Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Transforming knowledge systems for life on Earth: Visions of future systems and how to get there
    Fazey, Ioan ; Schäpke, Niko ; Caniglia, Guido ; Hodgson, Anthony ; Kendrick, Ian ; Lyon, Christopher ; Page, Glenn ; Patterson, James ; Riedy, Chris ; Strasser, Tim ; Verveen, Stephan ; Adams, David ; Goldstein, Bruce ; Klaes, Matthias ; Leicester, Graham ; Linyard, Alison ; McCurdy, Adrienne ; Ryan, Paul ; Sharpe, Bill ; Silvestri, Giorgia ; Abdurrahim, Ali Yansyah ; Abson, David ; Adetunji, Olufemi Samson ; Aldunce, Paulina ; Alvarez-Pereira, Carlos ; Amparo, Jennifer Marie ; Amundsen, Helene ; Anderson, Lakin ; Andersson, Lotta ; Asquith, Michael ; Augenstein, Karoline ; Barrie, Jack ; Bent, David ; Bentz, Julia ; Bergsten, Arvid ; Berzonsky, Carol ; Bina, Olivia ; Blackstock, Kirsty ; Boehnert, Joanna ; Bradbury, Hilary ; Brand, Christine ; Böhme (born Sangmeister), Jessica ; Bøjer, Marianne Mille ; Carmen, Esther ; Charli-Joseph, Lakshmi ; Choudhury, Sarah ; Chunhachoti-ananta, Supot ; Cockburn, Jessica ; Colvin, John ; Connon, Irena L.C. ; Cornforth, Rosalind ; Cox, Robin S. ; Cradock-Henry, Nicholas ; Cramer, Laura ; Cremaschi, Almendra ; Dannevig, Halvor ; Day, Catherine T. ; Lima Hutchison, Cathel de; Vrieze, Anke de; Desai, Vikas ; Dolley, Jonathan ; Duckett, Dominic ; Durrant, Rachael Amy ; Egermann, Markus ; Elsner (Adams), Emily ; Fremantle, Chris ; Fullwood-Thomas, Jessica ; Galafassi, Diego ; Gobby, Jen ; Golland, Ami ; González-Padrón, Shiara Kirana ; Gram-Hanssen, Irmelin ; Grandin, Jakob ; Grenni, Sara ; Lauren Gunnell, Jade ; Gusmao, Felipe ; Hamann, Maike ; Harding, Brian ; Harper, Gavin ; Hesselgren, Mia ; Hestad, Dina ; Heykoop, Cheryl Anne ; Holmén, Johan ; Holstead, Kirsty ; Hoolohan, Claire ; Horcea-Milcu, Andra Ioana ; Horlings, Lummina Geertruida ; Howden, Stuart Mark ; Howell, Rachel Angharad ; Huque, Sarah Insia ; Inturias Canedo, Mirna Liz ; Iro, Chidinma Yvonne ; Ives, Christopher D. ; John, Beatrice ; Joshi, Rajiv ; Juarez-Bourke, Sadhbh ; Juma, Dauglas Wafula ; Karlsen, Bea Cecilie ; Kliem, Lea ; Kläy, Andreas ; Kuenkel, Petra ; Kunze, Iris ; Lam, David Patrick Michael ; Lang, Daniel J. ; Larkin, Alice ; Light, Ann ; Luederitz, Christopher ; Luthe, Tobias ; Maguire, Cathy ; Mahecha-Groot, Ana Maria ; Malcolm, Jackie ; Marshall, Fiona ; Maru, Yiheyis ; McLachlan, Carly ; Mmbando, Peter ; Mohapatra, Subhakanta ; Moore, Michele Lee ; Moriggi, Angela ; Morley-Fletcher, Mark ; Moser, Susanne ; Mueller, Konstanze Marion ; Mukute, Mutizwa ; Mühlemeier, Susan ; Naess, Lars Otto ; Nieto-Romero, Marta ; Novo, Paula ; ÓBrien, Karen ; O'Connell, Deborah Anne ; O'Donnell, Kathleen ; Olsson, Per ; Pearson, Kelli Rose ; Pereira, Laura ; Petridis, Panos ; Peukert, Daniela ; Phear, Nicky ; Pisters, Siri Renée ; Polsky, Matt ; Pound, Diana ; Preiser, Rika ; Rahman, Md Sajidur ; Reed, Mark S. ; Revell, Philip ; Rodriguez, Iokiñe ; Rogers, Briony Cathryn ; Rohr, Jascha ; Nordbø Rosenberg, Milda ; Ross, Helen ; Russell, Shona ; Ryan, Melanie ; Saha, Probal ; Schleicher, Katharina ; Schneider, Flurina ; Scoville-Simonds, Morgan ; Searle, Beverley ; Sebhatu, Samuel Petros ; Sesana, Elena ; Silverman, Howard ; Singh, Chandni ; Sterling, Eleanor ; Stewart, Sarah Jane ; Tàbara, J.D. ; Taylor, Douglas ; Thornton, Philip ; Tribaldos, Theresa Margarete ; Tschakert, Petra ; Uribe-Calvo, Natalia ; Waddell, Steve ; Waddock, Sandra ; Merwe, Liza van der; Mierlo, Barbara van; Zwanenberg, Patrick van; Velarde, Sandra Judith ; Washbourne, Carla Leanne ; Waylen, Kerry ; Weiser, Annika ; Wight, Ian ; Williams, Stephen ; Woods, Mel ; Wolstenholme, Ruth ; Wright, Ness ; Wunder, Stefanie ; Wyllie, Alastair ; Young, Hannah R. - \ 2020
    Energy Research & Social Science 70 (2020). - ISSN 2214-6296
    Climate and energy research - Epistemology - Knowledge - Social-technical transitions - Sustainability science - Transformation

    Formalised knowledge systems, including universities and research institutes, are important for contemporary societies. They are, however, also arguably failing humanity when their impact is measured against the level of progress being made in stimulating the societal changes needed to address challenges like climate change. In this research we used a novel futures-oriented and participatory approach that asked what future envisioned knowledge systems might need to look like and how we might get there. Findings suggest that envisioned future systems will need to be much more collaborative, open, diverse, egalitarian, and able to work with values and systemic issues. They will also need to go beyond producing knowledge about our world to generating wisdom about how to act within it. To get to envisioned systems we will need to rapidly scale methodological innovations, connect innovators, and creatively accelerate learning about working with intractable challenges. We will also need to create new funding schemes, a global knowledge commons, and challenge deeply held assumptions. To genuinely be a creative force in supporting longevity of human and non-human life on our planet, the shift in knowledge systems will probably need to be at the scale of the enlightenment and speed of the scientific and technological revolution accompanying the second World War. This will require bold and strategic action from governments, scientists, civic society and sustained transformational intent.

    Introducing a mechanistic model in digital soil mapping to predict soil organic matter stocks in the Cantabrian region (Spain)
    Hendriks, Chantal Mechtildis Johanna ; Stoorvogel, Jetse Jacob ; Álvarez-Martínez, Jose Manuel ; Claessens, Lieven ; Pérez-Silos, Ignacio ; Barquín, José - \ 2020
    European Journal of Soil Science (2020). - ISSN 1351-0754
    Cordillera cantábrica - Natura2000 - organic carbon - soil-forming processes - sustainable development

    Digital soil mapping (DSM) is an effective mapping technique that supports the increased need for quantitative soil data. In DSM, soil properties are correlated with environmental characteristics using statistical models such as regression. However, many of these relationships are explicitly described in mechanistic simulation models. Therefore, the mechanistic relationships can, in theory, replace the statistical relationships in DSM. This study aims to develop a mechanistic model to predict soil organic matter (SOM) stocks in Natura2000 areas of the Cantabria region (Spain). The mechanistic model is established in four steps: (a) identify major processes that influence SOM stocks, (b) review existing models describing the major processes and the respective environmental data that they require, (c) establish a database with the required input data, and (d) calibrate the model with field observations. The SOM stocks map resulting from the mechanistic model had a mean error (ME) of −2 t SOM ha−1 and a root mean square error (RMSE) of 66 t SOM ha−1. The Lin's concordance correlation coefficient was 0.47 and the amount of variance explained (AVE) was 0.21. The results of the mechanistic model were compared to the results of a statistical model. It turned out that the correlation coefficient between the two SOM stock maps was 0.8. This study illustrated that mechanistic soil models can be used for DSM, which brings new opportunities. Mechanistic models for DSM should be considered for mapping soil characteristics that are difficult to predict by statistical models, and for extrapolation purposes. Highlights: Theoretically, mechanistic models can replace the statistical relationships in digital soil mapping. Mechanistic soil models were used to develop a mechanistic model for digital soil mapping that predicted SOM stocks. The applicability of the mechanistic approach needs to be explored for different soil properties and regions.

