Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Comparing diel activity patterns of wildlife across latitudes and seasons: Time transformations using day length
Vazquez, Carmen ; Rowcliffe, Marcus ; Spoelstra, Kamiel ; Jansen, Patrick A. - \ 2019
Methods in Ecology and Evolution (2019). - ISSN 2041-210X
activity level - activity pattern - camera trapping - day length - diel activity - double anchoring - equinoctial anchoring - mouflon - red deer - seasonal variation

Camera trapping allows scientists to study activity patterns of animals under natural conditions. However, comparisons of activity patterns across seasons or latitudes can be biased, because activity is often attuned to sunrise and sunset, the timing of which varies with latitude and season. Existing transformation methods to solve this problem have limitations. Here, we explore whether and how activity patterns can be transformed more accurately using two alternative ‘double anchoring’ transformations – equinoctial and average anchoring – that anchor activity time to two chosen anchor points during the study period. Using simulated noisy datasets mimicking species with either crepuscular, diurnal or cathemeral activity patterns, we compared the ability of different transformation methods to extract the latent pattern and activity levels under different study conditions. We found that average anchoring best retrieved the original diel activity pattern and yielded accurate estimates of activity level. Two alternative transformation methods – single anchoring and equinoctial anchoring – performed less well. Bias in estimates from using untransformed clock times was most marked (up to 2.5-fold overestimation) for longer studies covering 4–5 months either side of an equinox at high latitude, and focusing on crepuscular species. We applied the average anchoring method to 9 months of data on Red deer Cervus elaphus, Wild boar Sus scrofa and Mouflon Ovis amon musimon activity as captured by camera traps in National Park Hoge Veluwe, the Netherlands. Average anchoring revealed more pronounced peaks of activity after sunset than was apparent from untransformed data in red deer and wild boar, but not for mouflon, a cathemeral species. Similarly, activity level was lower when calculated using average anchored time for red deer and wild boar, but no difference was observed for mouflon. We conclude that transformation of time might not be necessary at latitudes below 20°, or in studies with a duration of less than a month (below 40° latitude). For longer study periods and/or higher latitudes, average anchoring resolves the problem of variable day length. Code is provided. The transformation functions are incorporated in the r-package ‘activity’.

Review of Legal Requirements on Ammonia and Greenhouse Gases Emissons form Animal Production Buildings in European countries
Bjerg, B. ; Demeyer, Peter ; Hoyaux, J. ; Didara, M. ; Grönroos, J. ; Hassouna, M. ; Amon, B. ; Sándor, R. ; Aarnink, A.J.A. ; Ozkan-Gulzari, Seyda - \ 2019
- p. 6 - 23.
The value of manure - Manure as co-product in life cycle assessment
Leip, Adrian ; Ledgard, Stewart ; Uwizeye, Aimable ; Palhares, Julio C.P. ; Aller, M.F. ; Amon, Barbara ; Binder, Michael ; Cordovil, Claudia M.D.S. ; Camillis, Camillo De; Dong, Hongming ; Fusi, Alessandra ; Helin, Janne ; Hörtenhuber, Stefan ; Hristov, Alexander N. ; Koelsch, Richard ; Liu, Chunjiang ; Masso, Cargele ; Nkongolo, Nsalambi V. ; Patra, Amlan K. ; Redding, Matthew R. ; Rufino, Mariana C. ; Sakrabani, Ruben ; Thoma, Greg ; Vertès, Françoise ; Wang, Ying - \ 2019
Journal of Environmental Management 241 (2019). - ISSN 0301-4797 - p. 293 - 304.
Livestock production is important for food security, nutrition, and landscape maintenance, but it is associated with several environmental impacts. To assess the risk and benefits arising from livestock production, transparent and robust indicators are required, such as those offered by life cycle assessment. A central question in such approaches is how environmental burden is allocated to livestock products and to manure that is re-used for agricultural production. To incentivize sustainable use of manure, it should be considered as a co-product as long as it is not disposed of, or wasted, or applied in excess of crop nutrient needs, in which case it should be treated as a waste. This paper proposes a theoretical approach to define nutrient requirements based on nutrient response curves to economic and physical optima and a pragmatic approach based on crop nutrient yield adjusted for nutrient losses to atmosphere and water. Allocation of environmental burden to manure and other livestock products is then based on the nutrient value from manure for crop production using the price of fertilizer nutrients. We illustrate and discuss the proposed method with two case studies.
