Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Chaperones of the endoplasmic reticulum are required for Ve1-mediated resistance to Verticillium
    Liebrand, T.W.H. ; Kombrink, A. ; Zhang, Z. ; Sklenar, J. ; Jones, A.M.E. ; Robatzek, S. ; Thomma, B.P.H.J. ; Joosten, M.H.A.J. - \ 2014
    Molecular Plant Pathology 15 (2014)1. - ISSN 1464-6722 - p. 109 - 117.
    receptor-like proteins - defective brassinosteroid receptor - pattern-recognition receptors - er quality-control - plant innate immunity - cell-surface - tomato ve1 - arabidopsis - gene - perception
    The tomato receptor-like protein (RLP) Ve1 mediates resistance to the vascular fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae. To identify the proteins required for Ve1 function, we transiently expressed and immunopurified functional Ve1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) from Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, followed by mass spectrometry. This resulted in the identification of peptides originating from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident chaperones HSP70 binding proteins (BiPs) and a lectin-type calreticulin (CRT). Knock-down of the different BiPs and CRTs in tomato resulted in compromised Ve1-mediated resistance to V.dahliae in most cases, showing that these chaperones play an important role in Ve1 functionality. Recently, it has been shown that one particular CRT is required for the biogenesis of the RLP-type Cladosporium fulvum resistance protein Cf-4 of tomato, as silencing of CRT3a resulted in a reduced pool of complex glycosylated Cf-4 protein. In contrast, knock-down of the various CRTs in N.benthamiana or N.tabacum did not result in reduced accumulation of mature complex glycosylated Ve1 protein. Together, this study shows that the BiP and CRT ER chaperones differentially contribute to Cf-4- and Ve1-mediated immunity.
    Ve1-mediated resistance against Verticillium does not involve a hypersensitive response in Arabidopsis
    Zhang, Z. ; Esse, H.P. van; Damme, M. van; Fradin, E.F. ; Liu, Chun-Ming ; Thomma, B.P.H.J. - \ 2013
    Molecular Plant Pathology 14 (2013)7. - ISSN 1464-6722 - p. 719 - 727.
    ethylene-inducing xylanase - receptor-like proteins - gated ion-channel - disease resistance - rhynchosporium-secalis - functional-analysis - defense responses - gene family - tomato ve1 - cell-death
    The recognition of pathogen effectors by plant immune receptors leads to the activation of immune responses that often include a hypersensitive response (HR): rapid and localized host cell death surrounding the site of attempted pathogen ingress. We have demonstrated previously that the recognition of the Verticillium dahliae effector protein Ave1 by the tomato immune receptor Ve1 triggers an HR in tomato and tobacco. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that tomato Ve1 provides Verticillium resistance in Arabidopsis upon Ave1 recognition. In this study, we investigated whether the co-expression of Ve1 and Ave1 in Arabidopsis results in an HR, which could facilitate a forward genetics screen. Surprisingly, we found that the co-expression of Ve1 and Ave1 does not induce an HR in Arabidopsis. These results suggest that an HR may occur as a consequence of Ve1/Ave1-induced immune signalling in tomato and tobacco, but is not absolutely required for Verticillium resistance.
    Optimized agroinfiltration and virus-induced gene silencing to study Ve1-mediated Verticillium resistance in tobacco
    Zhang, Z. ; Fradin, E. ; Jonge, R. de; Esse, P. van; Smit, P. ; Liu, C.M. ; Thomma, B.P.H.J. - \ 2013
    Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions 26 (2013)2. - ISSN 0894-0282 - p. 182 - 190.
    receptor-like proteins - transient expression system - mediated plant transformation - functional-analysis - disease resistance - albo-atrum - hypersensitive response - nicotiana-benthamiana - arabidopsis-thaliana - binary vectors
    Recognition of pathogen effectors by plant immune receptors often leads to the activation of a hypersensitive response (HR), which is a rapid and localized cell death of plant tissue surrounding the site at which recognition occurs. Due to its particular amenability to transient assays for functional genetics, tobacco is a model for immune signaling in the Solanaceae plant family. Here, we show that coexpression of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) immune receptor Ve1 and the corresponding Verticillium effector protein Ave1 leads to HR only in particular tobacco species. Whereas HR is obtained in Nicotiana tabacum, no such response is obtained in N. benthamiana. Furthermore, our analysis revealed an endogenous Ve1 ortholog in Nicotiana glutinosa, as expression of Ave1 in absence of Ve1 induced a HR, and N. glutinosa was found to be resistant against race 1 Verticillium dahliae. We furthermore report the establishment of virus-induced gene silencing in N. tabacum for functional analysis of Ve1 signaling. Collectively, our data show that N. tabacum can be used as a model plant to study Ve1-mediated immune signaling.
