Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Chloroflexi Dominate the Deep-Sea Golf Ball Sponges Craniella zetlandica and Craniella infrequens Throughout Different Life Stages
    Busch, Kathrin ; Wurz, Erik ; Rapp, Hans Tore ; Bayer, Kristina ; Franke, Andre ; Hentschel, Ute - \ 2020
    Frontiers in Marine Science 7 (2020). - ISSN 2296-7745
    amplicon sequencing - Chloroflexi - Craniella - early life stages - fluorescence in situ hybridization - sponges - symbiosis - vulnerable marine ecosystems

    Deep-sea sponge grounds are underexplored ecosystems that provide numerous goods and services to the functioning of the deep-sea. This study assessed the prokaryotic diversity in embryos, recruits, and adults of Craniella zetlandica and Craniella infrequens, common and abundant representatives of deep-sea sponge grounds in the North Atlantic. Our results reveal that symbiont transmission in the two Craniella sponge species likely occurs vertically, as highly similar microbial consortia have been identified in adults, embryos, and recruits. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy revealed high abundances of sponge-associated microorganisms, among which Chloroflexi (SAR202) were identified as common representatives by amplicon sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Equal diversity metrices, a similar overall prokaryotic community composition and a distinct dominance of the phylum Chloroflexi within all life stages are the key findings of our analyses. Information such as presented here provide understanding on the recruitment of deep-sea sponge holobionts which is needed to develop integrated management tools of such vulnerable marine ecosystems.

    Future water quality monitoring : improving the balance between exposure and toxicity assessments of real-world pollutant mixtures
    Altenburger, Rolf ; Brack, Werner ; Burgess, Robert M. ; Busch, Wibke ; Escher, Beate I. ; Focks, Andreas ; Mark Hewitt, L. ; Jacobsen, Bo N. ; Alda, Miren López de; Ait-Aissa, Selim ; Backhaus, Thomas ; Ginebreda, Antoni ; Hilscherová, Klára ; Hollender, Juliane ; Hollert, Henner ; Neale, Peta A. ; Schulze, Tobias ; Schymanski, Emma L. ; Teodorovic, Ivana ; Tindall, Andrew J. ; Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela de; Vrana, Branislav ; Zonja, Bozo ; Krauss, Martin - \ 2019
    Environmental Sciences Europe 31 (2019)1. - ISSN 2190-4707
    Bioanalysis - Chemical and ecological status - Ecological assessment - Mixture toxicity - Water framework directive - Water monitoring

    Environmental water quality monitoring aims to provide the data required for safeguarding the environment against adverse biological effects from multiple chemical contamination arising from anthropogenic diffuse emissions and point sources. Here, we integrate the experience of the international EU-funded project SOLUTIONS to shift the focus of water monitoring from a few legacy chemicals to complex chemical mixtures, and to identify relevant drivers of toxic effects. Monitoring serves a range of purposes, from control of chemical and ecological status compliance to safeguarding specific water uses, such as drinking water abstraction. Various water sampling techniques, chemical target, suspect and non-target analyses as well as an array of in vitro, in vivo and in situ bioanalytical methods were advanced to improve monitoring of water contamination. Major improvements for broader applicability include tailored sampling techniques, screening and identification techniques for a broader and more diverse set of chemicals, higher detection sensitivity, standardized protocols for chemical, toxicological, and ecological assessments combined with systematic evidence evaluation techniques. No single method or combination of methods is able to meet all divergent monitoring purposes. Current monitoring approaches tend to emphasize either targeted exposure or effect detection. Here, we argue that, irrespective of the specific purpose, assessment of monitoring results would benefit substantially from obtaining and linking information on the occurrence of both chemicals and potentially adverse biological effects. In this paper, we specify the information required to: (1) identify relevant contaminants, (2) assess the impact of contamination in aquatic ecosystems, or (3) quantify cause–effect relationships between contaminants and adverse effects. Specific strategies to link chemical and bioanalytical information are outlined for each of these distinct goals. These strategies have been developed and explored using case studies in the Danube and Rhine river basins as well as for rivers of the Iberian Peninsula. Current water quality assessment suffers from biases resulting from differences in approaches and associated uncertainty analyses. While exposure approaches tend to ignore data gaps (i.e., missing contaminants), effect-based approaches penalize data gaps with increased uncertainty factors. This integrated work suggests systematic ways to deal with mixture exposures and combined effects in a more balanced way, and thus provides guidance for future tailored environmental monitoring.

