Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Rhizobacterial community structure differences among sorghum cultivars in different growth stages and soils
    Schlemper, Thiago R. ; Leite, Márcio F.A. ; Lucheta, Adriano R. ; Shimels, Mahdere ; Bouwmeester, Harro J. ; Veen, Johannes A. van; Kuramae, Eiko E. - \ 2017
    FEMS microbiology ecology 93 (2017)8. - ISSN 0168-6496
    16S rRNA - bacterial community composition - next-generation sequencing - Sorghum genotypes; rhizosphere - strigolactone
    Plant genotype selects the rhizosphere microbiome. The success of plant-microbe interactions is dependent on factors that directly or indirectly influence the plant rhizosphere microbial composition. We investigated the rhizosphere bacterial community composition of seven different sorghum cultivars in two different soil types (abandoned (CF) and agricultural (VD)). The rhizosphere bacterial community was evaluated at four different plant growth stages: emergence of the second (day 10) and third leaves (day 20), the transition between the vegetative and reproductive stages (day 35), and the emergence of the last visible leaf (day 50). At early stages (days 10 and 20), the sorghum rhizosphere bacterial community composition was mainly driven by soil type, whereas at late stages (days 35 and 50), the bacterial community composition was also affected by the sorghum genotype. Although this effect of sorghum genotype was small, different sorghum cultivars assembled significantly different bacterial community compositions. In CF soil, the striga-resistant cultivar had significantly higher relative abundances of Acidobacteria GP1, Burkholderia, Cupriavidus (Burkholderiaceae), Acidovorax and Albidiferax (Comamonadaceae) than the other six cultivars. This study is the first to simultaneously investigate the contributions of plant genotype, plant growth stage and soil type in shaping sorghum rhizosphere bacterial community composition.
    Striga hermonthica MAX2 restores branching but not the Very Low Fluence Response in the Arabidopsis thaliana max2 mutant
    Liu, Q. ; Zhang, Y. ; Matusovaa, R. ; Charnikhova, T. ; Amini, M. ; Jamil, M. ; Fernandez-Aparicio, M. ; Huang, K. ; Timko, M.P. ; Westwood, J.H. ; Ruyter-Spira, C.P. ; Krol, A.R. van der; Bouwmeester, H.J. - \ 2014
    New Phytologist 202 (2014)2. - ISSN 0028-646X - p. 531 - 541.
    arabidopsis seed-germination - box protein max2 - plant hormone - strigolactone - inhibition - photomorphogenesis - stimulants - karrikins - molecule - pathway
    Seed germination of Striga spp. (witchweeds), one of the world’s most destructive parasitic weeds, cannot be induced by light but is specifically induced by strigolactones. It is not known whether Striga uses the same components for strigolactone signaling as host plants, whether it has endogenous strigolactone biosynthesis and whether there is post-germination strigolactone signaling in Striga. Strigolactones could not be detected in in vitro grown Striga, while for host-grown Striga, the strigolactone profile is dominated by a subset of the strigolactones present in the host. Branching of in vitro grown Striga is affected by strigolactone biosynthesis inhibitors. ShMAX2, the Striga ortholog of Arabidopsis MORE AXILLARY BRANCHING 2 (AtMAX2) – which mediates strigolactone signaling – complements several of the Arabidopsis max2-1 phenotypes, including the root and shoot phenotype, the High Irradiance Response and the response to strigolactones. Seed germination of max2-1 complemented with ShMAX2 showed no complementation of the Very Low Fluence Response phenotype of max2-1. Results provide indirect evidence for ShMAX2 functions in Striga. A putative role of ShMAX2 in strigolactone-dependent seed germination of Striga is discussed.
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