Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Correction to: Genetic variant predictors of gene expression provide new insight into risk of colorectal cancer
Bien, Stephanie A. ; Su, Yu Ru ; Conti, David V. ; Harrison, Tabitha A. ; Qu, Conghui ; Guo, Xingyi ; Lu, Yingchang ; Albanes, Demetrius ; Auer, Paul L. ; Banbury, Barbara L. ; Berndt, Sonja I. ; Bézieau, Stéphane ; Brenner, Hermann ; Buchanan, Daniel D. ; Caan, Bette J. ; Campbell, Peter T. ; Carlson, Christopher S. ; Chan, Andrew T. ; Chang-Claude, Jenny ; Chen, Sai ; Connolly, Charles M. ; Easton, Douglas F. ; Feskens, Edith J.M. ; Gallinger, Steven ; Giles, Graham G. ; Gunter, Marc J. ; Hampe, Jochen ; Huyghe, Jeroen R. ; Hoffmeister, Michael ; Hudson, Thomas J. ; Jacobs, Eric J. ; Jenkins, Mark A. ; Kampman, Ellen ; Kang, Hyun Min ; Kühn, Tilman ; Küry, Sébastien ; Lejbkowicz, Flavio ; Marchand, Loic Le; Milne, Roger L. ; Li, Li ; Li, Christopher I. ; Lindblom, Annika ; Lindor, Noralane M. ; Martín, Vicente ; McNeil, Caroline E. ; Melas, Marilena ; Moreno, Victor ; Newcomb, Polly A. ; Offit, Kenneth ; Pharaoh, Paul D.P. ; Potter, John D. ; Qu, Chenxu ; Riboli, Elio ; Rennert, Gad ; Sala, Núria ; Schafmayer, Clemens ; Scacheri, Peter C. ; Schmit, Stephanie L. ; Severi, Gianluca ; Slattery, Martha L. ; Smith, Joshua D. ; Trichopoulou, Antonia ; Tumino, Rosario ; Ulrich, Cornelia M. ; Duijnhoven, Fränzel J.B. van; Guelpen, Bethany Van; Weinstein, Stephanie J. ; White, Emily ; Wolk, Alicja ; Woods, Michael O. ; Wu, Anna H. ; Abeçasis, Goncalo R. ; Casey, Graham ; Nickerson, Deborah A. ; Gruber, Stephen B. ; Hsu, Li ; Zheng, Wei ; Peters, Ulrike - \ 2019
Human Genetics 138 (2019)7. - ISSN 0340-6717 - p. 789 - 791.

Every author has erroneously been assigned to the affiliation “62”. The affiliation 62 belongs to the author Graham Casey.

Genetic variant predictors of gene expression provide new insight into risk of colorectal cancer
Bien, Stephanie A. ; Su, Yu-Ru ; Conti, David V. ; Harrison, Tabitha A. ; Qu, Conghui ; Guo, Xingyi ; Lu, Yingchang ; Albanes, Demetrius ; Auer, Paul L. ; Banbury, Barbara L. ; Berndt, Sonja I. ; Bézieau, Stéphane ; Brenner, Hermann ; Buchanan, Daniel D. ; Caan, Bette J. ; Campbell, Peter T. ; Carlson, Christopher S. ; Chan, Andrew T. ; Chang-Claude, Jenny ; Chen, Sai ; Connolly, Charles M. ; Easton, Douglas F. ; Feskens, Edith J.M. ; Gallinger, Steven ; Giles, Graham G. ; Gunter, Marc J. ; Hampe, Jochen ; Huyghe, Jeroen R. ; Hoffmeister, Michael ; Hudson, Thomas J. ; Jacobs, Eric J. ; Jenkins, Mark A. ; Kampman, Ellen ; Kang, Hyun Min ; Kühn, Tilman ; Küry, Sébastien ; Lejbkowicz, Flavio ; Marchand, Loic Le; Milne, Roger L. ; Li, Christopher I. ; Lindblom, Annika ; Lindor, Noralane M. ; Martín, Vicente ; McNeil, Caroline E. ; Melas, Marilena ; Moreno, Victor ; Newcomb, Polly A. ; Offit, Kenneth ; Pharaoh, Paul D.P. ; Potter, John D. ; Qu, Chenxu ; Riboli, Elio ; Rennert, Gad ; Sala, Núria ; Schafmayer, Clemens ; Scacheri, Peter C. ; Schmit, Stephanie L. ; Severi, Gianluca ; Slattery, Martha L. ; Smith, Joshua D. ; Trichopoulou, Antonia ; Tumino, Rosario ; Ulrich, Cornelia M. ; Duijnhoven, Fränzel J.B. van; Guelpen, Bethany Van; Weinstein, Stephanie J. ; White, Emily ; Wolk, Alicja ; Woods, Michael O. ; Wu, Anna H. ; Abecasis, Goncalo R. ; Casey, Graham ; Nickerson, Deborah A. ; Gruber, Stephen B. ; Hsu, Li ; Zheng, Wei ; Peters, Ulrike - \ 2019
Human Genetics 138 (2019)4. - ISSN 0340-6717 - p. 307 - 326.
Genome-wide association studies have reported 56 independently associated colorectal cancer (CRC) risk variants, most of which are non-coding and believed to exert their effects by modulating gene expression. The computational method PrediXcan uses cis-regulatory variant predictors to impute expression and perform gene-level association tests in GWAS without directly measured transcriptomes. In this study, we used reference datasets from colon (n = 169) and whole blood (n = 922) transcriptomes to test CRC association with genetically determined expression levels in a genome-wide analysis of 12,186 cases and 14,718 controls. Three novel associations were discovered from colon transverse models at FDR ≤ 0.2 and further evaluated in an independent replication including 32,825 cases and 39,933 controls. After adjusting for multiple comparisons, we found statistically significant associations using colon transcriptome models with TRIM4 (discovery P = 2.2 × 10− 4, replication P = 0.01), and PYGL (discovery P = 2.3 × 10− 4, replication P = 6.7 × 10− 4). Interestingly, both genes encode proteins that influence redox homeostasis and are related to cellular metabolic reprogramming in tumors, implicating a novel CRC pathway linked to cell growth and proliferation. Defining CRC risk regions as one megabase up- and downstream of one of the 56 independent risk variants, we defined 44 non-overlapping CRC-risk regions. Among these risk regions, we identified genes associated with CRC (P < 0.05) in 34/44 CRC-risk regions. Importantly, CRC association was found for two genes in the previously reported 2q25 locus, CXCR1 and CXCR2, which are potential cancer therapeutic targets. These findings provide strong candidate genes to prioritize for subsequent laboratory follow-up of GWAS loci. This study is the first to implement PrediXcan in a large colorectal cancer study and findings highlight the utility of integrating transcriptome data in GWAS for discovery of, and biological insight into, risk loci.
A Bifidobacterial pilus-associated protein promotes colonic epithelial proliferation
O'Connell Motherway, Mary ; Houston, Aileen ; O'Callaghan, Grace ; Reunanen, Justus ; O'Brien, Frances ; O'Driscoll, Tara ; Casey, Patrick G. ; Vos, Willem M. de; Sinderen, Douwe van; Shanahan, Fergus - \ 2019
Molecular Microbiology 111 (2019)1. - ISSN 0950-382X - p. 287 - 301.