    Effectiveness of cover crops to reduce loss of soil organic matter in a rainfed vineyard
    López-Vicente, Manuel ; Calvo-Seas, Elena ; Álvarez, Sara ; Cerdà, Artemi - \ 2020
    Land 9 (2020)7. - ISSN 2073-445X
    Cover crop - Enrichment ratio - Mediterranean climate - Sediment trap - Soil erosion - Soil organic matter - Vineyard

    Cover crops (CCs) minimize the loss of soil in permanent cropping systems where the soil is usually bare due to intense tillage or overuse of herbicides. The topsoil, the richer layer in soil organic carbon and organic matter (OM), is affected by water erosion. Nature-based solutions appear as a suitable option for sustainable farming. In this study, the effectiveness of two years of CC management to reduce the OM loss is evaluated in a rainfed vineyard in a rolling landscape (Huesca, NE Spain). Two sediment traps collected runoff over 15 months. Topsoil OM contents (1.64% and 1.60%) and sediment/soil OM enrichment ratio (2.61 and 3.07) were similar. However, the average annual rate of OM loss was 3.6 times higher in the plot with lower vegetation cover than in the plot with CCs (1.29 vs. 0.35 kgOM ha-1 yr-1). The concentration of OMSed showed a negative relationship with the net soil loss; and significant differences appeared between the OMSed in the months with low and moderate-to-high ground cover. CCs are an excellent nature-based solution to control the unsustainable soil and OM losses measured in vineyards, which will contribute to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations.

    The global abundance of tree palms
    Muscarella, Robert ; Emilio, Thaise ; Phillips, Oliver L. ; Lewis, Simon L. ; Slik, Ferry ; Baker, William J. ; Couvreur, Thomas L.P. ; Eiserhardt, Wolf L. ; Svenning, Jens Christian ; Affum-Baffoe, Kofi ; Aiba, Shin Ichiro ; Almeida, Everton C. de; Almeida, Samuel S. de; Oliveira, Edmar Almeida de; Álvarez-Dávila, Esteban ; Alves, Luciana F. ; Alvez-Valles, Carlos Mariano ; Carvalho, Fabrício Alvim ; Guarin, Fernando Alzate ; Andrade, Ana ; Aragão, Luis E.O.C. ; Murakami, Alejandro Araujo ; Arroyo, Luzmila ; Ashton, Peter S. ; Corredor, Gerardo A.A. ; Baker, Timothy R. ; Camargo, Plinio Barbosa de; Barlow, Jos ; Bastin, Jean François ; Bengone, Natacha Nssi ; Berenguer, Erika ; Berry, Nicholas ; Blanc, Lilian ; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin ; Bonal, Damien ; Bongers, Frans ; Bradford, Matt ; Brambach, Fabian ; Brearley, Francis Q. ; Brewer, Steven W. ; Camargo, Jose L.C. ; Campbell, David G. ; Castilho, Carolina V. ; Castro, Wendeson ; Catchpole, Damien ; Cerón Martínez, Carlos E. ; Chen, Shengbin ; Chhang, Phourin ; Cho, Percival ; Chutipong, Wanlop ; Clark, Connie ; Collins, Murray ; Comiskey, James A. ; Medina, Massiel Nataly Corrales ; Costa, Flávia R.C. ; Culmsee, Heike ; David-Higuita, Heriberto ; Davidar, Priya ; Aguila-Pasquel, Jhon del; Derroire, Géraldine ; Fiore, Anthony Di; Do, Tran Van; Doucet, Jean Louis ; Dourdain, Aurélie ; Drake, Donald R. ; Ensslin, Andreas ; Erwin, Terry ; Ewango, Corneille E.N. ; Ewers, Robert M. ; Fauset, Sophie ; Feldpausch, Ted R. ; Ferreira, Joice ; Ferreira, Leandro Valle ; Fischer, Markus ; Franklin, Janet ; Fredriksson, Gabriella M. ; Gillespie, Thomas W. ; Gilpin, Martin ; Gonmadje, Christelle ; Gunatilleke, Arachchige Upali Nimal ; Hakeem, Khalid Rehman ; Hall, Jefferson S. ; Hamer, Keith C. ; Harris, David J. ; Harrison, Rhett D. ; Hector, Andrew ; Hemp, Andreas ; Herault, Bruno ; Pizango, Carlos Gabriel Hidalgo ; Honorio Coronado, Eurídice N. ; Hubau, Wannes ; Hussain, Mohammad Shah ; Ibrahim, Faridah Hanum ; Imai, Nobuo ; Joly, Carlos A. ; Joseph, Shijo ; Anitha, K. ; Kartawinata, Kuswata ; Kassi, Justin ; Killeen, Timothy J. ; Kitayama, Kanehiro ; Klitgård, Bente Bang ; Kooyman, Robert ; Labrière, Nicolas ; Larney, Eileen ; Laumonier, Yves ; Laurance, Susan G. ; Laurance, William F. ; Lawes, Michael J. ; Levesley, Aurora ; Lisingo, Janvier ; Lovejoy, Thomas ; Lovett, Jon C. ; Lu, Xinghui ; Lykke, Anne Mette ; Magnusson, William E. ; Mahayani, Ni Putu Diana ; Malhi, Yadvinder ; Mansor, Asyraf ; Peña, Jose Luis Marcelo ; Marimon-Junior, Ben H. ; Marshall, Andrew R. ; Melgaco, Karina ; Bautista, Casimiro Mendoza ; Mihindou, Vianet ; Millet, Jérôme ; Milliken, William ; Mohandass, D. ; Mendoza, Abel Lorenzo Monteagudo ; Mugerwa, Badru ; Nagamasu, Hidetoshi ; Nagy, Laszlo ; Seuaturien, Naret ; Nascimento, Marcelo T. ; Neill, David A. ; Neto, Luiz Menini ; Nilus, Rueben ; Vargas, Mario Percy Núñez ; Nurtjahya, Eddy ; Araújo, R.N.O. de; Onrizal, Onrizal ; Palacios, Walter A. ; Palacios-Ramos, Sonia ; Parren, Marc ; Paudel, Ekananda ; Morandi, Paulo S. ; Pennington, R.T. ; Pickavance, Georgia ; Pipoly, John J. ; Pitman, Nigel C.A. ; Poedjirahajoe, Erny ; Poorter, Lourens ; Poulsen, John R. ; Prasad, P.R.C. ; Prieto, Adriana ; Puyravaud, Jean Philippe ; Qie, Lan ; Quesada, Carlos A. ; Ramírez-Angulo, Hirma ; Razafimahaimodison, Jean Claude ; Reitsma, Jan Meindert ; Requena-Rojas, Edilson J. ; Correa, Zorayda Restrepo ; Rodriguez, Carlos Reynel ; Roopsind, Anand ; Rovero, Francesco ; Rozak, Andes ; Lleras, Agustín Rudas ; Rutishauser, Ervan ; Rutten, Gemma ; Punchi-Manage, Ruwan ; Salomão, Rafael P. ; Sam, Hoang Van; Sarker, Swapan Kumar ; Satdichanh, Manichanh ; Schietti, Juliana ; Schmitt, Christine B. ; Marimon, Beatriz Schwantes ; Senbeta, Feyera ; Nath Sharma, Lila ; Sheil, Douglas ; Sierra, Rodrigo ; Silva-Espejo, Javier E. ; Silveira, Marcos ; Sonké, Bonaventure ; Steininger, Marc K. ; Steinmetz, Robert ; Stévart, Tariq ; Sukumar, Raman ; Sultana, Aisha ; Sunderland, Terry C.H. ; Suresh, Hebbalalu Satyanarayana ; Tang, Jianwei ; Tanner, Edmund ; Steege, Hans ter; Terborgh, John W. ; Theilade, Ida ; Timberlake, Jonathan ; Torres-Lezama, Armando ; Umunay, Peter ; Uriarte, María ; Gamarra, Luis Valenzuela ; Bult, Martin van de; Hout, Peter van der; Martinez, Rodolfo Vasquez ; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães ; Vieira, Simone A. ; Vilanova, Emilio ; Cayo, Jeanneth Villalobos ; Wang, Ophelia ; Webb, Campbell O. ; Webb, Edward L. ; White, Lee ; Whitfeld, Timothy J.S. ; Wich, Serge ; Willcock, Simon ; Wiser, Susan K. ; Young, Kenneth R. ; Zakaria, Rahmad ; Zang, Runguo ; Zartman, Charles E. ; Zo-Bi, Irié Casimir ; Balslev, Henrik - \ 2020
    Global Ecology and Biogeography 29 (2020)9. - ISSN 1466-822X - p. 1495 - 1514.
    above-ground biomass - abundance patterns - Arecaceae - local abiotic conditions - Neotropics - pantropical biogeography - tropical rainforest - wood density

    Aim: Palms are an iconic, diverse and often abundant component of tropical ecosystems that provide many ecosystem services. Being monocots, tree palms are evolutionarily, morphologically and physiologically distinct from other trees, and these differences have important consequences for ecosystem services (e.g., carbon sequestration and storage) and in terms of responses to climate change. We quantified global patterns of tree palm relative abundance to help improve understanding of tropical forests and reduce uncertainty about these ecosystems under climate change. Location: Tropical and subtropical moist forests. Time period: Current. Major taxa studied: Palms (Arecaceae). Methods: We assembled a pantropical dataset of 2,548 forest plots (covering 1,191 ha) and quantified tree palm (i.e., ≥10 cm diameter at breast height) abundance relative to co-occurring non-palm trees. We compared the relative abundance of tree palms across biogeographical realms and tested for associations with palaeoclimate stability, current climate, edaphic conditions and metrics of forest structure. Results: On average, the relative abundance of tree palms was more than five times larger between Neotropical locations and other biogeographical realms. Tree palms were absent in most locations outside the Neotropics but present in >80% of Neotropical locations. The relative abundance of tree palms was more strongly associated with local conditions (e.g., higher mean annual precipitation, lower soil fertility, shallower water table and lower plot mean wood density) than metrics of long-term climate stability. Life-form diversity also influenced the patterns; palm assemblages outside the Neotropics comprise many non-tree (e.g., climbing) palms. Finally, we show that tree palms can influence estimates of above-ground biomass, but the magnitude and direction of the effect require additional work. Conclusions: Tree palms are not only quintessentially tropical, but they are also overwhelmingly Neotropical. Future work to understand the contributions of tree palms to biomass estimates and carbon cycling will be particularly crucial in Neotropical forests.

