Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Expertmeeting 'Werkzame elementen integrale aanpak overgewicht en obesitas voor kwetsbare groepen' (presentatie voor wetenschappelijk publiek)
    Verbaan, Caro-Lynn ; Dellas, Vicky ; Rinsum, Celeste van; Collard, Dorine ; Beune, Erik ; Wagemakers, Annemarie - \ 2019
    Werkzame elementen van een integrale aanpak van overgewicht en obesitas voor kwetsbare groepen
    Wagemakers, Annemarie ; Dellas, Vicky ; Beune, Erik ; Collard, Dorine ; Verbaan, Caro-Lynn - \ 2019
    Presentatie voor de Commissie Effectiviteitsonderzoek, Programmalijn binnen het Preventieprogramma 2019-2022
    Werkzame elementen van een integrale aanpak van overgewicht en obesitas voor kwetsbare groepen - presentatie voor de Commissie Effectiviteitsonderzoek, Programmalijn binnen het Preventieprogramma 2019-2022, ZonMw Utrecht
    Wagemakers, A. ; Dellas, Vicky ; Beune, Erik ; Collard, Dorine ; Verbaan, Caro-Lynn - \ 2019
    Effective elements of integral approaches for overweight and obesity amongst people with a low socioeconomic status or migrants : a scoping review
    Verbaan, Caro-Lynn ; Rinsum, Celeste van; Dellas, Vicky ; Collard, Dorine ; Beune, Erik ; Wagemakers, A. - \ 2019
    Werkzame elementen voor de integrale aanpak van overgewicht en obesitas bij kwetsbare groepen - factsheet
    Wagemakers, A. ; Rinsum, Celeste van; Dellas, Vicky ; Collard, Dorine ; Beune, Erik ; Verbaan, Caro-Lynn - \ 2019
    Wageningen University & Research - 1 p.
    Werkzame elementen van een integrale aanpak van overgewicht en obesitas voor kwetsbare groepen : een exploratieve studie onder professionals en mensen met een lage sociaaleconomische status en mensen met een migratieachtergrond
    Wagemakers, A. ; Dellas, Vicky ; Verbaan, Caro-Lynn ; Collard, Dorine ; Beune, Erik - \ 2019
    Verslag Expertmeeting 'Werkzame elementen voor de integrale aanpak van overgewicht en obesitas bij mensen met een lage sociaaleconomische status of een migratieachtergrond'
    Verbaan, Caro-Lynn ; Lonkhuijzen, Renske van; Rinsum, Celeste van; Dellas, Vicky ; Collard, Dorine ; Beune, Erik ; Wagemakers, Annemarie - \ 2019
    Leidraad focusgroep gesprek voor doelgroepen over werkzame elementen van programma's
    Dellas, Vicky ; Verbaan, Caro-Lynn ; Collard, Dorine ; Beune, Erik ; Wagemakers, A. - \ 2019
    Interviewleidraad voor professionals over werkzame elementen van een integrale aanpak van overgewicht en obesitas voor kwetsbare groepen
    Dellas, Vicky ; Verbaan, Caro-Lynn ; Collard, Dorine ; Beune, Erik ; Wagemakers, A. - \ 2019
    Leidraad focusgroep gesprek voor doelgroepen over werkzame elementen van programma's
    Dellas, Vicky ; Verbaan, Caro-Lynn ; Collard, Dorine ; Beune, Erik ; Wagemakers, Annemarie - \ 2019
    Interviewleidraad voor professionals over werkzame elementen van een integrale aanpak van overgewicht en obesitas voor kwetsbare groepen
    Dellas, Vicky ; Verbaan, Caro-Lynn ; Collard, Dorine ; Beune, Erik ; Wagemakers, Annemarie - \ 2019
    Werkzame elementen van een integrale aanpak van overgewicht en obesitas voor kwetsbare groepen
    Wagemakers, Annemarie ; Dellas, Vicky ; Collard, Dorine ; Verbaan, Caro-Lynn ; Beune, Erik - \ 2019
    Presentatie voor de Commissie Effectiviteitsonderzoek, Programmalijn binnen het Preventieprogramma 2019-2022 - Utrecht
    INNOVA Ezine4 – Experimenting to reducing the French West-Indies islands’ vulnerability to global change
