Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Recept voor plastic soep
Verburg, Charlotte - \ 2019
In: Plastic: Van zegen tot vloek / van Everdingen, Jannes, van Donk, Ellen, Poolen, Daniël, Buiter, Rob, Den Haag : Stichting Biowetenschappen en Maatschappij (Cahier Biowetenschappen en Maatschappij 2) - ISBN 9789073196957 - p. 36 - 47.
Twintig jaar terug ontdekte de Amerikaanse oceanograaf en kapitein Charles Moore in de StilleOceaan de eerste zogenoemde ‘plastic soep’: een enorme plek met een relatief hoge concentratieronddrijvend plastic. Inmiddels is die soep een iconisch begrip bij het grote publiek. Om tebegrijpen wat er aan de plastic soep kan worden gedaan – opruimen bij de bron of de uitgang? –zul je het moeten terugvolgen naar de bron. Waar komt al dat plastic vandaan?
Plastic, milieu en gezondheid
Koelmans, A.A. - \ 2019
In: Plastic: Van zegen tot vloek / van Everdingen, Jannes, van Donk, Ellen, Poolen, Daniël, Buiter, Rob, Den Haag : Stichting Biowetenschappen en Maatschappij (Cahier Biowetenschappen en Maatschappij 2) - ISBN 9789073196957 - p. 52 - 59.
Plastic dat in de zee komt vervalt vroeg of laat in minuscule stukjes
micro- of zelfs nanoplastic. Dat maakt het zoeken en eventueel
opruimen een lastige zaak. ‘Maar over de ecologische effecten van
die plasticdeeltjes maak ik mij vooralsnog geen grote zorgen’, zegt
de Wageningse chemicus professor Bart Koelmans
Hergebruiken of vervangen?
Brouwer, M.T. ; Bolck, C.H. - \ 2019
In: Plastic: Van zegen tot vloek / van Everdingen, Jannes, van Donk, Ellen, Poolen, Daniël, Buiter, Rob, Den Haag : Stichting Biowetenschappen en Maatschappij (Cahier Biowetenschappen en Maatschappij 2) - ISBN 9789073196957 - p. 64 - 73.
Volgens het ministerie van Infrastructuur en Waterstaat, zou Nederland
rond 2050 ‘afvalvrij’ moeten leven. Recycling van plastic is wat dat betreft
een hoopvolle optie, zegt de Wageningse onderzoekster Marieke Brouwer.
Ook biologisch afbreekbare plastics kunnen een rol spelen, zegt haar
collega Christiaan Bolck, ‘al is over die term de nodige verwarring.’
Data from: Warming enhances sedimentation and decomposition of organic carbon in shallow macrophyte-dominated systems with zero net effect on carbon burial
Velthuis, Mandy ; Kosten, S. ; Aben, Ralf ; Kazanjian, Garabet ; Hilt, Sabine ; Peeters, E.T.H.M. ; Donk, Ellen van; Bakker, Elisabeth S. - \ 2019
carbon cycle - decomposition - global warming - mineralization - phenology - primary production - sedimentation - submerged aquatic plant
Temperatures have been rising throughout recent decades and are predicted to rise further in the coming century. Global warming affects carbon cycling in freshwater ecosystems, which both emit and bury substantial amounts of carbon on a global scale. Currently, most studies focus on the effect of warming on overall carbon emissions from freshwater ecosystems, while net effects on carbon budgets may strongly depend on burial in sediments. Here, we tested whether year‐round warming increases the production, sedimentation, or decomposition of particulate organic carbon and eventually alters the carbon burial in a typical shallow freshwater system. We performed an indoor experiment in eight mesocosms dominated by the common submerged aquatic plant Myriophyllum spicatum testing two temperature treatments: a temperate seasonal temperature control and a warmed (+4°C) treatment (n = 4). During a full experimental year, the carbon stock in plant biomass, dissolved organic carbon in the water column, sedimented organic matter, and decomposition of plant detritus were measured. Our results showed that year‐round warming nearly doubled the final carbon stock in plant biomass from 6.9 ± 1.1 g C in the control treatment to 12.8 ± 0.6 g C (mean ± SE), mainly due to a prolonged growing season in autumn. DOC concentrations did not differ between the treatments, but organic carbon sedimentation increased by 60% from 96 ± 9.6 to 152 ± 16 g C m−2 year−1 (mean ± SE) from control to warm treatments. Enhanced decomposition of plant detritus in the warm treatment, however, compensated for the increased sedimentation. As a result, net carbon burial was 40 ± 5.7 g C m−2 year−1 in both temperature treatments when fluxes were combined into a carbon budget model. These results indicate that warming can increase the turnover of organic carbon in shallow macrophyte‐dominated systems, while not necessarily affecting net carbon burial on a system scale.
