Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Effects of a modestly lower carbohydrate diet in gestational diabetes : a randomized controlled trial
    Mijatovic, Jovana ; Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu ; Buso, Marion E.C. ; Atkinson, Fiona S. ; Ross, Glynis P. ; Markovic, Tania P. ; Brand-Miller, Jennie C. - \ 2020
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 112 (2020)2. - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 284 - 292.
    diet - gestational diabetes - ketones - lower carbohydrate - MAMI study - metabolism

    BACKGROUND: Lower carbohydrate diets have the potential to improve glycemia but may increase ketonemia in women with gestational diabetes (GDM). We hypothesized that modestly lower carbohydrate intake would not increase ketonemia. OBJECTIVE: To compare blood ketone concentration, risk of ketonemia, and pregnancy outcomes in women with GDM randomly assigned to a lower carbohydrate diet or routine care. METHODS: Forty-six women aged (mean ± SEM) 33.3 ± 0.6 y and prepregnancy BMI 26.8 ± 0.9 kg/m2 were randomly assigned at 28.5 ± 0.4 wk to a modestly lower carbohydrate diet (MLC, ∼135 g/d carbohydrate) or routine care (RC, ∼200 g/d) for 6 wk. Blood ketones were ascertained by finger prick test strips and 3-d food diaries were collected at baseline and end of the intervention. RESULTS: There were no detectable differences in blood ketones between completers in the MLC group compared with the RC group (0.1 ± 0.0 compared with 0.1 ± 0.0 mmol/L, n = 33, P = 0.31, respectively), even though carbohydrate and total energy intake were significantly lower in the intervention group (carbohydrate 165 ± 7 compared with 190 ± 9 g, P = 0.04; energy 7040 ± 240 compared with 8230 ± 320 kJ, P <0.01, respectively). Only 20% of participants in the MLC group met the target intake compared with 65% in the RC group (P <0.01). There were no differences in birth weight, rate of large-for-gestational-age infants, percent fat mass, or fat-free mass between groups. CONCLUSIONS: An intervention to reduce carbohydrate intake in GDM did not raise ketones to clinical significance, possibly because the target of 135 g/d was difficult to achieve in pregnancy. Feeding studies with food provision may be needed to assess the benefits and risks of low-carbohydrate diets. This trial was registered at www.anzctr.org.au as ACTRN12616000018415.

    The Glycaemic Index-Food-Frequency Questionnaire: Development and Validation of a Food Frequency Questionnaire Designed to Estimate the Dietary Intake of Glycaemic Index and Glycaemic Load : An Effort by the PREVIEW Consortium
    Brouwer, E.M. ; Berendsen, A.M. ; Sluik, D. ; Wiel, A.M. van de; Raben, Anne ; Vries, J.H.M. de; Brand-Miller, Jennie ; Feskens, E.J.M. - \ 2019
    Nutrients 11 (2019)1. - ISSN 2072-6643
    Dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) are indices used to quantify the effect of carbohydrate quality and quantity on postprandial glycaemia. GI/GL-health associations are widely studied but data on the validity of integrated GI/GL measurements are scarce. We evaluated the performance of a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) specifically developed to assess GI/GL. In total, 263 Dutch men and 212 women (aged 55 ± 11 years) completed a 58-item GI-FFQ, an 183-item general-FFQ and a 2-day 24 h-recall and donated blood for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) determination. The level of agreement between these methods was evaluated by (1) cross-classification, (2) correlations and (3) Bland and Altman plots. The three dietary assessment methods provided comparable mean intake estimates for total carbohydrates (range: 214–237 g/day), mono/disaccharides (100–107 g/day), polysaccharides (114–132 g/day), as well as bread, breakfast cereals, potatoes, pasta, rice, fruit, dairy, cakes/cookies and sweets. Mean (±SD) GI estimates were also comparable between the GI-FFQ (54 ± 3), general-FFQ (53 ± 4) and 24 h-recalls (53 ± 5). Mean (±SD) GI-FFQ GL (117 ± 37) was slightly lower than the general-FFQ GL (126 ± 38) and 24 h-recalls GL (127 ± 37). Classification of GI in quartiles was identical for the GI-FFQ and general-FFQ for 43% of the population (r = 0.58) and with 24 h-recalls for 35% of the population (de-attenuated r = 0.64). For GL, this was 48% (r = 0.65) and 44% (de-attenuated r = 0.74). Correlations between GI and HbA1c were low (r = −0.09 for GI-FFQ, r = −0.04 for general-FFQ and r = 0.07 for 24 h-recalls). In conclusion, compared to a general-FFQ and 24 h-recalls, the GI-FFQ showed a moderate to good relative validity for carbohydrates, carbohydrate-rich foods and GI/GL. No metric predicted HbA1c.