    Timmermans, W. ; Jong, F. de; Collard, Martine ; Ozier-Lafontaine, Harry ; Stattner, Erick ; Cellier, Louis - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Uitgeverij Blauwdruk
    Global survey data on rice breeders’ characteristics and willingness to adopt alternative breeding methods
    Lenaerts, Bert ; Collard, Bertrand C.Y. ; Mey, Yann de; Demont, Matty - \ 2019
    Data in Brief 23 (2019). - ISSN 2352-3409

    The data presented in this article contains information on 189 rice breeders from 51 rice-growing countries around the world. Firstly, this unique dataset permits to lay down a baseline of currently used breeding methods. Secondly, the data allow to make an assessment of the adoption behavior of rice breeders towards alternative breeding methods, and in specific rapid generation advance. A global online survey in Google Forms was conducted to obtain information about the different aspects of the adoption process. Both the raw and cleaned data are made available, along with Stata code to promote further research into adoption of breeding methods by public and private breeding institutes.

    Nature Inc.: environmental conservation in a neoliberal age
    Lansing, David ; Collard, Rosemary-Claire ; Dempsey, Jessica ; Sundberg, Juanita ; Heynen, Nik ; Büscher, Bram ; Dressler, Wolfram ; Fletcher, Robert - \ 2015
    Environment and Planning A 47 (2015)11. - ISSN 0308-518X - p. 2389 - 2408.
    Refining a reconnaissance soil map by calibrating regression models with data from the same map (Normandy, France)
    Collard, F. ; Kempen, B. ; Heuvelink, G.B.M. ; Sabi, N.P.A. ; Richer de Forge, A.C. ; Lehmann, S. ; Nehlig, P. ; Arrouays, D. - \ 2014
    Geoderma Regional 1 (2014). - ISSN 2352-0094 - p. 21 - 30.
    Reconnaissance soil maps at 1:250,000 scale are the most detailed source of soil information for large parts of France. For many environmental applications, however, the level of detail and accuracy of these maps is insufficient. Funds are lacking to refine and update these maps by traditional soil survey. In this study we investigated the merit of digital soil mapping to refine and improve the 1:250,000 reconnaissance soil map of a 1580 km2 area in Haute-Normandie, France. The soil map was produced in 1988 and distinguishes nine soil class units. The approach taken was to predict soil class from a large number of environmental covariates using regression techniques. The covariates used include DEM derivatives, geology and land cover maps. Because very few soil point observations were available within the area, we calibrated the regression model by sampling the soil map on a grid. We calibrated three models: classification tree (CT), multinomial logistic regression (MLR) and random forests (RF), and used these models to predict the nine soil classes across the study area. The new and original maps were validated with field data from 123 locations selected with a stratified simple random sampling design. For MLR, the estimate of the overall purity was 65.9%, while that of the reconnaissance map was 55.5%. The difference between the purity estimates of these maps was statistically significant (p = 0.014). The significant improvement over the existing soil map is remarkable because the regression model was calibrated with the existing soil map and uses no additional soil observations.
