Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    We will mail you new results for this query: keywords==tritrophic interactions
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Data from: Parasitic wasp-associated symbiont affects plant-mediated species interactions between herbivores
Cusumano, Antonino ; Zhu, F. ; Volkoff, Anne Nathalie ; Verbaarschot, P.G.H. ; Bloem, J. ; Vogel, Heiko ; Dicke, M. ; Poelman, E.H. - \ 2018
tritrophic interactions - plant-insect interactions - polydnaviruses - parasitoid - herbivore colonization - CgBV
Microbial mutualistic symbiosis is increasingly recognised as a hidden driving force in the ecology of plant–insect interactions. Although plant‐associated and herbivore‐associated symbionts clearly affect interactions between plants and herbivores, the effects of symbionts associated with higher trophic levels has been largely overlooked. At the third‐trophic level, parasitic wasps are a common group of insects that can inject symbiotic viruses (polydnaviruses) and venom into their herbivorous hosts to support parasitoid offspring development. Here, we show that such third‐trophic level symbionts act in combination with venom to affect plant‐mediated interactions by reducing colonisation of subsequent herbivore species. This ecological effect correlated with changes induced by polydnaviruses and venom in caterpillar salivary glands and in plant defence responses to herbivory. Because thousands of parasitoid species are associated with mutualistic symbiotic viruses in an intimate, specific relationship, our findings may represent a novel and widespread ecological phenomenon in plant–insect interactions
Parasitic wasp-associated symbiont affects plant-mediated species interactions between herbivores
Cusumano, Antonino ; Zhu, Feng ; Volkoff, Anne Nathalie ; Verbaarschot, Patrick ; Bloem, Janneke ; Vogel, Heiko ; Dicke, Marcel ; Poelman, Erik H. - \ 2018
Ecology Letters 21 (2018)7. - ISSN 1461-023X - p. 957 - 967.
Herbivore colonisation - parasitoid - plant–insect interactions - polydnaviruses - tritrophic interactions

Microbial mutualistic symbiosis is increasingly recognised as a hidden driving force in the ecology of plant–insect interactions. Although plant-associated and herbivore-associated symbionts clearly affect interactions between plants and herbivores, the effects of symbionts associated with higher trophic levels has been largely overlooked. At the third-trophic level, parasitic wasps are a common group of insects that can inject symbiotic viruses (polydnaviruses) and venom into their herbivorous hosts to support parasitoid offspring development. Here, we show that such third-trophic level symbionts act in combination with venom to affect plant-mediated interactions by reducing colonisation of subsequent herbivore species. This ecological effect correlated with changes induced by polydnaviruses and venom in caterpillar salivary glands and in plant defence responses to herbivory. Because thousands of parasitoid species are associated with mutualistic symbiotic viruses in an intimate, specific relationship, our findings may represent a novel and widespread ecological phenomenon in plant–insect interactions.

Data from: Compatible and incompatible pathogen-plant interactions differentially affect plant volatile emissions and the attraction of parasitoid wasps
Ponzio, C.A.M. ; Weldegergis, B.T. ; Dicke, M. ; Gols, R. - \ 2016
plant-insect interactions - parasitoid foraging - plant volatiles - insect herbivory - tritrophic interactions - plant defenses
The three data sheets show the data for the three types of comparisons that were made: (1) wasp choice when offered acaterpillar infested plant and a caterpillar + pathogen infected plant (2) wasp choice when offered a healthy plant against a singleattacker infected/infected plant and (3) wasp choice when offered a caterpillar infested plant against a pathogen infected plant.
Genetic engineering of plant volatile terpenoids: effects on a herbivore, a predator and a parasitoid
Kos, M. ; Houshyani Hassanzadeh, B. ; Overeem, A.J. ; Bouwmeester, H.J. ; Weldegergis, B.T. ; Loon, J.J.A. van; Dicke, M. ; Vet, L.E.M. - \ 2013
Pest Management Science 69 (2013)2. - ISSN 1526-498X - p. 302 - 311.
arabidopsis-thaliana - natural enemies - tritrophic interactions - tetranychus-urticae - biological-control - transgenic plants - prey interactions - host-plant - aphid - attraction
BACKGROUND: Most insect-resistant transgenic crops employ toxins to control pests. A novel approach is to enhance the effectiveness of natural enemies by genetic engineering of the biosynthesis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Before the commercialisation of such transgenic plants can be pursued, detailed fundamental studies of their effects on herbivores and their natural enemies are necessary. The linalool/nerolidol synthase gene FaNES1 was constitutively expressed from strawberry in three Arabidopsis thaliana accessions, and the behaviour of the aphid Brevicoryne brassicae L., the parasitoid Diaeretiella rapae McIntosh and the predator Episyrphus balteatus de Geer was studied. RESULTS: Transgenic FaNES1-expressing plants emitted (E)-nerolidol and larger amounts of (E)-DMNT and linalool. Brevicoryne brassicae was repelled by the transgenic lines of two of the accessions, whereas its performance was not affected. Diaeretiella rapae preferred aphid-infested transgenic plants over aphid-infested wild-type plants for two of the accessions. In contrast, female E. balteatus predators did not differentiate between aphid-infested transgenic or wild-type plants. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that the genetic engineering of plants to modify their emission of VOCs holds considerable promise for facilitating biological control of herbivores. Validation for crop plants is a necessary next step to assess the usefulness of modified volatile emission in integrated pest management. Copyright (C) 2012 Society of Chemical Industry
Are population differences in plant quality reflected in the preference and performance of two endoparasitoid wasps?
Gols, R. ; Dam, N.M. van; Raaijmakers, C.E. ; Dicke, M. ; Harvey, J.A. - \ 2009
Oikos 118 (2009)5. - ISSN 0030-1299 - p. 733 - 743.
diadegma-semiclausum hellen - host-searching behavior - natural enemies - specialist herbivore - chemical defense - tritrophic interactions - cotesia-glomerata - genetic-variation - pieris-brassicae - food plants
In recent years, increasing attention has been paid in exploring the role of direct plant defence, through the production of allelochemicals, on the performance of parasitoid wasps and their hosts. However, few studies have determined if parasitoids can detect differences in plant quality and thus preferentially attack hosts on which their progeny develop most successfully. In this study we examined the development and preference of two endoparasitoids, Diadegmasemiclausum and Cotesia glomerata, developing in larvae of their respective hosts, Plutella xylostella and Pieris brassicae. In turn, these were reared on different wild populations of black mustard Brassica nigra originating in the Netherlands and Sicily (Italy), as well as single cultivated strains of B. nigra and brown mustard, B. juncea. Chemical analyses of foliar glucosinolates and volatile emissions by P. xylostella-damaged plants revealed large differences between B. nigra and B. juncea plants, with smaller differences among the B. nigra populations. The four mustard populations differentially affected development time and body mass of the herbivores and parasitoids. Contrasts among the means revealed significant differences mainly between B. nigra and B. juncea. Both parasitoids, however, preferred to alight on plants in which their progeny developed most successfully. In behavioural bioassays, D. semiclausum did not discriminate among the B. nigra populations and preferred to alight on B. juncea, which was the best plant population for parasitoid development. By contrast, C. glomerata females exhibited the lowest preference for Italian B. nigra populations, on which adult parasitoid size was the smallest. These results reveal that parasitoids can detect even small differences in plant quality presumably through their volatile blends and that plant preference and offspring performance in the two species are 'optimally synchronized'.
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