fermentation and the importance of diurnal dynamics when understanding VFA, H2 and CH4 production.

    A dynamic mechanistic model was developed, in which the thermodynamic control of pH2 on VFA fermentation pathways, and methanogenesis in the bovine rumen are incorporated. The model represents substrate degradation, microbial fermentation and methanogenesis in the rumen, with the type of VFA formed to be controlled by the NAD+ to NADH ratio, which in turn is controlled by pH2. Feed composition and feed intake rate representing a twice daily feeding regime were used as model input. The model predicted a marked peak in pH2 after feeding that rapidly declined in time. This peak in pH2 caused a decrease in NAD+ to NADH ratio followed by an increased propionate molar proportion at the expense of acetate molar proportion. In response to feeding, the model predicted a sudden increase and a steady decrease in CH4 production in time. The pattern of CH4 emission rate followed the patterns of pH2 and H2 emission rate, but its magnitude of increase in response to feeding was less pronounced. A global sensitivity analysis indicated the parameter that determines the NADH oxidation rate to explain the most substantial part of the variation of predicted daily CH4 emission. The modeling effort provides the integration of more detailed knowledge than accomplished in previous rumen fermentation models and enables assessment of diurnal dynamics of rumen metabolic pathways yielding VFA, H2 and CH4.

    For assessing the general value of the research reported in this thesis, the potential for predicting enteric CH4 emission from dairy cattle based on milk FA profile was discussed in the light of published studies and compared with empirical modeling of enteric CH4 based on feed input. Moreover, the concept of NAD-controlled fermentation was considered in a more general perspective by comparing the rumen ecosystem with bioreactor systems. Furthermore, the feasibility of the developed models as an alternative for IPCC tiered approaches was explored. In conclusion, the research reported in this thesis contributes to an increased understanding of rumen fermentation and microbial metabolism, and has provides a basis to further improve prediction models of enteric CH4 emissions from dairy cattle.

    Browse species from Ethiopia: role in methane reduction and nematode control in goats
    Mengistu, Genet F. - \ 2017
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Wouter Hendriks, co-promotor(en): Wilbert Pellikaan. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789462579767 - 130
    goats - browsing - nematode control - methane - anthelmintic properties - browse plants - ethiopia - geiten - afgrazen - nematodenbestrijding - methaan - wormdrijvende eigenschappen - graasplanten - ethiopië

    The aim of the research reported in this thesis was to evaluate browse species collected from Ethiopia for preference by goats, and for their in vitro anthelmintic and methane (CH4) reduction properties. During the conduct of the studies observations were made warranting a further aim, to compare in vitro fermentation patterns of browse species using inocula from goats and cows kept on identical dietary regime.

    The preference of browse species using dry matter intake (DMI) as a proxy and in combination with polyethylene glycol (PEG), relationships between browse species intake and chemical composition were determined in Chapter 2. Air-dried leaves of Acacia etbaica, Cadaba farinosa, Capparis tomentosa, Dichrostachys cinerea, Dodonaea angustifolia, Euclea racemosa, Maerua angolensis, Maytenus senegalensis, Rhus natalensis and Senna singueana were used. Two cafeteria trials, each lasting 10 days were conducted using goats receiving a daily ration of grass hay and wheat bran, without (trial 1) or with (trial 2) the inclusion of PEG. Preference measured as the first 10 min browse DMI differed significantly among browse species and with PEG (P<0.0001). Browse with higher tannin content, D. cinerea, R. natalensis and A. etbaica were the most preferred species regardless of PEG presence. Preference appeared to be based on digestible fibre fraction, hemicellulose rather than tannin levels in the browse species.

    Extracts of the 10 browse species were evaluated for their anthelmintic activity against Haemonchus contortus (Chapter 3). The larval exsheathment inhibition assay (LEIA) was applied using H. contortus third stage larvae (L3) in a dose dependent manner with extract concentrations of 0, 150, 300, 600, 1200 µg/ml phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The role of polyphenols in the inhibition against L3 was evaluated using polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPP). All browse extracts significantly (P<0.0001) inhibited larval exsheathment in a dose dependent manner with the dose required to inhibit 50% of the L3 (EC50) being highest in C. farinosa and lowest in E. racemosa and M. senegalensis. Polyvinylpolypyrrolidone treated A. etbaica, C. tomentosa, M. angolensis, R. natalensis and D. cinerea were different (P<0.001) from the control (only PBS), indicating that larval inhibition was largely due to non-phenolic compounds. Absence of significant differences between PVPP treated E. racemosa, M. senegalensis, D. angustifolia and S. singueana, and control suggest that inhibition was mostly attributable to tannins and other polyphenols. Browse species anthelmintic property against H. contortus L3 was due to the presence of phenolic and non-phenolic compounds.

