Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

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State-of-the-art global models underestimate impacts from climate extremes
Schewe, Jacob ; Gosling, Simon N. ; Reyer, Christopher ; Zhao, Fang ; Ciais, Philippe ; Elliott, Joshua ; Francois, Louis ; Huber, Veronika ; Lotze, Heike K. ; Seneviratne, Sonia I. ; Vliet, Michelle T.H. Van; Vautard, Robert ; Wada, Yoshihide ; Breuer, Lutz ; Büchner, Matthias ; Carozza, David A. ; Chang, Jinfeng ; Coll, Marta ; Deryng, Delphine ; Wit, Allard De; Eddy, Tyler D. ; Folberth, Christian ; Frieler, Katja ; Friend, Andrew D. ; Gerten, Dieter ; Gudmundsson, Lukas ; Hanasaki, Naota ; Ito, Akihiko ; Khabarov, Nikolay ; Kim, Hyungjun ; Lawrence, Peter ; Morfopoulos, Catherine ; Müller, Christoph ; Müller Schmied, Hannes ; Orth, René ; Ostberg, Sebastian ; Pokhrel, Yadu ; Pugh, Thomas A.M. ; Sakurai, Gen ; Satoh, Yusuke ; Schmid, Erwin ; Stacke, Tobias ; Steenbeek, Jeroen ; Steinkamp, Jörg ; Tang, Qiuhong ; Tian, Hanqin ; Tittensor, Derek P. ; Volkholz, Jan ; Wang, Xuhui ; Warszawski, Lila - \ 2019
Nature Communications 10 (2019). - ISSN 2041-1723
Global impact models represent process-level understanding of how natural and human systems may be affected by climate change. Their projections are used in integrated assessments of climate change. Here we test, for the first time, systematically across many important systems, how well such impact models capture the impacts of extreme climate conditions. Using the 2003 European heat wave and drought as a historical analogue for comparable events in the future, we find that a majority of models underestimate the extremeness of impacts in important sectors such as agriculture, terrestrial ecosystems, and heat-related human mortality, while impacts on water resources and hydropower are overestimated in some river basins; and the spread across models is often large. This has important implications for economic assessments of climate change impacts that rely on these models. It also means that societal risks from future extreme events may be greater than previously thought.
One-carbon metabolism biomarkers and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
Vrieling, Alina ; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B. ; Ros, Martine M. ; Kampman, Ellen ; Aben, Katja K. ; Büchner, Frederike L. ; Jansen, Eugène H. ; Roswall, Nina ; Tjønneland, Anne ; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine ; Cadeau, Claire ; Chang-Claude, Jenny ; Kaaks, Rudolf ; Weikert, Steffen ; Boeing, Heiner ; Trichopoulou, Antonia ; Lagiou, Pagona ; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios ; Sieri, Sabina ; Palli, Domenico ; Panico, Salvatore ; Peeters, Petra H. ; Weiderpass, Elisabete ; Skeie, Guri ; Jakszyn, Paula ; Chirlaque, María Dolores ; Ardanaz, Eva ; Sánchez, María José ; Ehrnström, Roy ; Malm, Johan ; Ljungberg, Börje ; Khaw, Kay Tee ; Wareham, Nick J. ; Brennan, Paul ; Johansson, Mattias ; Riboli, Elio ; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. - \ 2019
International Journal of Cancer 145 (2019)9. - ISSN 0020-7136 - p. 2349 - 2359.
B-vitamins - biomarker - folate - nested case–control - urothelial cell carcinomas

Published associations between dietary folate and bladder cancer risk are inconsistent. Biomarkers may provide more accurate measures of nutrient status. This nested case–control analysis within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) investigated associations between pre-diagnostic serum folate, homocysteine, vitamins B6 and B12 and the risk of urothelial cell carcinomas of the bladder (UCC). A total of 824 patients with newly diagnosed UCC were matched with 824 cohort members. Serum folate, homocysteine, and vitamins B6 and B12 were measured. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for total, aggressive, and non-aggressive UCC were estimated using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for smoking status, smoking duration and intensity, and other potential confounders. Additionally, statistical interaction with smoking status was assessed. A halving in serum folate concentrations was moderately associated with risk of UCC (OR: 1.18; 95% CI: 0.98–1.43), in particular aggressive UCC (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.02–1.75; p-heterogeneity = 0.19). Compared to never smokers in the highest quartile of folate concentrations, this association seemed only apparent among current smokers in the lowest quartile of folate concentrations (OR: 6.26; 95% CI: 3.62–10.81, p-interaction = 0.07). Dietary folate was not associated with aggressive UCC (OR: 1.26; 95% CI: 0.81–1.95; p-heterogeneity = 0.14). No association was observed between serum homocysteine, vitamins B6 and B12 and risk of UCC. This study suggests that lower serum folate concentrations are associated with increased UCC risk, in particular aggressive UCC. Residual confounding by smoking cannot be ruled out and these findings require confirmation in future studies with multiple measurements.

