Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Deriving animal behaviour from high-frequency GPS: tracking cows in open and forested habitat
    Weerd, N. de; Langevelde, F. van; Oeveren, H. van; Nolet, B.A. ; Kölzsch, A. ; Prins, H.H.T. ; Boer, W.F. de - \ 2015
    PLoS ONE 10 (2015)6. - ISSN 1932-6203 - 17 p.
    collar performance - large herbivores - telemetry data - movement - cattle - ecology - states - technology - selection - position
    The increasing spatiotemporal accuracy of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) tracking systems opens the possibility to infer animal behaviour from tracking data.We studied the relationship between high-frequency GNSS data and behaviour, aimed at developing an easily interpretable classification method to infer behaviour from location data. Behavioural observations were carried out during tracking of cows (Bos Taurus) fitted with high-frequency GPS (Global Positioning System) receivers. Data were obtained in an open field and forested area, and movement metrics were calculated for 1 min, 12 s and 2 s intervals. We observed four behaviour types (Foraging, Lying, Standing and Walking). We subsequently used Classification and Regression Trees to classify the simultaneously obtained GPS data as these behaviour types, based on distances and turning angles between fixes. GPS data with a 1 min interval from the open field was classified correctly for more than 70% of the samples. Data from the 12 s and 2 s interval could not be classified successfully, emphasizing that the interval should be long enough for the behaviour to be defined by its characteristic movement metrics. Data obtained in the forested area were classified with a lower accuracy (57%) than the data from the open field, due to a larger positional error of GPS locations and differences in behavioural performance influenced by the habitat type. This demonstrates the importance of understanding the relationship between behaviour and movement metrics, derived from GNSS fixes at different frequencies and in different habitats, in order to successfully infer behaviour. When spatially accurate location data can be obtained, behaviour can be inferred from high-frequency GNSS fixes by calculating simple movement metrics and using easily interpretable decision trees. This allows for the combined study of animal behaviour and habitat use based on location data, and might make it possible to detect deviations in behaviour at the individual level.
    Advancing our thinking in presence-only and used-available analysis
    Warton, D. ; Aarts, G.M. - \ 2013
    Journal of Animal Ecology 82 (2013)6. - ISSN 0021-8790 - p. 1125 - 1134.
    resource selection functions - species distribution models - point process models - habitat selection - functional-responses - logistic-regression - pseudo-absences - animal movement - telemetry data - distributions
    1. The problems of analysing used-available data and presence-only data are equivalent, and this paper uses this equivalence as a platform for exploring opportunities for advancing analysis methodology. 2. We suggest some potential methodological advances in used-available analysis, made possible via lessons learnt in the presence-only literature, for example, using modern methods to improve predictive performance. We also consider the converse - potential advances in presence-only analysis inspired by used-available methodology. 3. Notwithstanding these potential advances in methodology, perhaps a greater opportunity is in advancing our thinking about how to apply a given method to a particular data set. 4. It is shown by example that strikingly different results can be achieved for a single data set by applying a given method of analysis in different ways - hence having chosen a method of analysis, the next step of working out how to apply it is critical to performance. 5. We review some key issues to consider in deciding how to apply an analysis method: apply the method in a manner that reflects the study design; consider data properties; and use diagnostic tools to assess how reasonable a given analysis is for the data at hand.
    Quantifying the effect of habitat availability on species distributions
    Aarts, G.M. ; Fieberg, J. ; Brasseur, S.M.J.M. ; Matthiopoulos, J. - \ 2013
    Journal of Animal Ecology 82 (2013)6. - ISSN 0021-8790 - p. 1135 - 1145.
    resource selection functions - point process models - presence-only data - functional-responses - weighted distributions - general framework - telemetry data - ecology - inference - populations
    1.If animals moved randomly in space, the use of different habitats would be proportional to their availability. Hence, deviations from proportionality between use and availability are considered the tell-tale sign of preference. This principle forms the basis for most habitat selection and species distribution models fitted to use-availability or count data (e.g. MaxEnt and Resource Selection Functions). 2.Yet, once an essential habitat type is sufficiently abundant to meet an individual's needs, increased availability of this habitat type may lead to a decrease in the use/availability ratio. Accordingly, habitat selection functions may estimate negative coefficients when habitats are superabundant, incorrectly suggesting an apparent avoidance. Furthermore, not accounting for the effects of availability on habitat use may lead to poor predictions, particularly when applied to habitats that differ considerably from those for which data have been collected. 3.Using simulations, we show that habitat use varies non-linearly with habitat availability, even when individuals follow simple movement rules to acquire food and avoid risk. The results show that the impact of availability strongly depends on the type of habitat (e.g. whether it is essential or substitutable) and how it interacts with the distribution and availability of other habitats. 4.We demonstrate the utility of a variety of existing and new methods that enable the influence of habitat availability to be explicitly estimated. Models that allow for non-linear effects (using b-spline smoothers) and interactions between environmental covariates defining habitats and measures of their availability were best able to capture simulated patterns of habitat use across a range of environments. 5.An appealing aspect of some of the methods we discuss is that the relative influence of availability is not defined a priori, but directly estimated by the model. This feature is likely to improve model prediction, hint at the mechanism of habitat selection, and may signpost habitats that are critical for the organism's fitness
    Comparative interpretation of count, presence-absence and point methods for species distribution models
    Aarts, G.M. ; Fieberg, J. ; Matthiopoulos, J. - \ 2012
    Methods in Ecology and Evolution 3 (2012)1. - ISSN 2041-210X - p. 177 - 187.
    presence-only data - resource selection - habitat selection - spatial autocorrelation - logistic-regression - telemetry data - abundance - prediction - preference - wildlife
    1. The need to understand the processes shaping population distributions has resulted in a vast increase in the diversity of spatial wildlife data, leading to the development of many novel analytical techniques that are fit-for-purpose. One may aggregate location data into spatial units (e.g. grid cells) and model the resulting counts or presence–absences as a function of environmental covariates. Alternatively, the point data may be modelled directly, by combining the individual observations with a set of random or regular points reflecting habitat availability, a method known as a use-availability design (or, alternatively a presence – pseudo-absence or case–control design). 2. Although these spatial point, count and presence–absence methods are widely used, the ecological literature is not explicit about their connections and how their parameter estimates and predictions should be interpreted. The objective of this study is to recapitulate some recent statistical results and illustrate that under certain assumptions, each method can be motivated by the same underlying spatial inhomogeneous Poisson point process (IPP) model in which the intensity function is modelled as a log-linear function of covariates. 3. The Poisson likelihood used for count data is a discrete approximation of the IPP likelihood. Similarly, the presence–absence design will approximate the IPP likelihood, but only when spatial units (i.e. pixels) are extremely small (Electric Journal of Statistics, 2010, 4, 1151–1201). For larger pixel sizes, presence–absence designs do not differentiate between one or multiple observations within each pixel, hence leading to information loss. 4. Logistic regression is often used to estimate the parameters of the IPP model using point data. Although the response variable is defined as 0 for the availability points, these zeros do not serve as true absences as is often assumed; rather, their role is to approximate the integral of the denominator in the IPP likelihood (The Annals of Applied Statistics, 2010, 4, 1383–1402). Because of this common misconception, the estimated exponential function of the linear predictor (i.e. the resource selection function) is often assumed to be proportional to occupancy. Like IPP and count models, this function is proportional to the expected density of observations. 5. Understanding these (dis-)similarities between different species distribution modelling techniques should improve biological interpretation of spatial models and therefore advance ecological and methodological cross-fertilization.
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