Comparison of ammonia emissions related to nitrogen use efficiency of livestock production in Europe
Groenestein, C.M. ; Hutchings, N.J. ; Haenel, H.D. ; Amon, B. ; Menzi, H. ; Mikkelsen, M.H. ; Misselbrook, T.H. ; Bruggen, C. van; Kupper, T. ; Webb, J. - \ 2019
Journal of Cleaner Production 211 (2019). - ISSN 0959-6526 - p. 1162 - 1170.
Ammonia emission intensity - Animal protein - Feed nitrogen - Manure management - Nitrogen use efficiency

The increasing global demand for food and the environmental effects of reactive nitrogen losses in the food production chain, increase the need for efficient use of nitrogen (N). Of N harvested in agricultural plant products, 80% is used to feed livestock. Because the largest atmospheric loss of reactive nitrogen from livestock production systems is ammonia (NH3), the focus of this paper is on N lost as NH3 during the production of animal protein. The focus of this paper is to understand the key factors explaining differences in Nitrogen Use Efficiency (NUE) of animal production among various European countries. Therefore we developed a conceptual framework to describe the NUE defined as the amount of animal-protein N per N in feed and NH3–N losses in the production of milk, beef, pork, chicken meat and eggs in The Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom, Germany, Austria and Denmark. The framework describes how manure management and animal-related parameters (feed, metabolism) relate to NH3 emissions and NUE. The results showed that the animal product with the lowest NUE had the largest NH3 emissions and vice versa, which agrees with the reciprocal relationship between NUE and NH3 within the conceptual framework. Across animal products for the countries considered, about 20% of the N in feed is lost as NH3. The significant smallest proportion (12%) of NH3–N per unit of Nfeed is from chicken production. The proportions for other products are 17%, 19%, 20% and 22% for milk, pork, eggs and beef respectively. These differences were not significantly different due to the differences among countries. For all countries, NUE was lowest for beef and highest for chicken. The production of 1 kg N in beef required about 5 kg N in feed, of which 1 kg N was lost as NH3–N. For the production of 1 kg N in chicken meat, 2 kg N in feed was required and 0.2 kg was lost as NH3. The production of 1 kg N in milk required 4 kg N in feed with 0.6 kg NH3–N loss, the same as pork and eggs, but those needed 3 and 3.5 kg N in feed per kg N in product respectively. Except for beef, the differences among these European countries were mainly caused by differences in manure management practices and their emission factors, rather than by animal-related factors including feed and digestibility influencing the excreted amount of ammoniacal N (TAN). For beef, both aspects caused important differences. Based on the results, we encourage the expression of N losses as per N in feed or per N in product, in addition to per animal place, when comparing production efficiency and NUE. We consider that disaggregating emission factors into a diet/animal effect and a manure management effect would improve the basis for comparing national NH3 emission inventories.

Review and analysis of small-scale aquaculture production in East Africa : Part 3. Tanzania
Heijden, P.G.M. van der; Shoko, Amon P. ; Duijn, A.P. van; Rurangwa, E. ; Bolman, B. - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen Centre for Development Innovation (Report WCDI 18-020) - 51 p.
This report describes the findings of a literature study and of interviews with fish farmers and key informants familiar with the Tanzanian freshwater aquaculture sector. The study was part of an assignment commissioned by Msingi East Africa. The report was developed in collaboration with Stichting BoP Innovation Centre. Msingi is an East African industry development organisation. It aims to support the growth of competitive industries in the region. Aquaculture has been selected as the first East African industry to support among strategic industries in which East Africa has a comparative advantage. Msingi supports their growth through investment and technical assistance to pioneer businesses; this is complemented by wider support to the sector, such as on policy, technology transfer, research and development, human capacity building or support to key sector organisations.The Tanzanian freshwater aquaculture sector consists of roughly 19,000 small-scale farmers operating one or a few small ponds stocked with tilapia and/or catfish. Fish are fed in most cases with agricultural by-products and residues that are available on the farm. For most producers, fish farming is a part-time activity besides other sources of income. A small but growing number of farmers have specialised and are applying commercial fish feeds and are reaching higher levels of production. Total annual freshwater fish production of Tanzania is estimated to be 5000 metric tonnes. In the last years a growth of production is reported to take place as result of existing farms expanding and new farms being established. Part of the new farms use floating cages placed in Lake Victoria and Lake Kumba. All farmed fish is sold on the Tanzanian market, mostly as fresh, whole fish. Lack of capital and finance opportunities, a shortage of affordable commercial fish feeds, a shortage of fingerlings (fish seeds) of good quality and a lack of knowledge among farmers about improved aquaculture practices, farm management and a business–like approach to fish farming have been identified as major bottlenecks for growth of production of the small-scale producers. Recommendations for action that would address these bottlenecks are given in this report.
