Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Mixing has limited impacts on the foliar nutrition of European beech and Scots pine trees across Europe
    Streel, Géraud de; Ammer, Christian ; Annighöfer, Peter ; Barbeito, Ignacio ; Bielak, Kamil ; Bravo-Oviedo, Andrés ; Brazaitis, Gediminas ; Buraczyk, Włodzimierz ; Collet, Catherine ; Hurt, Vaclav ; Kurylyak, Viktor ; Ouden, Jan den; Pach, Maciej ; Pretzsch, Hans ; Skrzyszewski, Jerzy ; Sramek, Vit ; Stankevičiūtė, Jolanta ; Strelcova, Katarina ; Svoboda, Miroslav ; Verheyen, Kris ; Zlatanov, Tzvetan ; Ponette, Quentin - \ 2020
    Forest Ecology and Management 479 (2020). - ISSN 0378-1127
    Complementarity - Fagus sylvatica L. - Foliar nutrition - Pinus sylvestris L. - Species mixture

    Tree species-mixing has been suggested as one option to counteract the adverse effects of global change on tree mineral nutrition, yet the effect of mixing on nutrient availability remains poorly documented. We therefore analyzed the current foliar nutrient (N, P, K, Ca, Mg) quantities and ilr balances (isometric log transformed ratios between elements or groups of elements) for 261 European beech and 248 Scots pine trees from 15 sites, each consisting of one beech-pine mixed stand and the respective monocultures, across a gradient of environmental conditions in Europe. We hypothesized an overall positive effect of mixing on tree foliar nutrient content, and that this mixing effect would be stronger on nutrient-poor sites. Using linear mixed models and multivariate linear regression models, we first tested for the effects of species (beech/pine) and composition (pure/mixed) across all sites; we then investigated whether the species-mixing effect was related to site fertility. The nutrient composition of beech leaves and pine needles differed significantly for all ilr balances. For both species, significant mixing effects were detected for some nutrients and ilr balances; those effects, however, could not be consistently related to contrasted nutrient composition between species. For most nutrients and ilr balances, the mixing effect was influenced by the site nutritional status, but the pattern differed from expectation: absence or minor differences between monocultures and mixtures at the lower end of the chemical fertility gradient, and maximum differences in rich soils. The contrasting foliar nutrient composition of pine and beech trees and the site nutrient status only partly explained the mixing effects on tree mineral nutrition. Our results claim for a better understanding of nutrient-related mechanisms associated with complementarity and points towards the need to further expand the existing frameworks to account for the multivariate nature of tree nutrition.

    Mediterranean diet intervention alters the gut microbiome in older people reducing frailty and improving health status : The NU-AGE 1-year dietary intervention across five European countries
    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar ; Rampelli, Simone ; Jeffery, Ian B. ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Neto, Marta ; Capri, Miriam ; Giampieri, Enrico ; Jennings, Amy ; Candela, Marco ; Turroni, Silvia ; Zoetendal, Erwin G. ; Hermes, Gerben D.A. ; Elodie, Caumon ; Brugere, Corinne Malpuech ; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle ; Berendsen, Agnes M. ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. De; Feskens, Edith J.M. ; Kaluza, Joanna ; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Bielak, Marta Jeruszka ; Comte, Blandine ; Maijo-Ferre, Monica ; Nicoletti, Claudio ; Vos, Willem M. de; Fairweather-Tait, Susan ; Cassidy, Aedin ; Brigidi, Patrizia ; Franceschi, Claudio ; O'Toole, Paul W. - \ 2020
    Gut 69 (2020)7. - ISSN 0017-5749
    ageing - diet - enteric bacterial microflora - inflammation - intestinal bacteria

    Objective: Ageing is accompanied by deterioration of multiple bodily functions and inflammation, which collectively contribute to frailty. We and others have shown that frailty co-varies with alterations in the gut microbiota in a manner accelerated by consumption of a restricted diversity diet. The Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) is associated with health. In the NU-AGE project, we investigated if a 1-year MedDiet intervention could alter the gut microbiota and reduce frailty. Design: We profiled the gut microbiota in 612 non-frail or pre-frail subjects across five European countries (UK, France, Netherlands, Italy and Poland) before and after the administration of a 12-month long MedDiet intervention tailored to elderly subjects (NU-AGE diet). Results: Adherence to the diet was associated with specific microbiome alterations. Taxa enriched by adherence to the diet were positively associated with several markers of lower frailty and improved cognitive function, and negatively associated with inflammatory markers including C-reactive protein and interleukin-17. Analysis of the inferred microbial metabolite profiles indicated that the diet-modulated microbiome change was associated with an increase in short/branch chained fatty acid production and lower production of secondary bile acids, p-cresols, ethanol and carbon dioxide. Microbiome ecosystem network analysis showed that the bacterial taxa that responded positively to the MedDiet intervention occupy keystone interaction positions, whereas frailty-associated taxa are peripheral in the networks. Conclusion: Collectively, our findings support the feasibility of improving the habitual diet to modulate the gut microbiota which in turn has the potential to promote healthier ageing.