Development of the human gut microbiota commences at birth, with certain bifidobacterial species representing dominant and early colonisers of the newborn gastrointestinal tract. The molecular basis of Bifidobacterium colonisation, persistence and presumed communication with the host has remained obscure. We previously identified tight adherence (Tad) pili from Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 as an essential colonisation factor. Here, we demonstrate that bifidobacterial Tad pili also promote in vivo colonic epithelial proliferation. A significant increase in cell proliferation was detectable 5 days postadministration of B. breve UCC2003. Using advanced functional genomic approaches, bacterial strains either (a) producing the Tad2003 pili or (b) lacking the TadE or TadF pseudopilins were created. Analysis of the ability of these mutant strains to promote epithelial cell proliferation in vivo demonstrated that the pilin subunit, TadE, is the bifidobacterial molecule responsible for this proliferation response. These findings were confirmed in vitro using purified TadE protein. Our data imply that bifidobacterial Tad pili may contribute to the maturation of the naïve gut in early life through the production of a specific scaffold of extracellular protein structures, which stimulate growth of the neonatal mucosa.

Preparation for the evaluation of the list of mandatory research surveys at sea
Sampson, David ; Alvarez, P. ; Armesto, Angeles ; Casey, J. ; Natale, A. Di; Hansson, Maria ; Karp, W.A. ; Mannini, A. ; Panayotova, Marina ; Renaud, F. ; Somarakis, Stylianos ; Spedicato, M.T. ; Stransky, C. ; Verver, S.W. ; Worsoe Clausen, L.A. ; Hoof, L.J.W. van - \ 2018
Luxembourg : Luxembourg (Publications Office of the european Union EWG-18-04) - ISBN 9789279793875 - 51 p.
Global, regional, and national burden of neurological disorders during 1990–2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015
Feigin, V.L. ; Krishnamurthi, R.V. ; Theadom, A.M. ; Abajobir, A.A. ; Mishra, S.R. ; Ahmed, M.B. ; Abate, K.H. ; Mengistie, M.A. ; Wakayo, T. ; Abd-Allah, F. ; Abdulle, A.M. ; Abera, S.F. ; Mohammed, K.E. ; Abyu, G.Y. ; Asgedom, S.W. ; Atey, T.M. ; Betsu, B.D. ; Mezgebe, H.B. ; Tuem, K.B. ; Woldu, M.A. ; Aichour, A.N. ; Aichour, I. ; Aichour, M.T. ; Akinyemi, R.O. ; Alabed, S. ; Al-Raddadi, R. ; Alvis-Guzman, N. ; Amare, A.T. ; Ansari, H. ; Anwari, P. ; Ärnlöv, J. ; Fereshtehnejad, S. ; Weiderpass, E. ; Havmoeller, R. ; Asayesh, H. ; Avila-Burgos, L. ; Avokpaho, E.F.G.A. ; Afrique, L.E.R.A.S. ; Azarpazhooh, M.R. ; Barac, A. ; Barboza, M. ; Barker-Collo, S.L. ; Bärnighausen, T. ; Farvid, M.S. ; Mohammed, S. ; Bedi, N. ; Beghi, E. ; Giussani, G. ; Bennett, D.A. ; Hay, S.I. ; Goulart, A.C. ; Santos, I.S. ; Bensenor, I.M. ; Lotufo, P.A. ; Berhane, A. ; Jeemon, P. ; Bhaumik, S. ; Dandona, L. ; Dandona, R. ; Kumar, G.A. ; Birlik, S.M. ; Biryukov, S. ; Casey, D. ; Foreman, K.J. ; Goldberg, E.M. ; Khalil, I.A. ; Kyu, H.H. ; Manhertz, T. ; Mokdad, A.H. ; Naghavi, M. ; Nguyen, G. ; Nichols, E. ; Smith, M. ; Carabin, H. ; Roth, G.A. ; Stanaway, J.D. ; Vos, T. ; Ellenbogen, R.G. ; Jakovljevic, M.B. ; Tirschwell, D.L. ; Zunt, J.R. ; Boneya, D.J. ; Hambisa, M. ; Bulto, L.N.B. ; Carabin, H. ; Castañeda-Orjuela, C.A. ; Catalá-López, F. ; Tabarés-Seisdedos, R. ; Chen, H. ; Chitheer, A.A. ; Chowdhury, R. ; Christensen, H. ; Deveber, G.A. ; Dharmaratne, S.D. ; Do, H.P. ; Nguyen, C.T. ; Nguyen, Q.L. ; Nguyen, T.H. ; Nong, V.M. ; Sheth, K.N. ; Dorsey, E.R. ; Eskandarieh, S. ; Fischer, F. ; Majeed, A. ; Steiner, T.J. ; Rawaf, S. ; Shakir, R. ; Shoman, H. ; Geleijnse, J.M. ; Gillum, R.F. ; Gona, P.N. ; Gugnani, H.C. ; Gupta, R. ; Hachinski, V. ; Hamadeh, R.R. ; Hankey, G.J. ; Hareri, H.A. ; Heydarpour, P. ; Sahraian, M.A. ; Kasaeian, A. ; Malekzadeh, R. ; Roshandel, G. ; Sepanlou, S.G. ; Hotez, P.J. ; Javanbakht, M. ; Jonas, J.B. ; Kalkonde, Y. ; Kandel, A. ; Karch, A. ; Kastor, A. ; Rahman, M.H.U. ; Keiyoro, P.N. ; Khader, Y.S. ; Khan, E.A. ; Khang, Y. ; Khoja, A.T.A. ; Tran, B.X. ; Khubchandani, J. ; Kim, D. ; Kim, Y.J. ; Kivimaki, M. ; Kokubo, Y. ; Kosen, S. ; Kravchenko, M. ; Piradov, M.A. ; Varakin, Y.Y. ; Defo, B.K. ; Kulkarni, C. ; Kumar, R. ; Larsson, A. ; Lavados, P.M. ; Li, Y. ; Liang, X. ; Liben, M.L. ; Lo, W.D. ; Logroscino, G. ; Loy, C.T. ; Mackay, M.T. ; Meretoja, A. ; Szoeke, C.E.I. ; Abd El Razek, H.M. ; Mantovani, L.G. ; Massano, J. ; Mazidi, M. ; McAlinden, C. ; Mehata, S. ; Mehndiratta, M.M. ; Memish, Z.A. ; Mendoza, W. ; Mensah, G.A. ; Wijeratne, T. ; Miller, T.R. ; Mohamed Ibrahim, N. ; Mohammadi, A. ; Moradi-Lakeh, M. ; Velasquez, I.M. ; Musa, K.I. ; Ngunjiri, J.W. ; Ningrum, D.N.A. ; Norrving, B. ; Stein, D.J. ; Noubiap, J.J.N. ; Ogbo, F.A. ; Renzaho, A.M.N. ; Owolabi, M.O. ; Pandian, J.D. ; Parmar, P.G. ; Pereira, D.M. ; Petzold, M. ; Phillips, M.R. ; Poulton, R.G. ; Pourmalek, F. ; Qorbani, M. ; Rafay, A. ; Rai, R.K. ; Rajsic, S. ; Ranta, A. ; Rezai, M.S. ; Rubagotti, E. ; Sachdev, P. ; Safiri, S. ; Sahathevan, R. ; Samy, A.M. ; Santalucia, P. ; Sartorius, B. ; Satpathy, M. ; Sawhney, M. ; Saylan, M.I. ; Shaikh, M.A. ; Shamsizadeh, M. ; Sheth, K.N. ; Shigematsu, M. ; Silva, D.A.S. ; Sobngwi, E. ; Sposato, L.A. ; Stovner, L.J. ; Suliankatchi Abdulkader, R. ; Tanne, D. ; Thrift, A.G. ; Topor-Madry, R. ; Truelsen, T. ; Ukwaja, K.N. ; Uthman, O.A. ; Yonemoto, N. ; Venketasubramanian, N. ; Vlassov, V.V. ; Wadilo, F. ; Wallin, M.T. ; Westerman, R. ; Wiysonge, C.S. ; Wolfe, C.D. ; Xavier, D. ; Xu, G. ; Yano, Y. ; Yimam, H.H. ; Yonemoto, N. ; Yu, C. ; Zaidi, Z. ; Zaki, M.E. - \ 2017
The Lancet Neurology 16 (2017)11. - ISSN 1474-4422 - p. 877 - 897.

