Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

    Records 1 - 20 / 22

    • help
    • print

      Print search results

    • export

      Export search results

    Check title to add to marked list
    Deriving socio-economic indicators for sustainability assessment of sweet cherry farming systems in South Patagonia
    Mundet, C.A. ; Baltuska, N. ; Córdoba, D. ; Sanz, C. ; Cittadini, E.D. - \ 2014
    In: VI International Cherry Symposium International Society for Horticultural Science (Acta Horticulturae ) - ISBN 9789462610071 - p. 523 - 528.
    Employer - Investors - Labour availability and efficiency - Managerial aspects - MESMIS - Multi-disciplinary approach - Operative cost

    Sweet cherry production is a new activity in South Patagonia and its development has carried out profound changes in the local agrarian structure and in the regional economy. New actors, such as growers or investors, have emerged and specific demands of labour and services (with different degrees of specialization) have been brought out. Adaptation to these emerging changes requires evaluation of cherry system sustainability on three dimensions: productive-economic, environmental, and social. Managerial aspects (different producers and levels of technology) and employer-labour relations are normally beyond a traditional farming systems analysis. In this study, the MESMIS evaluation framework for sustainability assessment [which considers five basic attributes (productivity, stability, resilience, reliability, and adaptability) that can be operationalized by defining several criteria and subsequently assessed through indicators], was used as a base to derive (socio-economic) sustainability indicators (under a multi-disciplinary approach) for the sweet cherry production sector of South Patagonia. The methodology used to measure and monitor these indicators is described and some results and conclusions derived from this survey are presented. Socio-economic indicators related to labour show, for example, that more than 60% of the total operative cost is labour. The annual distribution is concentrated in one month (December) and availability and efficiency, as described by two qualitative indicators, are scarce and low, respectively.

    Participatory analysis of the sweet cherry sector in Argentinian South Patagonia
    Mundet, C.A. ; Córdoba, D. ; Alvarez, S. ; Cittadini, E.D. - \ 2014
    In: VI International Cherry Symposium International Society for Horticultural Science (Acta Horticulturae ) - ISBN 9789462610071 - p. 529 - 535.
    Impact Pathway - Network maps - Outcome Logic Model - Problem tree analysis - Stakeholders - Sustainability - Vision

    Sweet cherry production is a newly developed and promising activity in Argentinian South Patagonia. Together with a rapid increase in area (from 176 ha in 1997 to 635 ha in 2009), problems related to productivity and commercialization have threatened its sustainability. To gain a collective understanding of the complexity of the cherry sector, a participatory approach has been proposed for research. The steps followed and the contribution of this participatory methodology to a better understanding of the sector and the possible solutions to overcome un-sustainability are described. The methodology (Participatory Impact Pathways Analysis - PIPA) allowed different stakeholders to make explicit their assumptions and hypotheses about how the project will achieve its desired goals and changes. The first step was a problem tree analysis where participants identified the main problems of the sector and suggested main changes and outcomes as well as the vision expected from the project intervention. The most important constraints described by the different stakeholder' group were: (a) inappropriate technology use at packinghouses and at farm level (requiring improvement of technology generation and transfer, and funding), (b) low profitability (less than 50% of the fruit is exportable and labour efficiency is low) and (c) commercialization (low prices, exchange rate, absence of contracts and unreliable brokers). The following step consisted of mapping the sector. Network maps were drawn by four groups of stakeholders: (1) packers and members of growers' organizations, (2) researchers, (3) extension agents and growers and (4) politically important actors. Positive and negative influences and connections between stakeholders were described. Afterwards, an Outcome Logic Model of the project was constructed showing how project activities and inputs will lead to outputs, which in turn may lead to changes in knowledge, attitudes and skills, which in turn may lead to changes in behavior (outcomes) that over time will have impacts (reduced poverty for example). While implementing the project, reflection spaces were carried out in order to generate a collective process of reflection on the advances of the project (monitoring and evaluation).