    Changing from a Western to a Mediterranean-style diet does not affect iron or selenium status : results of the New Dietary Strategies Addressing the Specific Needs of the Elderly Population for Healthy Aging in Europe (NU-AGE) 1-year randomized clinical trial in elderly Europeans
    Jennings, Amy ; Tang, Jonathan ; Gillings, Rachel ; Perfecto, Antonio ; Dutton, John ; Speakman, Jim ; Fraser, William D. ; Nicoletti, Claudio ; Berendsen, Agnes A.M. ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. de; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Jeruszka-Bielak, Marta ; Caumon, Elodie ; Caille, Aurélie ; Ostan, Rita ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J. - \ 2020
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 111 (2020)1. - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 98 - 109.
    elderly - Europeans - fish - iron - meat - Mediterranean-style diet - randomized controlled trial - selenium

    BACKGROUND: Mediterranean diets limit red meat consumption and increase intakes of high-phytate foods, a combination that could reduce iron status. Conversely, higher intakes of fish, a good source of selenium, could increase selenium status. OBJECTIVES: A 1-y randomized controlled trial [New Dietary Strategies Addressing the Specific Needs of the Elderly Population for Healthy Aging in Europe (NU-AGE)] was carried out in older Europeans to investigate the effects of consuming a Mediterranean-style diet on indices of inflammation and changes in nutritional status. METHODS: Selenium and iron intakes and status biomarkers were measured at baseline and after 1 y in 1294 people aged 65-79 y from 5 European countries (France, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, and the United Kingdom) who had been randomly allocated either to a Mediterranean-style diet or to remain on their habitual, Western diet. RESULTS: Estimated selenium intakes increased significantly with the intervention group (P < 0.01), but were not accompanied by changes in serum selenium concentrations. Iron intakes also increased (P < 0.001), but there was no change in iron status. However, when stratified by study center, there were positive effects of the intervention on iron status for serum ferritin for participants in Italy (P = 0.04) and France (P = 0.04) and on soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) for participants in Poland (P < 0.01). Meat intake decreased and fish intake increased to a greater degree in the intervention group, relative to the controls (P < 0.01 for both), but the overall effects of the intervention on meat and fish intakes were mainly driven by data from Poland and France. Changes in serum selenium in the intervention group were associated with greater changes in serum ferritin (P = 0.01) and body iron (P = 0.01), but not sTfR (P = 0.73); there were no study center × selenium status interactions for the iron biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS: Consuming a Mediterranean-style diet for 1 y had no overall effect on iron or selenium status, although there were positive effects on biomarkers of iron status in some countries. The NU-AGE trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01754012.