Background Comparable data on the global and country-specific burden of neurological disorders and their trends are crucial for health-care planning and resource allocation. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors (GBD) Study provides such information but does not routinely aggregate results that are of interest to clinicians specialising in neurological conditions. In this systematic analysis, we quantified the global disease burden due to neurological disorders in 2015 and its relationship with country development level. Methods We estimated global and country-specific prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), years of life lost (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) for various neurological disorders that in the GBD classification have been previously spread across multiple disease groupings. The more inclusive grouping of neurological disorders included stroke, meningitis, encephalitis, tetanus, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, motor neuron disease, migraine, tension-type headache, medication overuse headache, brain and nervous system cancers, and a residual category of other neurological disorders. We also analysed results based on the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a compound measure of income per capita, education, and fertility, to identify patterns associated with development and how countries fare against expected outcomes relative to their level of development. Findings Neurological disorders ranked as the leading cause group of DALYs in 2015 (250·7 [95% uncertainty interval (UI) 229·1 to 274·7] million, comprising 10·2% of global DALYs) and the second-leading cause group of deaths (9·4 [9·1 to 9·7] million], comprising 16·8% of global deaths). The most prevalent neurological disorders were tension-type headache (1505·9 [UI 1337·3 to 1681·6 million cases]), migraine (958·8 [872·1 to 1055·6] million), medication overuse headache (58·5 [50·8 to 67·4 million]), and Alzheimer's disease and other dementias (46·0 [40·2 to 52·7 million]). Between 1990 and 2015, the number of deaths from neurological disorders increased by 36·7%, and the number of DALYs by 7·4%. These increases occurred despite decreases in age-standardised rates of death and DALYs of 26·1% and 29·7%, respectively; stroke and communicable neurological disorders were responsible for most of these decreases. Communicable neurological disorders were the largest cause of DALYs in countries with low SDI. Stroke rates were highest at middle levels of SDI and lowest at the highest SDI. Most of the changes in DALY rates of neurological disorders with development were driven by changes in YLLs. Interpretation Neurological disorders are an important cause of disability and death worldwide. Globally, the burden of neurological disorders has increased substantially over the past 25 years because of expanding population numbers and ageing, despite substantial decreases in mortality rates from stroke and communicable neurological disorders. The number of patients who will need care by clinicians with expertise in neurological conditions will continue to grow in coming decades. Policy makers and health-care providers should be aware of these trends to provide adequate services. Funding Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The first microbial colonizers of the human gut : Composition, activities, and health implications of the infant gut microbiota
Milani, Christian ; Duranti, Sabrina ; Bottacini, Francesca ; Casey, Eoghan ; Turroni, Francesca ; Mahony, Jennifer ; Belzer, Clara ; Palacio, Susana Delgado ; Montes, Silvia Arboleya ; Mancabelli, Leonardo ; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea ; Rodriguez, Juan Miguel ; Bode, Lars ; Vos, Willem De; Gueimonde, Miguel ; Margolles, Abelardo ; Sinderen, Douwe Van; Ventura, Marco - \ 2017
Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews 81 (2017)4. - ISSN 1092-2172
Bifidobacteria - Gut commensals - Gut microbiota - Infants - Metagenomics - Microbiome - Microbiota - Probiotics - Virome
The human gut microbiota is engaged in multiple interactions affecting host health during the host's entire life span. Microbes colonize the neonatal gut immediately following birth. The establishment and interactive development of this early gut microbiota are believed to be (at least partially) driven and modulated by specific compounds present in human milk. It has been shown that certain genomes of infant gut commensals, in particular those of bifidobacterial species, are genetically adapted to utilize specific glycans of this human secretory fluid, thus representing a very intriguing example of host-microbe coevolution, where both partners are believed to benefit. In recent years, various metagenomic studies have tried to dissect the composition and functionality of the infant gut microbiome and to explore the distribution across the different ecological niches of the infant gut biogeography of the corresponding microbial consortia, including those corresponding to bacteria and viruses, in healthy and ill subjects. Such analyses have linked certain features of the microbiota/microbiome, such as reduced diversity or aberrant composition, to intestinal illnesses in infants or disease states that are manifested at later stages of life, including asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, and metabolic disorders. Thus, a growing number of studies have reported on how the early human gut microbiota composition/development may affect risk factors related to adult health conditions. This concept has fueled the development of strategies to shape the infant microbiota composition based on various functional food products. In this review, we describe the infant microbiota, the mechanisms that drive its establishment and composition, and how microbial consortia may be molded by natural or artificial interventions. Finally, we discuss the relevance of key microbial players of the infant gut microbiota, in particular bifidobacteria, with respect to their role in health and disease.
Global, regional, and national disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 315 diseases and injuries and healthy life expectancy (HALE), 1990–2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015
Kassebaum, N.J. ; Arora, Megha ; Barber, R.M. ; Bhutta, Zulfiqar ; Brown, J. ; Carter, Austin ; Casey, Daniel C. ; Charlson, Fiona J. ; Coates, M. ; Coggeshall, M.S. ; Geleijnse, J.M. - \ 2016
The Lancet 388 (2016)10053. - ISSN 0140-6736 - p. 1603 - 1658.
Background
Healthy life expectancy (HALE) and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) provide summary measures of health across geographies and time that can inform assessments of epidemiological patterns and health system performance, help to prioritise investments in research and development, and monitor progress toward the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We aimed to provide updated HALE and DALYs for geographies worldwide and evaluate how disease burden changes with development.