Review and analysis of small-scale aquaculture production in East Africa : Summary and Recommendations
Duijn, A.P. van; Heijden, P.G.M. van der; Bolman, B. ; Rurangwa, E. ; Meeks, Joshua ; Meijberg, Arnoud ; Nyachwaya, Maureen ; Cadogan, Tom ; Bosco Kabagambe, Jean ; Shoko, Amon P. ; Rutaisire, Justus - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen Centre for Development Innovation (Report WCDI 18-019)
Preface : Focus on imaging methods in granular physics
Amon, Axelle ; Born, Philip ; Daniels, Karen E. ; Dijksman, Joshua A. ; Huang, Kai ; Parker, David ; Schröter, Matthias ; Stannarius, Ralf ; Wierschem, Andreas - \ 2017
Review of Scientific Instruments 88 (2017)5. - ISSN 0034-6748
Challenges and priorities for modelling livestock health and pathogens in the context of climate change
Özkan, Şeyda ; Vitali, Andrea ; Lacetera, Nicola ; Amon, Barbara ; Bannink, André ; Bartley, Dave J. ; Blanco-penedo, Isabel ; Haas, Yvette De; Dufrasne, Isabelle ; Elliott, John ; Eory, Vera ; Fox, Naomi J. ; Garnsworthy, Phil C. ; Gengler, Nicolas ; Hammami, Hedi ; Kyriazakis, Ilias ; Leclère, David ; Lessire, Françoise ; Macleod, Michael ; Robinson, Timothy P. ; Ruete, Alejandro ; Sandars, Daniel L. ; Shrestha, Shailesh ; Stott, Alistair W. ; Twardy, Stanislaw ; Vanrobays, Marie-Laure ; Ahmadi, Bouda Vosough ; Weindl, Isabelle ; Wheelhouse, Nick ; Williams, Adrian G. ; Williams, Hefin W. ; Wilson, Anthony J. ; Østergaard, Søren ; Kipling, Richard P. - \ 2016
Environmental Research 151 (2016). - ISSN 0013-9351 - p. 130 - 144.
Climate change has the potential to impair livestock health, with consequences for animal welfare, productivity, greenhouse gas emissions, and human livelihoods and health. Modelling has an important role in assessing the impacts of climate change on livestock systems and the efficacy of potential adaptation strategies, to support decision making for more efficient, resilient and sustainable production. However, a coherent set of challenges and research priorities for modelling livestock health and pathogens under climate change has not previously been available. To identify such challenges and priorities, researchers from across Europe were engaged in a horizon-scanning study, involving workshop and questionnaire based exercises and focussed literature reviews. Eighteen key challenges were identified and grouped into six categories based on subject-specific and capacity building requirements. Across a number of challenges, the need for inventories relating model types to different applications (e.g. the pathogen species, region, scale of focus and purpose to which they can be applied) was identified, in order to identify gaps in capability in relation to the impacts of climate change on animal health. The need for collaboration and learning across disciplines was highlighted in several challenges, e.g. to better understand and model complex ecological interactions between pathogens, vectors, wildlife hosts and livestock in the context of climate change. Collaboration between socio-economic and biophysical disciplines was seen as important for better engagement with stakeholders and for improved modelling of the costs and benefits of poor livestock health. The need for more comprehensive validation of empirical relationships, for harmonising terminology and measurements, and for building capacity for under-researched nations, systems and health problems indicated the importance of joined up approaches across nations. The challenges and priorities identified can help focus the development of modelling capacity and future research structures in this vital field. Well-funded networks capable of managing the long-term development of shared resources are required in order to create a cohesive modelling community equipped to tackle the complex challenges of climate change
Field vegetable production in the Lake Zone of Tanzania
Everaarts, A.P. ; Putter, H. de; Maerere, A.P. ; Amon, W. - \ 2014
Lelystad : Applied Plant Research - 103
vollegrondsgroenten - gewasproductie - groenteteelt - marketing - tanzania - field vegetables - crop production - vegetable growing
In November 2012 and in August 2014 surveys were carried out in field vegetable producing areas in the Lake Zone of Tanzania. The aim of the surveys was to learn the conditions for field vegetable production and marketing in these areas. Recommendations for the development of vegetable production were formulated in order to enlarge the supply of vegetable products and secure a balanced nutrition for the rural and urban population.