    Food system analysis of Arua district in Uganda : Working document KB project Improving food systems in less-favoured rural areas of East Africa
    Hengsdijk, Huib ; Roefs, Marlene ; Pereira da Silva, Fatima ; Hermelink, Marleen ; Lee, Jan van der; Deolu-Ajayi, Ayodeji ; Wösten, Henk ; Özkan Gülzari, Seyda ; Pittore, Katherine ; Beekman, Gonne ; Janssen, Valerie ; Alvarez Aranguiz, Adolfo ; Ndambi, Asaah ; Heesmans, Hanneke - \ 2020
    Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research - 50
    Reconstruction of networks with direct and indirect genetic effects
    Kruijer, Willem ; Behrouzi, Pariya ; Bustos-Korts, Daniela ; Rodríguez-Álvarez, María Xosé ; Mahmoudi, Seyed Mahdi ; Yandell, Brian ; Wit, Ernst ; Eeuwijk, Fred A. van - \ 2020
    Genetics 214 (2020)4. - ISSN 0016-6731 - p. 781 - 807.

    Genetic variance of a phenotypic trait can originate from direct genetic effects, or from indirect effects, i.e., through genetic effects on other traits, affecting the trait of interest. This distinction is often of great importance, for example, when trying to improve crop yield and simultaneously control plant height. As suggested by Sewall Wright, assessing contributions of direct and indirect effects requires knowledge of (1) the presence or absence of direct genetic effects on each trait, and (2) the functional relationships between the traits. Because experimental validation of such relationships is often unfeasible, it is increasingly common to reconstruct them using causal inference methods. However, most current methods require all genetic variance to be explained by a small number of quantitative trait loci (QTL) with fixed effects. Only a few authors have considered the “missing heritability” case, where contributions of many undetectable QTL are modeled with random effects. Usually, these are treated as nuisance terms that need to be eliminated by taking residuals from a multi-trait mixed model (MTM). But fitting such an MTM is challenging, and it is impossible to infer the presence of direct genetic effects. Here, we propose an alternative strategy, where genetic effects are formally included in the graph. This has important advantages: (1) genetic effects can be directly incorporated in causal inference, implemented via our PCgen algorithm, which can analyze many more traits; and (2) we can test the existence of direct genetic effects, and improve the orientation of edges between traits. Finally, we show that reconstruction is much more accurate if individual plant or plot data are used, instead of genotypic means. We have implemented the PCgen-algorithm in the R-package pcgen.

    Long-term thermal sensitivity of Earth's tropical forests
    Sullivan, Martin J.P. ; Lewis, Simon L. ; Affum-Baffoe, Kofi ; Castilho, Carolina ; Costa, Flávia ; Sanchez, Aida Cuni ; Ewango, Corneille E.N. ; Hubau, Wannes ; Marimon, Beatriz ; Monteagudo-Mendoza, Abel ; Qie, Lan ; Sonké, Bonaventure ; Martinez, Rodolfo Vasquez ; Baker, Timothy R. ; Brienen, Roel J.W. ; Feldpausch, Ted R. ; Galbraith, David ; Gloor, Manuel ; Malhi, Yadvinder ; Aiba, Shin Ichiro ; Alexiades, Miguel N. ; Almeida, Everton C. ; Oliveira, Edmar Almeida de; Dávila, Esteban Álvarez ; Loayza, Patricia Alvarez ; Andrade, Ana ; Vieira, Simone Aparecida ; Aragão, Luiz E.O.C. ; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro ; Arets, Eric J.M.M. ; Arroyo, Luzmila ; Ashton, Peter ; Aymard C, Gerardo ; Baccaro, Fabrício B. ; Banin, Lindsay F. ; Baraloto, Christopher ; Camargo, Plínio Barbosa ; Barlow, Jos ; Barroso, Jorcely ; Bastin, Jean François ; Batterman, Sarah A. ; Beeckman, Hans ; Begne, Serge K. ; Bennett, Amy C. ; Berenguer, Erika ; Berry, Nicholas ; Blanc, Lilian ; Boeckx, Pascal ; Bogaert, Jan ; Bonal, Damien ; Bongers, Frans ; Bradford, Matt ; Brearley, Francis Q. ; Brncic, Terry ; Brown, Foster ; Burban, Benoit ; Camargo, José Luís ; Castro, Wendeson ; Céron, Carlos ; Ribeiro, Sabina Cerruto ; Moscoso, Victor Chama ; Chave, Jerôme ; Chezeaux, Eric ; Clark, Connie J. ; Souza, Fernanda Coelho de; Collins, Murray ; Comiskey, James A. ; Valverde, Fernando Cornejo ; Medina, Massiel Corrales ; Costa, Lola da; Dančák, Martin ; Dargie, Greta C. ; Davies, Stuart ; Cardozo, Nallaret Davila ; Haulleville, Thales de; Medeiros, Marcelo Brilhante de; Aguila Pasquel, Jhon Del; Derroire, Géraldine ; Fiore, Anthony Di; Doucet, Jean Louis ; Dourdain, Aurélie ; Droissant, Vincent ; Duque, Luisa Fernanda ; Ekoungoulou, Romeo ; Elias, Fernando ; Erwin, Terry ; Esquivel-Muelbert, Adriane ; Fauset, Sophie ; Ferreira, Joice ; Llampazo, Gerardo Flores ; Foli, Ernest ; Ford, Andrew ; Gilpin, Martin ; Hall, Jefferson S. ; Hamer, Keith C. ; Hamilton, Alan C. ; Harris, David J. ; Hart, Terese B. ; Hédl, Radim ; Herault, Bruno ; Herrera, Rafael ; Higuchi, Niro ; Hladik, Annette ; Coronado, Eurídice Honorio ; Huamantupa-Chuquimaco, Isau ; Huasco, Walter Huaraca ; Jeffery, Kathryn J. ; Jimenez-Rojas, Eliana ; Kalamandeen, Michelle ; Djuikouo, Marie Noël Kamdem ; Kearsley, Elizabeth ; Umetsu, Ricardo Keichi ; Kho, Lip Khoon ; Killeen, Timothy ; Kitayama, Kanehiro ; Klitgaard, Bente ; Koch, Alexander ; Labrière, Nicolas ; Laurance, William ; Laurance, Susan ; Leal, Miguel E. ; Levesley, Aurora ; Lima, Adriano J.N. ; Lisingo, Janvier ; Lopes, Aline P. ; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela ; Lovejoy, Tom ; Lovett, Jon C. ; Lowe, Richard ; Magnusson, William E. ; Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba ; Manzatto, Ângelo Gilberto ; Marimon, Ben Hur ; Marshall, Andrew R. ; Marthews, Toby ; Almeida Reis, Simone Matias de; Maycock, Colin ; Melgaço, Karina ; Mendoza, Casimiro ; Metali, Faizah ; Mihindou, Vianet ; Milliken, William ; Mitchard, Edward T.A. ; Morandi, Paulo S. ; Mossman, Hannah L. ; Nagy, Laszlo ; Nascimento, Henrique ; Neill, David ; Nilus, Reuben ; Vargas, Percy Núñez ; Palacios, Walter ; Camacho, Nadir Pallqui ; Peacock, Julie ; Pendry, Colin ; Peñuela Mora, Maria Cristina ; Pickavance, Georgia C. ; Pipoly, John ; Pitman, Nigel ; Playfair, Maureen ; Poorter, Lourens ; Poulsen, John R. ; Poulsen, Axel Dalberg ; Preziosi, Richard ; Prieto, Adriana ; Primack, Richard B. ; Ramírez-Angulo, Hirma ; Reitsma, Jan ; Réjou-Méchain, Maxime ; Correa, Zorayda Restrepo ; Sousa, Thaiane Rodrigues de; Bayona, Lily Rodriguez ; Roopsind, Anand ; Rudas, Agustín ; Rutishauser, Ervan ; Abu Salim, Kamariah ; Salomão, Rafael P. ; Schietti, Juliana ; Sheil, Douglas ; Silva, Richarlly C. ; Espejo, Javier Silva ; Valeria, Camila Silva ; Silveira, Marcos ; Simo-Droissart, Murielle ; Simon, Marcelo Fragomeni ; Singh, James ; Soto Shareva, Yahn Carlos ; Stahl, Clement ; Stropp, Juliana ; Sukri, Rahayu ; Sunderland, Terry ; Svátek, Martin ; Swaine, Michael D. ; Swamy, Varun ; Taedoumg, Hermann ; Talbot, Joey ; Taplin, James ; Taylor, David ; Steege, Hans Ter; Terborgh, John ; Thomas, Raquel ; Thomas, Sean C. ; Torres-Lezama, Armando ; Umunay, Peter ; Gamarra, Luis Valenzuela ; Heijden, Geertje van der; Hout, Peter van der; Meer, Peter van der; Nieuwstadt, Mark van; Verbeeck, Hans ; Vernimmen, Ronald ; Vicentini, Alberto ; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães ; Torre, Emilio Vilanova ; Vleminckx, Jason ; Vos, Vincent ; Wang, Ophelia ; White, Lee J.T. ; Willcock, Simon ; Woods, John T. ; Wortel, Verginia ; Young, Kenneth ; Zagt, Roderick ; Zemagho, Lise ; Zuidema, Pieter A. ; Zwerts, Joeri A. ; Phillips, Oliver L. - \ 2020
    Science 368 (2020)6493. - ISSN 0036-8075 - p. 869 - 874.