    In vitro gas production (GP), CH4, volatile fatty acids (VFA) and in vitro organic matter digestibility (IVOMD) of the 10 browse species were determined using PEG 6000 in Chapter 4. Proanthocyanidins (PA) were quantified using a modified HCl-butanol method and PA composition was determined by UPLC-DAD, with detection of other polyphenols by UPLC-ESI-MS/MS. Substrates were inoculated in buffered goat rumen fluid with or without PEG 6000 for 72 h to measure GP with head space gas sample measurements taken at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, 30, 48, 54, and 72 h for CH4. At the end of incubation, VFA, ammonia (NH3) and IVOMD were determined. Increased (P<0.0001) GP, CH4 and total VFA were observed after PEG addition indicating PA were mainly involved in reducing methanogenesis and to a lower extent also overall fermentability. Prodelphinidins were the major explaining factors for this reduction but other polyphenols like quercetin, myricetin and kaempferol were also involved in CH4 reduction. The effect of PEG addition on IVOMD was variable among browse and could be due to artefacts from the tannin-PEG complexes in the incubation residue. Proanthocyanidins were mainly responsible for the reduced in vitro fermentative activities with possible minor effects of other phenolic and non-phenolic components.

    Due to unusual fermentation patterns observed in Chapter 4, a comparison was made between goat and cow inocula on in vitro gas and CH4 production and kinetics parameters as well as VFA production in Chapter 5. Leaves of A. etbaica, C. tomentosa, D. cinerea, R. natalensis, freeze-dried maize and grass silage, and a concentrate were inoculated for 72 h to measure GP, in buffered inocula from goats and cows kept on an identical feeding regime. During incubation, headspace gas samples were obtained at 0, 3, 6, 9, 24, 30, 48, 54, and 72 h, and analysed for CH4 with VFA determined at the end of incubation. A triphasic and monophasic modified Michaelis-Menten equation was fitted to the cumulative GP and CH4 curves, respectively. Total GP and CH4 (P<0.0001), half-time for asymptotic (P<0.012) and rate (P<0.0001) of GP were higher for goat inoculum. The total VFA were higher (P<0.0001) in goats and the proportion of individual VFA differed significantly (P<0.002) between animal species. Differences between goat and cow inocula were attributable to variation in the activity and composition of the microbial population, and differences were more pronounced for fermentation of browse species than grass and maize silages.

    A synthesis of the results from the four research chapters is provided in the general discussion (Chapter 6). The present work highlights the browse species characteristics which can be strategically exploited in goat production systems to improve health and feed utilization efficiency.