An assessment of the variation of manure nitrogen efficiency throughout Europe and an appraisal of means to increase manure-N efficiency
Webb, J. ; Sorensen, P. ; Velthof, G.L. ; Amon, B. ; Pinto, M. ; Rodhe, L. ; Salomon, E. ; Hutchings, N. ; Burczyk, J. ; Reid, J.E. - \ 2013
Advances in Agronomy 119 (2013). - ISSN 0065-2113 - p. 371 - 442.
fertilizer replacement value - reducing ammonia emissions - greenhouse-gas emissions - treated cattle slurry - pig slurry - organic nitrogen - animal manures - short-term - mineral fertilizer - plant utilization
Using the nitrogen (N) in organic manures more effectively reduces losses to the environment. A requirement to take allowance of the N conserved by reduced ammonia (NH3)-emission techniques would increase manure-N efficiency by up to 15%. Covering manure stores and land application of slurry by injection beneath the soil surface and by rapid incorporation of both slurries and solid manures into uncropped soil reduce NH3 emissions. Injection of cattle slurry also reduces N immobilization compared with application methods, which mix the slurry with soil and increases manure-N efficiency by ca 10–15%. In growing cereals, NH3 emissions can be reduced by band spreading within the canopy. Anaerobic digestion of slurry may also increase manure-N availability in the season of application by 10–20%, compared with undigested slurry. Slurry acidification may increase manure-N efficiency by 35–65% by reducing total NH3 losses by 70% compared with unacidified slurry stored without cover and not incorporated after spreading. To fully utilize the fertilizer value of manure-N, uptake over more than 1 year needs to be accounted for. This is particularly important for solid manures which provide less-available N in the season after application than slurries but release more N to crops in subsequent years. Using manure-N as a sole N source may limit overall manure-N efficiency. Applying manures at reduced rates over a larger crop area, using N fertilizer at times when crop recovery of manure-N may be limited, may give the greatest overall manure-N efficiency.
Emissions of Ammonia, Nitrous Oxide and Methane during the Management of Solid Manures
Webb, J. ; Sommer, S.G. ; Kupper, T. ; Groenestein, K. ; Hutchings, N.J. ; Eurich-Menden, B. ; Rodhe, L. ; Misselbrook, T.H. ; Amon, B. - \ 2012
Sustainable Agriculture Reviews 8 (2012). - ISSN 2210-4410 - p. 67 - 107.