    Modelling approaches for mixed forests dynamics prognosis. Research gaps and opportunities
    Bravo, Felipe ; Fabrika, Marek ; Ammer, Christian ; Barreiro, Susana ; Bielak, Kamil ; Coll, Lluis ; Fonseca, Teresa ; Kangur, Ahto ; Löf, Magnus ; Merganičová, Katarina ; Pach, Maciej ; Pretzsch, Hans ; Stojanović, Dejan ; Schuler, Laura ; Peric, Sanja ; Rötzer, Thomas ; Río, Miren Del; Dodan, Martina ; Bravo-Oviedo, Andrés - \ 2019
    Forest Systems 28 (2019)1. - ISSN 2171-5068 - 18 p.
    Classification - Dynamics - Ecology - Empirical - Growth - Yield

    Aim of study: Modelling of forest growth and dynamics has focused mainly on pure stands. Mixed-forest management lacks systematic procedures to forecast the impact of silvicultural actions. The main objective of the present work is to review current knowledge and forest model developments that can be applied to mixed forests. Material and methods: Primary research literature was reviewed to determine the state of the art for modelling tree species mixtures, focusing mainly on temperate forests. Main results: The essential principles for predicting stand growth in mixed forests were identified. Forest model applicability in mixtures was analysed. Input data, main model components, output and viewers were presented. Finally, model evaluation procedures and some of the main model platforms were described. Research highlights: Responses to environmental changes and management activities in mixed forests can differ from pure stands. For greater insight into mixed-forest dynamics and ecology, forest scientists and practitioners need new theoretical frameworks, different approaches and innovative solutions for sustainable forest management in the context of environmental and social changes.

    Are Nutrition-Related Knowledge and Attitudes Reflected in Lifestyle and Health Among Elderly People? A Study Across Five European Countries
    Jeruszka-Bielak, Marta ; Kollajtis-Dolowy, Anna ; Santoro, A. ; Ostan, R. ; Berendsen, A.M. ; Jennings, A. ; Meunier, N. ; Marseglia, Anna ; Caumon, E. ; Gillings, Rachel ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Franceschi, Claudio ; Hieke, Sophie ; Pietruszka, B. - \ 2018
    Frontiers in Physiology 9 (2018). - ISSN 1664-042X - 13 p.
    Background: Nutrition-related knowledge (NRK) and nutrition-related attitudes (NRAs) are necessary for dietary changes toward healthier dietary patterns. In turn, healthier dietary patterns can be beneficial in maintaining health of older adults. Therefore, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate whether NRK and NRAs were associated with lifestyle and health features among older adults (65+ years) from five European countries (France, Italy, Poland, the Netherlands and United Kingdom). Methods: Within the European project NU-AGE, 1,144 healthy elderly volunteers (65–79 years) were randomly assigned to two groups: intervention (NU-AGE diet) or control. After 1-year of follow-up, both NRK and NRAs were assessed during exit interviews, in combination with a number of lifestyle and health variables (e.g., physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, BMI, self-assessed health status). Multivariable linear regression models were used in data analysis. Results: In the NU-AGE study sample, good NRK was associated with lower BMI and higher physical activity. More positive NRAs were related to lower BMI and self-reported very good or good appetite. Moreover, both NRK and NRAs were associated with some socio-economic determinants, like financial situation, age, education, living area (for NRK), and country (for NRAs). Participants in the intervention group showed a better NRK (β = 0.367 [95% CI: 0.117; 0.617], p = 0.004) and more positive NRAs (β = 0.838 [95% CI: 0.318; 1.358], p = 0.002) than those in the control group. Higher self-evaluated knowledge was also significantly related to more positive NRAs (p < 0.001). The most popular sources of nutrition information were food labels, books and magazines on health, the dietitian and the doctor's office, although their importance varied significantly among countries, and, to a lesser extent, between women and men and between intervention and control group. Conclusion: Higher NRK and NRA scores were associated with lower BMI and higher physical activity level. Therefore, a good nutrition-related knowledge and positive nutrition-related attitudes can strongly and positively influence the health status and quality of life among the older population. These results offer a great opportunity for policy makers to implement educational programs in order to counteract the epidemic of obesity and to improve the health span of European population.
    Knowledge gaps about mixed forests : What do European forest managers want to know and what answers can science provide?