    Changes in in vitro gas and methane production from rumen fluid from dairy cows during adaptation to feed additives in vivo
    Klop, G. ; Laar-van Schuppen, S. van; Pellikaan, W.F. ; Hendriks, W.H. ; Bannink, A. ; Dijkstra, Jan - \ 2017
    Animal 11 (2017)4. - ISSN 1751-7311 - p. 591 - 599.
    adaptation - dairy cows - essential oils - lauric acid - methane
    The adaptation of dairy cows to methane (CH4)-mitigating feed additives was evaluated using the in vitro gas production (GP) technique. Nine rumen-fistulated lactating Holstein cows were grouped into three blocks and within blocks randomly assigned to one of three experimental diets: Control (CON; no feed additive), Agolin Ruminant® (AR; 0.05 g/kg dry matter (DM)) or lauric acid (LA; 30 g/kg DM). Total mixed rations composed of maize silage, grass silage and concentrate were fed in a 40 : 30 : 30 ratio on DM basis. Rumen fluid was collected from each cow at days −4, 1, 4, 8, 15 and 22 relative to the introduction of the additives in the diets. On each of these days, a 48-h GP experiment was performed in which rumen fluid from each individual donor cow was incubated with each of the three substrates that reflected the treatment diets offered to the cows. DM intake was on average 19.8, 20.1 and 16.2 kg/day with an average fat- and protein-corrected milk production of 30.7, 31.7 and 26.2 kg/day with diet CON, AR and LA, respectively. In general, feed additives in the donor cow diet had a larger effect on gas and CH4 production than the same additives in the incubation substrate. Incubation substrate affected asymptotic GP, half-time of asymptotic CH4 production, total volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration, molar proportions of propionate and butyrate and degradation of organic matter (OMD), but did not affect CH4 production. No substrate×day interactions were observed. A significant diet×day interaction was observed for in vitro gas and CH4 production, total VFA concentration, molar proportions of VFA and OMD. From day 4 onwards, the LA diet persistently reduced gas and CH4 production, total VFA concentration, acetate molar proportion and OMD, and increased propionate molar proportion. In vitro CH4 production was reduced by the AR diet on day 8, but not on days 15 and 22. In line with these findings, the molar proportion of propionate in fermentation fluid was greater, and that of acetate smaller, for the AR diet than for the CON diet on day 8, but not on days 15 and 22. Overall, the data indicate a short-term effect of AR on CH4 production, whereas the CH4-mitigating effect of LA persisted.
    Assessing the case for sequential cropping to produce low ILUC risk biomethane : final report
    Peters, Daan ; Zabeti, Masoud ; Kühner, Ann-Kathri ; Spöttle, Matthias ; Werf, Wopke van der; Stomph, Jan - \ 2016
    Utrecht : ECOFYS Netherlands - 39
    methane - biofuels - sequential cropping - farmers' associations - biogas - ancillary enterprises - farm management - agricultural energy production - transport - biobased economy - fuel crops - biomass production - methaan - biobrandstoffen - estafetteteelt - boerenorganisaties - biogas - nevenactiviteiten - agrarische bedrijfsvoering - energieproductie in de landbouw - transport - biobased economy - brandstofgewassen - biomassa productie
    In recent years and especially since the COP - 21 climate agreement reached in Paris last year, efforts to mitigate climate change accelerate. All sectors need to contribute in order to achieve the well below 2 degree climate target. The agricultural sector is relevant for climate change in various ways. Like the agricultural sector, the transport sector is also responsible for significant greenhouse gas emissions. Advanced biofuels and biogas produced from wastes and residues can play an increasingly important role in the transport mix. In Italy, 600 Italian farmers are organised in the Italian Biogas Council (Consorzio Italiano Biogas e Gassificazione, CIB). Some years ago, CIB members developed a concept that they coined Biogasdoneright. In collaboration with various research institutes they seeked for a way to combine biogas feedstock production with crop production for food and feed as a way to generate additional income in a sustainable manner. The core of the Biogasdoneright concept is that farmers apply sequential cropping by growing a winter cover crop on land that was previously fallow during winter time, while maintaining the main crop production during summer time as previously. Multiple claims can be made about Biogasdoneright, for example related to the large potential role for biogas in our future energy system. This project focussed on the most relevant claims related to the use of biomethane in transport, with a focus on sustainability aspects.
    Rekenregels voor de enterische methaan-emissie op het melkveebedrijf en reductie van de methaan-emissie via mesthandling, het handelings-perspectief van het voerspoor inzichtelijk maken met de Kringloopwijzer
    S̆ebek, L.B. ; Mosquera, J. ; Bannink, A. - \ 2016
    Wageningen : Wageningen Livestock Research (Livestock Research rapport 976) - 65
    methaan - emissie - dierlijke meststoffen - emissiereductie - melkveehouderij - methane - emission - animal manures - emission reduction - dairy farming
    Methaanemissie uit mest : schatters voor biochemisch methaan potentieel (BMP) en methaanconversiefactor (MCF)
    Groenestein, C.M. ; Mosquera, J. ; Melse, R.W. - \ 2016
    Wageningen : Wageningen Livestock Research (Livestock Research rapport 961) - 28
    mest - methaan - emissie - broeikasgassen - dierhouderij - manures - methane - emission - greenhouse gases - animal husbandry
    This report presents the results of a desk study performed to determine and justify the use of new BMP and MCF values for cattle, pig and poultry manure under Dutch conditions.
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