Methods
We used results from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015) for all-cause mortality, cause-specific mortality, and non-fatal disease burden to derive HALE and DALYs by sex for 195 countries and territories from 1990 to 2015. We calculated DALYs by summing years of life lost (YLLs) and years of life lived with disability (YLDs) for each geography, age group, sex, and year. We estimated HALE using the Sullivan method, which draws from age-specific death rates and YLDs per capita. We then assessed how observed levels of DALYs and HALE differed from expected trends calculated with the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a composite indicator constructed from measures of income per capita, average years of schooling, and total fertility rate.

Findings
Total global DALYs remained largely unchanged from 1990 to 2015, with decreases in communicable, neonatal, maternal, and nutritional (Group 1) disease DALYs offset by increased DALYs due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Much of this epidemiological transition was caused by changes in population growth and ageing, but it was accelerated by widespread improvements in SDI that also correlated strongly with the increasing importance of NCDs. Both total DALYs and age-standardised DALY rates due to most Group 1 causes significantly decreased by 2015, and although total burden climbed for the majority of NCDs, age-standardised DALY rates due to NCDs declined. Nonetheless, age-standardised DALY rates due to several high-burden NCDs (including osteoarthritis, drug use disorders, depression, diabetes, congenital birth defects, and skin, oral, and sense organ diseases) either increased or remained unchanged, leading to increases in their relative ranking in many geographies. From 2005 to 2015, HALE at birth increased by an average of 2·9 years (95% uncertainty interval 2·9–3·0) for men and 3·5 years (3·4–3·7) for women, while HALE at age 65 years improved by 0·85 years (0·78–0·92) and 1·2 years (1·1–1·3), respectively. Rising SDI was associated with consistently higher HALE and a somewhat smaller proportion of life spent with functional health loss; however, rising SDI was related to increases in total disability. Many countries and territories in central America and eastern sub-Saharan Africa had increasingly lower rates of disease burden than expected given their SDI. At the same time, a subset of geographies recorded a growing gap between observed and expected levels of DALYs, a trend driven mainly by rising burden due to war, interpersonal violence, and various NCDs.

Interpretation
Health is improving globally, but this means more populations are spending more time with functional health loss, an absolute expansion of morbidity. The proportion of life spent in ill health decreases somewhat with increasing SDI, a relative compression of morbidity, which supports continued efforts to elevate personal income, improve education, and limit fertility. Our analysis of DALYs and HALE and their relationship to SDI represents a robust framework on which to benchmark geography-specific health performance and SDG progress. Country-specific drivers of disease burden, particularly for causes with higher-than-expected DALYs, should inform financial and research investments, prevention efforts, health policies, and health system improvement initiatives for all countries along the development continuum.
Global, regional, and national life expectancy, all-cause mortality, and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes of death, 1980–2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015
Wang, Haidong ; Naghavi, Mohsen ; Allen, Christine ; Barber, R.M. ; Bhutta, Zulfiqar ; Carter, Austin ; Casey, Daniel C. ; Charlson, Fiona J. ; Chen, Alan Z. ; Coates, M. ; Geleijnse, J.M. - \ 2016
The Lancet 388 (2016)10053. - ISSN 0140-6736 - p. 1459 - 1544.
Background
Improving survival and extending the longevity of life for all populations requires timely, robust evidence on local mortality levels and trends. The Global Burden of Disease 2015 Study (GBD 2015) provides a comprehensive assessment of all-cause and cause-specific mortality for 249 causes in 195 countries and territories from 1980 to 2015. These results informed an in-depth investigation of observed and expected mortality patterns based on sociodemographic measures.

Methods
We estimated all-cause mortality by age, sex, geography, and year using an improved analytical approach originally developed for GBD 2013 and GBD 2010. Improvements included refinements to the estimation of child and adult mortality and corresponding uncertainty, parameter selection for under-5 mortality synthesis by spatiotemporal Gaussian process regression, and sibling history data processing. We also expanded the database of vital registration, survey, and census data to 14 294 geography–year datapoints. For GBD 2015, eight causes, including Ebola virus disease, were added to the previous GBD cause list for mortality. We used six modelling approaches to assess cause-specific mortality, with the Cause of Death Ensemble Model (CODEm) generating estimates for most causes. We used a series of novel analyses to systematically quantify the drivers of trends in mortality across geographies. First, we assessed observed and expected levels and trends of cause-specific mortality as they relate to the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a summary indicator derived from measures of income per capita, educational attainment, and fertility. Second, we examined factors affecting total mortality patterns through a series of counterfactual scenarios, testing the magnitude by which population growth, population age structures, and epidemiological changes contributed to shifts in mortality. Finally, we attributed changes in life expectancy to changes in cause of death. We documented each step of the GBD 2015 estimation processes, as well as data sources, in accordance with Guidelines for Accurate and Transparent Health Estimates Reporting (GATHER).

Findings
Globally, life expectancy from birth increased from 61·7 years (95% uncertainty interval 61·4–61·9) in 1980 to 71·8 years (71·5–72·2) in 2015. Several countries in sub-Saharan Africa had very large gains in life expectancy from 2005 to 2015, rebounding from an era of exceedingly high loss of life due to HIV/AIDS. At the same time, many geographies saw life expectancy stagnate or decline, particularly for men and in countries with rising mortality from war or interpersonal violence. From 2005 to 2015, male life expectancy in Syria dropped by 11·3 years (3·7–17·4), to 62·6 years (56·5–70·2). Total deaths increased by 4·1% (2·6–5·6) from 2005 to 2015, rising to 55·8 million (54·9 million to 56·6 million) in 2015, but age-standardised death rates fell by 17·0% (15·8–18·1) during this time, underscoring changes in population growth and shifts in global age structures. The result was similar for non-communicable diseases (NCDs), with total deaths from these causes increasing by 14·1% (12·6–16·0) to 39·8 million (39·2 million to 40·5 million) in 2015, whereas age-standardised rates decreased by 13·1% (11·9–14·3). Globally, this mortality pattern emerged for several NCDs, including several types of cancer, ischaemic heart disease, cirrhosis, and Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. By contrast, both total deaths and age-standardised death rates due to communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional conditions significantly declined from 2005 to 2015, gains largely attributable to decreases in mortality rates due to HIV/AIDS (42·1%, 39·1–44·6), malaria (43·1%, 34·7–51·8), neonatal preterm birth complications (29·8%, 24·8–34·9), and maternal disorders (29·1%, 19·3–37·1). Progress was slower for several causes, such as lower respiratory infections and nutritional deficiencies, whereas deaths increased for others, including dengue and drug use disorders. Age-standardised death rates due to injuries significantly declined from 2005 to 2015, yet interpersonal violence and war claimed increasingly more lives in some regions, particularly in the Middle East. In 2015, rotaviral enteritis (rotavirus) was the leading cause of under-5 deaths due to diarrhoea (146 000 deaths, 118 000–183 000) and pneumococcal pneumonia was the leading cause of under-5 deaths due to lower respiratory infections (393 000 deaths, 228 000–532 000), although pathogen-specific mortality varied by region. Globally, the effects of population growth, ageing, and changes in age-standardised death rates substantially differed by cause. Our analyses on the expected associations between cause-specific mortality and SDI show the regular shifts in cause of death composition and population age structure with rising SDI. Country patterns of premature mortality (measured as years of life lost [YLLs]) and how they differ from the level expected on the basis of SDI alone revealed distinct but highly heterogeneous patterns by region and country or territory. Ischaemic heart disease, stroke, and diabetes were among the leading causes of YLLs in most regions, but in many cases, intraregional results sharply diverged for ratios of observed and expected YLLs based on SDI. Communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional diseases caused the most YLLs throughout sub-Saharan Africa, with observed YLLs far exceeding expected YLLs for countries in which malaria or HIV/AIDS remained the leading causes of early death.

