Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

    Records 1 - 20 / 207

    • help
    • print

      Print search results

    • export

      Export search results

    Check title to add to marked list
    Impact of maturation and growth temperature on cell-size distribution, heat-resistance, compatible solute composition and transcription profiles of Penicillium roqueforti conidia
    Punt, Maarten ; Brule, Tom van den; Teertstra, Wieke R. ; Dijksterhuis, Jan ; Besten, Heidy M.W. den; Ohm, Robin A. ; Wösten, Han A.B. - \ 2020
    Food Research International 136 (2020). - ISSN 0963-9969
    Food spoilage - Fungus - Heterogeneity - Penicillium - Spores - Thermal inactivation

    Penicillium roqueforti is a major cause of fungal food spoilage. Its conidia are the main dispersal structures of this fungus and therefore the main cause of food contamination. These stress resistant asexual spores can be killed by preservation methods such as heat treatment. Here, the effects of cultivation time and temperature on thermal resistance of P. roqueforti conidia were studied. To this end, cultures were grown for 3, 5, 7 and 10 days at 25 °C or for 7 days at 15, 25 and 30 °C. Conidia of 3- and 10-day-old cultures that had been grown at 25 °C had D56-values of 1.99 ± 0.15 min and 5.31 ± 1.04 min, respectively. The effect of cultivation temperature was most pronounced between P. roqueforti conidia cultured for 7 days at 15 °C and 30 °C, where D56-values of 1.12 ± 0.05 min and 4.19 ± 0.11 min were found, respectively. Notably, D56-values were not higher when increasing both cultivation time and temperature by growing for 10 days at 30 °C. A correlation was found between heat resistance of conidia and levels of trehalose and arabitol, while this was not found for glycerol, mannitol and erythritol. RNA-sequencing showed that the expression profiles of conidia of 3- to 10-day-old cultures that had been grown at 25 °C were distinct from conidia that had been formed at 15 °C and 30 °C for 7 days. Only 33 genes were upregulated at both prolonged incubation time and increased growth temperature. Their encoded proteins as well as trehalose and arabitol may form the core of heat resistance of P. roqueforti conidia.

    Consumer preferences for different formats of personalised nutrition and health services
    Bouwman, Emily ; Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Hogenelst, Koen ; Reinders, M.J. ; Taufik, D. ; Wijk, R.A. de - \ 2020
    Wageningen University & Research - 60 p.
    Comparing thermal inactivation to a combined process of moderate heat and high pressure : Effect on ascospores in strawberry puree
    Timmermans, Rian ; Hayrapetyan, Hasmik ; Vollebregt, Martijntje ; Dijksterhuis, Jan - \ 2020
    International Journal of Food Microbiology 325 (2020). - ISSN 0168-1605
    Aspergillus fischeri - Heat assisted high pressure processing - Heat resistant molds - Spore activation - Talaromyces macrosporus - Tyndallisation

    High pressure processing is a mild preservation process that inactivates pathogenic and spoilage micro-organisms in food products, but preserves the fresh characteristics of a product. Compared to untreated product, an enhanced shelf life is obtained during refrigerated storage. Knowledge on the use of high pressure pasteurisation aimed for ambient storage is limited. The aim of this research was to investigate if a combination of high pressure and moderate heat could be used to produce a shelf-stable high-acid fruit product. Ascospores of the heat resistant fungi Talaromyces macrosporus and Aspergillus fischeri were added to fresh strawberry puree that served as a model system. The effect of the processing steps and storage at ambient temperature for 2 weeks was studied on viability of the ascospores. A preheating step at 69 °C/2 min resulted in full or partial activation of A. fischeri and T. macrosporus spores, respectively. The pressure build-up by the process without any holding time resulted in additional activation of spores. A combination of moderate heat (maximum 85–90 °C) and high pressure (500–700 MPa) for holding times up to 13 min inactivated these highly resistant spores much faster than a heat treatment alone. At Tmax = 85 °C and 600 MPa the spores of T. macrosporus and A. fischeri were inactivated by 5.0 and 5.5 log10 after 13 and 7 min, respectively. At Tmax = 85 °C the heat treatment alone did not reduce the viability of these spores up to 60 min of treatment. At Tmax = 90 °C the holding time of the combined pressure-heat treatment could be reduced to obtain the same degree of inactivation of the heat resistant fungi. In addition, treated and untreated ascospores in strawberry puree were stored for 14 days at room temperature to evaluate delayed outgrowth of spores. Untreated ascospores of A. fischeri were activated by storage in the puree. However, at conditions combining high pressure ≥ 600 MPa with Tmax ≥ 85 °C for 13 min, heat resistant fungi were successfully inactivated. This research showed that a combination of moderate heat and pressure can drastically improve the effectiveness to inactivate heat-resistant ascospores in a high-acid fruit product compared to a heat treatment, potentially resulting in a better product quality.

    Implementing immersive technologies in consumer testing : Liking and Just-About-Right ratings in a laboratory, immersive simulated café and real café
    Zandstra, E.H. ; Kaneko, D. ; Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Vennik, E. ; Wijk, R.A. De - \ 2020
    Food Quality and Preference 84 (2020). - ISSN 0950-3293
    Context - Engagement - Immersive technology - Just-About-Right ratings - Liking

    Initial research indicates that the use of immersive technologies may improve the predictive validity and reliability of liking scores in consumer testing. However, how immersive technologies impact Just-About-Right ratings is hardly known. Forty-five participants took part in three tasting sessions, each in a different context: 1) laboratory, 2) immersive context simulating a café using audiovisual cues, and 3) real café. Each session, participants tasted four tomato soups varying in salt content preceded by a warm-up sample. Liking, optimal levels of sensory attributes (JAR) and engagement were measured. Results showed that there were no differences in liking or JAR ratings on sensory attributes of the soups across the three contexts. Nevertheless, participants felt more engaged in the real café and simulated café than in the laboratory. These results contribute to a better understanding of how sensory differences as assessed in a laboratory or immersive context relate to sensory differences that consumers would notice when they use the products in real-life.

