Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    In vivo and in vitro effects of tea extracts on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-induced intestinal fluid loss in animal models
    Bruins, M.J. ; Cermak, R. ; Kiers, J.L. ; Meulen, J. van der; Amelsvoort, J.M.M. van; Klinken, B.J. - \ 2006
    Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 43 (2006). - ISSN 0277-2116 - p. 459 - 469.
    antibacterial activity - net absorption - transport - flavonoids - secretion - mechanism - diarrhea - pigs
    OBJECTIVES: Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is a major cause of dehydrating diarrhoea in infants and early-weaned piglets living under subhygienic conditions. We studied the effect of different tea types and subfractions on the intestinal fluid and electrolyte losses involved in ETEC diarrhoea. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Jejunal segments of anaesthetised piglets were infected with ETEC or ETEC heat-labile toxin (LT) and subsequently perfused for 8 hours with control or tea solutions containing green or black tea extract (BTE) or 3 different BTE subfractions containing small-size, large-size or no phenolics. Changes in intestinal fluid and electrolyte net absorption were measured. To assess the antisecretory effects of tea, BTE was incubated before or after administration of the secretagogue forskolin in rat jejunal tissue placed in Ussing chambers and Cl- secretion measured as changes in short-circuit current (I(SC)). RESULTS: Enterotoxigenic E. coli infection of piglet jejunal segments significantly reduced net absorption of fluid, Na+ and Cl- and increased net secretion of K+ compared with controls. Perfusion of the ETEC-infected segments with both 3 g/L green tea extract and BTE significantly inhibited these disturbances in fluid and electrolyte balance. The BTE subfraction rich in polymeric phenolics but not the other subfractions improved the fluid and electrolyte balance. Addition of forskolin to rat jejunal tissue induced a significant increase in I(SC). Pretreating but not posttreating the jejunal tissue with BTE inhibited the forskolin-induced increase in I(SC). CONCLUSIONS: Tea may inhibit net fluid and electrolyte losses involved in secretory diarrhoea from ETEC.
    P0564 black tea inhibits ETEC K88+ and enterotoxin-induced fluid loss in small intestinal segments of anaesthetised piglets
    Bruins, M.J. ; Meulen, J. van der; Amelsvoort, J.M.M. van; Klinken, B.J. - \ 2004
    Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 39 (2004)1 S271. - ISSN 0277-2116
    Impact of One Year of Shift Work on Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors
    Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M. van; Schouten, E.G. ; Kok, F.J. - \ 2004
    Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine 46 (2004)7. - ISSN 1076-2752 - p. 699 - 706.
    body-mass index - coronary-heart-disease - hormone - smoking - weight - cohort
    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the reported increased cardiovascular disease risk in shift workers could be explained by changes in cardiovascular risk factors. In a cohort of 239 shift and 157 daytime workers, 1-year changes in biological and lifestyle cardiovascular risk factors were monitored between the start Of a new job and I year later. Both body mass index and low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio decreased significantly in shift workers compared with daytime workers (body mass index change: -0.31 and +0.13 kg/m(2) low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio change: -0.33 and -0.13 respectively). Cigarettes smoked per day increased significantly in shift compared with daytime workers (+1.42 and -1.03, respectively). Therefore, only for smoking, an unfavorable change was observed. This may explain, at most, only a part of the excess cardiovascular disease risk reported in shaft workers.
    Asscociation between n-3 fatty acid status in blood and heart rate variability in healthy volunteers
    Brouwer, I.A. ; Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M. van; Katan, M.B. ; Schouten, E.G. ; Zock, P.L. - \ 2003
    FASEB Journal 16 (2003). - ISSN 0892-6638 - p. A241 - A241.
    Chlorogenic acid, quercetin-3-rutinoside and black tea phenols are extensively metabolized in humans
    Olthof, M.R. ; Hollman, P.C.H. ; Buijsman, M.N.C.P. ; Amelsvoort, J.M.M. van; Katan, M.B. - \ 2003
    The Journal of Nutrition 133 (2003)6. - ISSN 0022-3166 - p. 1806 - 1814.