    Coll, Lluís ; Ameztegui, Aitor ; Collet, Catherine ; Löf, Magnus ; Mason, Bill ; Pach, Maciej ; Verheyen, Kris ; Abrudan, Ioan ; Barbati, Anna ; Barreiro, Susana ; Bielak, Kamil ; Bravo-Oviedo, Andrés ; Ferrari, Barbara ; Govedar, Zoran ; Kulhavy, Jiri ; Lazdina, Dagnija ; Metslaid, Marek ; Mohren, Frits ; Pereira, Mário ; Peric, Sanja ; Rasztovits, Ervin ; Short, Ian ; Spathelf, Peter ; Sterba, Hubert ; Stojanovic, Dejan ; Valsta, Lauri ; Zlatanov, Tzvetan ; Ponette, Quentin - \ 2018
    Forest Ecology and Management 407 (2018). - ISSN 0378-1127 - p. 106 - 115.
    Ecosystem services - Forest management and functioning - Forest stability - Participatory process - Research challenges - Review - Species mixtures

    Research into mixed-forests has increased substantially in the last decades but the extent to which the new knowledge generated meets practitioners’ concerns and is adequately transmitted to them is unknown. Here we provide the current state of knowledge and future research directions with regards to 10 questions about mixed-forest functioning and management identified and selected by a range of European forest managers during an extensive participatory process. The set of 10 questions were the highest ranked questions from an online prioritization exercise involving 168 managers from 22 different European countries. In general, the topics of major concern for forest managers coincided with the ones that are at the heart of most research projects. They covered important issues related to the management of mixed forests and the role of mixtures for the stability of forests faced with environmental changes and the provision of ecosystem services to society. Our analysis showed that the current scientific knowledge about these questions was rather variable and particularly low for those related to the management of mixed forests over time and the associated costs. We also found that whereas most research projects have sought to evaluate whether mixed forests are more stable or provide more goods and services than monocultures, there is still little information on the underlying mechanisms and trade-offs behind these effects. Similarly, we identified a lack of knowledge on the spatio-temporal scales at which the effects of mixtures on the resistance and adaptability to environmental changes are operating. Our analysis may help researchers to identify what knowledge needs to be better transferred and to better design future research initiatives meeting practitioner's concerns.

    Effects of crown architecture and stand structure on light absorption in mixed and monospecific Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris forests along a productivity and climate gradient through Europe
    Forrester, David Ian ; Ammer, Christian ; Annighöfer, Peter J. ; Barbeito, Ignacio ; Bielak, Kamil ; Bravo-Oviedo, Andrés ; Coll, Lluis ; Río, Miren del; Drössler, Lars ; Heym, Michael ; Hurt, Václav ; Löf, Magnus ; Ouden, Jan den - \ 2018
    Journal of Ecology 106 (2018). - ISSN 0022-0477 - p. 746 - 760.
    Allometric equation - Biodiversity - Complementarity - Maestra model - Plant-plant interactions - Resource availability - Tree height
    When tree-species mixtures are more productive than monocultures, higher light absorption is often suggested as a cause. However, few studies have quantified this effect and even fewer have examined which light-related interactions are most important, such as the effects of species interactions on tree allometric relationships and crown architecture, differences in vertical or horizontal canopy structure, phenology of deciduous species or the mixing effects on tree size and stand density. In this study, measurements of tree sizes and stand structures were combined with a detailed tree-level light model (Maestra) to examine the contribution of each light-related interaction on tree- and stand-level light absorption at 21 sites, each of which contained a triplet of plots including a mixture and monocultures of Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris (63 plots). These sites were distributed across the current distribution of these species within Europe. Averaged across all sites, the light absorption of mixtures was 14% higher than the mean of the monocultures. At the whole community level, this positive effect of mixing on light absorption increased as canopy volume or site productivity increased, but was unrelated to climate. At the species population or individual tree levels, the mixing effect on light absorption resulted from light-related interactions involving vertical canopy structure, stand density, the presence of a deciduous species (F. sylvatica), as well as the effects of mixing on tree size and allometric relationships between diameter and height, crown diameter and crown length. The mixing effects on light absorption were only correlated with the mixing effects on growth for P. sylvestris, suggesting that the mixing effects on this species were driven by the light-related interactions, whereas mixing effects on F. sylvatica or whole community growth were probably driven by non-light-related interactions. Synthesis. The overall positive effect of mixing on light absorption was the result of a range of light-related interactions. However, the relative importance of these interactions varied between sites and is likely to vary between other species combinations and as stands develop.