Fungal parasites of a toxic inedible cyanobacterium provide food to zooplankton
Frenken, Thijs ; Wierenga, Joren ; Donk, Ellen van; Declerck, Steven A.J. ; Senerpont Domis, Lisette N. de; Rohrlack, Thomas ; Waal, Dedmer B. van de - \ 2018
Limnology and Oceanography 63 (2018)6. - ISSN 0024-3590 - p. 2384 - 2393.

During the end of spring and throughout summer, large-sized phytoplankton taxa often proliferate and form dense blooms in freshwater ecosystems. In many cases, they are inedible to zooplankton and prevent efficient transfer of energy and elements to higher trophic levels. Such a constraint may be alleviated by fungal parasite infections on large-sized phytoplankton taxa like diatoms and filamentous cyanobacteria, as infections may provide zooplankton with a complementary food source in the form of fungal zoospores. Zoospores have been shown to support somatic growth of large filter feeding zooplankton species. Here, we tested if selectively feeding zooplankton, more specifically rotifers, also can use fungal zoospores as a food source. Our results show that chytrid fungal parasites can indeed support population growth of rotifers (Keratella sp.). Specifically, in cultures of an inedible filamentous cyanobacterium (Planktothrix rubescens), Keratella populations rapidly declined, while in Planktothrix cultures infected with chytrids, Keratella population growth rate equaled the growth observed for populations fed with a more suitable green algal diet (Chlorella sorokiniana). Feeding of Keratella on zoospores was furthermore indicated by a reduced number of zoospores during the last sampling day. These findings not only imply that rotifers may survive on zoospores, but also that the zoospores can support high rotifer population growth rates. We thus show that fungal parasites of inedible cyanobacteria can facilitate grazers by providing them alternative food sources. Together, these results highlight the important role that parasites may play in the aquatic plankton food web.

Warming enhances sedimentation and decomposition of organic carbon in shallow macrophyte-dominated systems with zero net effect on carbon burial
Velthuis, Mandy ; Kosten, Sarian ; Aben, Ralf ; Kazanjian, Garabet ; Hilt, Sabine ; Peeters, Edwin T.H.M. ; Donk, Ellen van; Bakker, Elisabeth S. - \ 2018
Global Change Biology 24 (2018)11. - ISSN 1354-1013 - p. 5231 - 5242.
carbon cycle - decomposition - global warming - mineralization - phenology - primary production - sedimentation - submerged aquatic plant

Temperatures have been rising throughout recent decades and are predicted to rise further in the coming century. Global warming affects carbon cycling in freshwater ecosystems, which both emit and bury substantial amounts of carbon on a global scale. Currently, most studies focus on the effect of warming on overall carbon emissions from freshwater ecosystems, while net effects on carbon budgets may strongly depend on burial in sediments. Here, we tested whether year-round warming increases the production, sedimentation, or decomposition of particulate organic carbon and eventually alters the carbon burial in a typical shallow freshwater system. We performed an indoor experiment in eight mesocosms dominated by the common submerged aquatic plant Myriophyllum spicatum testing two temperature treatments: a temperate seasonal temperature control and a warmed (+4°C) treatment (n = 4). During a full experimental year, the carbon stock in plant biomass, dissolved organic carbon in the water column, sedimented organic matter, and decomposition of plant detritus were measured. Our results showed that year-round warming nearly doubled the final carbon stock in plant biomass from 6.9 ± 1.1 g C in the control treatment to 12.8 ± 0.6 g C (mean ± SE), mainly due to a prolonged growing season in autumn. DOC concentrations did not differ between the treatments, but organic carbon sedimentation increased by 60% from 96 ± 9.6 to 152 ± 16 g C m−2 yaer−1 (mean ± SE) from control to warm treatments. Enhanced decomposition of plant detritus in the warm treatment, however, compensated for the increased sedimentation. As a result, net carbon burial was 40 ± 5.7 g C m−2 year−1 in both temperature treatments when fluxes were combined into a carbon budget model. These results indicate that warming can increase the turnover of organic carbon in shallow macrophyte-dominated systems, while not necessarily affecting net carbon burial on a system scale.