Plasma carotenoids and vitamin C concentrations and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
Ros, M.M. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B. ; Kampman, E. ; Aben, K.K. ; Büchner, F.L. ; Jansen, E.H.J.M. ; Gils, C.H. van; Egevad, L. ; Overvad, K. ; Kiemeney, L.A. - \ 2012
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 96 (2012). - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 902 - 910.
bladder-cancer - beta-carotene - alpha-tocopherol - vegetable consumption - physicians health - controlled-trial - retinol - serum - fruit - antioxidants
BACKGROUND: Published associations between dietary carotenoids and vitamin C and bladder cancer risk are inconsistent. Biomarkers may provide more accurate measures of nutrient status. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association between plasma carotenoids and vitamin C and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. DESIGN: A total of 856 patients with newly diagnosed UCC were matched with 856 cohort members by sex, age at baseline, study center, date and time of blood collection, and fasting status. Plasma carotenoids (a- and ß-carotene, ß-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein, and zeaxanthin) were measured by using reverse-phase HPLC, and plasma vitamin C was measured by using a colorimetric assay. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were estimated by using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for smoking status, duration, and intensity. RESULTS: UCC risk decreased with higher concentrations of the sum of plasma carotenoids (IRR for the highest compared with the lowest quartile: 0.64; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.93; P-trend = 0.04). Plasma ß-carotene was inversely associated with aggressive UCC (IRR: 0.51; 95% CI: 0.30, 0.88; P-trend = 0.02). Plasma lutein was inversely associated with risk of nonaggressive UCC (IRR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.32, 0.98; P-trend = 0.05). No association was observed between plasma vitamin C and risk of UCC. CONCLUSIONS: Although residual confounding by smoking or other factors cannot be excluded, higher concentrations of plasma carotenoids may reduce risk of UCC, in particular aggressive UCC. Plasma lutein may reduce risk of nonaggressive UCC.
Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of aggressive and non-aggressive urothelial cell carcinomas in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
Ros, M. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B. ; Kampman, E. ; Büchner, F.L. ; Aben, K.K. ; Egevad, L. ; Overvad, K. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Roswall, N. ; Clavel-Chapelon, F. ; Boutron-Ruault, M.C. ; Moiros, S. ; Kaaks, R. ; Teucher, B. ; Weikert, S. ; Ruesten, A.V. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Naska, A. ; Benetou, V. ; Saieva, C. ; Pala, V. ; Ricceri, F. ; Tumino, R. ; Mattiello, A. ; Peeters, P.H.M. ; Gils, C.H. van; Gram, I.T. ; Engeset, D. ; Chirlaque, M.D. ; Ardanazx, E. ; Rodriguez, L. - \ 2012
European Journal of Cancer 48 (2012)17. - ISSN 0959-8049 - p. 3267 - 3277.
bladder-cancer - vitamin-c - prospective cohort - carotenoids - smoking - diet - carcinogenesis - prevention - nutrient - folate
Background - Many epidemiological studies have examined fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to the risk of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) of the bladder, but results are inconsistent. The association between fruit and vegetable consumption and UCC risk may vary by bladder tumour aggressiveness. Therefore, we examined the relation between fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of aggressive and non-aggressive UCC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods - After 8.9 years of follow-up, 947 UCC were diagnosed among 468,656 EPIC participants. Of these, 421 could be classified as aggressive UCC and 433 as non-aggressive UCC cases. At recruitment, fruit and vegetable consumption was assessed by validated dietary questionnaires. Multivariable hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression stratified by age, sex and center and adjusted for smoking status, duration and intensity of smoking, and energy intake. Results - Total consumption of fruits and vegetables was not associated with aggressive UCC nor with non-aggressive UCC. A 25 g/day increase in leafy vegetables and grapes consumption was associated with a reduced risk of non-aggressive UCC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78–1.00 and HR 0.87; 95% CI 0.77–0.98, respectively), while the intake of root vegetables was inversely associated with risk of aggressive UCC (HR 0.87; 95% CI 0.77–0.98). Conclusion - Our study did not confirm a protective effect of total fruit and/or vegetable consumption on aggressive or non-aggressive UCC. High consumption of certain types of vegetables and of fruits may reduce the risk of aggressive or non-aggressive UCC; however chance findings cannot be excluded.