    The sensitivity of tropical forest carbon to climate is a key uncertainty in predicting global climate change. Although short-term drying and warming are known to affect forests, it is unknown if such effects translate into long-term responses. Here, we analyze 590 permanent plots measured across the tropics to derive the equilibrium climate controls on forest carbon. Maximum temperature is the most important predictor of aboveground biomass (-9.1 megagrams of carbon per hectare per degree Celsius), primarily by reducing woody productivity, and has a greater impact per °C in the hottest forests (>32.2°C). Our results nevertheless reveal greater thermal resilience than observations of short-term variation imply. To realize the long-term climate adaptation potential of tropical forests requires both protecting them and stabilizing Earth's climate.

    Competition influences tree growth, but not mortality, across environmental gradients in Amazonia and tropical Africa
    Rozendaal, Danaë M.A. ; Phillips, Oliver L. ; Lewis, Simon L. ; Affum-Baffoe, Kofi ; Alvarez-Davila, Esteban ; Andrade, Ana ; Aragão, Luiz E.O.C. ; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro ; Baker, Timothy R. ; Bánki, Olaf ; Brienen, Roel J.W. ; Camargo, José Luis C. ; Comiskey, James A. ; Djuikouo Kamdem, Marie Noël ; Fauset, Sophie ; Feldpausch, Ted R. ; Killeen, Timothy J. ; Laurance, William F. ; Laurance, Susan G.W. ; Lovejoy, Thomas ; Malhi, Yadvinder ; Marimon, Beatriz S. ; Marimon Junior, Ben Hur ; Marshall, Andrew R. ; Neill, David A. ; Núñez Vargas, Percy ; Pitman, Nigel C.A. ; Poorter, Lourens ; Reitsma, Jan ; Silveira, Marcos ; Sonké, Bonaventure ; Sunderland, Terry ; Taedoumg, Hermann ; Steege, Hans ter; Terborgh, John W. ; Umetsu, Ricardo K. ; Heijden, Geertje M.F. van der; Vilanova, Emilio ; Vos, Vincent ; White, Lee J.T. ; Willcock, Simon ; Zemagho, Lise ; Vanderwel, Mark C. - \ 2020
    Ecology 101 (2020)7. - ISSN 0012-9658
    climatic water deficit - competition - forest dynamics - mortality - neighborhood effects - soil fertility - trait-based models - tree growth - tropical forest - wood density

    Competition among trees is an important driver of community structure and dynamics in tropical forests. Neighboring trees may impact an individual tree’s growth rate and probability of mortality, but large-scale geographic and environmental variation in these competitive effects has yet to be evaluated across the tropical forest biome. We quantified effects of competition on tree-level basal area growth and mortality for trees ≥10-cm diameter across 151 ~1-ha plots in mature tropical forests in Amazonia and tropical Africa by developing nonlinear models that accounted for wood density, tree size, and neighborhood crowding. Using these models, we assessed how water availability (i.e., climatic water deficit) and soil fertility influenced the predicted plot-level strength of competition (i.e., the extent to which growth is reduced, or mortality is increased, by competition across all individual trees). On both continents, tree basal area growth decreased with wood density and increased with tree size. Growth decreased with neighborhood crowding, which suggests that competition is important. Tree mortality decreased with wood density and generally increased with tree size, but was apparently unaffected by neighborhood crowding. Across plots, variation in the plot-level strength of competition was most strongly related to plot basal area (i.e., the sum of the basal area of all trees in a plot), with greater reductions in growth occurring in forests with high basal area, but in Amazonia, the strength of competition also varied with plot-level wood density. In Amazonia, the strength of competition increased with water availability because of the greater basal area of wetter forests, but was only weakly related to soil fertility. In Africa, competition was weakly related to soil fertility and invariant across the shorter water availability gradient. Overall, our results suggest that competition influences the structure and dynamics of tropical forests primarily through effects on individual tree growth rather than mortality and that the strength of competition largely depends on environment-mediated variation in basal area.

    Warming and CO2 effects under oligotrophication on temperate phytoplankton communities
    Cabrerizo, Marco J. ; Álvarez-Manzaneda, Inmaculada M. ; León-Palmero, Elizabeth ; Guerrero-Jiménez, Gerardo ; Senerpont Domis, Lisette N. de; Teurlincx, Sven ; González-Olalla, Juan M. - \ 2020
    Water Research 173 (2020). - ISSN 0043-1354
    Cyanobacteria - Eukaryotes - Global change - Photosynthesis - Resource use efficiency - Shallow lakes

    Eutrophication, global warming, and rising carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are the three most prevalent pressures impacting the biosphere. Despite their individual effects are well-known, it remains untested how oligotrophication (i.e. nutrients reduction) can alter the planktonic community responses to warming and elevated CO2 levels. Here, we performed an indoor mesocosm experiment to investigate the warming × CO2 interaction under a nutrient reduction scenario (40%) mediated by an in-lake management strategy (i.e. addition of a commercial solid-phase phosphorus sorbent -Phoslock®) on a natural freshwater plankton community. Biomass production increased under warming × CO2 relative to present-day conditions; however, a Phoslock®-mediated oligotrophication reduced such values by 30–70%. Conversely, the warming × CO2 × oligotrophication interaction stimulated the photosynthesis by 20% compared to ambient nutrient conditions, and matched with higher resource use efficiency (RUE) and nutrient demand. Surprisingly, at a group level, we found that the multi-stressors scenario increased the photosynthesis in eukaryotes by 25%, but greatly impaired in cyanobacteria (ca. −25%). This higher cyanobacterial sensitivity was coupled with a reduced light harvesting efficiency and compensation point. Since Phoslock®-induced oligotrophication unmasked a strong negative warming × CO2 effect on cyanobacteria, it becomes crucial to understand how the interplay between climate change and nutrient abatement actions may alter the, ecosystems functioning. With an integrative understanding of these processes, policy makers will design more appropriate management strategies to improve the ecological status of aquatic ecosystems without compromising their ecological attributes and functioning.

    Evaluation of Terrestrial Laser Scanner and Structure from Motion photogrammetry techniques for quantifying soil surface roughness parameters over agricultural soils
    Martinez‐Agirre, Alex ; Álvarez‐Mozos, Jesús ; Milenković, Milutin ; Pfeifer, Norbert ; Giménez, Rafael ; Valle Melón, José Manuel ; Rodríguez Miranda, Álvaro - \ 2020
    Earth Surface Processes and Landforms 45 (2020)3. - ISSN 0197-9337 - p. 605 - 621.
    The surface roughness of agricultural soils is mainly related to the type of tillage performed, typically consisting of oriented and random components. Traditionally, soil surface roughness (SSR) characterization has been difficult due to its high spatial variability and the sensitivity of roughness parameters to the characteristics of the instruments, including its measurement scale. Recent advances in surveying have greatly improved the spatial resolution, extent, and availability of surface elevation datasets. However, it is still unknown how new roughness measurements relates with the conventional roughness measurements such as 2D profiles acquired by laser profilometers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the suitability of Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) and Structure from Motion (SfM) photogrammetry techniques for quantifying SSR over different agricultural soils. With this aim, an experiment was carried out in three plots (5 × 5 m) representing different roughness conditions, where TLS and SfM photogrammetry measurements were co‐registered with 2D profiles obtained using a laser profilometer. Differences between new and conventional roughness measurement techniques were evaluated visually and quantitatively using regression analysis and comparing the values of six different roughness parameters. TLS and SfM photogrammetry measurements were further compared by evaluating multi‐directional roughness parameters and analyzing corresponding Digital Elevation Models. The results obtained demonstrate the ability of both TLS and SfM photogrammetry techniques to measure 3D SSR over agricultural soils. However, profiles obtained with both techniques (especially SfM photogrammetry) showed a loss of high‐frequency elevation information that affected the values of some parameters (e.g. initial slope of the autocorrelation function, peak frequency and tortuosity). Nevertheless, both TLS and SfM photogrammetry provide a massive amount of 3D information that enables a detailed analysis of surface roughness, which is relevant for multiple applications, such as those focused in hydrological and soil erosion processes and microwave scattering.
    Exploring solution spaces for nutrition-sensitive agriculture in Kenya and Vietnam
    Timler, Carl ; Alvarez, Stéphanie ; DeClerck, Fabrice ; Remans, Roseline ; Raneri, Jessica ; Estrada Carmona, Natalia ; Mashingaidze, Nester ; Abe Chatterjee, Shantonu ; Chiang, Tsai Wei ; Termote, Celine ; Yang, Ray Yu ; Descheemaeker, Katrien ; Brouwer, Inge D. ; Kennedy, Gina ; Tittonell, Pablo A. ; Groot, Jeroen C.J. - \ 2020
    Agricultural Systems 180 (2020). - ISSN 0308-521X
    Agrobiodiversity - Dietary diversity - FarmDESIGN - Nutrition - Synergies - Trade-offs