    Aeolian sediment mass fluxes on a sandy soil in Central Patagonia
    Sterk, G. ; Parigiani, J. ; Cittadini, E. ; Peters, P. ; Scholberg, J.M.S. ; Peri, P. - \ 2012
    Catena 95 (2012). - ISSN 0341-8162 - p. 112 - 123.
    saltation transport - wind - environment - windbreaks - models
    The climate of Patagonia is semi-arid and characterised by frequent strong winds. Wind erosion is potentially a serious soil degradation process that impacts long-term sustainability of local agricultural systems, but the conditions and the rates of wind erosion in this region have not been studied extensively. The aim of this study was to quantify windblown mass transport on asandysoil in CentralPatagonia. Aeolianmassfluxes were measured in the valley of Sarmiento (Chubut province, Argentina) using two saltiphones and 24 Modified Wilson and Cooke (MWAC) sediment catchers. The latter were installed along three transects: (1) a control on a bare strip of land cleared of its natural vegetation, to measure the maximum wind erosion; (2) a similar transect protected by an artificial windbreak with an optical porosity of 50%; and (3) a transect in a cherry orchard protected with the same type of windbreak. Nine windstorms were recorded throughout the experimental period. Storms with wind speed peaks of 20 m s- 1 caused a total soil loss of 248 Mg ha- 1 in the control strip and heavily depleted the soil of its erodible fraction. The artificial windbreak reduced the soil loss by 51.0% on average, while no erosion was recorded in the cherry orchard. Measured maximum mass transport values were used to fit five sediment transport equations in order to select the best equation to integrate into a GIS-based wind erosion prediction system. The Kawamura (1964) equation showed the highest model efficiency and was considered to be the best sediment transport equation for the Patagonia conditions. It expresses total mass transport as a function of two empirical constants: the threshold friction velocity (u*t), and an erodibility coefficient CKa. It is concluded that wind erosion in CentralPatagonia poses a serious risk of soil degradation once the natural vegetation is removed due to overgrazing or other anthropogenic activities.
    Model-based on farm design of mixed farming systems
    Groot, J.C.J. ; Oomen, G.J.M. ; Rossing, W.A.H. - \ 2010
    In: Congreso de Co-Innovación de Sistemas Sostenibles de Sustento Rural, 28-30 April 2010, Lavalleja, Uruguay. - Minas, Uruguay : Facultad de Agronomía - ISBN 9789974006270 - p. 155 - 158.
    Co-innovation at farm level in the sweet cherry sector of South Patagonia
    Mundet, C.A. ; Córdoba, D.M. ; Rossing, W.A.H. ; Baltuska, N. ; Szlápelis, S. ; Cittadini, E.D. ; Sanz, C.E. - \ 2009
    In: Proceedings VI International Cherry Symposium, Viña del Mar, Chile, 16 - 19 November, 2009. - Reñaca, Chile : - p. 97 - 105.
    Exploring options for farm-level strategic and tactical decision-making in fruit production systems of South Patagonia Argentina
    Cittadini, E.D. ; Lubbers, M.T.M.H. ; Ridder, N. de; Keulen, H. van; Claassen, G.D.H. - \ 2008
    Agricultural Systems 98 (2008)3. - ISSN 0308-521X - p. 189 - 198.
    land-use - netherlands - model
    In South Patagonia, Argentina, sweet cherry is the main fruit-tree crop grown for export, resulting in a highly seasonal labour demand. Managers of deciduous perennial fruit orchards must consider both biological and economic relationships in selecting crop species and orchard design. This makes decisions at the farm-level extremely complex, as especially in such perennial crops, strategic (`what to plant¿, `with which technology¿ and `how much area of each activity¿, i.e. the final design) and tactical (`when, what and how to plant in time¿, the pathway to the planned farm) decisions have a long-term effect. The objective of this study was to explore the consequences of different strategic and tactical decisions at farm scale in fruit production systems of South Patagonia, considering the variation in interests and aims of different stakeholders, and using a sensitivity analysis to evaluate the consequences of possible changes in external conditions. A dynamic farm-scale optimization model called OPTIFROP was developed to generate alternative farm development plans, by allocating, in the course of the time horizon of the run, production activities to different land units, while optimising different objective functions, subject to several constraints. Although time-dependent, dynamic, mathematical programming models for analysing farming systems have been described in literature, the dynamic aspects of long-term decision-making in orchard design and their impact on the sequential (annual) nature of orchards in different growth phases (i.e. medium-term decision-making), need a higher time-staged dynamic approach with a staircase matrix structure. The model includes two objective functions at farm level: (1) maximization