Variety in vegetable and fruit consumption and the risk of gastric and esophageal cancer in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
Jeurnink, S.M. ; Büchner, F.L. ; Bueno-de Mesquita, H.B. ; Siersema, P.D. ; Boshuizen, H.C. ; Numans, M.E. ; Dahm, C.C. ; Overvad, K. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Roswall, N. ; Clavel-Chapelon, F. ; Boutron-Ruault, M.C. ; Morois, S. ; Kaaks, R. ; Teucher, B. ; Boeing, H. ; Buijsse, B. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Benetou, V. ; Zylis, D. ; Palli, D. ; Sieri, S. ; Vineis, P. ; Tumino, R. ; Panico, S. ; Ocké, M.C. ; Peeters, P.H. ; Skeie, G. ; Brustad, M. ; Lund, E. ; Sanchez-Cantalejo, E. ; Navarro, C. ; Amiano, P. ; Ardanaz, E. ; Ramón Quirós, J. ; Hallmans, G. ; Johansson, I. ; Lindkvist, B. ; Regnér, S. ; Khaw, K.T. ; Wareham, N. ; Key, T.J. ; Slimani, N. ; Norat, T. ; Vergnaud, A.C. ; Romaguera, D. ; Gonzalez, C.A. - \ 2012
International Journal of Cancer 131 (2012)6. - ISSN 0020-7136 - p. E963 - E973.
epic-eurgast - epidemiologic evidence - helicobacter-pylori - physical-activity - diet diversity - cereal fiber - vitamin-c - stomach - adenocarcinomas - metaanalysis
Diets high in vegetables and fruits have been suggested to be inversely associated with risk of gastric cancer. However, the evidence of the effect of variety of consumption is limited. We therefore investigated whether consumption of a variety of vegetables and fruit is associated with gastric and esophageal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Data on food consumption and follow-up on cancer incidence were available for 452,269 participants from 10 European countries. After a mean follow-up of 8.4 years, 475 cases of gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas (180 noncardia, 185 cardia, gastric esophageal junction and esophagus, 110 not specified) and 98 esophageal squamous cell carcinomas were observed. Diet Diversity Scores were used to quantify the variety in vegetable and fruit consumption. We used multivariable Cox proportional hazard models to calculate risk ratios. Independent from quantity of consumption, variety in the consumption of vegetables and fruit combined and of fruit consumption alone were statistically significantly inversely associated with the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (continuous hazard ratio per 2 products increment 0.88; 95% CI 0.79–0.97 and 0.76; 95% CI 0.62–0.94, respectively) with the latter particularly seen in ever smokers. Variety in vegetable and/or fruit consumption was not associated with risk of gastric and esophageal adenocarcinomas. Independent from quantity of consumption, more variety in vegetable and fruit consumption combined and in fruit consumption alone may decrease the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. However, residual confounding by lifestyle factors cannot be excluded
Fluid intake and the risk of urothelial cell carcinomas in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)
Ros, M.M. ; Bueno de Mesquita, H.B. ; Büchner, F.L. ; Kampman, E. ; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van - \ 2011
International Journal of Cancer 128 (2011)11. - ISSN 0020-7136 - p. 2695 - 2708.
food frequency questionnaire - disinfection by-products - lower urinary-tract - bladder-cancer - drinking-water - relative validity - life-style - consumption - epidemiology - coffee
Results from previous studies investigating the association between fluid intake and urothelial cell carcinomas (UCC) are inconsistent. We evaluated this association among 233,236 subjects in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), who had adequate baseline information on water and total fluid intake. During a mean follow-up of 9.3 years, 513 first primary UCC occurred. At recruitment, habitual fluid intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression stratified by age, sex and center and adjusted for energy intake, smoking status, duration of smoking and lifetime intensity of smoking. When using the lowest tertile of intake as reference, total fluid intake was not associated with risk of all UCC (HR 1.12; 95%CI 0.86–1.45, p-trend = 0.42) or with risk of prognostically high-risk UCC (HR 1.28; 95%CI 0.85–1.93, p-trend = 0.27) or prognostically low-risk UCC (HR 0.93; 95%CI 0.65–1.33, p-trend = 0.74). No associations were observed between risk of UCC and intake of water, coffee, tea and herbal tea and milk and other dairy beverages. For prognostically low-risk UCC suggestions of an inverse association with alcoholic beverages and of a positive association with soft drinks were seen. Increased risks were found for all UCC and prognostically low-risk UCC with higher intake of fruit and vegetable juices. In conclusion, total usual fluid intake is not associated with UCC risk in EPIC. The relationships observed for some fluids may be due to chance, but further investigation of the role of all types of fluid is warranted.