    Interfamily Transfer of Tomato Ve1 Mediates Verticillium Resistance in Arabidopsis
    Fradin, E.F. ; Abd-El-Haliem, A. ; Masini, L. ; Berg, G.C.M. van den; Joosten, M.H.A.J. ; Thomma, B.P.H.J. - \ 2011
    Plant Physiology 156 (2011)4. - ISSN 0032-0889 - p. 2255 - 2265.
    receptor-like proteins - leucine-rich repeat - disease resistance - cladosporium-fulvum - cell-death - recognitional specificity - scab resistance - innate immunity - plant-pathogen - gene family
    Vascular wilts caused by soil-borne fungal species of the Verticillium genus are devastating plant diseases. The most common species, Verticillium dahliae and Verticillium albo-atrum, have broad host ranges and are notoriously difficult to control. Therefore, genetic resistance is the preferred method for disease control. Only from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has a Verticillium resistance locus been cloned, comprising the Ve1 gene that encodes a receptor-like protein-type cell surface receptor. Due to lack of a suitable model for receptor-like protein (RLP)-mediated resistance signaling in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), so far relatively little is known about RLP signaling in pathogen resistance. Here, we show that Ve1 remains fully functional after interfamily transfer to Arabidopsis and that Ve1-transgenic Arabidopsis is resistant to race 1 but not to race 2 strains of V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum, nor to the Brassicaceae-specific pathogen Verticillium longisporum. Furthermore, we show that signaling components utilized by Ve1 in Arabidopsis to establish Verticillium resistance overlap with those required in tomato and include SERK3/BAK1, EDS1, and NDR1, which strongly suggests that critical components for resistance signaling are conserved. We subsequently investigated the requirement of SERK family members for Ve1 resistance in Arabidopsis, revealing that SERK1 is required in addition to SERK3/BAK1. Using virus-induced gene silencing, the requirement of SERK1 for Ve1-mediated resistance was confirmed in tomato. Moreover, we show the requirement of SERK1 for resistance against the foliar fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum mediated by the RLP Cf-4. Our results demonstrate that Arabidopsis can be used as model to unravel the genetics of Ve1-mediated resistance.
    Genetic dissection of Verticillium wilt resistance mediated by tomato Ve1
    Fradin, E.F. ; Zhang, Z. ; Juarez Ayala, J.C. ; Castroverde, C.C.M. ; Nazar, R.N. ; Robb, J. ; Liu, Chun-Ming ; Thomma, B.P.H.J. - \ 2009
    Plant Physiology 150 (2009). - ISSN 0032-0889 - p. 320 - 332.
    receptor-like proteins - plant-disease resistance - leucine-rich repeats - cladosporium-fulvum - hypersensitive response - fungal pathogen - functional-analysis - scab resistance - cell-death - defense
    Vascular wilt diseases caused by soil-borne pathogens are among the most devastating plant diseases worldwide. The Verticillium genus includes vascular wilt pathogens with a wide host range. Although V. longisporum infects various hosts belonging to the Cruciferaceae, V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum cause vascular wilt diseases in over 200 dicotyledonous species, including economically important crops. A locus responsible for resistance against race 1 strains of V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum has been cloned from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) only. This locus, known as Ve, comprises two closely linked inversely oriented genes, Ve1 and Ve2, that encode cell surface receptor proteins of the extracellular leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein class of disease resistance proteins. Here, we show that Ve1, but not Ve2, provides resistance in tomato against race 1 strains of V. dahliae and V. albo-atrum and not against race 2 strains. Using virus-induced gene silencing in tomato, the signaling cascade downstream of Ve1 is shown to require both EDS1 and NDR1. In addition, NRC1, ACIF, MEK2, and SERK3/BAK1 also act as positive regulators of Ve1 in tomato. In conclusion, Ve1-mediated resistance signaling only partially overlaps with signaling mediated by Cf proteins, type members of the receptor-like protein class of resistance proteins.
    How plants recognize pathogens and defend themselves
    Wit, P.J.G.M. de - \ 2007
    Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences 64 (2007)21. - ISSN 1420-682X - p. 2726 - 2732.
    receptor-like proteins - pseudomonas-syringae - innate immunity - disease-resistance - flagellin perception - molecular-patterns - signaling pathway - effector proteins - bacterial disease - avirulence genes
    Plants have an innate immunity system to defend themselves against pathogens. With the primary immune system, plants recognize microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) of potential pathogens through pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that mediate a basal defense response. Plant pathogens suppress this basal defense response by means of effectors that enable them to cause disease. With the secondary immune system, plants have gained the ability to recognize effector-induced perturbations of host targets through resistance proteins (RPs) that mediate a strong local defense response that stops pathogen growth. Both primary and secondary immune responses in plants depend on germ line-encoded PRRs and RPs. During induction of local immune responses, systemic immune responses also become activated, which predispose plants to become more resistant to subsequent pathogen attacks. This review gives an update on recent findings that have enhanced our understanding of plant innate immunity and the arms race between plants and their pathogens.
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