    potentially anticarcinogenic flavonoids - caffeic acid - human plasma - derivatives - quercetin - bioavailability - consumption - microflora - catechins - lithium
    Dietary phenols are antioxidants, and their consumption might contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Coffee and tea are major dietary sources of phenols. Dietary phenols are metabolized extensively in the body. Lack of quantitative data on their metabolites hinders a proper evaluation of the potential biological effects of dietary phenols in vivo. The aim of this study was to identify and quantify the phenolic acid metabolites of chlorogenic acid (major phenol in coffee), quercetin-3-rutinoside (major flavonol in tea) and black tea phenols in humans, and determine the site, of metabolism. Healthy humans (n = 20) with an intact colon participated in a dietary controlled crossover study, and we identified and quantified similar to60 potential phenolic acid metabolites in urine. Half of the ingested chlorogenic acid and 43% of the tea phenols were metabolized to hippuric acid. Quercetin-3-rutinoside was metabolized mainly to phenylacetic acids, i.e., 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (36%), 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (8%) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (5%). In contrast, in seven humans without a colon, we found only traces of phenolic acid metabolites in urine after they had ingested chlorogenic acid and quercetin-3-rutinoside. This implies that the colonic microflora convert most of these dietary phenols into metabolites that then reach the circulation. Metabolites of dietary phenols have lower antioxidant activity than their parent compounds; therefore, the contribution of dietary phenols to antioxidant activity in vivo might be lower than expected from in vitro tests. J. Nutr. 133: 1806-1814, 2003.
    Associations between n-3 fatty acid status in blood and electrocardiographic predictors of arrhythmia risk in healthy volunteers
    Brouwer, I.A. ; Zock, P.L. ; Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M. van; Katan, M.B. ; Schouten, E.G. - \ 2002
    American Journal of Cardiology 89 (2002). - ISSN 0002-9149 - p. 629 - 631.
    Changes in frequency of premature complexes and heart rate variability related to shift work
    Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M. van; Schouten, E.G. ; Maan, A.C. ; Swenne, C.A. ; Kok, F.J. - \ 2001
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine 58 (2001). - ISSN 1351-0711 - p. 678 - 681.
    OBJECTIVES To investigate whether an increased risk of cardiovascular disease might be caused by increased arrhythmogeneity and by unfavourable changes in autonomic cardiac control the changes in the occurrence of premature complexes (PVCs) and in heart rate variability (HRV) were studied in subjects who started to work in shifts. METHODS1 Year changes in frequency of PVCs and HRV were measured in 49 shift workers and 22 control subjects working in daytime. All respondents were starting in a new job in integrated circuit or waste incinerator plants. RESULTSThe incidence of PVC increased significantly in shift workers over the 1 year follow up, compared with daytime workers. The frequency of ventricular extrasystoles increased in 48.9 f the shift workers, and in 27.3 f the daytime workers. The Spearman correlation coefficient between the number of nights worked and the change in PVCs was 0.33 (p=0.004). A small non-significant unfavourable change in HRV was found in both the shift and daytime workers. CONCLUSIONSA change in arrhythmogeneity, but not in cardiac autonomic control, might explain the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in shift workers
    24-Hour heart rate variability in shift workers: impact of shift schedule
    Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M. van; Schouten, E.G. ; Maan, A.C. ; Swenne, K.A. ; Kok, F.J. - \ 2001
    Journal of occupational health 43 (2001). - ISSN 1341-9145 - p. 32 - 38.
    Occupational determinants of heart rate variability
    Amelsvoort, L.P.G.M. van; Schouten, E.G. ; Maan, A.C. ; Swenne, C.A. ; Kok, F.J. - \ 2000
    International Archives of Occupational and Environmental Health 73 (2000). - ISSN 0340-0131 - p. 255 - 262.
    Cardiovascular risk profile in shift workers : cardiac control, biological and lifestyle risk factors
    Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M. van - \ 2000
    Agricultural University. Promotor(en): F.J. Kok; E.G. Schouten. - S.l. : S.n. - ISBN 9789058081995 - 131
    hart- en vaatziekten - werknemers in ploegendienst - levensstijl - cardiovascular diseases - shift workers - lifestyle

    Background: Evidence available so far indicates a 40% excess cardiovascular disease risk among shift workers. As, in the Netherlands alone, about one million people are working in shifts, this might have a considerable public health impact. Factors responsible for this elevated risk have not yet been elucidated. Both changes in biological and lifestyle risk factors and disturbance of the cardiac control, as reflected by an increased frequency of premature ventricular complexes and decreased heart rate variability, might be involved in this excess risk. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether shift work related changes occur in these factors that might explain the elevated CVD risk among shift workers.

    Methods: A cohort study was carried out in 1997 to 1999 among 227 shift workers and 150 controls working in daytime, all nurses and industrial workers. One-year changes in cardiac control (premature ventricular complexes and heart rate variability), biological risk factors (blood pressure, body mass index, waist to hip ratio and blood cholesterol) and lifestyle risk factors (dietary habits, smoking, and decreased physical activity) were investigated.