Variety in vegetable and fruit consumption and risk of bladder cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
Büchner, F.L. ; Bueno de Mesquita, H.B. ; Ros, M.M. ; Kampman, E. ; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van - \ 2011
International Journal of Cancer 128 (2011)12. - ISSN 0020-7136 - p. 2971 - 2979.
diet diversity - cigarette-smoking - pharyngeal cancer - colorectal-cancer - colon-cancer - food groups - questionnaire - validity
Recent research does not show an association between fruit and vegetable consumption and bladder cancer risk. None of these studies investigated variety in fruit and vegetable consumption, which may capture different aspects of consumption. We investigated whether a varied consumption of vegetables and fruits is associated with bladder cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Detailed data on food consumption and complete follow-up for cancer incidence were available for 452,185 participants, who were recruited from ten European countries. After a mean follow-up of 8.7 years, 874 participants were diagnosed with bladder cancer. Diet diversity scores (DDSs) were used to quantify the variety in fruit and vegetable consumption. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the effect of the DDSs on bladder cancer risk. There was no evidence of a statistically significant association between bladder cancer risk and any of the DDSs when these scores were considered as continuous covariates. However, the hazard ratio (HR) for the highest tertile of the DDS for combined fruit and vegetable consumption was marginally significant compared to the lowest (HR = 1.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.00–1.69, p-trend = 0.05). In EPIC, there is no clear association between a varied fruit and vegetable consumption and bladder cancer risk. This finding provides further evidence for the absence of any strong association between fruit and vegetable consumption as measured by a food frequency questionnaire and bladder cancer risk.
Consumption of meat and fish and risk of lung cancer: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
Linseisen, J. ; Rohrmann, S. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, B. ; Büchner, F.L. ; Boshuizen, H.C. ; Agudo, A. ; Gram, I.T. ; Dahm, C.C. ; Overvad, K. ; Egeberg, R. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Boeing, H. ; Steffen, A. ; Kaaks, R. ; Lukanova, A. ; Berrino, F. ; Palli, D. ; Panico, S. ; Tumino, R. ; Ardanaz, E. ; Dorronsoro, M. ; Huerta, J.M. ; Rodríguez, L. ; Sánchez, M.J. ; Rasmuson, T. ; Hallmans, G. ; Manjer, J. ; Wirfält, E. ; Engeset, D. ; Skeie, G. ; Katsoulis, M. ; Oikonomou, E. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Peeters, P.H. ; Khaw, K.T. ; Wareham, N. ; Allen, N. ; Key, T. ; Brennan, P. ; Romieu, I. ; Slimani, N. ; Vergnaud, A.C. ; Xun, W.W. ; Vineis, P. ; Riboli, E. - \ 2011
Cancer Causes and Control 22 (2011)6. - ISSN 0957-5243 - p. 909 - 918.