Organic manures arising from livestock production provide a source of plant nutrients when applied to agricultural land. However, only about 52% of the N excreted by livestock is estimated to be recycled as a plant nutrient. The ­greatest losses of N from livestock excreta and manures are as gaseous emissions. These emissions are in the form of ammonia (NH3), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4). Ammonia forms particles in the atmosphere which reduce visibility and may also harm human health, and when deposited to land NH3 causes nutrient enrichment of soil. Nitrous oxide and CH4 contribute significantly to global warming and N2O can also cause the breakdown of the protective ozone layer in the upper atmosphere. We established a database of emissions from solid manures. Statistical analysis provided new information, focussing on developing emission factors, emission algorithms and also new understanding of emission patterns from solid manure. The review found that housing systems with deep litter emit more NH3 than tied stalls. This is likely to be because the emitting surface area in a tied stall is smaller. Laying hens emit more NH3 than broilers and reduced-emission housing systems for poultry, including the aviary system, can reduce NH3 emissions by between 50% and 80%. The greatest N2O-N emissions from buildings housing livestock were also from deep litter systems, but the amount of N2O-N was smaller than that of NH3-N by a factor of 15. Air exchange and temperature increase induced by aerobic decomposition during manure storage may greatly increase NH3 emission. Emissions of 0.25–0.30 of the total-N have been recorded from pig and cattle manure heaps undergoing aerobic decomposition. Increased density of manure during storage significantly decreased temperatures in manure heaps. Storing solid manures at high density also reduces air exchange which with the low temperature limits the formation and transfer of NH3 to the surface layers of the heap, reducing emissions. Most N2O emission estimates from cattle and pig manure have been between 0.001 and 0.009 of total-N. Emission of N2O from poultry manure tends to be small. Average unabated NH3 emissions following application of manure were 0.79, 0.63 and 0.40 of total ammoniacal-N (TAN) from cattle, pig and poultry manure respectively. The smaller emission from poultry manure is expected as hydrolysis of uric acid to urea may take many months and is often incomplete even after application, hence limiting the potential for NH3 emission. Manure incorporation within 4 h after application reduced emission on average by 32%, 92% and 85% for cattle, pig and poultry manure respectively. Reductions following incorporation within 24 h or more after application were 20%, 56% and 50% for cattle, pigs and poultry, respectively. Incorporation by disc or harrow reduced NH3 emissions less than incorporation by plough. Emissions of N2O following the application of cattle manure were 0.12 of TAN without incorporation after application and 0.073 TAN with incorporation after application. Conversely, emissions following application of pig and poultry manures were 0.003 and 0.001 TAN respectively without and 0.035 and 0.089 TAN respectively with incorporation after application
Study on variation of manure N efficiency throughout Europe
Webb, J. ; Sorensen, P. ; Velthof, G.L. ; Amon, B. ; Pinto, M. ; Rodhe, L. ; Salomon, E. ; Hutchings, N. ; Burczyk, J. ; Reid, J.E. - \ 2011
Didcot, United Kingdom : AEA Technology plc (Final report ) - 114 p.
A survey of field vegetable production in Tanzania. Recommendations for improvement
Everaarts, A.P. ; Putter, H. de; Amon, W. - \ 2011
Lelystad : PPO AGV - 66
groenten - veldgewassen - gewasproductie - waterbeschikbaarheid - verliezen na de oogst - verpakkingsmaterialen - marketing - tanzania - vegetables - field crops - crop production - water availability - postharvest losses - packaging materials - marketing - tanzania
In July 2011 a survey was carried out in five field vegetable producing areas in Tanzania. The aim of the survey was to learn about the conditions for field vegetable production in these areas and to learn about production methods and marketing.
Farm data needed for agri-environmental reporting
Oenema, O. ; Amon, B. ; Beek, C.L. ; Hutchings, N. ; Perez-Soba, M. ; Velthof, G.L. - \ 2011
Luxembourg : Publications Office of the European Union (EUROSTAT methodologies & working papers 2011 ed) - ISBN 9789279196485
EU-AGRO-BIOGAS : European Biogas Initiative to Improve the Yield of Agricultural Biogas Plants
Amon, T. - \ 2010
The EU Agro Biogas Project
Amon, T. ; Mayr, H. ; Eder, M. ; Hobbs, P. ; Rao Ravella, S. ; Roth, U. ; Niebaum, A. ; Doehler, H. ; Weiland, P. ; Abdoun, E. ; Moser, A. ; Lyson, M. ; Heiermann, M. ; Blochl, M. ; Budde, J. ; Schattauer, A. ; Suarez, T. ; Moller, H. ; Ward, A. ; Hillen, F. ; Sulima, P. ; Oniszk-Polplawska, A. ; Krampe, P. ; Pastorek, Z. ; Kara, J. ; Mazancova, J. ; Dooren, H.J.C. van; Wim, C. ; Gioelli, F. ; Balsari, P. - \ 2010
In a Randomized Controlled Trial of Iron Fortification, Anthelmintic Treatment, and Intermittent Preventive Treatment of Malaria for Anemia Control in Ivorian Children, only Anthelmintic Treatment Shows Modest Benefit
Rohner, F. ; Zimmermann, M.B. ; Amon, R.J. ; Vounatsou, P. ; Tschannen, A.B. ; N'goran, E.K. ; Nindjin, C. ; Cacou, M.C. ; Té-Bonlé, D. ; Aka, H. ; Sess, D.E. ; Utzinger, J. ; Hurrell, R.F. - \ 2010
The Journal of Nutrition 140 (2010)3. - ISSN 0022-3166 - p. 635 - 641.