Interpretation
At the global scale, age-specific mortality has steadily improved over the past 35 years; this pattern of general progress continued in the past decade. Progress has been faster in most countries than expected on the basis of development measured by the SDI. Against this background of progress, some countries have seen falls in life expectancy, and age-standardised death rates for some causes are increasing. Despite progress in reducing age-standardised death rates, population growth and ageing mean that the number of deaths from most non-communicable causes are increasing in most countries, putting increased demands on health systems.
Global, regional, and national incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for 310 diseases and injuries, 1990–2015 : a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015
Vos, Theo ; Allen, Christine ; Arora, Megha ; Barber, R.M. ; Bhutta, Zulfiqar ; Brown, Alexandria ; Carter, Austin ; Casey, Daniel C. ; Charlson, Fiona J. ; Chen, Alan Z. ; Geleijnse, J.M. - \ 2016
The Lancet 388 (2016)10053. - ISSN 0140-6736 - p. 1545 - 1602.

Background

Non-fatal outcomes of disease and injury increasingly detract from the ability of the world's population to live in full health, a trend largely attributable to an epidemiological transition in many countries from causes affecting children, to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) more common in adults. For the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2015 (GBD 2015), we estimated the incidence, prevalence, and years lived with disability for diseases and injuries at the global, regional, and national scale over the period of 1990 to 2015.


Methods

We estimated incidence and prevalence by age, sex, cause, year, and geography with a wide range of updated and standardised analytical procedures. Improvements from GBD 2013 included the addition of new data sources, updates to literature reviews for 85 causes, and the identification and inclusion of additional studies published up to November, 2015, to expand the database used for estimation of non-fatal outcomes to 60 900 unique data sources. Prevalence and incidence by cause and sequelae were determined with DisMod-MR 2.1, an improved version of the DisMod-MR Bayesian meta-regression tool first developed for GBD 2010 and GBD 2013. For some causes, we used alternative modelling strategies where the complexity of the disease was not suited to DisMod-MR 2.1 or where incidence and prevalence needed to be determined from other data. For GBD 2015 we created a summary indicator that combines measures of income per capita, educational attainment, and fertility (the Socio-demographic Index [SDI]) and used it to compare observed patterns of health loss to the expected pattern for countries or locations with similar SDI scores.


Findings

We generated 9·3 billion estimates from the various combinations of prevalence, incidence, and YLDs for causes, sequelae, and impairments by age, sex, geography, and year. In 2015, two causes had acute incidences in excess of 1 billion: upper respiratory infections (17·2 billion, 95% uncertainty interval [UI] 15·4–19·2 billion) and diarrhoeal diseases (2·39 billion, 2·30–2·50 billion). Eight causes of chronic disease and injury each affected more than 10% of the world's population in 2015: permanent caries, tension-type headache, iron-deficiency anaemia, age-related and other hearing loss, migraine, genital herpes, refraction and accommodation disorders, and ascariasis. The impairment that affected the greatest number of people in 2015 was anaemia, with 2·36 billion (2·35–2·37 billion) individuals affected. The second and third leading impairments by number of individuals affected were hearing loss and vision loss, respectively. Between 2005 and 2015, there was little change in the leading causes of years lived with disability (YLDs) on a global basis. NCDs accounted for 18 of the leading 20 causes of age-standardised YLDs on a global scale. Where rates were decreasing, the rate of decrease for YLDs was slower than that of years of life lost (YLLs) for nearly every cause included in our analysis. For low SDI geographies, Group 1 causes typically accounted for 20–30% of total disability, largely attributable to nutritional deficiencies, malaria, neglected tropical diseases, HIV/AIDS, and tuberculosis. Lower back and neck pain was the leading global cause of disability in 2015 in most countries. The leading cause was sense organ disorders in 22 countries in Asia and Africa and one in central Latin America; diabetes in four countries in Oceania; HIV/AIDS in three southern sub-Saharan African countries; collective violence and legal intervention in two north African and Middle Eastern countries; iron-deficiency anaemia in Somalia and Venezuela; depression in Uganda; onchoceriasis in Liberia; and other neglected tropical diseases in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.


Interpretation

Ageing of the world's population is increasing the number of people living with sequelae of diseases and injuries. Shifts in the epidemiological profile driven by socioeconomic change also contribute to the continued increase in years lived with disability (YLDs) as well as the rate of increase in YLDs. Despite limitations imposed by gaps in data availability and the variable quality of the data available, the standardised and comprehensive approach of the GBD study provides opportunities to examine broad trends, compare those trends between countries or subnational geographies, benchmark against locations at similar stages of development, and gauge the strength or weakness of the estimates available
Engineers at the Patient’s Bedside: : The Case of Silence in Inter-institutional Educational Innovation
Verouden, Nick ; Sanden, M.C.A. van der; Aarts, M.N.C. - \ 2016
In: The Silences of Science / Mellor, Felicity, Webster, Stephen, London : Routledge - ISBN 9781472459978 - p. 89 - 112.
Innovation in science and technology is increasingly linked with interdisciplinarity. Encouraging this trend depends in part on cutting-edge educational programmes that revise, reinvent and redesign curricula as interdisciplinary vehicles, establishing and re-establishing relations between traditional fields and areas of expertise (Stone et al., 1999; Casey, 1994). Such programmes are valuable because they can overcome ‘silo’ mentalities and equip prospective students with the skills and knowledge necessary for understanding and solving complex societal problems (Stone et al.,1999; McFadden et al., 2010). Although these programmes are very promising, their development and