Impacts of warming on top-down and bottom-up controls of periphyton production
Kazanjian, Garabet ; Velthuis, Mandy ; Aben, Ralf ; Stephan, Susanne ; Peeters, Edwin T.H.M. ; Frenken, Thijs ; Touwen, Jelle ; Xue, Fei ; Kosten, Sarian ; De Waal, Dedmer B. Van; Senerpont Domis, Lisette N. De; Donk, Ellen van; Hilt, Sabine - \ 2018
Scientific Reports 8 (2018)1. - ISSN 2045-2322

Global warming profoundly impacts the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. Nonetheless, the effect of warming on primary producers is poorly understood, especially periphyton production, which is affected both directly and indirectly by temperature-sensitive top-down and bottom-up controls. Here, we study the impact of warming on gross primary production in experimental ecosystems with near-realistic foodwebs during spring and early summer. We used indoor mesocosms following a temperate temperature regime (control) and a warmed (+4 °C) treatment to measure biomass and production of phytoplankton and periphyton. The mesocosms' primary production was dominated by periphyton (>82%) during the studied period (April-June). Until May, periphyton production and biomass were significantly higher in the warm treatment (up to 98% greater biomass compared to the control) due to direct temperature effects on growth and indirect effects resulting from higher sediment phosphorus release. Subsequently, enhanced grazer abundances seem to have counteracted the positive temperature effect causing a decline in periphyton biomass and production in June. We thus show, within our studied period, seasonally distinct effects of warming on periphyton, which can significantly affect overall ecosystem primary production and functioning.

Response of submerged macrophyte communities to external and internal restoration measures in north temperate shallow lakes
Hilt, Sabine ; Alirangues Nuñez, Marta M. ; Bakker, Elisabeth S. ; Blindow, Irmgard ; Davidson, Thomas A. ; Gillefalk, Mikael ; Hansson, Lars Anders ; Janse, Jan H. ; Janssen, Annette B.G. ; Jeppesen, Erik ; Kabus, Timm ; Kelly, Andrea ; Köhler, Jan ; Lauridsen, Torben L. ; Mooij, Wolf M. ; Noordhuis, Ruurd ; Phillips, Geoff ; Rücker, Jacqueline ; Schuster, Hans Heinrich ; Søndergaard, Martin ; Teurlincx, Sven ; Weyer, Klaus van de; Donk, Ellen van; Waterstraat, Arno ; Willby, Nigel ; Sayer, Carl D. - \ 2018
Frontiers in Plant Science 9 (2018). - ISSN 1664-462X
Aquaticplants - Biomanipulation - Eutrophication - Lakerestoration - Nutrient loadreduction - PCLake - Plant traits - Regime shift
Submerged macrophytes play a key role in north temperate shallow lakes by stabilizing clear-water conditions. Eutrophication has resulted in macrophyte loss and shifts to turbid conditions in many lakes. Considerable efforts have been devoted to shallow lake restoration in many countries, but long-term success depends on a stable recovery of submerged macrophytes. However, recovery patterns vary widely and remain to be fully understood. We hypothesize that reduced external nutrient loading leads to an intermediate recovery state with clear spring and turbid summer conditions similar to the pattern described for eutrophication. In contrast, lake internal restoration measures can result in transient clear-water conditions both in spring and summer and reversals to turbid conditions. Furthermore, we hypothesize that these contrasting restoration measures result in different macrophyte species composition, with added implications for seasonal dynamics due to differences in plant traits. To test these hypotheses, we analyzed data on water quality and submerged macrophytes from 49 north temperate shallow lakes that were in a turbid