Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    FEM growth and yield data - selection forest - Het Oude Trekerbos
    Jansen, J.J. ; Klein, J.P.G. de; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2016
    Wageningen UR
    growth and yield - uneven-aged mixed species forest - selection cut - tree diameter - tree height - recruitment - ingrowth - transitions - monitoring - Douglas fir - Pseudotsuga mensisii - fir Abies spec - spruce - Picea spec. - pine Pinus spec - Japanese larch Larix kaempferi - Common Beech Fagus sylvatica - Common oak Quercus robur - Den Treek
    The current database is part of the FEM growth and yield database, a collection of growth and yield data from even-aged monocultures (douglas fir, common oak, poplar, Japanese Larch, Norway spruce, Scots pine, Corsican pine, Austrian pine, red oak and several other species, with only a few plots, even-aged mixed species forest plots, uneven-aged natural forest, uneven-aged selection forest and roadside plantattions of poplar. The FEM growth and yield data base is currently supervised by Jan den Ouden and Frits Mohren.
    Challenges in elevated CO2 experiments on forests
    Calfapietra, C. ; Ainsworth, E.A. ; Beier, C. ; Godbold, D. ; Hoosbeek, M.R. - \ 2010
    Trends in Plant Science 15 (2010)1. - ISSN 1360-1385 - p. 5 - 10.
    atmospheric co2 - carbon-dioxide - climate-change - ecosystem responses - enrichment system - growth dynamics - air fumigation - design - spruce - ozone
    Current forest Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments are reaching completion. Therefore, it is time to define the scientific goals and priorities of future experimental facilities. In this opinion article, we discuss the following three overarching issues (i) What are the most urgent scientific questions and how can they be addressed? (ii) What forest ecosystems should be investigated? (iii) Which other climate change factors should be coupled with elevated CO2 concentrations in future experiments to better predict the effects of climate change? Plantations and natural forests can have conflicting purposes for high productivity and environmental protection. However, in both cases the assessment of carbon balance and how this will be affected by elevated CO2 concentrations and the interacting climate change factors is the most pressing priority for future experiments.
    Analyses of the impact of changes in atmospheric deposition and climate on forest growth in European monitoring plots: A stand growth approach
    Solberg, S. ; Dobbertin, M. ; Reinds, G.J. ; Andreassen, K. ; Lange, H. ; Garcia Fernandez, P. ; Hildingsson, A. ; Vries, W. de - \ 2009
    Forest Ecology and Management 258 (2009)8. - ISSN 0378-1127 - p. 1735 - 1750.
    nitrogen deposition - acid deposition - picea-abies - tree growth - carbon sequestration - soil acidification - density index - norway - spruce - responses
    During the last 15 years a number of studies have shown increasing forest growth in central Europe, rather than a decline as was expected due to negative effects of air pollution. We have here used data from intensive monitoring plots spread over Europe for a five year period in order to examine the influence of environmental factors on forest growth. Evaluations focussed on the influence of nitrogen, sulphur and acid deposition, temperatures, precipitation and on a drought index calculated as deviation from the long-term mean. The study included the main tree species Norway spruce, Scots pine, common beech as well as European and sessile oak and was based on data from 363 plots. As many other factors besides nitrogen and temperature influence tree growth, expected stem volume increments were modelled using site productivity, stand age and a stand density index. Relative volume increment was then calculated as actual increment in % of expected increment. The site productivity, assumed to be given by site conditions and past environmental conditions, was either taken from expert estimates or computed from site index curves from northern, central and southern Europe. The model explained between 18% and 39% of the variance with site productivity being positively related and age negatively related to actual increment. The various models and statistical approaches were fairly consistent, and indicated a fertilizing effect of nitrogen deposition, with slightly above one percent increase in volume increment per kg of nitrogen deposition per ha and year. This was most clear for spruce and pine, and most pronounced for plots having soil C/N ratios above 25. Also, we found a positive relationship between relative increment and summer temperature, i.e. May–August mean temperature deviation from the 1961–1990 means. The cause–effect relationship here is, however, less certain. Other influences were uncertain. Possibly, sulphur and acid deposition have effects on growth, but these effects are obscured by, and outweighed by the positive effect of nitrogen deposition, because of collinearity between these variables. Drought effects were uncertain also, and one reason for this might be large uncertainties in the precipitation data: precipitation measured on some 50% of the plots correlated poorly with the precipitation data obtained from Europe-wide databases. The major finding of this study was a positive relationship between higher than normal volume increment on one hand and nitrogen deposition on the other hand.
    Relationship between diet and liver carcinomas in roe deer in Kielder Forest and Galloway Forest
    Jong, C.B. de; Wieren, S.E. van; Gill, R.M.A. ; Munro, R. - \ 2004
    Veterinary Record 155 (2004)7. - ISSN 0042-4900 - p. 197 - 200.
    capreolus-capreolus - microhistological analysis - monoterpene composition - cervus-elaphus - spruce - leaves - herbivores - oleoresin - tumors - oils
    The winter diets of roe deer culled from Kielder Forest, in north-east England, where the incidence of liver carcinomas in roe deer is high, and Galloway Forest, in south-west Scotland, where the incidence of liver carcinomas is low, were compared by microhistological analysis of faeces. Both areas are planted with spruce forests but the diets of the deer from Kielder Forest were less varied and contained more spruce and heather than the diets of the deer from Galloway Forest.
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