implementation also brings challenges. The literature on curriculum development shows that many programmes have struggled to achieve true integration (McFadden et al., 2010; Stone et al., 1999). Dam-Mieras et al. (2008), in their study of an international master’s programme in sustainable development and management developed collaboratively by nine universities, observed that universities have their own experts and own programmes and that the ‘not invented here’ argument influences how details about new programme are discussed. Focussing on innovative online instruction courses, Xu and Morris (2007) found that the absence of group cohesiveness between faculty and project coordinators can hinder the collaborative course development process and affect the quality of the end product. Stone et al. (1999) emphasize that faculty members and administrators work at cross-purposes and view each other’s initiatives with suspicion. Given the importance that scientists, academic institutions and policy makers ascribe to innovation, along with their assumption that such innovation is a sure result of interdisciplinarity, it is essential to gain a better understanding of how curriculum development in academic education actually works. For this chapter, we consider how processes of connecting and inter-

relating could add to our understanding of the problems and dilemmas that arise in developing and implementing such programmes. Scholars of innovation, in science and technology and beyond, have explained that innovation is not some abstract algorithm: it relies on interaction and collaboration between

multiple actors with different expertises, visions, priorities and investment (Van Bommel et al., 2011; Leeuwis and Aarts, 2011; Akrich et al., 2002; Fonseca, 2002). This process of interacting is very difficult, however, and creates many tensions. This is revealed by studies that show the lurking problems of connecting previously unconnected people around new ideas and technologies. These studies show how innovation processes become defined by competition for scarce resources, protracted negotiations over priorities and interests, and dynamics of inclusion and exclusion (Leeuwis andAarts, 2011; Pretty, 1995; Van Bommel et al., 2011). Fonseca (2002) hence explains that innovation always creates a paradoxical situation, in which organizations, in their search to accelerate change and adapt to and find solutions for external challenges and demands, unavoidably create new and unpredictable interactional patterns. Given that interacting is a complicated matter in innovation processes, a

key question within the management of innovation literature is how we can account for the way relevant actors connect, or fail to connect (Akrich et al., 2002). In this respect, verbal communication is often cited as an essential mechanism for effectively connecting important actors and social groups around innovative ideas, products, or technologies (Van Bommel et al., 2011). In turn, the markers of effective verbal communication as a frame for innovation are seen to be openness, dialogue, and the ability to cooperate and be reflective on one’s thoughts and actions (Stilgoe et al., 2013). Thorp and Goldstein (2010), writing about university innovation, describe conversations as the fertile ground from which innovation grows and urge us to make time and space for those conversations. Dialogue and openness are seen as indicators of the quality of interaction, and process transparency as a decisive component of academic innovation. By being open or transparent in discussing issues and problems, actors build confidence that negotiation is ‘real’ and not a cover-up for private backroom deals (de Bruijn and ten Heuvelhof, 2008). Although there is a wealth of research on communication for innovation,

most scholarly work focuses on what is exchanged verbally, on how actors collate all the relevant evidence, put it on the table and discuss it openly. As of yet, silence is absent from these studies of communication for innovation. Building on recent organizational and strategy scholarship, in which silence is approached as an intricate concept with powerful functions and meanings in social interaction (Van Assche and Costaglioli, 2012; Carter et al., 2008; Henriksen and Dayton, 2006; Panteli and Fineman, 2005; Tucker and Edmondson, 2003; Jaworski, 2005; Morrison and Milliken, 2000), we suggest that silence merits much more attention in analyses of academic innovation. This chapter therefore explores the role of moments of silence during interactions within networks developing and implementing educational innovation. The structure of this chapter is as follows. We start by looking at the litera-

ture on dynamic innovation networks and communication and complement these insights with scholarship on silence within organization studies. After briefly introducing our approach, we present the findings of a study of an inter-institutional and interdisciplinary joint bachelor’s programme that was

implemented at the interface of health and technology. The purpose of the study was to better understand the significance of moments of silence in developing and implementing this programme. We end with the implications of our findings for steering in the context of interdisciplinary innovation.
An expanded evaluation of protein function prediction methods shows an improvement in accuracy
Jiang, Yuxiang ; Oron, Tal Ronnen ; Clark, Wyatt T. ; Bankapur, Asma R. ; Andrea, Daniel D'; Lepore, Rosalba ; Funk, Christopher S. ; Kahanda, Indika ; Verspoor, Karin M. ; Ben-Hur, Asa ; Koo, Da Chen Emily ; Penfold-Brown, Duncan ; Shasha, Dennis ; Youngs, Noah ; Bonneau, Richard ; Lin, Alexandra ; Sahraeian, Sayed M.E. ; Martelli, Pier Luigi ; Profiti, Giuseppe ; Casadio, Rita ; Cao, Renzhi ; Zhong, Zhaolong ; Cheng, Jianlin ; Altenhoff, Adrian ; Skunca, Nives ; Dessimoz, Christophe ; Dogan, Tunca ; Hakala, Kai ; Kaewphan, Suwisa ; Mehryary, Farrokh ; Salakoski, Tapio ; Ginter, Filip ; Fang, Hai ; Smithers, Ben ; Oates, Matt ; Gough, Julian ; Törönen, Petri ; Koskinen, Patrik ; Holm, Liisa ; Chen, Ching Tai ; Hsu, Wen Lian ; Bryson, Kevin ; Cozzetto, Domenico ; Minneci, Federico ; Jones, David T. ; Chapman, Samuel ; BKC, Dukka ; Khan, Ishita K. ; Kihara, Daisuke ; Ofer, Dan ; Rappoport, Nadav ; Stern, Amos ; Cibrian-Uhalte, Elena ; Denny, Paul ; Foulger, Rebecca E. ; Hieta, Reija ; Legge, Duncan ; Lovering, Ruth C. ; Magrane, Michele ; Melidoni, Anna N. ; Mutowo-Meullenet, Prudence ; Pichler, Klemens ; Shypitsyna, Aleksandra ; Li, Biao ; Zakeri, Pooya ; ElShal, Sarah ; Tranchevent, Léon Charles ; Das, Sayoni ; Dawson, Natalie L. ; Lee, David ; Lees, Jonathan G. ; Sillitoe, Ian ; Bhat, Prajwal ; Nepusz, Tamás ; Romero, Alfonso E. ; Sasidharan, Rajkumar ; Yang, Haixuan ; Paccanaro, Alberto ; Gillis, Jesse ; Sedeño-Cortés, Adriana E. ; Pavlidis, Paul ; Feng, Shou ; Cejuela, Juan M. ; Goldberg, Tatyana ; Hamp, Tobias ; Richter, Lothar ; Salamov, Asaf ; Gabaldon, Toni ; Marcet-Houben, Marina ; Supek, Fran ; Gong, Qingtian ; Ning, Wei ; Zhou, Yuanpeng ; Tian, Weidong ; Falda, Marco ; Fontana, Paolo ; Lavezzo, Enrico ; Toppo, Stefano ; Ferrari, Carlo ; Giollo, Manuel ; Piovesan, Damiano ; Tosatto, Silvio C.E. ; Pozo, Angela del; Fernández, José M. ; Maietta, Paolo ; Valencia, Alfonso ; Tress, Michael L. ; Benso, Alfredo ; Carlo, Stefano Di; Politano, Gianfranco ; Savino, Alessandro ; Rehman, Hafeez Ur ; Re, Matteo ; Mesiti, Marco ; Valentini, Giorgio ; Bargsten, Joachim W. ; Dijk, Aalt-Jan van; Gemovic, Branislava ; Glisic, Sanja ; Perovic, Vladmir ; Veljkovic, Veljko ; Veljkovic, Nevena ; Almeida-e-Silva, Danillo C. ; Vencio, Ricardo Z.N. ; Sharan, Malvika ; Vogel, Jörg ; Kansakar, Lakesh ; Zhang, Shanshan ; Vucetic, Slobodan ; Wang, Zheng ; Sternberg, Michael J.E. ; Wass, Mark N. ; Huntley, Rachael P. ; Martin, Maria J. ; O'Donovan, Claire ; Robinson, Peter N. ; Moreau, Yves ; Tramontano, Anna ; Babbitt, Patricia C. ; Brenner, Steven E. ; Linial, Michal ; Orengo, Christine A. ; Rost, Burkhard ; Greene, Casey S. ; Mooney, Sean D. ; Friedberg, Iddo ; Radivojac, Predrag - \ 2016
Genome Biology 17 (2016)1. - ISSN 1474-7596
Disease gene prioritization - Protein function prediction