    Results: We observed a significantly greater one-year increase in the frequency of premature ventricular complexes in the shift workers compared with the day workers. The frequency of ventricular extrasystoles went up in 48.9 % of the shift workers, and in 27.3 % of the day workers. The Spearman correlation coefficient between the number of nights worked and the change in frequency of PVC's was 0.33; P = 0.004. The one-year change in the HRV parameters measured (SDNNi, Low and High frequency power and %LF) was similar between the shift and day workers. However, among the shift workers the low frequency power component of the total heart rate variability (%LF) was stronger during sleep after a night shift than after a day shift (%LF + 3.04, P < 0.01). This suggests an increased sympathetic activity during a sleep after night shift. The magnitude of the reported effects was related to the shift schedule. Backward rotating schedules (three to five shifts of night work, evening work, day work, respectively) appeared to be the most unfavourable. Smoking was the only variable among the other biological and lifestyle risk factors that showed an unfavourable one-year change in the shift workers compared with the day workers (difference in change: 2.5 cigarettes per day; p < 0.05).

    Exercise training and heart rate variability in older people
    Schuit, A.J. ; Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M. van; Verheij, T.C. ; Rijneke, R.D. ; Maan, A.C. ; Swenne, C.A. ; Schouten, E.G. - \ 1999
    Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise 31 (1999)6. - ISSN 0195-9131 - p. 816 - 821.
    Purpose: Heart rate variability (HRV), a characteristic that is potentially increased by physical activity, has been associated with incidence of cardiac events and total mortality. Since the incidence of cardiac events among older people is high and their physical activity levels and HRV are generally low, it is important to investigate whether regular physical activity can modify HRV in this age group. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of regular physical activity on HRV in older men and women. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, the effect of six months' training on HRV was investigated in a group of 51 older men and women (67.0 ± 5.1 yr). The training group gathered three times per week for 45 min supervised training. Results: At the end of the intervention period, HRV was higher primarily during the day. During daytime, the SD of all normal intervals (+ 6%) as well as the low frequency component (+ 15%) and the very low frequency component (+ 10%) of HRV were significantly increased (P < 0.05) as compared with the control group. Effects of training were most pronounced in subjects inactive in sports at baseline. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that regular physical activity increases HRV (specifically in the very low and low frequency components) in older subjects. Hence, in older subjects, physical training may be an effective means to modify positively a factor that is associated with increased incidence of cardiac events.
    Intake of fatty acids in Western Europe with emphasis on trans fatty acids : The TRANSFAIR study
    Hulshof, K.F.A.M. ; Erp-Baart, M.A. van; Antttolainen, M. ; Becker, W. ; Church, S.M. ; Couet, C. ; Amelsvoort, J.J.M. van - \ 1999
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 53 (1999). - ISSN 0954-3007 - p. 143 - 157.
    Duration of shiftwork related to body mass index and waist to hip ratio
    Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M. van; Schouten, E.G. ; Kok, F.J. - \ 1999
    International Journal of Obesity 23 (1999). - ISSN 0307-0565 - p. 973 - 978.
    Years of shiftwork experience in relation with body mass index and blood pressure.
    Amelsvoort, L. van; Schouten, E.G. - \ 1998
    In: The international conference on work environment and cardiovascuar diseases, Tel-Aviv, Israel - p. 10 - 10.
    Body mass index, taille/heup ratio en jaren in ploegendienst.
    Amelsvoort, L.P.G.M. van; Schouten, E.G. - \ 1998
    Tijdschrift voor sociale gezondheidszorg 4 (1998). - ISSN 0920-0517 - p. 23.1 - 23.1.
    Hartritmevariabiliteit en fitheid bij fragiele ouderen.
    Chin A Paw, J.M.M. ; Gruijs, S. ; Amelsvoort, L.P.G.M. van - \ 1998
    Tijdschrift voor sociale gezondheidszorg 4 (1998). - ISSN 0920-0517 - p. 8.2 - 8.2.
    Limited effect of consumption of uncooked (RS2) or retrograded (RS3) resistant starch on putative risk factors for colon cancer in healthy men.
    Heijnen, M.L.A. ; Amelsvoort, J.M.M. van; Deurenberg, P. ; Beynen, A.C. - \ 1998
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 67 (1998). - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 322 - 331.
    Exposure to organic dusts, endotoxines and microorganisms in the municipal waste industry.
    Tongeren, M. ; Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M. van; Heederik, D.J.J. - \ 1997
    International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health 3 (1997). - ISSN 1077-3525 - p. 30 - 36.
    Heart rate variability during a night and dayshift in low and medium strain jobs.
    Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M. van; Maan, A.C. ; Schouten, E.G. - \ 1997
    In: IEA European regional meeting; The Health of populations in a changing Europe. Munster - p. 36 - 36.
    Effect van werkstress op hartritmevariabiliteit bij werknemers in ploegendienst.
    Amelsvoort, L.G.P.M. van; Maan, A.C. ; Schouten, E.G. - \ 1997
    In: 22e WEON Congress 1997 Tijdschrift voor Sociale Gezondheidszorg - p. 75 - 55.
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