placebo-controlled trial - cote-divoire - double-blind - sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine - micronutrient status - ferric pyrophosphate - electrolytic iron - school-children - efficacy - deficiency
Anemia is common among children in sub-Saharan Africa and its etiology is multifactorial. Likely causes of anemia are low bioavailability of dietary iron, malaria, and helminth infection. In this study, we aimed to assess the effect of iron fortification, intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) of malaria, and anthelmintic treatment on hemoglobin concentration and anemia prevalence among school children. The study was a 6-mo, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial enrolling 591 6- to 14-y-old school children in Côte d'Ivoire using the following: 1) iron-fortified biscuits providing an additional 20 mg iron/d as electrolytic iron 4 times/wk; 2) IPT of malaria with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine at 0 and 3 mo; and 3) anthelmintic treatment at 0 and 3 mo as the interventions. Prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, malaria parasitemia, and helminth infection was 70.4, 9.3, 57.7, and 54.8%, respectively. Iron fortification did not improve iron status, IPT of malaria did not affect malaria burden, and neither had an impact on anemia prevalence. Anthelmintics significantly reduced the burden of helminth infections and decreased anemia prevalence (odds ratio: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.3, 0.7). The low prevalence of iron deficiency and an extended dry season that decreased malaria transmission likely reduced the potential impact of iron fortification and IPT. In this setting, anthelmintic treatment was the only intervention that modestly decreased rates of anemia
EU Agro Biogas Project
Amon, T. ; Mayr, H. ; Eder, M. ; Hobbs, P. ; Rao Ravella, S. ; Roth, U. ; Niebaum, A. ; Doehler, H. ; Weiland, P. ; Abdoun, E. ; Moser, A. ; Lyson, M. ; Heiermann, M. ; Plöchl, M. ; Budde, J. ; Schattauer, A. ; Suarez, T. ; Möller, H. ; Ward, A. ; Hillen, F. ; Sulima, P. ; Oniszk-Polplawska, A. ; Krampe, P. ; Pastorek, Z. ; Kara, J. ; Mazancova, J. ; Dooren, H.J.C. van; Wim, C. ; Gioelli, F. ; Balsari, P. - \ 2009
EU-AGRO-BIOGAS is a European Biogas initiative to improve the yield of agricultural biogas plants in Europe, to optimise biogas technology and processes and to improve the efficiency in all parts of the production chain from feedstock to biogas utilisation. Leading European research institutions and universities are cooperating with key industry partners in order to work towards a sustainable Europe. Fourteen partners from eight European countries are involved. EU-AGRO-BIOGAS aims at the development and optimisation of the entire value chain – to range from the production of raw materials, the production and refining of biogas to the utilisation of heat and electricity. The online European Feedstock Database was developed from all participant countries, a substantial amount of data (more than 10 000 analyses) was generated and collected. The online European Feedstock Database is designed as an open database where new data can always be fed in. It contains essential information on the quality of feedstock utilizable for fermentation including their methane production capacity. The online European Feedstock Database allows an initial testing of biogas potentials of regionally available substrates and substrate mixtures. The set up of quality definitions for feedstock enables the economic and energetic optimisation of substrate mixtures for biogas production. Field demonstrations of all technologies and methods developed in course of EUAGRO- BIOGAS are the core element of the project. EU-AGRO-BIOGAS includes the following demonstration activities at commercial plant level: Innovative approaches of feeding technologies, monitoring, management and early warning system, newly developed sensors, approaches to improve the degree of efficiency of the fermentation steps (enzymes, micro-organisms, stirring technologies), a floating system which recovers a significant amount of methane from the digestate storage tank without requiring changes to the A.D. management chain. A crucial task within the EU-AGRO-BIOGAS project is the economic and environmental assessment of the demonstration measures on selected medium- and large-scale biogas plants across Europe. EU-AGRO-BIOGAS started in January 2007 and will be finalised in January 2010