    Smallholder agriculture is an important source of livelihoods in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. In these regions the highest concentrations of nutritionally vulnerable populations are found. Agricultural development needs to be nutrition-sensitive, and contribute simultaneously to improving household nutrition, farm productivity and environmental performance. We explored the windows of opportunities for farm development and the potential of crop diversification options for meeting household dietary requirements, whilst concurrently improving household economic performance in contrasting smallholder farm systems in Kenya and Vietnam. Farm and household features and farmer perspectives and priorities were integrated into a farm-household model that allowed quantification of a diverse set of nutritional, labour and productive indicators. Using a multi-objective optimization algorithm, we generated ‘solution spaces’ comprising crop compositions and management configurations that would satisfy household dietary needs and allowed income gains. Results indicated site-specific synergies between income and nutritional system yield for vitamin A. Diversification with novel vegetables could cover vitamin A requirements of 10 to 31 extra people per hectare and lead to greater income (25 to 185% increase) for some households, but reduced leisure time. Although the Vietnamese sites exhibited greater nutrient system yields than those in Kenya, the household diets in Kenya had greater nutrient adequacy due to the fact that the Vietnamese farmers sold greater proportions of their on-farm produced foods. We conclude that nutrition-sensitive, multi-method approaches have potential to identify solutions to simultaneously improve household income, nutrition and resource management in vulnerable smallholder farming systems.

    A model-based exploration of farm-household livelihood and nutrition indicators to guide nutrition-sensitive agriculture interventions
    Estrada-Carmona, Natalia ; Raneri, Jessica E. ; Alvarez, Stephanie ; Timler, Carl ; Chatterjee, Shantonu Abe ; Ditzler, Lenora ; Kennedy, Gina ; Remans, Roseline ; Brouwer, Inge ; Borgonjen van-den Berg, Karin ; Talsma, Elise F. ; Groot, Jeroen C.J. - \ 2020
    Food Security 12 (2020)1. - ISSN 1876-4517 - p. 59 - 81.
    Crop diversification - Farm-household model - Home garden - Human nutrition metrics - Multi-objective optimisation

    Assessing progress towards healthier people, farms and landscapes through nutrition-sensitive agriculture (NSA) requires transdisciplinary methods with robust models and metrics. Farm-household models could facilitate disentangling the complex agriculture-nutrition nexus, by jointly assessing performance indicators on different farm system components such as farm productivity, farm environmental performance, household nutrition, and livelihoods. We, therefore, applied a farm-household model, FarmDESIGN, expanded to more comprehensively capture household nutrition and production diversity, diet diversity, and nutrient adequacy metrics. We estimated the potential contribution of an NSA intervention targeting the diversification of home gardens, aimed at reducing nutritional gaps and improving livelihoods in rural Vietnam. We addressed three central questions: (1) Do ‘Selected Crops’ (i.e. crops identified in a participatory process) in the intervention contribute to satisfying household dietary requirements?; (2) Does the adoption of Selected Crops contribute to improving household livelihoods (i.e. does it increase leisure time for non-earning activities as well as the dispensable budget)?; and (3) Do the proposed nutrition-related metrics estimate the contribution of home-garden diversification towards satisfying household dietary requirements? Results indicate trade-offs between nutrition and dispensable budget, with limited farm-household configurations leading to jointly improved nutrition and livelihoods. FarmDESIGN facilitated testing the robustness and limitations of commonly used metrics to monitor progress towards NSA. Results indicate that most of the production diversity metrics performed poorly at predicting desirable nutritional outcomes in this modelling study. This study demonstrates that farm-household models can facilitate anticipating the effect (positive or negative) of agricultural interventions on nutrition and the environment, identifying complementary interventions for significant and positive results and helping to foresee the trade-offs that farm-households could face. Furthermore, FarmDESIGN could contribute to identifying agreed-upon and robust metrics for measuring nutritional outcomes at the farm-household level, to allow comparability between contexts and NSA interventions.