of the present value of cumulative financial result, which is the main objective for growers, and (2) maximization of cumulative farm labour, which is an objective often mentioned by policy makers. The inter-months deviation for labour demand (during the period of high labour demand, November¿April) was included as an upper-bound. Input and output coefficients for the land use options considered in OPTIFROP were quantified using the Technical Coefficient Generator FRUPAT. Model results indicated that the present value of cumulative financial result and the cumulative farm labour are conflicting to a very limited extent. Timing and feasibility of implementing certain combinations of production technologies are affected by resource endowments and initial conditions, but these factors do not influence land use selection in the long term. Land use selection is driven by the objectives of the stakeholders. OPTIFROP showed that, through introduction of alternative crops, substantial reductions in labour peaks in the period November¿April could be achieved with a relatively small reduction in farm income. The sensitivity of the model solution to the cherry price suggests that the fruit production sector of South Patagonia should pay more attention to the robustness of their land use plans and take preventive measures to avoid being caught by a possible crisis due to changes in the context.
    Effect of fruit-to-leaf area ratio on fruit quality and vegetative growth of 'bing' sweet cherry trees at optimal leaf area index
    Cittadini, E.D. ; Keulen, H. van; Ridder, N. de; Vallés, N. ; Rodríguez, M. ; Peri, P.L. - \ 2008
    Acta Horticulturae 795 (2008). - ISSN 0567-7572 - p. 677 - 680.
    Fruit yield and quality determine grower income from commercial sweet cherry orchards. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Fruit Number to Leaf Area Ratio (FNLAR, fruit m-2 LA) on Mean Fruit Weight (MFW), firmness (F), soluble solids content (SSC), titratable acidity (TA) and SSC:TA ratio of `Bing¿ sweet cherries trees of near-optimal leaf area index (LAI). The effect of FNLAR on Mean Shoot Growth (MSG) and trunk cross-sectional area increment (TCSAI) also was analysed to determine possible competition between reproductive and vegetative growth. Regression analysis was used with FNLAR as the independent variable. While SSC:TA, MSG and TCSAI were not significantly correlated to FNLAR (P>0.05), MFW, TA and SSC decreased linearly with increasing FNLAR (P
    Relationship between fruit weight and the fruit-to-leaf area ratio, at the spur and whole-tree level, for three sweet cherry varieties
    Cittadini, E.D. ; Ridder, N. de; Peri, P.L. ; Keulen, H. van - \ 2008
    Acta Horticulturae 795 (2008). - ISSN 0567-7572 - p. 669 - 672.
    Fruit weight is the main quality parameter of sweet cherries and leaf area/fruit is the most important characteristic influencing fruit weight. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between Mean Fruit Weight (MFW) and the Fruit Number to Leaf Area Ratio (FNLAR) for `Bing¿, `Van¿ and `Lapins¿, grown under tatura-trellis and vase training systems, at both the spur and whole-tree level. The research was performed through regression analysis with FNLAR as the independent variable and MFW as the dependent variable. There were no significant interactions between training system and cultivar for the effect of FNLAR on MFW at either the spur or whole-tree level. Also, there were no significant differences between training systems. The R2 for the relationships per cultivar were higher at the whole-tree level than at the spur level. At both levels, `Lapins¿ had the highest fruit weight potential and `Van¿ the lowest. At the spur level, the slopes of the regression were similar for the different cultivars, but at the whole-tree level, `Van¿ was less sensitive. The better fit at the whole-tree level suggests that fruits of a spur are supplied not only by the leaves on that spur, but also from other less fruit-loaded spurs, from non-fruiting shoots and from reserves
    Fruit dry weight and quality of 'bing' sweet cherries grown without source limitations
    Cittadini, E.D. ; Ridder, N. de; Rodriquez, M.J. ; Keulen, H. van; Peri, P.L. - \ 2008
    Acta Horticulturae 795 (2008). - ISSN 0567-7572 - p. 639 - 644.
    Understanding the seasonal pattern of potential fruit growth is important for identification and timing of possible management operations, and quantification of this pattern is an important prerequisite to serve as input for crop growth models. `Bing¿ sweet cherry trees were heavily thinned at 63 degree-days (DD) (=8 days) after full bloom so weight and quality of the remaining fruit could be monitored under conditions of limiting and non-limiting carbohydrate supply. The effect of fruit thinning on mean shoot growth and trunk cross-sectional area also was analysed to detect possible translocation from reproductive to vegetative growth. Mean Fruit Dry Weight (MFDW) of tagged fruit was estimated weekly, based on fruit diameter, to identify the moment of the onset of competition between fruit within trees. At harvest, Fruit Number to Leaf Area Ratio (FNLAR, fruits m-2 LA) was 52% lower in heavily-thinned trees than in non-thinned trees. Yield per tree was higher (P