Background: A major bottleneck in our understanding of the molecular underpinnings of life is the assignment of function to proteins. While molecular experiments provide the most reliable annotation of proteins, their relatively low throughput and restricted purview have led to an increasing role for computational function prediction. However, assessing methods for protein function prediction and tracking progress in the field remain challenging. Results: We conducted the second critical assessment of functional annotation (CAFA), a timed challenge to assess computational methods that automatically assign protein function. We evaluated 126 methods from 56 research groups for their ability to predict biological functions using Gene Ontology and gene-disease associations using Human Phenotype Ontology on a set of 3681 proteins from 18 species. CAFA2 featured expanded analysis compared with CAFA1, with regards to data set size, variety, and assessment metrics. To review progress in the field, the analysis compared the best methods from CAFA1 to those of CAFA2. Conclusions: The top-performing methods in CAFA2 outperformed those from CAFA1. This increased accuracy can be attributed to a combination of the growing number of experimental annotations and improved methods for function prediction. The assessment also revealed that the definition of top-performing algorithms is ontology specific, that different performance metrics can be used to probe the nature of accurate predictions, and the relative diversity of predictions in the biological process and human phenotype ontologies. While there was methodological improvement between CAFA1 and CAFA2, the interpretation of results and usefulness of individual methods remain context-dependent.

Questioning the effectiveness of technical measures implemented by the Basque bottom otter trawl fleet : Implications under the EU landing obligation
Alzorriz, N. ; Arregi, L. ; Herrmann, B. ; Sistiaga, M. ; Casey, J. ; Poos, J.J. - \ 2016
Fisheries Research 175 (2016). - ISSN 0165-7836 - p. 116 - 126.
Bottom trawl - Contact probabilityl Bay of Biscay - Discards - Landing obligation - Selectivity - Square mesh panel (SMP)

The selective properties of a bottom trawl fitted with a 70 mm diamond mesh codend and a 100 mm top square mesh panel (SMP) for hake (Merluccius merluccius), pouting (Trisopterus luscus and Trisopterus minutus) and red mullet (Mullus surmuletus) were investigated over the period 2011-2013. The experiments were carried out over three separate cruises aboard two commercial Basque bottom otter trawlers in the Bay of Biscay area. "Fall-through" experiments were also undertaken to estimate the potential size selection of 100 mm square mesh for the same species. Results from the "Fall-through" experiments and the at-sea selectivity cruises demonstrated that a 100 mm SMP has the potential to enable undersized and immature individuals to escape through the meshes. However, the selectivity cruises demonstrated that in practice, the SMP was largely ineffective at releasing undersized individuals as only a small fraction of the fish entering the trawl attempted to escape through the SMP during their drift towards the codend. The fraction attempting to escape was quantified by the "SMP contact probability" and was less than 4% for hake and red mullet and less than 15% for pouting. Furthermore, for each species, the release potential for the diamond mesh codend was found to be significantly lower than the length-at-maturity and the legal minimum conservation reference size. On average, the proportions of the total catch of undersized individuals of each species retained by the gear, were 52%, 17% and 45% for hake, pouting and red mullet respectively. Based on our findings, we conclude that the gear currently deployed by the Basque bottom otter trawl fleet operating in the Bay of Biscay is largely ineffective at releasing undersized hake, pouting and red mullet. The introduction of the obligation to land all catches, under the 2013 reform of the EU Common Fisheries policy will create new challenges for the Basque bottom otter trawl fleet and thereby an incentive to improve selectivity to avoid unwanted catches of undersized individuals.