    Operationalizing the concept of robustness of nitrogen networks in mixed smallholder systems: A pilot study in the mid-hills and lowlands of Nepal
    Alomia-Hinojosa, Victoria ; Groot, Jeroen C.J. ; Speelman, Erika N. ; Bettinelli, Carlo ; Mcdonald, Andrew J. ; Alvarez, Stephanie ; Tittonell, Pablo - \ 2020
    Ecological Indicators 110 (2020). - ISSN 1470-160X
    Nitrogen (N) is often the most limiting nutrient to productivity in smallholder mixed crop-livestock systems such as commonly found in the mid-hills and lowland (Terai) of Nepal. Identifying current bottlenecks constraining agroecosystem functioning in terms of N flows and associated improvement options in these systems is paramount. Here, we explore variations in robustness, a concept from ecological network analysis (ENA) which represents the balance of system’s degree of order between organization (order/constraint) and adaptive flexibility (freedom/resilience) of N flows. Robustness can provide a detailed assessment of N flows and assist in evaluation of measures to reduce nutrient losses. In this study, the FarmDESIGN model was employed to quantify nitrogen flows, generate ENA indicators of integration, diversity and robustness, and to explore the impact of crop intensification options on N networks across farm types in the mid-hills and lowland (Terai) of Nepal. Results revealed that the farms in the different agroecosystems recycled only a small portion of the total N inputs (<15%), and had therefore high rates of N losses (63–1135 kg N per ha per year) and high dependency on N imports in the form of fodder (feed self-reliance 11–43%). The farm N networks were organised (high productivity) but inflexible (poorly resilient) and consequently unbalanced (low robustness). Scenarios of improved management (improved seed, intercropping, use of fertilizers, better timing of activities) resulted in improved crop production, leading to reduced fodder imports and less N losses. Consequently, the N networks increased in flexibility which resulted in greater robustness of the N flow network in the farm systems. Increasing on-farm biomass production by improved farm management could be an important element on the way to sustainably intensify smallholder farms, especially when dependency on external resources can be reduced. We conclude that a detailed analysis of nutrient flows and their robustness is a suitable instrument for targeted improvement of nutrient use in smallholder crop-livestock systems.
    A standardized assessment of forest mammal communities reveals consistent functional composition and vulnerability across the tropics
    Rovero, Francesco ; Ahumada, Jorge ; Jansen, Patrick A. ; Sheil, Douglas ; Alvarez, Patricia ; Boekee, Kelly ; Espinosa, Santiago ; Lima, Marcela Guimarães Moreira ; Martin, Emanuel H. ; O'Brien, Timothy G. ; Salvador, Julia ; Santos, Fernanda ; Rosa, Melissa ; Zvoleff, Alexander ; Sutherland, Chris ; Tenan, Simone - \ 2020
    Ecography 43 (2020)1. - ISSN 0906-7590 - p. 75 - 84.
    The understanding of global diversity patterns has benefitted from a focus on functional traits and how they relate to variation in environmental conditions among assemblages. Distant communities in similar environments often share characteristics, and for tropical forest mammals, this functional trait convergence has been demonstrated at coarse scales (110–200 km resolution), but less is known about how these patterns manifest at fine scales, where local processes (e.g. habitat features and anthropogenic activities) and biotic interactions occur. Here, we used standardized camera trapping data and a novel analytical method that accounts for imperfect detection to assess how the functional composition of terrestrial mammal communities for two traits – trophic guild and body mass – varies across 16 protected areas in tropical forests and three continents, in relation to the extent of protected habitat and anthropogenic pressures. We found that despite their taxonomic differences, communities generally have a consistent trophic guild composition, and respond similarly to these factors. Insectivores were found to be sensitive to the size of protected habitat and surrounding human population density. Body mass distribution varied little among communities both in terms of central tendency and spread, and interestingly, community average body mass declined with proximity to human settlements. Results indicate predicted trait convergence among assemblages at the coarse scale reflects consistent functional composition among communities at the local scale, suggesting that broadly similar habitats and selective pressures shaped communities with similar trophic strategies and responses to drivers of change. These similarities provide a foundation for assessing assemblages under anthropogenic threats and sharing conservation measures.
    NEOTROPICAL XENARTHRANS: a data set of occurrence of xenarthran species in the Neotropics
    Santos, Paloma Marques ; Bocchiglieri, Adriana ; Chiarello, Adriano Garcia ; Paglia, Adriano Pereira ; Moreira, Adryelle ; Souza, Agnis Cristiane de; Abba, Agustin Manuel ; Paviolo, Agustin ; Gatica, Ailin ; Medeiro, Akyllan Zoppi ; Costa, Alan Nilo ; Gallina, Alberto Gonzalez ; Yanosky, Alberto A. ; Jesus, Alejandro ; Bertassoni, Alessandra ; Rocha, Alessandro ; Bovo, Alex Augusto Abreu ; Bager, Alex ; Mol, Alexandra Cravino ; Martensen, Alexandre Camargo ; Faustino, Alexandre Casagrande ; Lopes, Alexandre Martins Costa ; Percequillo, Alexandre Reis ; Vogliotti, Alexandre ; Keuroghlian, Alexine ; Colina, María Alicia de la; Devlin, Allison L. ; García-Olaechea, Alvaro ; Sánchez, Amadeo ; Srbek-Araujo, Ana Carolina ; Ochoa, Ana Cecilia ; Oliveira, Ana Cristina Mendes ; Lacerda, Ana Cristyna Reis ; Campelo, Ana Kellen Nogueira ; Oliveira Paschoal, Ana Maria de; Costa, Ana Raíssa Cunha ; Meiga, Ana Yoko Ykeuti ; Jesus, Anamélia Souza ; Feijó, Anderson ; Hirsch, André ; Silva, André Luiz Ferreira da; Botelho, André Luis Moura ; Regolin, André Luis ; Lanna, André Monnerat ; Nunes, André Valle ; Kindel, Andreas ; Moraes, Andreia Magro ; Gatti, Andressa ; Noss, Andrew J. ; Nobre, Andrezza Bellotto ; Montanarin, Anelise ; Deffaci, Ângela Camila ; Albuquerque, Anna Carolina Figueiredo de; Oliveira, Anne Karoline de; Mangione, Antonio Marcelo ; Pontes, Antonio Rossano Mendes ; Bertoldi, Ariane Teixeira ; Calouro, Armando Muniz ; Desbiez, Arnaud L.J. ; Fernandes, Arthur ; Ferreguetti, Atilla Colombo ; Silva, Maria Augusta Andrade da; Zimbres, Barbara ; Luciano, Beatriz Fernandes Lima ; Thoisy, Benoit de; Niebuhr, Bernardo Brandão S. ; Papi, Bernardo ; Gómez-Valencia, Bibiana ; Santos, Bráulio A. ; Lima, Breno Campelo ; Oliveira, Bruna Gomes ; Santos, Bruna Silva ; Campos, Bruno Augusto Torres Parahyba ; Leles, Bruno ; Albuquerque França, Bruno Rodrigo de; Lim, Burton ; Oliveira, Caetano Troncoso ; Cantagallo, Camila ; Lara, Camila Clozato ; Lima, Camila Silveira ; Gestich, Carla Cristina ; Melo-Soares, Carla Danielle de; Peres, Carlos A. ; Kasper, Carlos Benhur ; Candia-Gallardo, Carlos ; Angelo, Carlos De; Fragoso, Carlos Eduardo ; Freitas, Carlos Henrique de; Salvador, Carlos Henrique ; Brocardo, Carlos R. ; Melo, Carolina Depolito ; Leuchtenberger, Caroline ; Braga, Caryne ; Sánchez-Lalinde, Catalina ; Bueno, Cecília ; Luna, Cecília Licarião ; Rojano, Cesar ; Hurtado, Cindy Meliza ; Santos, Cinthya Chiva dos; Tellaeche, Cintia ; Rosa, Clarissa ; Campos, Claudia Bueno de; Silva, Cláudia Regina ; Kanda, Claudia Zukeran ; Jenkins, Clinton N. ; McDonough, Colleen ; Trinca, Cristiano Trapé ; Cunha, Cristina Jaques da; Widmer, Cynthia Elisa ; Santos, Cyntia ; Buscariol, Daiane ; Carreira, Daiane Cristina ; Carvalho, Danianderson Rodrigues ; Silva Ferraz, Daniel da; Casali, Daniel ; Thornton, Daniel ; Vasconcellos, Daniela Rodrigues ; Barcelos, Daniele ; Brown, Danielle ; Ramos, Daniella Leal ; Moreira, Danielle Oliveira ; Yogui, Débora Regina ; Faria, Deborah ; Sana, Denis Alessio ; Mattia, Denise Lidoro de; Henz, Denison José ; Friedeberg, Diana B. ; Carvalho, Diana Letícia Kruger Pacheco ; Astúa, Diego ; Queirolo, Diego ; Varela, Diego M. ; Eaton, Donald P. ; Dias, Douglas Matos ; Rivadeneira, Edgar Federico ; Rocha, Ednaldo Cândido ; Abreu-Júnior, Edson Fiedler de; Carrano, Eduardo ; Santos, Eduardo Marques ; Setz, Eleonore Zulnara Freire ; Carvalho, Elildo Alves Ribeiro ; Almeida Chiquito, Elisandra de; Matos Cardoso, Elizandra de; Mendonça, Eloisa Neves ; Bastiani, Elvira D'; Vieira, Emerson M. ; Ramalho, Emiliano Esterci ; Guijosa-Guadarrama, Emiliano ; González, Enrique ; Maggiorini, Erica Vanessa ; Fischer, Erich ; Aguiar, Erick Francisco ; Castro, Érika Paula ; Peña-Cuéllar, Erika de la; Viveiros de Castro, Ernesto B. ; Brítez, Evelyn Beatriz ; Vanderhoeven, Ezequiel Andres ; Pedó, Ezequiel ; Rocha, Fabiana Lopes ; Girardi, Fabiane ; Oliveira Roque, Fabio de; Mazim, Fábio Dias ; Barros, Fabio Monteiro de; Martello, Felipe ; Fantacini, Felipe Moreli ; Pedrosa, Felipe ; Peters, Felipe Bortolotto ; Abra, Fernanda Delborgo ; Azevedo, Fernanda Cavalcanti de; Silva Santos, Fernanda da; Silva, Fernanda Guedes da; Teixeira, Fernanda Zimmermann ; Perini, Fernando Araujo ; Passos, Fernando C. ; Carvalho, Fernando ; Azevedo, Fernando Cesar Cascelli de; Pinho, Fernando Ferreira de; Gonçalves, Fernando ; Lima, Fernando ; Contreras-Moreno, Fernando M. ; Pedroni, Fernando ; Tortato, Fernando Rodrigo ; Santos, Filipe Pereira Rego ; Caruso, Flavia ; Tirelli, Flávia Pereira ; Miranda, Flávia Regina ; Rodrigues, Flávio Henrique Guimarães ; Ubaid, Flávio Kulaif ; Palmeira, Francesca Belem Lopes ; Silva, Franciane Almeida da; Grotta-Neto, Francisco ; Souza, Franco Leandro de; Costa, Francys Emanuelle ; Pérez-Garduza, Freddy ; Delsuc, Frédéric ; Lemos, Frederico ; Pinto, Fredy Ramirez ; Boaglio, Gabriel Ivan ; Massocato, Gabriel Fávero ; Preuss, Gabriel ; Hofmann, Gabriel Selbach ; Aguiar, Gabriel Lima ; Oliveira, Gabriela Schuck ; Duarte, Gabriela Teixeira ; Beca, Gabrielle ; Giné, Gastón Andrés Fernandez ; Batista, Graziele Oliveira ; Gil, Guillermo Eduardo ; Gonsioroski, Gustavo ; Secco, Helio ; Medeiros, Hugo Reis ; Coelho, Igor Pfeifer ; Franceschi, Ingridi Camboim ; Bernardi, Itiberê ; Torre, Antonio de la; Zocche, Jairo José ; Seibert, Jardel Brandão ; Faria Falcão, Jéssica Caroline de; Dias, Jéssica Helena Mangueira ; Nodari, Joana Zorzal ; Oliveira, João Alves ; Giovanelli, João Gabriel Ribeiro ; Favoretti, João Paulo Pandini ; Polisar, John ; Sponchiado, Jonas ; Cherem, Jorge José ; Ramírez, José Fernando Moreira ; Toledo, José Julio de; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti ; Matos, Jose Roberto de; Arrabal, Juan Pablo ; Faria Oshima, Júlia Emi de; Ribeiro, Juliana Fernandes ; Bogoni, Juliano André ; Pacheco, Julio Javier Chacón ; Schuchmann, Karl L. ; Ferraz, Katia M.P.M.B. ; Santos Everton, Laís dos; Bailey, Larissa L. ; Gonçalves, Larissa Oliveira ; Cullen, Laury ; Andrade, Layla Reis de; Trevelin, Leonardo Carreira ; Bonjorne, Lilian ; Almeida Rodrigues, Livia de; Leuzinger, Lucas ; Perillo, Lucas Neves ; Araújo, Luciana Souza ; Hufnagel, Ludmila ; Ribeiro, Ludmilla Oliveira ; Bernardo, Luis Renato Rezende ; Oliveira-Santos, Luiz Gustavo Rodrigues ; Varzinczak, Luiz Henrique ; Borges, Luiz Henrique Medeiros ; Guimarães, Luiza Neves ; Möcklinghoff, Lydia ; Oliveira, Marcela Alvares ; Magioli, Marcelo ; Assis Jardim, Márcia Maria de; Oliveira, Márcio Leite de; Tortato, Marcos Adriano ; Dums, Marcos ; Iezzi, Maria Eugenia ; Pereira, Maria João Ramos ; Jorge, Maria Luísa ; Castro Morini, Maria Santina de; Landis, Mariana Bueno ; Xavier, Mariana Sampaio ; Barros, Marília A.S. ; Silva, Marina Lima da; Rivero, Marina ; Zanin, Marina ; Marques, Marinêz Isaac ; Alves, Mario Henrique ; Bitetti, Mario S. Di; Alvarez, Martín R. ; Graipel, Maurício Eduardo ; Godoi, Mauricio Neves ; Benedetti, Maximiliano Augusto ; Beltrão, Mayara Guimarães ; Monteiro, Miguel Coutinho Moretta ; Paula, Milton José de; Perilli, Miriam Lucia Lages ; Silva, Murillo Prado da; Villar, Nacho ; Albuquerque, Natasha Moraes De; Canassa, Nathália F. ; Filho, Newton Mota ; Rosa Oliveira, Nicole da; Pasqualotto, Nielson ; Cáceres, Nilton Carlos ; Attias, Nina ; Favarini, Marina Ochoa ; Ribeiro, Otávio Santi ; Gonçalves, Pablo Rodrigues ; Rocha, Patrício Adriano da; Condé, Paula Alves ; Akkawi, Paula ; Cruz, Paula ; Lira, Paula Koeler ; Ferreira, Paula Modenesi ; Arroyo-Gerala, Paulina ; Hartmann, Paulo Afonso ; Tarso Zuquim Antas, Paulo de; Marinho, Paulo Henrique ; Faria Peres, Pedro Henrique de; Peña-Mondragón, Juan Luis ; Lombardi, Pryscilla Moura ; Souza Laurindo, Rafael de; Alves, Rafael Souza Cruz ; Grangeiro, Raissa Danielle Praxedes ; Silva, Ramon Lima ; Beltrão-Mendes, Raone ; Bonikowski, Renata Twardowsky Ramalho ; Reppucci, Juan ; Arrais, Ricardo Corassa ; Sampaio, Ricardo ; Sartorello, Ricardo ; Bovendorp, Ricardo Siqueira ; McNab, Roan ; Hack, Robson Odeli Espíndola ; Magalhães, Rodolfo Assis ; Araújo, Rodrigo Costa ; Almeida Nobre, Rodrigo de; Pérez, Rodrigo Raúl León ; Massara, Rodrigo Lima ; Paula, Rogério Cunha de; Anleu, Rony García ; Marques, Rosane Vieira ; Dornas, Rubem ; Rolim, Samir Gonçalves ; Cavalcanti, Sandra M.C. ; Lima, Saulo Ramos ; Ballari, Sebastián A. ; Santamaría, Silvia Benito ; Silva, Sofia Marques ; Age, Stefani Gabrieli ; Godim, Tayana ; Sobral-Souza, Thadeu ; Maccarini, Thiago Bernardes ; Rodrigues, Thiago Ferreira ; Piovezan, Ubiratan ; Cunha Tavares, Valéria da; Quiroga, Verónica Andrea ; Krepschi, Victor Gasperotto ; Filho, Vilmar Picinatto ; Galvão Bastazini, Vinícius Augusto ; Oliveira Gasparotto, Vinicius Peron de; Orsini, Vinicius Santana ; Guedes Layme, Viviane Maria ; Hannibal, Wellington ; Dáttilo, Wesley ; Carvalho, William Douglas de; Loughry, William James ; Blanco, Yamil Edgardo Di; Núñez-Regueiro, Mauricio M. ; Giubbina, Marina Furlan ; Passamani, Marcelo ; Alagão Querido, Luciano Carramaschi de; Costa Toledo, Gustavo Alvez da; Ribeiro, Igor Kintopp ; Quintilham, Lucas ; Bustos, Soledad de; Maza, Javier de la; Lima Neto, Jorge Ferreira ; Kossel de Andrade Silva, Katyucha Von; Sartorello, Leonardo ; Rampim, Lilian Elaine ; Marás, Gustavo A. ; Camino, Micaela ; Freitas-Junior, Mozart ; Perovic, Pablo Gaston ; Paolino, Roberta Montanheiro ; Ferreira, Scarlat Dalva ; Towns, Valeria ; Esperandio, Isadora Beraldi ; Aximoff, Izar ; Beduschi, Júlia ; Guenther, Mariana ; Cassia Bianchi, Rita de; Keuroghlian-Eaton, Sean ; Mendes, Sérgio Lucena ; Fatima Cunha, Lerrane de; Cirignoli, Sebastián ; Ciocheti, Giordano ; Prado, Helena Alves do; Fernandes-Ferreira, Hugo ; Mendes de Sena, Liana Mara ; Yamane, Marcelo Hideki ; Brennand, Pamella G.G. ; Silva, Rayana Diniz da; Escobar, Santiago ; Endo, Whaldener ; Hurtado, Rafael Reyna ; Gontijo, Nila Rássia Costa ; Marsh, Laura K. ; Severo, Magnus Machado ; Pardo, Julia Martinez ; Costa, Sebastián Andrés ; Melo, Geruza Leal ; Santana, Gindomar Gomes ; Miranda Mourão, Guilherme de; Gaspari, Gustavo Gabirele ; Duarte, Herbert ; Cabral, Hugo ; Silva, Leonardo Henrique da; Mendonça, Luana ; Barbosa, Lucas Lobo ; Santos, Manuela Vieira dos; Moraes, Marcela Figuerêdo Duarte ; Gordo, Marcelo ; Versiani, Natalia Fraguas ; Cantero, Nicolás ; Pays, Olivier ; Guedes, Patrícia Gonçalves ; Colas-Rosas, Paul François ; Ribeiro, Paulo ; Renaud, Pierre Cyril ; Hoogesteijn, Rafael Jan ; Ayala, Rodrigo ; Cunha, Rogério Grassetto Teixeira da; Schaub, Roxane ; Laurito, Sabrina ; Betkowski, Samuel Eurich ; Cortez, Sara ; Silva, Shirley Seixas Pereira ; Oliveira, Tadeu Gomes de; Spironello, Wilson Roberto ; Gengler, Nicholas ; Hidalgo, Mircea Mihart ; Juárez, Rugieri ; Iglesias, Jesús A. ; Anacleto, Teresa Cristina ; Souza Fialho, Marcos de; Cavicchioli, Guilherme ; Beccato, Maria Angélica Barbosa ; Silva, Marcelo da; Neto, Omar Correia ; Lopes, Karine Galisteo Diemer ; Godoy, Leandro Perez ; Luiz, Micheli Ribeiro ; Rojas Bonzi, Viviana B. ; Ferreira, Guilherme Braga ; Oliveira, Marcelo Juliano Rabelo ; Hinojosa, Javier ; Oliveira, Luiz Flamarion Barbosa de; Nagy-Reis, Mariana Baldy ; Ramirez, Sixto Fernández ; Concone, Henrique Villas Boas ; Mourthe, Italo ; Martínez-Lanfranco, Juan A. ; Zanoni, Juliani Bruna ; Moreira, Tainah Cruz ; Guarderas, Zoila Vega ; Bazilio, Sérgio ; Cervini, Marcelo ; Pinheiro, Marcell Soares ; Morato, Ronaldo Gonçalves ; Peroni, Nivaldo ; Trigo, Tatiane Campos ; Machado, Ricardo Bomfim ; Gaspari, Fernando ; Koenemann, Joceleia G. ; Rudolf, Juan Carlos ; Benchimol, Maíra ; Vieira, Marcus Vinícius ; Retta, Lucía Martínez ; Santiago, Pablo Gerardo Fernández ; Ciccia, Paula Gonzalez ; Estrela, Pedro Cordeiro ; Carvalho, Santiago ; Esbérard, Carlos Eduardo Lustosa ; Cruz, Yaribeth Bravata de la; Castro-Prieto, Jessica ; Braga, Ricardo Miranda ; Cartes, Jose Luis ; Andrade-Núñez, María José ; Denkiewicz, Natalia Mariana ; Falconi, Nereyda ; Pezzuti, Juarez Carlos Brito ; Castillo Cordero, Hugo Fernando del; Sousa, Luziene Conceição de; Gaspari Júnior, Roque Lázaro de; Santos-Filho, Manoel ; Almeida, Josué Santos ; Thompson, Jeffrey J. ; Santos, Juliana Silveira dos; Pereira-Ribeiro, Juliane ; Burs, Kathrin ; Silva, Kena Ferrari Moreira da; Velilla, Marianela ; Silva, Marina Xavier da; Sancha, Noé U. de la; Pinheiro, Paula Fabiana ; Castilho, Pedro Volkmer de; Bercê, William ; Assis, Julia Camara ; Tonetti, Vinicius Rodrigues ; Alves-Eigenheer, Milene ; Chinem, Simonne ; Honda, Laura K. ; Godoy Bergallo, Helena de; Alberici, Vinicius ; Wallace, Robert ; Campos Krauer, Juan Manuel ; Ribeiro, Milton Cezar ; Galetti, Mauro - \ 2019
    Ecology 100 (2019)7. - ISSN 0012-9658
    biodiversity hotspot - cingulata - forest fragmentation - habitat loss - neotropical mammals - neotropical region - pilosa - xenarthra