state and subjected to restoration measures. To study the dynamics of macrophytes during nutrient load reduction, we adapted the ecosystem model PCLake. Our survey and model simulations revealed the existence of an intermediate recovery state upon reduced external nutrient loading, characterized by spring clear-water phases and turbid summers, whereas internal lake restoration measures often resulted in clear-water conditions in spring and summer with returns to turbid conditions after some years. External and internal lake restoration measures resulted in different macrophyte communities. The intermediate recovery state following reduced nutrient loading is characterized by a few macrophyte species (mainly pondweeds) that can resist wave action allowing survival in shallowareas, germinate early in spring, have energy-rich vegetative propagules facilitating rapid initial growth and that can complete their life cycle by early summer. Later in the growing season these plants are, according to our simulations, outcompeted by periphyton, leading to late-summer phytoplankton blooms. Internal lake restoration measures often coincide with a rapid but transient colonization by hornworts, waterweeds or charophytes. Stable clear-water conditions and a diverse macrophyte flora only occurred decades after external nutrient load reduction or when measures were combined.
Data from: Warming advances top-down control and reduces producer biomass in a freshwater plankton community
Velthuis, Mandy ; Senerpont Domis, Lisette de; Frenken, Thijs ; Stephan, Susanne ; Kazanjian, Garabet ; Aben, Ralf ; Hilt, Sabine ; Kosten, Sarian ; Donk, Ellen van; De Waal, Dedmer B. Van - \ 2017
chytrid dynamics - global warming - phytoplankton community dynamics - seasonal succession - zooplankton phenology - Synedra - Dinobryon - Keratella - Bosmina
Global warming has been shown to affect ecosystems worldwide. Warming may, for instance, disrupt plant herbivore synchrony and bird phenology in terrestrial systems, reduce primary production in oceans, and promote toxic cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater lakes. Responses of communities will not only depend on direct species-specific temperature effects, but also on indirect effects related to bottom-up and top-down processes. Here, we investigated the impact of warming on freshwater phytoplankton community dynamics, and assessed the relative contribution of nutrient availability, fungal parasitism, and grazing therein. For this purpose, we performed an indoor mesocosm experiment following seasonal temperature dynamics of temperate lakes and a warmed (+4°C) scenario from early spring to late summer. We assessed phytoplankton biomass, C:N:P stoichiometry and community composition, dissolved nutrient availabilities, fungal parasite (i.e., chytrid) prevalence, and zooplankton abundance. Warming led to an overall reduction in phytoplankton biomass as well as lower C:P and N:P ratios, while phytoplankton community composition remained largely unaltered. Warming resulted in an earlier termination of the diatom spring bloom, and an epidemic of its fungal parasite ended earlier as well. Furthermore, warming advanced zooplankton phenology, leading to an earlier top-down control on phytoplankton in the period after the spring bloom. Linear model analysis showed that most of the observed variance in phytoplankton biomass was related to seasonal temperature dynamics in combination with zooplankton abundance. Our findings showed that warming advanced grazer phenology and reduced phytoplankton biomass, thereby demonstrating how bottom-up and top-down related processes may shape future phytoplankton dynamics.