    IJslandse multinational ontwikkelt software om voeding gedetailleerd te scannen Weet wat je eet, ‘tot het DNA van de koe aan toe'
    Dijksterhuis, Garmt - \ 2019

    Is een vlugge scan binnenkort voldoende om een pakje vlees in de supermarkt aan een rigoureuze inspectie te onderwerpen, tot het DNA van de koe aan toe? Niet smaak, maar traceerbaarheid lijkt vandaag wel de goudmijn van de voedingsindustrie.

    Applied psychological research
    Dijksterhuis, Garmt - \ 2019
    Design chewing
    Dijksterhuis, Garmt - \ 2019
    Ruiken en proeven
    Dijksterhuis, Garmt - \ 2019
    Consumens erger je niet: Hoe maken we keuzen en hoe kunnen we dat veranderen?
    Dijksterhuis, Garmt - \ 2019
    Ruiken, Proeven en (W)eten!
    Dijksterhuis, Garmt - \ 2019
    The potential of ICT tools in changing consumers’ food waste behaviour
    Haar, S. van der; Zeinstra, G.G. ; Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Vogels, J.W.P.M. ; Bos-Brouwers, H.E.J. - \ 2019
    The potential of ICT tools in changing consumers’ food waste behaviour
    Haar, S. van der; Zeinstra, G.G. ; Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Vogels, J.W.P.M. ; Bos-Brouwers, H.E.J. - \ 2019
    The authenticity test investigated
    Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Polet, I.A. - \ 2019
    The authenticity test investigated
    Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Polet, I.A. - \ 2019
    Implementing immersive technologies in consumer testing: Taste perception and liking in a laboratory, immersive simulated café and real café
    Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Kaneko, D. ; Wijk, R.A. de; Zoggel, M. van; Schiona, Irene ; Zandstra, E.H. - \ 2019
    Implementing immersive technologies in consumer testing: Taste perception and liking in a laboratory, immersive simulated café and real café
    Zandstra, Liesbeth ; Kaneko, D. ; Dijksterhuis, G.B. de; Vennik, E. van; Wijk, R.A. de; Zandstra, E.H. - \ 2019
    Food perception and emotion measured over time in-lab and in-home
    Wijk, R.A. De; Kaneko, D. ; Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Zoggel, M. van; Schiona, I. ; Visalli, M. ; Zandstra, Liesbeth - \ 2019
    Eating context - Facial expressions - Heart rate - Repeated sensory tests
    Background: Real-life human eating behaviour does not take place in a vacuum, rather it happens in context. The context in which consumers eat their foods influences the acceptance of the consumed foods. Consequently, consumers’ hedonic and sensory ratings elicited in a natural consumption context will differ from those elicited under controlled sensory laboratory conditions. Moreover, foods are rarely consumed on one single occasion but are typically consumed repeatedly and ratings may change over repeated consumptions as well. Often, consumer acceptance is tested explicitly, for example with liking ratings, especially when the testing is done outside the laboratory. Implicit tests such as facial expressions and physiological measurements of the autonomic nervous system can provide additional information on consumer acceptance. As a result of technological advantages, such tests are no longer limited to the laboratory but can also be used in natural consumption contexts. Method: Eighteen healthy Dutch consumers (18–65 years of age) tested four test foods plus a warm-up sample ten times on consecutive weekdays and on similar hours using their own laptop and webcam. Test locations alternated between the sensory laboratory and the participant's own home. Explicit measures included liking scores and scores on ten sensory taste/flavour/texture attributes, and implicit measures included facial expressions, heart rate and consumption duration using Face Reader TM . This study was the first to validate the Face Reader TM for usage at home. Results: The liking scores and sensory profiles varied between test foods (p < 0.05), but not between test locations and only some specific sensory attributes showed systematic variation over repeated consumption. In contrast, implicit measures showed systematic effects of test foods, test locations, and repeated consumptions (p < 0.05). Compared to consumption in the laboratory, consumption at home was faster, triggered higher heart rates, and triggered more intense facial expressions of happiness, contempt, disgust and boredom. Conclusions: Implicit tests were more sensitive to effects of test location and repeated consumption than explicit tests. Additional research is required to investigate the relevance of these measures to long term consumer acceptance of food products.
    Effects of eating context on food perception are not caused by the eating location itself
    Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Kaneko, D. ; Wijk, R.A. de; Zoggel, M. van; Schiona, Irene ; Zandstra, Liesbeth - \ 2019
    Effects of eating context on food perception are not caused by the eating location itself
    Dijksterhuis, G.B. ; Kaneko, D. ; Wijk, R.A. de; Zoggel, M. van; Schiona, Irene ; Zandstra, E.H. - \ 2019
    PPS-project onderzoekt effect omgeving op voedselgewoonten
    Wijk, Rene de; Dijksterhuis, Garmt - \ 2019
    Check title to add to marked list
    << previous | next >>

    Show 20 50 100 records per page

     
    Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.