    Embracing 3D Complexity in Leaf Carbon–Water Exchange
    Earles, J.M. ; Buckley, Thomas N. ; Brodersen, Craig R. ; Busch, Florian A. ; Cano, F.J. ; Choat, Brendan ; Evans, John R. ; Farquhar, Graham D. ; Harwood, Richard ; Huynh, Minh ; John, Grace P. ; Miller, Megan L. ; Rockwell, Fulton E. ; Sack, Lawren ; Scoffoni, Christine ; Struik, Paul C. ; Wu, Alex ; Yin, Xinyou ; Barbour, Margaret M. - \ 2019
    Trends in Plant Science 24 (2019)1. - ISSN 1360-1385 - p. 15 - 24.
    3D - leaf anatomy - leaf hydraulic conductance - mesophyll conductance - photosynthesis

    Leaves are a nexus for the exchange of water, carbon, and energy between terrestrial plants and the atmosphere. Research in recent decades has highlighted the critical importance of the underlying biophysical and anatomical determinants of CO2 and H2O transport, but a quantitative understanding of how detailed 3D leaf anatomy mediates within-leaf transport has been hindered by the lack of a consensus framework for analyzing or simulating transport and its spatial and temporal dynamics realistically, and by the difficulty of measuring within-leaf transport at the appropriate scales. We discuss how recent technological advancements now make a spatially explicit 3D leaf analysis possible, through new imaging and modeling tools that will allow us to address long-standing questions related to plant carbon–water exchange.

    Survey of tools for measuring in vivo photosynthesis
    Walker, Berkley J. ; Busch, Florian A. ; Driever, Steven M. ; Kromdijk, Johannes ; Lawson, Tracy - \ 2018
    In: Photosynthesis / Covshoff, Sarah, New York : Humana Press Inc. (Methods in Molecular Biology ) - ISBN 9781493977857 - p. 3 - 24.
    Chlorophyll fluorescence - CO exchange - O exchange - Online mass spectrometry - Photosynthesis
    Measurements of in vivo photosynthesis are powerful tools that probe the largest fluxes of carbon and energy in an illuminated leaf, but often the specific techniques used are so varied and specialized that it is difficult for researchers outside the field to select and perform the most useful assays for their research questions. The goal of this chapter is to provide a broad overview of the current tools available for the study of in vivo photosynthesis so as to provide a foundation for selecting appropriate techniques, many of which are presented in detail in subsequent chapters. This chapter also organizes current methods into a comparative framework and provides examples of how they have been applied to research questions of broad agronomical, ecological, or biological importance. The chapter closes with an argument that the future of in vivo measurements of photosynthesis lies in the ability to use multiple methods simultaneously and discusses the benefits of this approach to currently open physiological questions. This chapter, combined with the relevant methods chapters, could serve as a laboratory course in methods in photosynthesis research or as part of a more comprehensive laboratory course in general plant physiology methods.
    LPCAT1 controls phosphate homeostasis in a zinc-dependent manner
    Kisko, Mushtak ; Bouain, Nadia ; Safi, Alaeddine ; Medici, Anna ; Akkers, Robert C. ; Secco, David ; Fouret, Gilles ; Krouk, Gabriel ; Aarts, Mark G.M. ; Busch, Wolfgang ; Rouached, Hatem - \ 2018
    eLife 7 (2018). - ISSN 2050-084X

    All living organisms require a variety of essential elements for their basic biological functions. While the homeostasis of nutrients is highly intertwined, the molecular and genetic mechanisms of these dependencies remain poorly understood. Here, we report a discovery of a molecular pathway that controls phosphate (Pi) accumulation in plants under Zn deficiency. Using genome-wide association studies, we first identified allelic variation of the Lyso- Phosphatidyl Choline (PC) Acyl Transferase 1 (LPCAT1) gene as the key determinant of shoot Pi accumulation under Zn deficiency. We then show that regulatory variation at the LPCAT1 locus contributes significantly to this natural variation and we further demonstrate that the regulation of LPCAT1 expression involves bZIP23 TF, for which we identified a new binding site sequence. Finally, we show that in Zn deficient conditions loss of function of LPCAT1 increases the phospholipid Lyso-Phosphatidyl Choline/Phosphatidyl Choline ratio, the expression of the Pi transporter PHT1;1, and that this leads to shoot Pi accumulation.