Cross continental increase in methane ebullition under climate change
Aben, Ralf C.H. ; Barros, Nathan ; Donk, Ellen Van; Frenken, Thijs ; Hilt, Sabine ; Kazanjian, Garabet ; Lamers, Leon P.M. ; Peeters, Edwin T.H.M. ; Roelofs, Jan G.M. ; Senerpont Domis, Lisette N. De; Stephan, Susanne ; Velthuis, Mandy ; De Waal, Dedmer B. Van; Wik, Martin ; Thornton, Brett F. ; Wilkinson, Jeremy ; Delsontro, Tonya ; Kosten, Sarian - \ 2017
Nature Communications 8 (2017)1. - ISSN 2041-1723
Methane (CH4) strongly contributes to observed global warming. As natural CH4 emissions mainly originate from wet ecosystems, it is important to unravel how climate change may affect these emissions. This is especially true for ebullition (bubble flux from sediments), a pathway that has long been underestimated but generally dominates emissions. Here we show a remarkably strong relationship between CH4 ebullition and temperature across a wide range of freshwater ecosystems on different continents using multi-seasonal CH4 ebullition data from the literature. As these temperature-ebullition relationships may have been affected by seasonal variation in organic matter availability, we also conducted a controlled year-round mesocosm experiment. Here 4 °C warming led to 51% higher total annual CH4 ebullition, while diffusion was not affected. Our combined findings suggest that global warming will strongly enhance freshwater CH4 emissions through a disproportional increase in ebullition (6-20% per 1 °C increase), contributing to global warming.
Combined physical, chemical and biological factors shape Alexandrium ostenfeldii blooms in the Netherlands
Brandenburg, Karen M. ; Senerpont Domis, Lisette N. de; Wohlrab, Sylke ; Krock, Bernd ; John, Uwe ; Scheppingen, Yvonne van; Donk, Ellen van; Waal, Dedmer B. van de - \ 2017
Harmful Algae 63 (2017). - ISSN 1568-9883 - p. 146 - 153.
Alexandrium - Grazing - Nutrients - Salinity - Temperature - Wind speed

Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are globally expanding, compromising water quality worldwide. HAB dynamics are determined by a complex interplay of abiotic and biotic factors, and their emergence has often been linked to eutrophication, and more recently to climate change. The dinoflagellate Alexandrium is one of the most widespread HAB genera and its success is based on key functional traits like allelopathy, mixotrophy, cyst formation and nutrient retrieval migrations. Since 2012, dense Alexandrium ostenfeldii blooms (up to 4500 cells mL−1) have recurred annually in a creek located in the southwest of the Netherlands, an area characterized by intense agriculture and aquaculture. We investigated how physical, chemical and biological factors influenced A. ostenfeldii bloom dynamics over three consecutive years (2013–2015). Overall, we found a decrease in the magnitude of the bloom over the years that could largely be linked to changing weather conditions during summer. More specifically, low salinities due to excessive rainfall and increased wind speed corresponded to a delayed A. ostenfeldii bloom with reduced population densities in 2015. Within each year, highest population densities generally corresponded to high temperatures, low DIN:DIP ratios and low grazer densities. Together, our results demonstrate an important role of nutrient availability, absence of grazing, and particularly of the physical environment on the magnitude and duration of A. ostenfeldii blooms. Our results suggest that predicted changes in the physical environment may enhance bloom development in future coastal waters and embayments.

Warming advances top-down control and reduces producer biomass in a freshwater plankton community
Velthuis, Mandy ; Senerpont Domis, Lisette N. de; Frenken, Thijs ; Stephan, Susanne ; Kazanjian, Garabet ; Aben, Ralf ; Hilt, Sabine ; Kosten, Sarian ; Donk, Ellen van; De Waal, Dedmer B. Van - \ 2017
Ecosphere 8 (2017)1. - ISSN 2150-8925
Global warming has been shown to affect ecosystems worldwide. Warming may, for instance, disrupt plant herbivore synchrony and bird phenology in terrestrial systems, reduce primary production in oceans, and promote toxic cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater lakes. Responses of communities will not only depend on direct species-specific temperature effects, but also on indirect effects related to bottom-up and top-down processes. Here, we investigated the impact of warming on freshwater phytoplankton community dynamics, and assessed the relative contribution of nutrient availability, fungal parasitism, and grazing therein. For this purpose, we performed an indoor mesocosm experiment following seasonal temperature dynamics of temperate lakes and a warmed (+4°C) scenario from early spring to late summer. We assessed phytoplankton biomass, C:N:P stoichiometry and community composition, dissolved nutrient availabilities, fungal parasite (i.e., chytrid) prevalence, and zooplankton abundance. Warming led to an overall reduction in phytoplankton biomass as well as lower C:P and N:P ratios, while phytoplankton community composition remained largely unaltered. Warming resulted in an earlier termination of the diatom spring bloom, and an epidemic of its fungal parasite ended earlier as well. Furthermore, warming advanced zooplankton phenology, leading to an earlier top-down control on phytoplankton in the period after the spring bloom. Linear model analysis showed that most of the observed variance in phytoplankton biomass was related to seasonal temperature dynamics in combination with zooplankton abundance. Our findings showed that warming advanced grazer phenology and reduced phytoplankton biomass, thereby demonstrating how bottom-up and top-down related processes may shape future phytoplankton dynamics.