Authority and legitimacy in governing global food chains
Oosterveer, P.J.M. - \ 2015
In: The changing landscape of food governance. Public and private encounters / Havinga, T., van Waarden, F., Casey, D., Cheltenham, UK / Northampton, MA, USA : Edward Elgar Publishing Ltd. - ISBN 9781784715403 - p. 117 - 133.
As more food is traded across borders, food regulation is profoundly transforming as well. Conventionally this regulation was based on sovereign nation-states deciding how to secure their economy and feed their population. But nowadays, national authorities can no longer assume effective control over food because the volumes traded have increased dramatically while the structures of production and consumption constitute swiftly changing transnational networks. The emergence of unfamiliar hazards, such as BSE and Avian Influenza H5N1, leading to growing food safety worries among consumers, however, create an intense pressure to control food under the conditions of globalization. It is unlikely that existing multilateral structures, such as the WTO and the Codex Alimentarius, can adequately address present-day food concerns because they necessarily build on existing state structures and capacities. It is therefore not surprising that innovative governance arrangements multiply, notably via private standards and labelling initiatives. However, the involvement of private actors in food governance generates a debate about their authority and legitimacy.
Virulence aspects of Listeria monocytogenes LO28 high pressure-resistant variants
Boeijen, K.H. van; Casey, P.G. ; Hill, C. ; Moezelaar, R. ; Zwietering, M.H. ; Gahan, C.G.M. ; Abee, T. - \ 2013
Microbial Pathogenesis 59-60 (2013). - ISSN 0882-4010 - p. 48 - 51.
high hydrostatic-pressure - ctsr - stress - kinetics - environment - strains - scott - acid - food
High pressure treatment is a novel food processing approach for reducing pathogens in foods and food ingredients. However, relatively little is known about the pathogenic potential of organisms that survive the treatment. Twelve previously isolated and characterized variants of Listeria monocytogenes LO28 obtained after a high pressure treatment were assessed for their virulence potential and antibiotic susceptibility. Ten variants showed attenuated virulence while two variants retained full virulence in a mouse model of infection. Seven of the attenuated variants demonstrated a reduction in virulence factor activity. Compared to the wild type, all variants exhibited similar or increased susceptibility to multiple antibiotics commonly used in listeriosis treatment. Keywords: High hydrostatic pressure; Mouse model; Diversity; Pathogenicity; Antibiotics; CtsR
Minimal analytical characterization of engineered nanomaterials needed for hazard assessment in biological matrices
Bouwmeester, H. ; Lynch, I. ; Marvin, H.J.P. ; Dawson, K.A. ; Berges, M. ; Braguer, D. ; Byrne, H.J. ; Casey, A. ; Chambers, G. ; Clift, M.J.D. ; Elia, G. ; Fernandes, T.F. ; fjellsbo, L.B. ; Hatto, P. ; Juillerat, L. ; Klein, C. ; Kreyling, W.G. ; Nickel, C. ; Riediker, M. ; Stone, V. - \ 2011
Nanotoxicology 5 (2011)1. - ISSN 1743-5390 - p. 1 - 11.
environmental risk-assessment - walled carbon nanotubes - in-vitro - safety evaluation - surface-area - ultrafine particles - research strategies - oxidative stress - protein corona - nanoparticles
This paper presents the outcomes from a workshop of the European Network on the Health and Environmental Impact of Nanomaterials (NanoImpactNet). During the workshop, 45 experts in the field of safety assessment of engineered nanomaterials addressed the need to systematically study sets of engineered nanomaterials with specific metrics to generate a data set which would allow the establishment of dose-response relations. The group concluded that international cooperation and worldwide standardization of terminology, reference materials and protocols are needed to make progress in establishing lists of essential metrics. High quality data necessitates the development of harmonized study approaches and adequate reporting of data. Priority metrics can only be based on well-characterized dose-response relations derived from the systematic study of the bio-kinetics and bio-interactions of nanomaterials at both organism and (sub)-cellular levels. In addition, increased effort is needed to develop and validate analytical methods to determine these metrics in a complex matrix Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/17435391003775266
Foraging strategies of Antarctic Fulmarine petrels
Creuwels, J.C.S. ; Engelhard, G.A. ; Franeker, J.A. van; Veer, W. van der; Hasperhoven, J.G. ; Ruiterman, W. - \ 2010
Marine Ornithology 38 (2010)1. - ISSN 1018-3337 - p. 17 - 22.
During breeding, procellariiform seabirds are typical central-place foragers, depending on distant pelagic resources. Especially in polar environments, where there is only a short time window to complete the breeding season, high chick provisioning rates are needed to allow chicks to fledge successfully. The duration of the chick period and of chick growth are linked to provisioning parameters such as the frequency and quantity of the chick meals, but probably also to the quality of the food delivered. We studied the provisioning and growth of chicks of Southern Fulmars Fulmarus glacialoides and Antarctic Petrels Thalassoica antarctica on Ardery Island (66°S, 110°E) near the Australian Antarctic station Casey. During two seasons (1998, 1999) we deployed artificial nests to collect data on chick provisioning. Southern Fulmars delivered meals more frequently (one per 14 hours) than did Antarctic Petrels (one every 25-26 hours). In 1998, the mass of meals brought to chicks of both species was not significantly different and averaged around 128 g. In 1999, the meal mass of Southern Fulmars remained the same, but that of the Antarctic Petrel was 28 g heavier. Chick provisioning rates calculated from meal frequencies and masses were significantly different between Southern Fulmars (254 g/d) and Antarctic Petrels (151 g/d), even after correction for body size. Because growth rates for the two species were not significantly different we suggest that Antarctic Petrels deliver meals of higher nutritional value, probably related to food reaching a higher density in the parents’ stomach during their longer foraging trips.
Variations of snow petrel breeding success in relation to sea-ice extent: detecting local response to large-scale processes?
Olivier, F. ; Franeker, J.A. van; Creuwels, J.C.S. ; Woehler, E.J. - \ 2005
Polar Biology 28 (2005). - ISSN 0722-4060 - p. 687 - 699.
antarctic penguin populations - nino-southern-oscillation - pagodroma-nivea - surface temperature - thalassoica-antarctica - reproductive success - environmental-change - circumpolar wave - body condition - top predator
Demographic parameters were estimated for snow petrels Pagodroma nivea nesting at the study colony of Reeve Hill near Casey station, Antarctica between 1984 and 2003. Average breeding success for the colony varied from 18.2% to 76.5%. Breeding effort, hatching and fledging success were subject to a high interannual variability. We examined the influence of regional sea-ice extent on the breeding performance of snow petrels at Reeve Hill. Fewer birds were breeding when sea-ice had been extensive during April-May. Overall breeding success and fledging success were improved during years with extensive sea-ice cover in winter. Successful breeding effort and breeding success were depressed when there was extensive sea-ice cover during January-February. Sea surface temperatures also correlated to snow petrel breeding performance parameters. Previous work showed that large-scale climatic events (ENSO, Antarctic circumpolar wave) and the related sea-ice cover around the Antarctic might affect the lower trophic levels of the marine environment and consequently food availability for snow petrels. A comparison with the long-term study conducted at Ile des Petrels (Terre Adelie) suggests that despite similarities in the underlying biological processes that control snow petrel breeding performance, the nature of the correlation of large-scale environmental factors with breeding performance differs substantially between the two colonies, probably because of the confounding effects of other environmental factors acting at a local scale (local weather, nest quality), which also affect bird body condition.
Unexpected effects of climate change on the predation of Antarctic petrels
Franeker, J.A. van; Creuwels, J.C.S. ; Veer, W. van der; Cleland, S. ; Robertson, G. - \ 2001
Antarctic Science 13 (2001)4. - ISSN 0954-1020 - p. 430 - 439.
ecologie - klimaatverandering - ornithologie - stormvogel - zuidpoolgebied - Antarctica
Antarctic petrels Thalassoica antarctica on Ardery Island, Antarctica (66°S, 110°E), experienced major reductions in breeding success and breeder survival over four seasons between 1984/85 and 1996/97. In 1996 the reason was revealed. A large snowdrift covered part of the study colony on the cliffs. Southern giant petrels Macronectes giganteus, normally lacking access to this area, exploited the snow for soft 'crash landings'. After landing they waited for the disturbed birds to resettle on their nests and then used surprise to seize and kill a victim. Predation continued into the egg period, and only stopped after the snowdrift had melted. Giant petrels showed no interest in the eggs but, during the panic caused by their activities, South Polar skuas Catharacta maccormicki took the deserted eggs. Antarctic petrel mortality due to predation within the 1996/97 season amounted to 15.4␘f experienced breeders, and breeding success was reduced to virtually zero. Weather data from the nearby Casey station over the 1980-96 period showed that a significant increase in precipitation has occurred, in combination with shifts in speed and direction of winds. We conclude that the decreases in breeding success and survival in earlier seasons were also related to increased snowfall and predation. Although similar predation behaviour by giant petrels has not been reported before, we think that it is long established and explains why nesting of the smaller fulmarine petrels is limited to steeper cliffs or sheltered sites. The complexity of the response seems unlikely to be predicted by our present understanding of how climate change affects ecosystems.
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