    Hg transfer from contaminated soils to plants and animals
    Rodrigues, S.M. ; Henriques, B. ; Reis, A.T. ; Duarte, A.C. ; Pereira, E. ; Romkens, P.F.A.M. - \ 2012
    Environmental Chemistry Letters 10 (2012)1. - ISSN 1610-3653 - p. 61 - 67.
    potentially toxic elements - chloralkali plant - available pools - total mercury - part ii - speciation - transport - portugal - slovenia - samples
    Understanding the transfer of mercury (Hg) from soil to crops is crucial due to Hg toxicity and Hg occurrence in terrestrial systems. Previous research has shown that available Hg in soils contributes to plant Hg levels. Plant Hg concentrations are related to soil conditions and plant characteristics. Mechanistic models describing such soil–plant interactions are however difficult to quantify. Here we performed a field study in agricultural, mining and industrial areas in Portugal to evaluate potential food chain risks. The uptake of Hg by Italian ryegrass, ryegrass, orchard grass, collard greens and rye was measured to calculate daily intakes (DI) of Hg for cows and sheep grazing. A total of 136 soil samples and 129 plant samples were analysed. Results show that total Hg concentrations ranged from 0.01 to 98 mg kg-1 in soils; 0.01–5.4 mg kg-1 in shoots and 0.01–42 mg kg-1 in roots. Calculated DI ranged from 0.18 to 132 mg d-1 for cows, and from 0.028 to 23 mg d-1 for sheep. In 27 grassland sites, daily intakes exceeded the acceptable daily intake of both cows and sheep in view of food safety considering Hg in animal kidneys evidencing potential risks to human health. The transfer of Hg from soil to crops was described using empirical Freundlich-type functions. For ryegrass, orchard grass and collard greens, the soil-to-root or soil-to-shoot transfer of Hg appeared to be controlled by the total soil Hg concentration and levels of Alox and Feox. Empirical functions allowed us to obtain realistic estimates of Hg levels in crops and can be used as an alternative to mechanistic models when evaluating food chain risks of Hg contamination in agricultural soils.
    PCR detection of oxytetracycline resistance genes from diverse habitats in total community DNA and in streptomycete isolates.
    Nikolakopoulou, T.L. ; Egan, S. ; Overbeek, L.S. van; Guillaume, G. ; Heuer, H. ; Wellington, E.M.H. ; Elsas, J.D. van; Collard, J.M. ; Smalla, K. ; Karagouni, A.D. - \ 2005
    Current Microbiology 51 (2005)4. - ISSN 0343-8651 - p. 211 - 216.
    environmental bacteria - efflux protein - mycobacterium - prevalence - validation - plasmids - clusters - rimosus - primers - soil
    A range of European habitats was screened by PCR for detection of the oxytetracycline resistance genes otr(A) and otr(B), found in the oxytetracycline-producing strain Streptomyces rimosus. Primers were developed to detect these otr genes in tetracycline-resistant (TcR) streptomycete isolates from environmental samples. Samples were obtained from bulk and rhizosphere soil, manure, activated sludge and seawater. The majority of TcR streptomycetes originated from bulk and rhizosphere soil. Fewer TcR streptomycetes were isolated from manure and seawater and none from sewage. By PCR, three out of 217 isolates were shown to contain the otr(A) gene and 13 out of 217 the otr(B) gene. Surprisingly, these genes were detected in taxonomic groups not known as tetracycline-producing strains. The majority of the otr gene¿carrying strains was assigned to S. exfoliatus or S. rochei and originated from all habitats from which TcR streptomycetes were obtained. Our results indicated that the occurrence of otr(A) and otr(B) genes in natural environments was limited and that otr(B), in comparison to otr(A), seemed to be more common
    Occurrence and reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes in the environment
    Seveno, N. ; Kallifidas, D. ; Smalla, K. ; Elsas, J.D. van; Collard, J.M. ; Karagouni, A. ; Wellington, E.M.H. - \ 2002
    Reviews in medical microbiology 13 (2002). - ISSN 0954-139X - p. 15 - 27.