Evaluating early-warning indicators of critical transitions in natural aquatic ecosystems
Gsell, A.S. ; Scharfenberger, Ulrike ; Özkundakci, Deniz ; Walters, Annika ; Hansson, Lars Anders ; Janssen, Annette B.G. ; Nõges, Peeter ; Reid, Philip C. ; Schindler, Daniel E. ; Donk, Ellen Van ; Dakos, Vasilis ; Adrian, Rita - \ 2016
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 113 (2016)50. - ISSN 0027-8424 - p. E8089 - E8095.
Competition - Intraguild predation - Resilience indicators - Time series - Trophic cascade

Ecosystems can show sudden and persistent changes in state despite only incremental changes in drivers. Such critical transitions are difficult to predict, because the state of the system often shows little change before the transition. Early-warning indicators (EWIs) are hypothesized to signal the loss of system resilience and have been shown to precede critical transitions in theoretical models, paleo-climate time series, and in laboratory as well as whole lake experiments. The generalizability of EWIs for detecting critical transitions in empirical time series of natural aquatic ecosystems remains largely untested, however. Here we assessed four commonly used EWIs on long-term datasets of five freshwater ecosystems that have experienced sudden, persistent transitions and for which the relevant ecological mechanisms and drivers are well understood. These case studies were categorized by three mechanisms that can generate critical transitions between alternative states: competition, trophic cascade, and intraguild predation. Although EWIs could be detected in most of the case studies, agreement among the four indicators was low. In some cases, EWIs were detected considerably ahead of the transition. Nonetheless, our results show that at present, EWIs do not provide reliable and consistent signals of impending critical transitions despite using some of the best routinely monitored freshwater ecosystems. Our analysis strongly suggests that a priori knowledge of the underlying mechanisms driving ecosystem transitions is necessary to identify relevant state variables for successfully monitoring EWIs.

Warming accelerates termination of a phytoplankton spring bloom by fungal parasites
Frenken, Thijs ; Velthuis, Mandy ; Senerpont Domis, L.N. de; Stephan, Susanne ; Aben, Ralf ; Kosten, Sarian ; Donk, Ellen van; Waal, D.B. Van de - \ 2016
Global Change Biology 22 (2016)1. - ISSN 1354-1013 - p. 299 - 309.
Bacteria - Chytrid - Climate change - Ecological stoichiometry - Epidemic - Rotifer phenology - Synedra - Zoospores

Climate change is expected to favour infectious diseases across ecosystems worldwide. In freshwater and marine environments, parasites play a crucial role in controlling plankton population dynamics. Infection of phytoplankton populations will cause a transfer of carbon and nutrients into parasites, which may change the type of food available for higher trophic levels. Some phytoplankton species are inedible to zooplankton, and the termination of their population by parasites may liberate otherwise unavailable carbon and nutrients. Phytoplankton spring blooms often consist of large diatoms inedible for zooplankton, but the zoospores of their fungal parasites may serve as a food source for this higher trophic level. Here, we investigated the impact of warming on the fungal infection of a natural phytoplankton spring bloom and followed the response of a zooplankton community. Experiments were performed in ca. 1000 L indoor mesocosms exposed to a controlled seasonal temperature cycle and a warm (+4 °C) treatment in the period from March to June 2014. The spring bloom was dominated by the diatom Synedra. At the peak of infection over 40% of the Synedra population was infected by a fungal parasite (i.e. a chytrid) in both treatments. Warming did not affect the onset of the Synedra bloom, but accelerated its termination. Peak population density of Synedra tended to be lower in the warm treatments. Furthermore, Synedra carbon: phosphorus stoichiometry increased during the bloom, particularly in the control treatments. This indicates enhanced phosphorus limitation in the control treatments, which may have constrained chytrid development. Timing of the rotifer Keratella advanced in the warm treatments and closely followed chytrid infections. The chytrids' zoospores may thus have served as an alternative food source to Keratella. Our study thus emphasizes the importance of incorporating not only nutrient limitation and grazing, but also parasitism in understanding the response of plankton communities towards global warming.