    Predicting the spatial and temporal dynamics of species interactions in Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris forests across Europe
    Forrester, David Ian ; Ammer, Ch ; Annighöfer, Peter J. ; Avdagic, A. ; Barbeito, I. ; Bielak, Kamil ; Brazaitis, Gediminas ; Coll, L. ; Río, M. del; Drössler, L. ; Heym, Michael ; Hurt, Václav ; Löf, Magnus ; Matović, B. ; Meloni, F. ; Ouden, J. den; Pach, Maciej ; Pereira, M.G. ; Ponette, Quentin ; Pretzsch, H. ; Skrzyszewski, Jerzy ; Stojanović, D. ; Svoboda, M. ; Ruiz-Peinado, R. ; Vacchiano, G. ; Verheyen, K. ; Zlatanov, T. ; Bravo-Oviedo, A. - \ 2017
    Forest Ecology and Management 405 (2017). - ISSN 0378-1127 - p. 112 - 133.
    Biodiversity - Climate - Competition - Complementarity - Forest growth model - Mixed-species - Silviculture
    The productivity and functioning of mixed-species forests often differs from that of monocultures. However, the magnitude and direction of these differences are difficult to predict because species interactions can be modified by many potentially interacting climatic and edaphic conditions, stand structure and previous management. Process-based forest growth models could potentially be used to disentangle the effects of these factors and thereby improve our understanding of mixed forest functioning while facilitating their design and silvicultural management. However, to date, the predicted mixing effects of forest growth models have not been compared with measured mixing effects. In this study, 26 sites across Europe, each containing a mixture and monocultures of Fagus sylvatica and Pinus sylvestris, were used to calculate mixing effects on growth and yield and compare them with the mixing effects predicted by the forest growth model 3-PGmix. The climate and edaphic conditions, stand structures and ages varied greatly between sites. The model performed well when predicting the stem mass and total mass (and mixing effects on these components), with model efficiency that was usually >0.7. The model efficiency was lower for growth or smaller components such as foliage mass and root mass. The model was also used to predict how mixing effects would change along gradients in precipitation, temperature, potential available soil water, age, thinning intensity and soil fertility. The predicted patterns were consistent with measurements of mixing effects from published studies. The 3-PG model is a widely used management tool for monospecific stands and this study shows that 3-PGmix can be used to examine the dynamics of mixed-species stands and determine how they may need to be managed.
    Data from: EuMIXFOR empirical forest mensuration and ring width data from pure and mixed stands of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) through Europe
    Heym, Michael ; Ruíz-Peinado, Ricardo ; Río, Miren del; Bielak, Kamil ; Forrester, David Ian ; Dirnberger, Gerald ; Barbeito, I. ; Brazaitis, Gediminas ; Ruškytkė, Indré ; Coll, L. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2017
    Technische Universitat Munchen
    Fagus sylvatica - Pinus sylvestris
    This data set provides unique empirical data from triplets of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) across Europe. Dendrometric variables are provided for 32 triplets, 96 plots, 7555 trees and 4695 core samples. These data contribute to our understanding of mixed stand dynamics.
    EuMIXFOR empirical forest mensuration and ring width data from pure and mixed stands of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) through Europe
    Heym, Michael ; Ruíz-Peinado, Ricardo ; Río, Miren del; Bielak, Kamil ; Forrester, David Ian ; Dirnberger, Gerald ; Barbeito, I. ; Brazaitis, Gediminas ; Ruškytkė, Indré ; Coll, L. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2017
    Annals of Forest Science 74 (2017)3. - ISSN 1286-4560 - 9 p.