    Sweet cherry production in South Patagonia
    Cittadini, E.D. ; Sanz, C.E. ; Pugh, A.B. ; Peri, P.L. ; Szlápelis, E. ; Cárcamo, M.A. ; Kikuchi, N. ; Manavella, F.A. ; San Martino, L. ; Ñancucheo, J.A. ; Muñoz, M. ; Ridder, N. de; Keulen, H. van; Mundet, C.A. - \ 2008
    Acta Horticulturae 795 (2008). - ISSN 0567-7572 - p. 585 - 590.
    In South Patagonia, the total sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) area has increased from 176 ha in 1997 to 507 ha in 2004, of which 232 ha are located in Los Antiguos (46°19¿ SL; 220 m elevation), 158 ha in the Lower Valley of Chubut River (LVCHR) (43°16¿ SL; 30 m elevation), 52 ha in Sarmiento (45°35¿ SL; 270 m elevation), 35 ha in Esquel (42°55¿ SL; 570 m elevation) and 30 ha in Comodoro Rivadavia (45°52¿ SL; 50 m elevation). The most common varieties are `Lapins¿, `Bing¿, `Newstar¿, `Sweetheart¿, `Stella¿, `Sunburst¿ and `Van¿ grafted on `Mahaleb¿, `Pontaleb¿, `SL 64¿, `Colt¿ or `Mazzard¿ rootstocks. Trees generally are drip-irrigated and planted at high densities, using training systems such as Tatura, central leader and modified vase (2700, 1100 and 1000 trees ha-1, respectively). Growers in Los Antiguos are more traditional, planting mainly as vase (400 to 1000 trees ha-1) or freestanding trees (280 trees ha-1) and irrigating by gravity (74% of the area). Only 4.4% of the area of Los Antiguos is frost protected, as growers rely strongly on the moderating effect of Lake Buenos Aires. Frost control systems are absent in Comodoro Rivadavia because the established orchards are located next to the sea, in an area with low risk of frost. The frost-protected area is 49% in Sarmiento, 35% in Esquel and 57% in LVCHR. Fruit are harvested from November (LVCHR) to the end of January (Los Antiguos and Esquel), and the harvest-only labour demand during the 2004/2005 season was 100,000 h. In that season, seven packinghouses exported 390 t (45% of the total production) to Europe. Most orchards have not yet reached their mature stage and new ones are being established. Therefore, fruit volumes will continue to increase and shortages of labour and packing facilities may become a constraint.
    Sweet cherries from the end of the world: options and constraints for fruit production systems in South Patagonia, Argentina
    Cittadini, E.D. - \ 2007
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Herman van Keulen, co-promotor(en): Nico de Ridder; P.L. Peri. - [S.l.] : S.n. - ISBN 9789085047261 - 134
    kersen - prunus avium - fruitteelt - boomvruchten - bedrijfssystemen - beschadigingen door vorst - agrarische bedrijfsvoering - argentinië - cherries - prunus avium - fruit growing - tree fruits - farming systems - frost injury - farm management - argentina
    In South Patagonia, development of the fruit production sector has been almost exclusively based on the production of sweet cherry, with an area increase from 176 ha in 1997 to 578 ha at the end of 2006. These orchards are designed as intensive systems and oriented to export markets. Even though sweet cherry seems currently the most profitable crop in the region, other crops may be interesting to increase the use efficiency of the resources, to complement income and to spread risk. The general objective of this thesis was to assess constraints and opportunities for fruit production systems in Chubut and Santa Cruz Provinces, with emphasis on sweet cherry. In the context of cherry production for export, it is important to define fruit quality and how this can be affected. Although quality has different meanings for different stakeholders, consumer acceptance seems to be the most important factor to be considered, but independent of consumer liking, firmness is a key aspect for marketing cherries overseas. To estimate the optimal combination of yield and fruit quality, a “target-tree” approach to maximize gross value of product (GVP) at farm gate was developed and applied to cherry orchards, integrating eco-physiological information, model estimates and expert knowledge. Minimum fruit quality thresholds define the suitable market for the fruit, with their associated price ranges. In addition, on both domestic and export markets, price depends mainly on fruit size. The fruit number to leaf area ratio determines fruit quality (and indirectly fruit price), but in combination with mean fruit weight and leaf area index, also yield. GVP is calculated as the product of yield and fruit price. Quantification of frost damage risk is important in planning the development of new orchards and to decide on design and installation of frost control