    PREVIEW study—Influence of a behavior modification intervention (PREMIT) in over 2300 people with pre-diabetes : Intention, self-efficacy and outcome expectancies during the early phase of a lifestyle intervention
    Huttunen-Lenz, Maija ; Hansen, Sylvia ; Christensen, Pia ; Larsen, Thomas Meinert ; Sandø-Pedersen, Finn ; Drummen, Mathijs ; Adam, Tanja C. ; Macdonald, Ian A. ; Taylor, Moira A. ; Martinez, J.A. ; Navas-Carretero, Santiago ; Handjiev, Svetoslav ; Poppitt, Sally D. ; Silvestre, Marta P. ; Fogelholm, Mikael ; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H. ; Brand-Miller, Jennie ; Berendsen, Agnes A.M. ; Raben, Anne ; Schlicht, Wolfgang - \ 2018
    Psychology Research and Behavior Management 11 (2018). - ISSN 1179-1578 - p. 383 - 394.
    Cognition - Diabetes mellitus - Goals - Habits - Weight loss

    Purpose: Onset of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is often gradual and preceded by impaired glucose homeostasis. Lifestyle interventions including weight loss and physical activity may reduce the risk of developing T2D, but adherence to a lifestyle change is challenging. As part of an international T2D prevention trial (PREVIEW), a behavior change intervention supported participants in achieving a healthier diet and physically active lifestyle. Here, our aim was to explore the influence of this behavioral program (PREMIT) on social-cognitive variables during an 8-week weight loss phase. Methods: PREVIEW consisted of an initial weight loss, Phase I, followed by a weight-maintenance, Phase II, for those achieving the 8-week weight loss target of ≥ 8% from initial bodyweight. Overweight and obese (BMI ≥25 kg/m2) individuals aged 25 to 70 years with confirmed pre-diabetes were enrolled. Uni-and multivariate statistical methods were deployed to explore differences in intentions, self-efficacy, and outcome expectancies between those who achieved the target weight loss (“achievers”) and those who did not (“non-achievers”). Results: At the beginning of Phase I, no significant differences in intentions, self-efficacy and outcome expectancies between “achievers” (1,857) and “non-achievers” (163) were found. “Non-achievers” tended to be younger, live with child/ren, and attended the PREMIT sessions less frequently. At the end of Phase I, “achievers” reported higher intentions (healthy eating χ2 (1)=2.57; P <0.008, exercising χ2 (1)=0.66; P <0.008), self-efficacy (F(2; 1970)=10.27, P <0.005), and were more positive about the expected outcomes (F(4; 1968)=11.22, P <0.005). Conclusion: Although statistically significant, effect sizes observed between the two groups were small. Behavior change, however, is multi-determined. Over a period of time, even small differences may make a cumulative effect. Being successful in behavior change requires that the “new” behavior is implemented time after time until it becomes a habit. Therefore, having even slightly higher self-efficacy, positive outcome expectancies and intentions may over time result in considerably improved chances to achieve long-term lifestyle changes.

    Demographic and Social-Cognitive Factors Associated with Weight Loss in Overweight, Pre-diabetic Participants of the PREVIEW Study
    Hansen, Sylvia ; Huttunen-Lenz, Maija ; Sluik, Diewertje ; Brand-Miller, Jennie ; Drummen, Mathijs ; Fogelholm, Mikael ; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora ; Macdonald, Ian ; Martinez, Alfredo J. ; Larsen, Thomas Meinert ; Poppitt, Sally ; Raben, Anne ; Schlicht, Wolfgang - \ 2018
    International Journal of Behavioral Medicine 25 (2018)6. - ISSN 1070-5503 - p. 682 - 692.