    This data set provides unique empirical data from triplets of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestrisL.) and European beech (Fagus sylvaticaL.) across Europe. Dendrometric variables are provided for 32 triplets, 96 plots, 7555 treesand 4695 core samples. These data contribute to our understanding of mixed stand dynamics.
    Species interactions increase the temporal stability of community productivity in Pinus sylvestris-Fagus sylvatica mixtures across Europe
    Río, Miren del; Pretzsch, Hans ; Ruíz-Peinado, Ricardo ; Ampoorter, Evy ; Annighöfer, Peter ; Barbeito, Ignacio ; Bielak, Kamil ; Brazaitis, Gediminas ; Coll, Lluís ; Drössler, Lars ; Mohren, Frits ; Ouden, Jan den; Bravo-Oviedo, Andrés - \ 2017
    Journal of Ecology 105 (2017)4. - ISSN 0022-0477 - p. 1032 - 1043.
    Asynchrony - Mixed-species forests - Niche complementarity - Organizational levels - Overyielding - Plant-plant interactions - Temporal variability

    There is increasing evidence that species diversity enhances the temporal stability (TS) of community productivity in different ecosystems, although its effect at the population and tree levels seems to be negative or neutral. Asynchrony in species responses to environmental conditions was found to be one of the main drivers of this stabilizing process. However, the effect of species mixing on the stability of productivity, and the relative importance of the associated mechanisms, remain poorly understood in forest communities. We investigated the way mixing species influenced the TS of productivity in Pinus sylvestris L. and Fagus sylvatica L. forests, and attempted to determine the main drivers among overyielding, asynchrony between species annual growth responses to environmental conditions, and temporal shifts in species interactions. We used a network of 93 experimental plots distributed across Europe to compare the TS of basal area growth over a 15-year period (1999-2013) in mixed and monospecific forest stands at different organizational levels, namely the community, population and individual tree levels. Mixed stands showed a higher TS of basal area growth than monospecific stands at the community level, but not at the population or individual tree levels. The TS at the community level was related to asynchrony between species growth in mixtures, but not to overyielding nor to asynchrony between species growth in monospecific stands. Temporal shifts in species interactions were also related to asynchrony and to the mixing effect on the TS. Synthesis. Our findings confirm that species mixing can stabilize productivity at the community level, whereas there is a neutral or negative effect on stability at the population and individual tree levels. The contrasting findings regarding the relationships between the temporal stability and asynchrony in species growth in mixed and monospecific stands suggest that the main driver in the stabilizing process may be the temporal niche complementarity between species rather than differences in species' intrinsic responses to environmental conditions.

    Data from: Species interactions increase the temporal stability of community productivity in Pinus sylvestris-Fagus sylvatica mixtures across Europe
    Río, Miren del; Pretzsch, Hans ; Ruíz-Peinado, Ricardo ; Ampoorter, Evy ; Annighöfer, Peter ; Barbeito, Ignacio ; Bielak, Kamil ; Brazaitis, Gediminas ; Coll, Lluís ; Drössler, L. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den; Bravo-Oviedo, Andrés - \ 2016
    Wageningen University & Research
    temporal variability
    Main data are basal area increments by triplet, species composition and year, for the study period 1999-2013. Dataset includes data at community level (stand basal area increment), population level (species basal area increment in mixed and monospecific stands), and individual tree level (basal area increments by core, two cores by tree). Moreover data describing the trees used in the analysis is included.