EU Agro Biogas Project
Amon, T. ; Mayr, H. ; Eder, M. ; Hobbs, P. ; Rao Ravella, S. ; Roth, U. ; Niebaum, A. ; Doehler, H. ; Weiland, P. ; Abdoun, E. ; Moser, A. ; Lyson, M. ; Heiermann, M. ; Plöchl, M. ; Budde, J. ; Schattauer, A. ; Suarez, T. ; Möller, H. ; Ward, A. ; Hillen, F. ; Sulima, P. ; Oniszk-Polplawska, A. ; Krampe, P. ; Pastorek, Z. ; Kara, J. ; Mazancova, J. ; Dooren, H.J.C. van; Wim, C. ; Gioelli, F. ; Balsari, P. - \ 2009
biobased economy - biogas - europese unie - projecten - biobased economy - biogas - european union - projects
EU-AGRO-BIOGAS is a European Biogas initiative to improve the yield of agricultural biogas plants in Europe, to optimise biogas technology and processes and to improve the efficiency in all parts of the production chain from feedstock to biogas utilisation. Leading European research institutions and universities are cooperating with key industry partners in order to work towards a sustainable Europe. Fourteen partners from eight European countries are involved. EU-AGRO-BIOGAS aims at the development and optimisation of the entire value chain – to range from the production of raw materials, the production and refining of biogas to the utilisation of heat and electricity.
EU Agro Biogas Project
Amon, T. ; Mayr, H. ; Eder, M. ; Hobbs, P. ; Rao Ravella, S. ; Roth, U. ; Niebaum, A. ; Doehler, H. ; Weiland, P. ; Abdoun, E. ; Moser, A. ; Lyson, M. ; Heiermann, M. ; Plöchl, M. ; Budde, J. ; Schattauer, A. ; Suarez, T. ; Möller, H. ; Ward, A. ; Hillen, F. ; Sulima, P. ; Oniszk-Polplawska, A. ; Krampe, P. ; Pastorek, Z. ; Kara, J. ; Mazancova, J. ; Dooren, H.J.C. van; Wim, C. ; Gioelli, F. ; Balsari, P. - \ 2009
EU-AGRO-BIOGAS is a European Biogas initiative to improve the yield of agricultural biogas plants in Europe, to optimise biogas technology and processes and to improve the efficiency in all parts of the production chain from feedstock to biogas utilisation. Leading European research institutions and universities are cooperating with key industry partners in order to work towards sustainable biogas production in Europe. Fourteen partners from eight European countries are involved in the EU-AGRO-BIOGAS project that aims at the development and optimisation of the entire value chain – that ranges from the production of raw materials, the production and refining of biogas; to the utilisation of heat and electricity. A online European Feedstock Database was developed from all participant countries from a substantial amount of data (more than 10 000 analyses). The online European Feedstock Database is designed as an open database where new data can always be added. It contains essential information on the quality of feedstock for fermentation including the methane production capacity. The online European Feedstock Database was built after the determination of biogas potentials of regionally available substrates and substrate mixtures. The set up of quality definitions for feedstock enables both the economic optimisation and optimisation of of energy output for different substrate mixtures for biogas production. Field demonstrations of all technologies and methods developed in the course of EU-AGRO-BIOGAS project are the core element of the project. The EU-AGRO-BIOGAS project includes the following demonstration activities at commercial plant level: Innovative approaches of feeding technologies, monitoring, management and early warning system, newly developed sensors, approaches to improve the degree of efficiency of the fermentation steps (enzymes, micro-organisms, stirring technologies), a floating system which recovers a significant amount of methane from the digestate storage tank without requiring changes to the A.D. management chain. A crucial task within the EU-AGRO-BIOGAS project is the economic and environmental assessment of the demonstration measures on selected medium- and large-scale biogas plants across Europe. The EU-AGRO-BIOGAS project started in January 2007 and will be completed in January 2010
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