Pharmaceuticals may disrupt natural chemical information flows and species interactions in aquatic systems: ideas and perspectives on a hidden global change
Donk, E. van; Peacor, S. ; Grosser, K. ; Senerpont Domis, L.N. de; Lürling, M.F.L.L.W. - \ 2016
In: Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology / de Voogt, P., Springer (Reviews of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology ) - ISBN 9783319307909 - p. 91 - 105.
Over the last decades, anthropogenic activities have discharged into the environment many manmade chemicals. There is a rising concern regarding pharmaceutical products and their spread into the environment (e.g. Kümmerer 2008). Due to the enormous quantities consumed, anti-inflammatories, antibiotics, anti-depressives, hormones and blood lipid regulators are found in almost all aquatic environments (Kolpin et al. 2002; Loos et al. 2009). Most pharmaceuticals tend to enter the aquatic environment continuously (but see Sacher et al. 2008 for seasonal exception) in contrast to other pollutants such as herbicides and insecticides which are applied only at specific times related to the life cycle of the target organism, or in response to observed pest outbreaks (Rosi-Marshall and Royer 2012). Pharmaceuticals are designed to be biologically active at very low concentrations and end up in surface waters either unchanged, or as active metabolites/polar conjugates, mostly via municipal wastewater and agricultural discharges (Boxall et al. 2012).
Minimum Information about a Biosynthetic Gene cluster
Medema, M.H. ; Kottmann, Renzo ; Yilmaz, Pelin ; Cummings, Matthew ; Biggins, J.B. ; Blin, Kai ; Bruijn, Irene De; Chooi, Yit Heng ; Claesen, Jan ; Coates, R.C. ; Cruz-Morales, Pablo ; Duddela, Srikanth ; Düsterhus, Stephanie ; Edwards, Daniel J. ; Fewer, David P. ; Garg, Neha ; Geiger, Christoph ; Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo ; Greule, Anja ; Hadjithomas, Michalis ; Haines, Anthony S. ; Helfrich, Eric J.N. ; Hillwig, Matthew L. ; Ishida, Keishi ; Jones, Adam C. ; Jones, Carla S. ; Jungmann, Katrin ; Kegler, Carsten ; Kim, Hyun Uk ; Kötter, Peter ; Krug, Daniel ; Masschelein, Joleen ; Melnik, Alexey V. ; Mantovani, Simone M. ; Monroe, Emily A. ; Moore, Marcus ; Moss, Nathan ; Nützmann, Hans Wilhelm ; Pan, Guohui ; Pati, Amrita ; Petras, Daniel ; Reen, F.J. ; Rosconi, Federico ; Rui, Zhe ; Tian, Zhenhua ; Tobias, Nicholas J. ; Tsunematsu, Yuta ; Wiemann, Philipp ; Wyckoff, Elizabeth ; Yan, Xiaohui ; Yim, Grace ; Yu, Fengan ; Xie, Yunchang ; Aigle, Bertrand ; Apel, Alexander K. ; Balibar, Carl J. ; Balskus, Emily P. ; Barona-Gómez, Francisco ; Bechthold, Andreas ; Bode, Helge B. ; Borriss, Rainer ; Brady, Sean F. ; Brakhage, Axel A. ; Caffrey, Patrick ; Cheng, Yi Qiang ; Clardy, Jon ; Cox, Russell J. ; Mot, René De; Donadio, Stefano ; Donia, Mohamed S. ; Donk, Wilfred A. Van Der; Dorrestein, Pieter C. ; Doyle, Sean ; Driessen, Arnold