    Genome-wide analysis identifies 12 loci influencing human reproductive behavior
    Barban, Nicola ; Jansen, Rick ; Vlaming, Ronald de; Vaez, Ahmad ; Mandemakers, Jornt J. ; Tropf, Felix C. ; Shen, Xia ; Wilson, James F. ; Chasman, Daniel I. ; Nolte, Ilja M. ; Tragante, Vinicius ; Laan, Sander W. van der; Perry, John R.B. ; Kong, Augustine ; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S. ; Albrecht, Eva ; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura ; Atzmon, Gil ; Auro, Kirsi ; Ayers, Kristin ; Bakshi, Andrew ; Ben-Avraham, Danny ; Berger, Klaus ; Bergman, Aviv ; Bertram, Lars ; Bielak, Lawrence F. ; Bjornsdottir, Gyda ; Bonder, Marc Jan ; Broer, Linda ; Bui, Minh ; Barbieri, Caterina ; Cavadino, Alana ; Chavarro, Jorge E. ; Turman, Constance ; Concas, Maria Pina ; Cordell, Heather J. ; Davies, Gail ; Eibich, Peter ; Eriksson, Nicholas ; Esko, Tõnu ; Eriksson, Joel ; Falahi, Fahimeh ; Felix, Janine F. ; Fontana, Mark Alan ; Franke, Lude ; Gandin, Ilaria ; Gaskins, Audrey J. ; Gieger, Christian ; Gunderson, Erica P. ; Guo, Xiuqing ; Hayward, Caroline ; He, Chunyan ; Hofer, Edith ; Huang, Hongyan ; Joshi, Peter K. ; Kanoni, Stavroula ; Karlsson, Robert ; Kiechl, Stefan ; Kifley, Annette ; Kluttig, Alexander ; Kraft, Peter ; Lagou, Vasiliki ; Lecoeur, Cecile ; Lahti, Jari ; Li-Gao, Ruifang ; Lind, Penelope A. ; Liu, Tian ; Makalic, Enes ; Mamasoula, Crysovalanto ; Matteson, Lindsay ; Mbarek, Hamdi ; McArdle, Patrick F. ; McMahon, George ; Meddens, S.F.W. ; Mihailov, Evelin ; Miller, Mike ; Missmer, Stacey A. ; Monnereau, Claire ; Most, Peter J. van der; Myhre, Ronny ; Nalls, Mike A. ; Nutile, Teresa ; Kalafati, Ioanna Panagiota ; Porcu, Eleonora ; Prokopenko, Inga ; Rajan, Kumar B. ; Rich-Edwards, Janet ; Rietveld, Cornelius A. ; Robino, Antonietta ; Rose, Lynda M. ; Rueedi, Rico ; Ryan, Kathleen A. ; Saba, Yasaman ; Schmidt, Daniel ; Smith, Jennifer A. ; Stolk, Lisette ; Streeten, Elizabeth ; Tönjes, Anke ; Thorleifsson, Gudmar ; Ulivi, Sheila ; Wedenoja, Juho ; Wellmann, Juergen ; Willeit, Peter ; Yao, Jie ; Yengo, Loic ; Zhao, Jing Hua ; Zhao, Wei ; Zhernakova, Daria V. ; Amin, Najaf ; Andrews, Howard ; Balkau, Beverley ; Barzilai, Nir ; Bergmann, Sven ; Biino, Ginevra ; Bisgaard, Hans ; Bønnelykke, Klaus ; Boomsma, Dorret I. ; Buring, Julie E. ; Campbell, Harry ; Cappellani, Stefania ; Ciullo, Marina ; Cox, Simon R. ; Cucca, Francesco ; Toniolo, Daniela ; Davey-Smith, George ; Deary, Ian J. ; Dedoussis, George ; Deloukas, Panos ; Duijn, Cornelia M. van; Geus, Eco J.C. de; Eriksson, Johan G. ; Evans, Denis A. ; Faul, Jessica D. ; Sala, Cinzia Felicita ; Froguel, Philippe ; Gasparini, Paolo ; Girotto, Giorgia ; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen ; Greiser, Karin Halina ; Groenen, Patrick J.F. ; Haan, Hugoline G. de; Haerting, Johannes ; Harris, Tamara B. ; Heath, Andrew C. ; Heikkilä, Kauko ; Hofman, Albert ; Homuth, Georg ; Holliday, Elizabeth G. ; Hopper, John ; Hyppönen, Elina ; Jacobsson, Bo ; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V. ; Johannesson, Magnus ; Jugessur, Astanand ; Kähönen, Mika ; Kajantie, Eero ; Kardia, Sharon L.R. ; Keavney, Bernard ; Kolcic, Ivana ; Koponen, Päivikki ; Kovacs, Peter ; Kronenberg, Florian ; Kutalik, Zoltan ; Bianca, Martina la; Lachance, Genevieve ; Iacono, William G. ; Lai, Sandra ; Lehtimäki, Terho ; Liewald, David C. ; Lindgren, Cecilia M. ; Liu, Yongmei ; Luben, Robert ; Lucht, Michael ; Luoto, Riitta ; Magnus, Per ; Magnusson, Patrik K.E. ; Martin, Nicholas G. ; McGue, Matt ; McQuillan, Ruth ; Medland, Sarah E. ; Meisinger, Christa ; Mellström, Dan ; Metspalu, Andres ; Traglia, Michela ; Milani, Lili ; Mitchell, Paul ; Montgomery, Grant W. ; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis ; Mutsert, Renée de; Nohr, Ellen A. ; Ohlsson, Claes ; Olsen, Jørn ; Ong, Ken K. ; Paternoster, Lavinia ; Pattie, Alison ; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H. ; Perola, Markus ; Peyser, Patricia A. ; Pirastu, Mario ; Polasek, Ozren ; Power, Chris ; Kaprio, Jaakko ; Raffel, Leslie J. ; Räikkönen, Katri ; Raitakari, Olli ; Ridker, Paul M. ; Ring, Susan M. ; Roll, Kathryn ; Rudan, Igor ; Ruggiero, Daniela ; Rujescu, Dan ; Salomaa, Veikko ; Schlessinger, David ; Schmidt, Helena ; Schmidt, Reinhold ; Schupf, Nicole ; Smit, Johannes ; Sorice, Rossella ; Spector, Tim D. ; Starr, John M. ; Stöckl, Doris ; Strauch, Konstantin ; Stumvoll, Michael ; Swertz, Morris A. ; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur ; Thurik, A.R. ; Timpson, Nicholas J. ; Tung, Joyce Y. ; Uitterlinden, André G. ; Vaccargiu, Simona ; Viikari, Jorma ; Vitart, Veronique ; Völzke, Henry ; Vollenweider, Peter ; Vuckovic, Dragana ; Waage, Johannes ; Wagner, Gert G. ; Wang, Jie Jin ; Wareham, Nicholas J. ; Weir, David R. ; Willemsen, Gonneke ; Willeit, Johann ; Wright, Alan F. ; Zondervan, Krina T. ; Stefansson, Kari ; Krueger, Robert F. ; Lee, James J. ; Benjamin, Daniel J. ; Cesarini, David ; Koellinger, Philipp D. ; Hoed, Marcel den; Snieder, Harold ; Mills, Melinda C. - \ 2016
    Nature Genetics 48 (2016)12. - ISSN 1061-4036 - p. 1462 - 1472.
    The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior—age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB)—has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified, and the underlying mechanisms of AFB and NEB are poorly understood. We report a large genome-wide association study of both sexes including 251,151 individuals for AFB and 343,072 individuals for NEB. We identified 12 independent loci that are significantly associated with AFB and/or NEB in a SNP-based genome-wide association study and 4 additional loci associated in a gene-based effort. These loci harbor genes that are likely to have a role, either directly or by affecting non-local gene expression, in human reproduction and infertility, thereby increasing understanding of these complex traits.
    Expanding our understanding of K* (Kt, KE, Ktt, KMb, KB, KM, etc.) : a concept paper emerging from the K* conference held in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, April 2012
    Shaxson, L. ; Bielak, A. ; Ahmed, I. ; Brien, D. ; Conant, B. ; Fisher, C. ; Gwyn, E. ; Klerkx, L.W.A. - \ 2012
    Hamilton, Canada : United Nations University (Concept paper & case studies ) - ISBN 9789280860368 - 88
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