    Behavioral determination - Lifestyle intervention - Social-cognitive factors - Weight loss

    Purpose: Weight loss has been demonstrated to be a successful strategy in diabetes prevention. Although weight loss is greatly influenced by dietary behaviors, social-cognitive factors play an important role in behavioral determination. This study aimed to identify demographic and social-cognitive factors (intention, self-efficacy, outcome expectancies, social support, and motivation with regard to dietary behavior and goal adjustment) associated with weight loss in overweight and obese participants from the PREVIEW study who had pre-diabetes. Method: Prospective correlational data from 1973 adult participants were analyzed. The participants completed psychological questionnaires that assessed social-cognitive variables with regard to dietary behavior. Stepwise multiple regression analyses were performed to identify baseline demographic and social-cognitive factors associated with weight loss. Results: Overall, being male, having a higher baseline BMI, having a higher income, perceiving fewer disadvantages of a healthy diet (outcome expectancies), experiencing less discouragement for healthy eating by family and friends (social support), and lower education were independently linked to greater weight loss. When evaluating females and males separately, education was no longer associated with weight loss. Conclusion: The results indicate that a supportive environment in which family members and friends avoid discouraging healthy eating, with the application of a strategy that uses specific behavior change techniques to emphasize the benefits of outcomes, i.e., the benefits of a healthy diet, may support weight loss efforts. Weight loss programs should therefore always address the social environment of persons who try to lose body weight because family members and friends can be important supporters in reaching a weight loss goal.

    Objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time are associated with cardiometabolic risk factors in adults with prediabetes : The PREVIEW study
    Swindell, Nils ; Mackintosh, Kelly ; Mcnarry, Melitta ; Stephens, Jeffrey W. ; Sluik, Diewertje ; Fogelholm, Mikael ; Drummen, Mathijs ; Macdonald, Ian ; Martinez, J.A. ; Handjieva-Darlenska, Teodora ; Poppitt, Sally D. ; Brand-Miller, Jennie ; Larsen, Thomas M. ; Raben, Anne ; Stratton, Gareth - \ 2018
    Diabetes Care 41 (2018)3. - ISSN 0149-5992 - p. 562 - 569.
    OBJECTIVE The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to examine the association among physical activity (PA), sedentary time (ST), and cardiometabolic risk in adults with prediabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Participants (n = 2,326; 25-70 years old, 67% female) from eight countries, with a BMI >25 kg · m22 and impaired fasting glucose (5.6-6.9 mmol · L21) or impaired glucose tolerance (7.8-11.0 mmol · L21 at 2 h), participated. Seven-day accelerometry objectively assessed PA levels and ST. RESULTS Multiple linear regression revealed that moderate-To-vigorous PA (MVPA) was negatively associated withHOMAof insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) (standardizedb =20.078 [95% CI20.128,20.027]), waist circumference (WC) (b =20.177 [20.122,20.134]), fasting insulin (b = 20.115 [20.158, 20.072]), 2-h glucose (b = 20.069 [20.112, 20.025]), triglycerides (b = 20.091 [20.138, 20.044]), and CRP (b = 20.086 [20.127, 20.045]). ST was positively associated with HOMA-IR (b = 0.175 [0.114, 0.236]), WC (b = 0.215 [0.026, 0.131]), fasting insulin (b = 0.155 [0.092, 0.219]), triglycerides (b = 0.106 [0.052, 0.16]), CRP (b = 0.106 [0.39, 0.172]), systolic blood pressure (BP) (b = 0.078 [0.026, 0.131]), and diastolic BP (b = 0.106 [0.39, 20.172]). Associations reported between total PA (counts · min21), and all risk factors were comparable or stronger than for MVPA: HOMA-IR (b = 20.151 [20.194, 20.107]), WC (b = 20.179 [20.224, 20.134]), fasting insulin (b = 20.139 [20.183, 20.096]), 2-h glucose (b = 20.088 [20.131, 20.045]), triglycerides (b = 20.117 [20.162, 20.071]), and CRP (b = 20.104 [20.146, 20.062]). CONCLUSIONS In adults with prediabetes, objectively measured PA and ST were associated with cardiometabolic risk markers. Total PA was at least as strongly associated with cardiometabolic risk markers as MVPA, which may imply that the accumulation of total PA over the day is as important as achieving the intensity of MVPA.