    Help, een E-nummer
    Hartemink, Ralf - \ 2015
    Animal Welfare: the challenges of implementing a common legislation in Europe
    Miele, M. ; Bock, B.B. ; Horlings, L.G. - \ 2015
    In: Handbook of International Political Economy of Agriculture and Food / Bonanno, A., Busch, L., Cheltenham, UK : Edward Elgar Publishing (Handbooks of Research on International Political Economy series ) - ISBN 9781782548256 - p. 295 - 231.
    International Domestic Linkages and Policy Convergence
    Busch, P.O. ; Gupta, A. ; Falkner, R. - \ 2012
    In: Global Environmental Governance Reconsidered / Biermann, F., Pattberg, P., Cambridge MA : The MIT Press - ISBN 9780262517706 - p. 199 - 218.
    The notion of global governance is widely studied in academia and increasingly relevant to politics and policy making. Yet many of its fundamental elements remain unclear in both theory and practice. This book offers a fresh perspective by analyzing global governance in terms of three major trends, as exemplified by developments in global sustainability governance: the emergence of nonstate actors; new mechanisms of transnational cooperation; and increasingly segmented and overlapping layers of authority. The book, which is the synthesis of a ten-year “Global Governance Project” carried out by thirteen leading European research institutions, first examines new nonstate actors, focusing on international bureaucracies, global corporations, and transnational networks of scientists; then investigates novel mechanisms of global governance, particularly transnational environmental regimes, public-private partnerships, and market-based arrangements; and, finally, looks at fragmentation of authority, both vertically among supranational, international, national, and subnational layers, and horizontally among different parallel rule-making systems. The implications, potential, and realities of global environmental governance are defining questions for our generation. This book distills key insights from the past and outlines the most important research challenges for the future.
    Effect of high-in-taste pulses on taste perception
    Busch, J. ; Knoop, J.E. ; Tournier, C. ; Smit, G. - \ 2010
    In: Expression of multidisciplinary flavour science / Blank, I, Wust, M, Yeretzian, C, Interlaken, Switzerland : Zürcher Hochschule für Angewandte Wissenschaften - p. 47 - 50.
    Reviewing progress towards finding an acceptable natural flavour alternative to salt
    Busch, J.L.H.C. ; Batenburg, M. ; Velden, R. van der; Smit, G. - \ 2009
    Agro Food Industry Hi-Tech 20 (2009)5. - ISSN 1722-6996 - p. 66 - 68.
    taste - perception - aroma - 3-hydroxy-4,5-dimethyl-2(5h)-furanone - enhancement - impact
    The level of sodium in food products needs to be lowered in order to help reduce incidences of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases of the world population. Important functionalities of salt (NaCl) – salty taste and flavour enhancement – are to be delivered by replacer systems. One approach is enhancement of saltiness by aroma. We show that saltiness and the overall flavour profile are increased upon addition of extra beef flavouring in a salt-reduced beef bouillon. Furthermore, the saltiness enhancement potency of the single compound sotolone (savoury note) is demonstrated. Practical perspectives of the application of aroma for sodium reduction and routes of natural production of sotolone are discussed.
    Design of Foods for the optimal delivery of basic tastes
    Oever, G.J. van den; Busch, J.L.H.C. ; Linden, E. van der; Smit, G. ; Zuidam, N.J. - \ 2009
    In: Designing functional foods : Measuring and Controlling Food Structure Breakdown and Nutrient Absorption / McClements, J., Decker, E., Woodhead Publishing - ISBN 9781845694326 - p. 453 - 480.
    Temporal contrast of salt delivery in mouth increases salt perception
    Busch, J.L.H.C. ; Tournier, C. ; Knoop, J.E. ; Kooyman, G. ; Smit, G. - \ 2009
    Chemical Senses 34 (2009)4. - ISSN 0379-864X - p. 341 - 348.
    flavor release - chorda tympani - gustatory adaptation - time-intensity - taste - sweeteners - sweetness - stimuli - system - gels