systems. Therefore, a comprehensive method to quantify frost damage risk was developed and the potential impact of frost control systems on risk reduction was estimated. Frost damage for any specific day of the season was assumed to occur when the minimum temperature on that day was below the specific lethal temperature for the phenological stage predicted at that moment. Frost damage probability was estimated for each production location of the region as the frequency of years in which at least one damaging frost occurs, at any time during the growing season until harvest. Frost damage risk was compared among cultivars and locations, and also the effect of active frost control methods on frost damage risk reduction was analyzed. Due to the long lifespan of orchard systems, an explorative modelling study was performed. OPTIFROP is a dynamic farm model, developed as an Interactive Multiple Goal Linear Program, capable of allocating, throughout the time horizon of the run, production activities to different land units, while optimizing different (conflicting) objectives, subject to several constraints. For deriving land use options and quantifying the TCs, a software called FRUPAT was developed. This allows combining crop-tree species, edaphic environment, training, irrigation and frost control system, and moment of installation of the frost control system. Feasible land use options were completely characterised by their inputs and outputs at each orchard age until their maximum lifespan. The aim of OPTIFROP was to support strategic decision-making, such as ‘when to plant’, ‘what to plant’, ‘with which technology’, and ‘how much area of each activity’. Thus, the model allowed identification of the options for development plans for Patagonian farms (‘window of opportunities’). The model allowed quantifying the trade-off between conflicting objectives. The different methods developed in this thesis contribute significantly to the fruit industry in South Patagonia by supporting growers, extensionists and researchers in developing structured thinking for analyzing and processing available (fragmented) information.
    Ecofisiologia y potencial productivo del cerezo
    Cittadini, E.D. - \ 2007
    In: El cultivo de cerezos en Patagonia Sur Technologia de manejo, empaque y comercialización / Cittadini, E., San Martino, L., Santa Cruz : INTA Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria - ISBN 9789875212206 - p. 21 - 30.
    Implantación y conducción de montes de cerezo
    Pugh, B. ; Cittadini, E.D. - \ 2007
    In: El cultivo de cerezos en Patagonia Sur Technologia de manejo, empaque y comercialización / Cittadini, E.D., San Martino, L., Santa Cruz : INTA Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria - p. 59 - 72.
    La situación actual del sector productor de cerezas an Patagonia Sur
    Cittadini, E.D. - \ 2007
    In: El cultivo de cerezos en Patagonia Sur Technologia de manejo, empaque y comercialización / Cittadini, E.D., San Martino, L., Santa Cruz : INTA Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria - p. 15 - 20.
    El cultivo de cerezos en Patagonia Sur Technologia de manejo, empaque y comercialización
    Cittadini, E.D. ; San Martino, L. - \ 2007
    Santa Cruz : INTA Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria - ISBN 9789875212206 - 200 p.
    Designing a "Target-Tree" for maximizing gross value of product in Patagonian sweet cherry orchards
    Cittadini, E.D. ; Keulen, H. van; Peri, P.L. ; Ridder, N. de - \ 2006
    International journal of fruit science 6 (2006)3. - ISSN 1553-8362 - p. 3 - 22.
    Sweet cherry quality in the horticultural production chain
    Romano, G.S. ; Cittadini, E.D. - \ 2006
    Stewart Postharvest Review 6 (2006). - ISSN 1745-9656 - p. 1 - 9.
    Somerset’ is a dark-red, sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.) cultivar displaying
    remarkable firmness levels, with concomitantly longer shelf-life potential in
    comparison to other cultivars. It is generally accepted that fruit firmness depends
    mainly on the composition, structure and interconnections among cell wall
    polysaccharides. However, the biochemical mechanisms involved in cell wall
    disassembly vary widely among species, and the understanding of the processes
    underlying firmness loss in cherry fruit is particularly poor, although a critical role for β-galactosidase (β-Gal) activity has been suggested. In this study, ‘Somerset’ fruit were hand-collected at commercial maturity, and kept at 0°C for 14 or 28 days plus 3 additional days at 20°C to simulate commercial shelf life. Firmness, weight loss and juiciness were assessed in each case as indicators of fruit texture. Soluble and insoluble cell wall materials were extracted from lyophilized tissue, and a number of cell wall-modifying enzyme activities were also assessed therein. While β-xylosidase (β-Xyl), pectate lyase (PL), α-L-arabinofuranosidase (AFase) and pectin methylesterase (PME) activities were apparently connected to ripening-related firmness changes in this cherry cultivar, data obtained do not support a role for β-Gal in this process.