    Xenarthrans—anteaters, sloths, and armadillos—have essential functions for ecosystem maintenance, such as insect control and nutrient cycling, playing key roles as ecosystem engineers. Because of habitat loss and fragmentation, hunting pressure, and conflicts with domestic dogs, these species have been threatened locally, regionally, or even across their full distribution ranges. The Neotropics harbor 21 species of armadillos, 10 anteaters, and 6 sloths. Our data set includes the families Chlamyphoridae (13), Dasypodidae (7), Myrmecophagidae (3), Bradypodidae (4), and Megalonychidae (2). We have no occurrence data on Dasypus pilosus (Dasypodidae). Regarding Cyclopedidae, until recently, only one species was recognized, but new genetic studies have revealed that the group is represented by seven species. In this data paper, we compiled a total of 42,528 records of 31 species, represented by occurrence and quantitative data, totaling 24,847 unique georeferenced records. The geographic range is from the southern United States, Mexico, and Caribbean countries at the northern portion of the Neotropics, to the austral distribution in Argentina, Paraguay, Chile, and Uruguay. Regarding anteaters, Myrmecophaga tridactyla has the most records (n = 5,941), and Cyclopes sp. have the fewest (n = 240). The armadillo species with the most data is Dasypus novemcinctus (n = 11,588), and the fewest data are recorded for Calyptophractus retusus (n = 33). With regard to sloth species, Bradypus variegatus has the most records (n = 962), and Bradypus pygmaeus has the fewest (n = 12). Our main objective with Neotropical Xenarthrans is to make occurrence and quantitative data available to facilitate more ecological research, particularly if we integrate the xenarthran data with other data sets of Neotropical Series that will become available very soon (i.e., Neotropical Carnivores, Neotropical Invasive Mammals, and Neotropical Hunters and Dogs). Therefore, studies on trophic cascades, hunting pressure, habitat loss, fragmentation effects, species invasion, and climate change effects will be possible with the Neotropical Xenarthrans data set. Please cite this data paper when using its data in publications. We also request that researchers and teachers inform us of how they are using these data