    antibiotic resistance genes
    Antibiotic resistance genes have become highly mobile since the development of antibiotic chemotherapy. A considerable body of evidence exists proving the link between antibiotic use and the significant increase in drug-resistant human bacterial pathogens. The application of molecular detection and tracking techniques in microbial ecological studies has allowed the reservoirs of antibiotic resistance genes to be investigated. It is clear that the transfer of resistance genes has occurred on a global scale and in all natural environments. The considerable diversity of bacteria and mobile elements in soils has meant that the spread of resistance genes has occurred by all currently known mechanisms for bacterial gene transfer. Trans-kingdom transfers from plants to bacteria may occur in soil. Hot spots for gene transfer in the soil/plant environment have been described and colonized niches such as the rhizosphere and other nutrient-enriched sites, for example manured soil, have been identified as reservoirs of resistance genes. Although exposure and selection for tolerance of antibiotics is considerable in clinical environments there is increasing evidence that selection for resistant phenotypes is occurring in natural environments. Antibiotic-producing bacteria are abundant in soil and there is evidence that they are actively producing antibiotics in nutrient-enriched environments in soil. In addition there is clear evidence that the self-resistance genes found within antibiotic gene clusters of the producers have transferred to other non-producing bacteria. Perhaps most important of all is the use of antibiotics in agriculture as growth promotants and for treatment of disease in intensively reared farm animals. These treatments have resulted in gut commensal and pathogenic bacteria acquiring resistance genes under selection and then, due to the way in which farm slurries are disposed of, the spread of these genes to the soil bacterial community. Integrons with multiple resistance gene cassettes have been selected and disseminated in this way; many of these cassettes carry other genes such as those conferring heavy metal and disinfectant resistance which have been co-selected in bacteria surviving in effluents and contaminated soils, further maintaining and spreading the antibiotic resistance genes.
    Gentamicin resistance genes in environmental bacteria: prevalence and transfer
    Heuer, H. ; Krögerrecklenfort, E. ; Wellington, E.M.H. ; Egan, S. ; Elsas, J.D. van; Overbeek, L.S. van; Collard, J.M. ; Guillaume, G. ; Karagouni, A. ; Nikolakopoulou, D. ; Smalla, K. - \ 2002
    FEMS microbiology ecology 42 (2002). - ISSN 0168-6496 - p. 289 - 302.
    gentamicin
    A comprehensive multiphasic survey of the prevalence and transfer of gentamicin resistance (Gmr) genes in different non-clinical environments has been performed. We were interested to find out whether Gmr genes described from clinical isolates can be detected in different environmental habitats and whether hot spots can be identified. Furthermore, this study aimed to evaluate the impact of selective pressure on the abundance and mobility of resistance genes. The study included samples from soils, rhizospheres, piggery manure, faeces from cattle, laying and broiler chickens, municipal and hospital sewage water, and coastal water. Six clusters of genes coding for Gm-modifying enzymes (aac(3)-I, aac(3)-II/VI, aac(3)-III/IV, aac(6')-II/Ib, ant(2'')-I, aph(2'')-I) were identified based on a database comparison and primer systems for each gene cluster were developed. Gm-resistant bacteria isolated from the different environments had a different taxonomic composition. In only 34 of 207 isolates, mainly originating from sewage, faeces and coastal water polluted with wastewater, were known Gmr genes corresponding to five of the six clusters detected. The strains belonged to genera in which the genes had previously been detected (Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter) but also to phylogenetically distant bacteria, such as members of the CFB group, - and -Proteobacteria. Gmr genes located on mobile genetic elements (MGE) could be captured in exogenous isolations into recipients belonging to -, - and -Proteobacteria from all environments except for soil. A high proportion of the MGE, conferring Gm resistance isolated from sewage, were identified as IncP plasmids. Molecular detection of Gmr genes, and broad host range plasmid-specific sequences (IncP-1, IncN, IncW and IncQ) in environmental DNA indicated a habitat-specific dissemination. A high abundance and diversity of Gmr genes could be shown for samples from faeces (broilers, layers, cattle), from sewage, from seawater, collected close to a wastewater outflow, and from piggery manure. In the latter samples all six clusters of Gmr genes could be detected. The different kinds of selective pressure studied here seemed to enhance the abundance of MGE, while an effect on Gmr genes was not obvious.
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