    A method for assessing frost damage risk in sweet cherry orchards of South Patagonia
    Cittadini, E.D. ; Ridder, N. de; Peri, P.L. ; Keulen, H. van - \ 2006
    Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 141 (2006). - ISSN 0168-1923 - p. 235 - 243.
    africa
    Quantification of frost damage risk is important in planning the development of new orchard areas and for decision-making on design and installation of frost control systems. The objective of this study was to develop a comprehensive method to quantify frost damage risk in different sweet cherry production areas of South Patagonia and to estimate the potential impact of frost control systems on risk reduction. Lack of historical weather data required a theoretical-empirical approach. Frost damage for any specific day of the season was assumed to occur when the minimum temperature on that day was below the specific lethal temperature for the phenological stage predicted at that moment (based on phenological models). Frost damage probability was estimated for each production location of South Patagonia as the frequency of seasons in which at least one damaging frost (damaging 90% of the reproductive organs) occurs, at any time during the growing season until harvest. Frost damage risk was compared among cultivars and locations. Finally, the effect of active frost control methods on frost damage risk reduction was analyzed. There was very little difference in frost damage risk among cultivars, although 'Sunburst' was the cultivar with the lowest risk. The most risky locations were Los Antiguos and Esquel, while Comodoro Rivadavia was the safest location. The frequency of years with at least one killing frost decreased dramatically when the minimum temperature was increased by 3 °C, using active frost control systems. The methodology presented appears useful to identify the main and secondary variables affecting frost damage risk. Thus, this type of quantitative analysis can support growers in decision-making on required investments and operational costs of the equipment for frost control, on the basis of potential impact of a particular control system on mean yields and yield stability. It may also be a guide to prioritise research issues to fill knowledge-gaps with regard to frost risk assessment.
    Estimation of Leaf area in sweet cherry using a non-destructive method
    Cittadini, E.D. ; Peri, P.L. - \ 2006
    Revista de Investigaciones Agropecurias 35 (2006)1. - ISSN 0325-8718 - p. 143 - 150.
    FRUPAT: A Tool to Quantify Inputs and Outputs of Patagonian Fruit Production Systems
    Cittadini, E.D. ; Keulen, H. van; Peri, P.L. - \ 2006
    In: Proceedings VIIth IS on Modelling in Fruit Research / Braun, P., - p. 223 - 230.
    A software called FRUPAT was developed for calculating input and output coefficients (Technical Coefficients) of fruit production systems in South Patagonia. FRUPAT combined locations (Río Chubut valley; Sarmiento valley; Los Antiguos valley; Río Chico valley), edaphic environment (good quality soil with water-table depth exceeding 2 m; good quality soil with water-table depth between 1 and 2 m; low water holding capacity soil without water-table influence), fruit-tree crops (sweet cherry; plum; peach; apple; walnut), training systems (tatura; central leader; vase), irrigation systems (drip; furrow) and frost control systems (sprinkler irrigation; heating; passive) that provided 1080 multi-annual fruit production activities. Parameters have been identified as default values and most of those can be easily modified by the user. Relevant inputs and outputs can be estimated, such as gross value of product, expenditures, financial result, biocide use, N-fertiliser surplus and labour. As an example of how FRUPAT can be used, some results are presented for a single physical environment (good quality soil with water-table depth exceeding 2 m, in the Río Chubut valley) using sprinkler irrigation as frost control method. First, 5 crops under a single production technique (vase with furrow irrigation) are compared in terms of their monetary technical coefficients. Subsequently, results of sweet cherry under different production techniques (3 training systems with 2 irrigation systems) are presented. Finally, the time course of gross value of product, total expenditures, financial result and cumulative financial result are analyzed for a single activity (sweet cherry, trained as tatura under drip irrigation). FRUPAT may be used as a stand-alone tool for simple analysis as demonstrated here or as an intermediate step for linear programming
    Check title to add to marked list
    << previous | next >>

    Show 20 50 100 records per page

     
    Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.