    Data from: Patterns of nitrogen-fixing tree abundance in forests across Asia and America
    Menge, Duncan N.L. ; Chisholm, Ryan A. ; Davies, Stuart J. ; Abu Salim, Kamariah ; Allen, David ; Alvarez, Mauricio ; Bourg, Norm ; Brockelman, Warren Y. ; Bunyavejchewin, Sarayudh ; Butt, Nathalie ; Ouden, Jan den; Jansen, Patrick - \ 2019
    Dryad
    Determinants of plant community diversity and structure - Forest - Smithsonian ForestGEO - legume - symbiosis - nutrient limitation - nitrogen fixation
    Symbiotic nitrogen (N)‐fixing trees can provide large quantities of new N to ecosystems, but only if they are sufficiently abundant. The overall abundance and latitudinal abundance distributions of N‐fixing trees are well characterised in the Americas, but less well outside the Americas. Here, we characterised the abundance of N‐fixing trees in a network of forest plots spanning five continents, ~5,000 tree species and ~4 million trees. The majority of the plots (86%) were in America or Asia. In addition, we examined whether the observed pattern of abundance of N‐fixing trees was correlated with mean annual temperature and precipitation. Outside the tropics, N‐fixing trees were consistently rare in the forest plots we examined. Within the tropics, N‐fixing trees were abundant in American but not Asian forest plots (~7% versus ~1% of basal area and stems). This disparity was not explained by mean annual temperature or precipitation. Our finding of low N‐fixing tree abundance in the Asian tropics casts some doubt on recent high estimates of N fixation rates in this region, which do not account for disparities in N‐fixing tree abundance between the Asian and American tropics. Synthesis. Inputs of nitrogen to forests depend on symbiotic nitrogen fixation, which is constrained by the abundance of N‐fixing trees. By analysing a large dataset of ~4 million trees, we found that N‐fixing trees were consistently rare in the Asian tropics as well as across higher latitudes in Asia, America and Europe. The rarity of N‐fixing trees in the Asian tropics compared with the American tropics might stem from lower intrinsic N limitation in Asian tropical forests, although direct support for any mechanism is lacking. The paucity of N‐fixing trees throughout Asian forests suggests that N inputs to the Asian tropics might be lower than previously thought.
    Data for: A model to examine farm household trade-offs and synergies with an application to smallholders in Vietnam
    Groot, Jeroen ; Timler, Carl ; Chatterjee, Shantonu Abe ; Chiang, Tsai Wei ; Komarek, Adam M. ; Estrada Carmona, Natalia ; Kennedy, Gina ; Alvarez, Stephanie ; Raneri, Jessica ; Ditzler, Lenora - \ 2019
    Wageningen University & Research
    Rural development - Cropping system - Modelling - Farming system
    FarmDESIGN Model with the case study farms and their data for the paper "A model to examine farm household trade-offs and synergies with an application to smallholders in Vietnam"
    Mejora de la Fertilidad. Estartegias Nutricionales
    Alvarez Aranguiz, Adolfo - \ 2019
    Sistemas de producción de leche en el mundo “Nuevos Desafíos”
    Alvarez Aranguiz, Adolfo - \ 2019
    Update of the list of QPS-recommended biological agents intentionally added to food or feed as notified to EFSA 9 : Suitability of taxonomic units notified to EFSA until september 2018
    Koutsoumanis, Kostas ; Allende, Ana ; Álvarez-Ordóñz, Avelino ; Bolton, Declan ; Bover-Cid, Sara ; Chemaly, Marianne ; Davies, Robert ; Hilbert, Friederike ; Lindqvist, Roland ; Nauta, Maarten ; Peixe, Luisa ; Ru, Giuseppe ; Simmons, Marion ; Skandamis, Panagiotis ; Suffredini, Elisabetta ; Cocconcelli, Pier Sandro ; Escámez, Pablo Salvador Fernández ; Maradona, Miguel Prieto ; Querol, Amparo ; Suarez, Juan Evaristo ; Sundh, Ingvar ; Vlak, Just ; Barizzone, Fulvio ; Correia, Sandra ; Herman, Lieve - \ 2019
    EFSA Journal 17 (2019)1. - ISSN 1831-4732
    Bacteria - Corynebacterium glutamicum - Komagataeibacter sucrofermentans - Mycobacterium setense - Pseudomonas fluorescens - QPS - Safety - Yeast

    The qualified presumption of safety (QPS) procedure was developed to provide a harmonised generic pre-evaluation to support safety risk assessments of biological agents performed by EFSA’s Scientific Panels. The taxonomic identity, body of knowledge, safety concerns and antimicrobial resistance were assessed. Safety concerns identified for a taxonomic unit are, where possible and reasonable in number, reflected by ‘qualifications’ which should be assessed at the strain level by the EFSA’s Scientific Panels. During the current assessment, no new information was found that would change the previously recommended QPS taxonomic units and their qualifications. Between April and September 2018, the QPS notification list was updated with 48 microorganisms from applications for market authorisation. Of these, 30 biological agents already had QPS status, 15 were excluded from the QPS exercise by the previous QPS mandate (five filamentous fungi) or from further evaluations within the current mandate (two notifications of Enterococcus faecium, one of Streptomyces spp. and seven of Escherichia coli). One taxonomic unit was (re)evaluated: Pseudomonas fluorescens had been previously evaluated in 2016, and was now re-evaluated within this mandate. The revision of the literature supports the previously identified safety concerns (e.g. production of biocompounds with antimicrobial activity and virulence features), preventing the inclusion of P. fluorescens in the QPS list. Mycobacterium setense and Komagataeibacter sucrofermentans were evaluated for the first time. M. setense cannot be considered for the QPS assessment because there are significant safety concerns. K. sucrofermentans (Acetobacter xylinus subsp. sucrofermentans) can be proposed for the QPS list but only for production purposes. The QPS status of Corynebacterium glutamicum is confirmed with the qualification extended to other production purposes.

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