Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Knowledge, attitudes and practices of cervical cancer prevention among Zambian women and men
Nyambe, Anayawa ; Kampen, Jarl K. ; Baboo, Stridutt K. ; Hal, Guido Van - \ 2019
BMC Public Health 19 (2019)1. - ISSN 1471-2458
Attitude - Cervical cancer - Knowledge - Practices - Screening - Social ecological model - Theory of triadic influence - Vaccination - Zambia

Background: In Zambia, cervical cancer screening was started in 2006 and the human papillomavirus vaccine was piloted in 2013. Nevertheless, cervical cancer remains the leading cancer. It is assumed that knowledge, social interaction, health behaviors and religion are factors that can influence screening and vaccination practices. This study addresses the question, what is the relationship between knowledge about cervical cancer, attitudes, self-reported behavior, and immediate support system, towards screening and vaccination of cervical cancer of Zambian women and men. The results of this study serve as a basis for future research, an input for improvement and adjustment of the existing prevention program and build on documented health behavior frameworks. Methods: A cross-sectional mixed methods study was conducted from February to May 2016. Two separate questionnaires were used to collect data from women (N = 300) and men (N = 300) residing in Chilenje and Kanyama (two townships in the capital city Lusaka). Respondent's knowledge of cervical cancer was operationalized by grading their ability to correctly identify causes and protective factors if they were aware of cervical cancer. Besides providing descriptive statistics of all study variables, we tested four research hypotheses concerning the link between knowledge, attitudes and practices suggested by the literature, by applying appropriate statistical tests (chi square test, analysis of variance, logistic regression). Results: Less than half of the respondents (36.8%) had heard of cervical cancer, 20.7% of women had attended screening and 6.7% of the total sample had vaccinated their daughter. Knowledge of causes and prevention was very low. There was a strong association between having awareness of cervical cancer and practicing screening (odds ratio = 20.5, 95% confidence interval = [9.214, 45.516]) and vaccination (odds ratio = 5.1, 95% confidence interval = [2.473, 10.423]). Social interactions were also found to greatly influence screening and vaccination behaviors. Conclusions: The low level of knowledge of causes and prevention of cervical cancer suggests a need to increase knowledge and awareness among both women and men. Interpersonal interactions have great impact on practicing prevention behaviors, for instance, vaccination of daughters.

Using Film to Disseminate Information on Cervical Cancer Prevention in Lusaka: Results from a Small Intervention Study
Nyambe, Anayawa ; Kampen, Jarl K. ; Baboo, Stridutt K. ; Hal, Guido Van - \ 2019
Journal of Cancer Education 34 (2019)5. - ISSN 0885-8195 - p. 854 - 859.
Cervical cancer - Film - Intervention - Knowledge - Zambia

In order to prevent the spread of cervical cancer, people must be aware and knowledgeable about the available preventive practices such as screening and vaccination. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent that film is effective in disseminating information on cervical cancer and its prevention to women and men in Lusaka. A pilot intervention study was carried out at churches in Lusaka city from August to September 2017. A sample size of 38 women and 43 men filled in both baseline and follow-up questionnaires. A knowledge grade (range, 1–10 points) which linked causes to risk factors for cervical cancer was used to assess the knowledge of a respondent. Significant results (p < 0.01) were obtained at follow-up for watching the film and having awareness and knowledge. The main finding is that a short informational film can be an effective means of disseminating information on cervical cancer and its prevention to women and men.

The impact of the social environment on Zambian cervical cancer prevention practices
Nyambe, Anayawa ; Kampen, Jarl K. ; Baboo, Stridutt K. ; Hal, Guido Van - \ 2018
BMC Cancer 18 (2018). - ISSN 1471-2407
Cervical Cancer - Screening - Social ecological model - Theory of triadic influence - Vaccination - Zambia

Background: Cervical cancer which is preventable by screening and vaccination is the most common cancer in Zambia among both the female and male population. In this article we aim to determine how the key players of the sociocultural and political environment recognize cervical cancer as a public health problem and therefore impact the provision of cervical cancer prevention services (screening and vaccination). Methods: Qualitative data in the form of interviews with stakeholders (health care providers, teachers and religious leaders), special interest groups (advocacy groups and non-governmental organizations) and policy makers, was collected as part of a mixed methods study from February to May 2016. Results: The views expressed by the respondents were coded into predetermined themes (cervical cancer in general, screening, vaccination) and an organizational chart of the administration of cervical cancer prevention services in Zambia was developed. Conclusions: It is evident that the Zambian cervical cancer prevention system has targeted several areas and multiple sectors of society to reduce cervical cancer cases. However, awareness, knowledge, social support and facilities are factors that can be improved.

A possible molecular basis for photoprotection in the minor antenna proteins of plants
Fox, Kieran F. ; Ünlü, Caner ; Balevičius, Vytautas ; Ramdour, Baboo Narottamsing ; Kern, Carina ; Pan, Xiaowei ; Li, Mei ; Amerongen, Herbert van; Duffy, Christopher D.P. - \ 2018
Biochimica et Biophysica Acta. B, Bioenergetics 1859 (2018)7. - ISSN 0005-2728 - p. 471 - 481.
Carotenoids - Light-harvesting - Minor antenna - Non-photochemical quenching - Photoprotection - Photosystem II

The bioenergetics of light-harvesting by photosynthetic antenna proteins in higher plants is well understood. However, investigation into the regulatory non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) mechanism, which dissipates excess energy in high light, has led to several conflicting models. It is generally accepted that the major photosystem II antenna protein, LHCII, is the site of NPQ, although the minor antenna complexes (CP24/26/29) are also proposed as alternative/additional NPQ sites. LHCII crystals were shown to exhibit the short excitation lifetime and several spectral signatures of the quenched state. Subsequent structure-based models showed that this quenching could be explained by slow energy trapping by the carotenoids, in line with one of the proposed models. Using Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) we show that the crystal structure of CP29 corresponds to a strongly quenched conformation. Using a structure-based theoretical model we show that this quenching may be explained by the same slow, carotenoid-mediated quenching mechanism present in LHCII crystals.

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