heterocyclic amines - dietary habits - heme iron - women - calibration - cohort - recalls - mortality - mutagens - fat
Evidence from case–control studies, but less so from cohort studies, suggests a positive association between meat intake and risk of lung cancer. Therefore, this association was evaluated in the frame of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, EPIC. Data from 478,021 participants, recruited from 10 European countries, who completed a dietary questionnaire in 1992–2000 were evaluated; 1,822 incident primary lung cancer cases were included in the present evaluation. Relative risk estimates were calculated for categories of meat intake using multi-variably adjusted Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, the continuous intake variables were calibrated by means of 24-h diet recall data to account for part of the measurement error. There were no consistent associations between meat consumption and the risk of lung cancer. Neither red meat (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.89–1.27 per 50 g intake/day; calibrated model) nor processed meat (RR = 1.13, 95% CI 0.95–1.34 per 50 g/day; calibrated model) was significantly related to an increased risk of lung cancer. Also, consumption of white meat and fish was not associated with the risk of lung cancer. These findings do not support the hypothesis that a high intake of red and processed meat is a risk factor for lung cancer
Vergelijking inname van nutriënten en contaminanten uit voedselconsumptiepeilingen & duplicaatvoedingen
Büchner, F.L. ; Ocké, M.C. ; Egmond, H.P. van - \ 2010
Bilthoven : RIVM (RIVM briefrapport / Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu 350910001/2010) - 21
voedselconsumptie - voedingsstoffen - voedselveiligheid - voeding en gezondheid - besmetters - food consumption - nutrients - food safety - nutrition and health - contaminants
Voedselconsumptiepeilingen (VCP) en onderzoek van duplicaatvoedingen zijn twee verschillende methoden om de inname van nutriënten en blootstelling aan chemische stoffen te kunnen schatten. Doel van dit onderzoek is het vergelijken van de resultaten van duplicaatvoedingenonderzoek en voedselconsumptiepeilingen die in dezelfde periode zijn uitgevoerd. Het betreft onderzoeken bij (jong) volwassenen en kinderen.
Samenwerkingsproject van RIVM, TNO en Wageningen Universiteit / Gezondheidseffecten van groenten en fruit
Hendriks, H. ; Verhagen, H. ; Büchner, F. ; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Witkamp, R.F. ; Peppelenbos, H. ; Woltering, E.J. - \ 2010
Voeding Nu 12 (2010)3. - ISSN 1389-7608 - p. 26 - 28.
voedselconsumptie - voedingsonderzoek bij de mens - groenten - fruit - gezondheidsbevordering - obesitas - samenwerking - onderzoeksinstituten - kennis - voeding en gezondheid - food consumption - human nutrition research - vegetables - fruit - health promotion - obesity - cooperation - research institutes - knowledge - nutrition and health
In 2007 publiceerden Wageningen-UR, TNO en RIVM samen met ZonMW het rapport 'Wat gaan we eten?' Een van de aanbevelingen was om tot meer samenhang en afstemming in het onderzoek te komen. Sindsdien stemmen de drie kennisinstituten hun activiteiten voor de ministeries van VWS en LNV op elkaar af. Het parapluproject dat sindsdien is opgestart 'Gezondheidseffecten van groenten en fruit', heeft tot doel de kennisbehoefte van overheid, maatschappelijke praktijkgerichte organisaties en wetenschap in kaart te brengen. In dit geval met betrekking tot obesitas, een belangrijk probleem waarmee de maatschappij zich geconfronteerd ziet
Consumption of vegetables and fruit and the risk of bladder cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
Büchner, F.L. ; Bueno de Mesquita, H.B. ; Ros, M.M. ; Kampman, E. - \ 2009
International Journal of Cancer 125 (2009)11. - ISSN 0020-7136 - p. 2643 - 2651.
vitamin-c - cigarette-smoking - prospective cohort - carotenoids - epidemiology - folate - diet - food
Previous epidemiologic studies found inconsistent associations between vegetables and fruit consumption and the risk of bladder cancer. We therefore investigated the association between vegetable and fruit consumption and the risk of bladder cancer among participants of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Data on food consumption and complete follow-up for cancer occurrence was available for a total of 478,533 participants, who were recruited in 10 European countries. Estimates of rate ratios were obtained by Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by age at recruitment, gender and study centre, and adjusted for total energy intake, smoking status, duration of smoking and lifetime intensity of smoking. A calibration study in a subsample was used to control for dietary measurement errors. After a mean follow-up of 8.7 years, 1015 participants were newly diagnosed with bladder cancer. Increments of 100 g/day in fruit and vegetable consumption combined did not affect bladder cancer risk (i.e., calibrated HR = 0.98; 95%CI: 0.95–1.01). Borderline statistically significant lower bladder cancer risks were found among never smokers with increased consumption of fruit and vegetables combined (HR = 0.94 95%CI: 0.87–1.00 with increments of 100 g/day; calibrated HR = 0.92 95%CI 0.79–1.06) and increased consumption of apples and pears (hard fruit; calibrated HR = 0.90 95%CI: 0.82–0.98 with increments of 25 g/day). For none of the associations a statistically significant interaction with smoking status was found. Our findings do not support an effect of fruit and vegetable consumption, combined or separately, on bladder cancer risk.
Genetic dissection of plant stress responses
Pereira, A. - \ 2001
In: Molecular Analysis of Plant Adaptation to the Environment / Hawkesford, M.J., Buchner, P.,
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