    The sustainable seafood movement is a Governance concert, with the audience playing a key role
    Barclay, Kate ; Miller, Alice - \ 2018
    Sustainability 10 (2018)1. - ISSN 2071-1050
    Corporate social responsibility - Ecolabels - Ethical consumption - Green marketing - Supply chain management - Sustainable seafood
    Private standards, including ecolabels, have been posed as a governance solution for the global fisheries crisis. The conventional logic is that ecolabels meet consumer demand for certified "sustainable" seafood, with "good" players rewarded with price premiums or market share and "bad" players punished by reduced sales. Empirically, however, in the markets where ecolabeling has taken hold, retailers and brands-rather than consumers-are demanding sustainable sourcing, to build and protect their reputation. The aim of this paper is to devise a more accurate logic for understanding the sustainable seafood movement, using a qualitative literature review and reflection on our previous research. We find that replacing the consumer-driven logic with a retailer/brand-driven logic does not go far enough in making research into the sustainable seafood movement more useful. Governance is a "concert" and cannot be adequately explained through individual actor groups. We propose a new logic going beyond consumer- or retailer/brand-driven models, and call on researchers to build on the partial pictures given by studies on prices and willingness-to-pay, investigating more fully the motivations of actors in the sustainable seafood movement, and considering audience beyond the direct consumption of the product in question.
    Contributors to dietary glycaemic index and glycaemic load in the Netherlands: the role of beer
    Sluik, D. ; Atkinson, Fiona S. ; Brand-Miller, J. ; Fogelholm, M. ; Raben, A. ; Feskens, E.J.M. - \ 2016
    The British journal of nutrition 115 (2016)7. - ISSN 0007-1145 - p. 1218 - 1225.
    Diets high in glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) have been associated with a higher diabetes risk. Beer explained a large proportion of variation in GI in a Finnish and an American study. However, few beers have been tested according to International Organization for Standardization (ISO) methodology. We tested the GI of beer and estimated its contribution to dietary GI and GL in the Netherlands. GI testing of pilsner beer (Pilsner Urquell) was conducted at The University of Sydney according to ISO international standards with glucose as the reference food. Subsequently, GI and GL values were assigned to 2556 food items in the 2011 Dutch food composition table using a six-step methodology and consulting four databases. This table was linked to dietary data from 2106 adults in the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey 2007–2010. Stepwise linear regression identified contribution to inter-individual variation in dietary GI and GL. The GI of pilsner beer was 89 (sd 5). Beer consumption contributed to 9·6 and 5·3 % inter-individual variation in GI and GL, respectively. Other foods that contributed to the inter-individual variation in GI and GL included potatoes, bread, soft drinks, sugar, candy, wine, coffee and tea. The results were more pronounced in men than in women. In conclusion, beer is a high-GI food. Despite its relatively low carbohydrate content (approximately 4–5 g/100 ml), it still made a contribution to dietary GL, especially in men. Next to potatoes, bread, sugar and sugar-sweetened beverages, beer captured a considerable proportion of between-person variability in GI and GL in the Dutch diet.
    The PREVIEW-Population studies: design and methods
    Feskens, E.J.M. ; Sluik, D. ; Fogelholm, M. ; Brand-Miller, J. ; Poppit, S. ; Tremblay, A. ; Raben, A. - \ 2013
    Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism 63 (2013)Suppl.1. - ISSN 0250-6807 - p. 97 - 98.
    The overall objective of PREVIEW population studies is to substantiate the findings in the intervention study with data from five longitudinal population studies from Europe, New Zealand and Canada, covering the entire lifespan. It will be evaluated whether protein intake, glycaemic index (GI), and physical activity, are predictive of diabetes and its cardiovascular consequences. This will add insight into the natural history of diabetes, by considering specific dietary and exercise factors. The following epidemiological studies will be analysed: 1. The Netherlands: LifeLines (2006-ongoing), a three-generation population-based study in 165,000 people 4-90+y and NQplus (2011-ongoing), a survey in n=1,750 people 20-70y, repeated 3 times. 2. Finland: Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (1980-2012), a survey in n=3,596 people 3-18y at baseline, repeated 8 times. 3. New Zealand: NZ Adult Nutrition Survey (2008/09), a cross-sectional survey in n=4,721 people> 15y. 4. Canada: Quebec Family Study (1978-2002), a 3-phase longitudinal study from ~500 families including ~200 families with one obese member. A common database of these five population studies will be generated. Main exposure variables will be dietary components and physical activity. The outcome will be diabetes prevalence or incidence, and blood glucose parameters. Data-analysis will be conducted with meta-analytical techniques, using a random-effects model to consider heterogeneity among cohorts. Population attributable risks will give an estimate on how much of diabetes risk could theoretically be prevented by modifying these factors. Additionally, given that GI, one of the key exposures, is not routinely available in all food tables, a dedicated questionnaire focusing on assessing GI will be developed. It will be applied to the NQPlus cohort to gain insight into the quality of the GI results. The research described here receives funding from the EU Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement no. 312057.
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