    The impact of salt delivery in mouth on salt perception was investigated. It was hypothesized that fast concentration changes in the delivery to the receptor can reduce sensory adaptation, leading to an increased taste perception. Saltiness ratings were scored by a panel over time during various stimulation conditions involving relative changes in NaCl concentration of 20% and 38%. Changes in salt delivery profile had similar effect on saltiness perception when delivered either by a sipwise method or by a gustometer. The impact of concentration variations and frequency of concentration changes was further investigated with the gustometer method. Five second boosts and 2 s pulses were delivered during 3 sequential 10-s intervals, whereas the delivered total salt content was the same for all conditions. Two second pulses were found to increase saltiness perception, but only when the pulses were delivered during the first seconds of stimulation. Results suggest that the frequency, timing, and concentration differences of salt stimuli can affect saltiness. Specifically, a short and intense stimulus can increase salt perception, possibly through a reduction of adaptation.
    Effect of high-in-taste pulses on taste perception
    Busch, J.L.H.C. ; Knoop, J.E. ; Tournier, C. ; Smit, G. - \ 2008
    Searching for the future of land: scenarios from the local to global scale
    Alcamo, J. ; Kok, K. ; Busch, G. ; Priess, J. - \ 2008
    In: Environmental futures: the practice of environmental scenario analysis / Alcamo, J., Amsterdam : Elsevier (Developments in Integrated Environmental Assessment 2) - ISBN 9780444532930 - p. 67 - 103.
    Enzymatic conversions involved in the formation and degradation of aldehydes in fermented foods
    Smit, G. ; Smit, B.A. ; Engels, W.J.M. ; Hylckama Vlieg, J.E.T. van; Busch, J. ; Batenburg, M. - \ 2006
    In: Flavour Science: recent advances and trends. / Bredie, W.L.P., Petersen, M.A., Elsevier - ISBN 9780444527424 - p. 79 - 84.
    Searching for the future of land: Scenarios from the local to global scale
    Alcamo, J. ; Kok, K. ; Busch, J. ; Priess, J. ; Eickhout, B. ; Rounsevell, M. ; Rothmann, D.S. ; Heistermann, M. - \ 2006
    In: Land-use and land-cover change / Lambin, E.F., Geist, H.J., Dordrecht : Springer (The IGBP Series ) - ISBN 9783540322016 - p. 137 - 155.
    Enzymatic conversions involved in the formation and degradation of aldehydes in fermenrted products
    Smit, G. ; Smit, B.A. ; Engels, W.J.M. ; Hylckama Vlieg, J.E.T. van; Busch, J. ; Batenburg, M. - \ 2005
    Synthesis and conclusions
    Dolman, A.J. ; Ierland, E. van; Hutjes, R.W.A. ; Maat, H.W. ter; Haarsma, R. ; Dorland, C. ; Leemans, R. - \ 2001
    In: Land use, climate and biogeochemical cycles: feedbacks and options for emission reduction / Hutjes, R.W.A., Dolman, A.J., Nabuurs, G.J., Schelhaas, M.J., ter Maat, H.W., Kabat, P., Moors, E., Huygen, J., Haarsma, R., Ronda, R., Schaeffer, M., Opsteegh, J.D., Leemans, R., Bouwman, L., Busch, G., Eickhout, B., Kreileman, E., Strengers, B., de Vries, B., Verhagen, A., Vleeshouwers, L., Corre, W.J., Jongschaap, R.E.E., Kruseman, G., van Ierland, E., Holtslag, A.A.M., Willemsen, F., Dorland, C., van Tol, R.S.J., - p. 211 - 221.
    atmosfeer - biogeochemie - broeikaseffect - koolstofkringloop - landgebruik - klimaat - milieu - stikstofkringloop
    Feedback of the land surface with the atmosphere at regional scales
    Maat, H.W. ter; Hutjes, R.W.A. ; Dolman, A.J. - \ 2001
    In: Land use, climate and biogeochemical cycles: feedbacks and options for emission reduction / Hutjes, R.W.A., Dolman, A.J., Nabuurs, G.J., Schelhaas, M.J., ter Maat, H.W., Kabat, P., Moors, E., Huygen, J., Haarsma, R., Ronda, R., Schaeffer, M., Opsteegh, J.D., Leemans, R., Bouwman, L., Busch, G., Eickhout, B., Kreileman, E., Strengers, B., de Vries, B., Verhagen, A., Vleeshouwers, L., Corre, W.J., Jongschaap, R.E.E., Kruseman, G., van Ierland, E., Holtslag, A.A.M., Willemsen, F., Dorland, C., van Tol, R.S.J., Bilthoven : RIVM (Dutch nat. Res. Programme global Air Pollut. Climate Change Rep. 410200107) - ISBN 9789058510815 - p. 93 - 145.
    atmosfeer - broeikaseffect - landgebruik - klimaat - milieu
    Stocks and fluxes of carbon and other land use related greenhouse gas emissions
    Hutjes, R.W.A. ; Huygen, J. ; Nabuurs, G.J. ; Schelhaas, M.J. ; Verhagen, A. ; Vleeshouwers, L.M. ; Corre, W.J. ; Jongschaap, R.E.E. - \ 2001
    In: Land use, climate and biogeochemical cycles: feedbacks and options for emission reduction / Hutjes, R.W.A., Dolman, A.J., Nabuurs, G.J., Schelhaas, M.J., ter Maat, H.W., Kabat, P., Moors, E., Huygen, J., Haarsma, R., Ronda, R., Schaeffer, M., Opsteegh, J.D., Leemans, R., Bouwman, L., Busch, G., Eickhout, B., Kreileman, E., Strengers, B., de Vries, B., Verhagen, A., Vleeshouwers, L., Corre, W.J., Jongschaap, R.E.E., Kruseman, G., van Ierland, E., Holtslag, A.A.M., Willemsen, F., Dorland, C., van Tol, R.S.J., Bilthoven : RIVM - p. 31 - 92.
    atmosfeer - broeikaseffect - koolstofkringloop - landgebruik - klimaat - milieu
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