J.M. ; Ehling-Schulz, Monika ; Entian, Karl Dieter ; Fischbach, Michael A. ; Gerwick, Lena ; Gerwick, William H. ; Gross, Harald ; Gust, Bertolt ; Hertweck, Christian ; Höfte, Monica ; Jensen, Susan E. ; Ju, Jianhua ; Katz, Leonard ; Kaysser, Leonard ; Klassen, Jonathan L. ; Keller, Nancy P. ; Kormanec, Jan ; Kuipers, Oscar P. ; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa ; Kyrpides, Nikos C. ; Kwon, Hyung Jin ; Lautru, Sylvie ; Lavigne, Rob ; Lee, Chia Y. ; Linquan, Bai ; Liu, Xinyu ; Liu, Wen ; Luzhetskyy, Andriy ; Mahmud, Taifo ; Mast, Yvonne ; Méndez, Carmen ; Metsä-Ketelä, Mikko ; Micklefield, Jason ; Mitchell, Douglas A. ; Moore, Bradley S. ; Moreira, Leonilde M. ; Müller, Rolf ; Neilan, Brett A. ; Nett, Markus ; Nielsen, Jens ; O'Gara, Fergal ; Oikawa, Hideaki ; Osbourn, Anne ; Osburne, Marcia S. ; Ostash, Bohdan ; Payne, Shelley M. ; Pernodet, Jean Luc ; Petricek, Miroslav ; Piel, Jörn ; Ploux, Olivier ; Raaijmakers, Jos M. ; Salas, José A. ; Schmitt, Esther K. ; Scott, Barry ; Seipke, Ryan F. ; Shen, Ben ; Sherman, David H. ; Sivonen, Kaarina ; Smanski, Michael J. ; Sosio, Margherita ; Stegmann, Evi ; Süssmuth, Roderich D. ; Tahlan, Kapil ; Thomas, Christopher M. ; Tang, Yi ; Truman, Andrew W. ; Viaud, Muriel ; Walton, Jonathan D. ; Walsh, Christopher T. ; Weber, Tilmann ; Wezel, Gilles P. Van; Wilkinson, Barrie ; Willey, Joanne M. ; Wohlleben, Wolfgang ; Wright, Gerard D. ; Ziemert, Nadine ; Zhang, Changsheng ; Zotchev, Sergey B. ; Breitling, Rainer ; Takano, Eriko ; Glöckner, Frank Oliver - \ 2015
Nature Chemical Biology 11 (2015)9. - ISSN 1552-4450 - p. 625 - 631.

A wide variety of enzymatic pathways that produce specialized metabolites in bacteria, fungi and plants are known to be encoded in biosynthetic gene clusters. Information about these clusters, pathways and metabolites is currently dispersed throughout the literature, making it difficult to exploit. To facilitate consistent and systematic deposition and retrieval of data on biosynthetic gene clusters, we propose the Minimum Information about a Biosynthetic Gene cluster (MIBiG) data standard.

Food quality dominates the impact of food quantity on Daphnia life history: possible implications for re-oligotrophication
Sarpe, D. ; Senerpont Domis, L.N. de; Declerck, S.A.J. ; Donk, E. van; Ibelings, B.W. - \ 2014
Inland Waters : Journal of the International Society of Limnology 4 (2014)4. - ISSN 2044-2041 - p. 363 - 368.
phosphorus limitation - nutrient limitation - long-term - lakes - carbon - eutrophication - growth
The elemental composition of phytoplankton is highly variable compared to the relatively narrow stoichiometry of zooplankton grazers. Using a full factorial design, we tested the effects of alterations in algal elemental composition (i.e., food quality) combined with food quantity on the life history of a Daphnia galeata clone from Lake IJsselmeer. Lower food quality reduced survival, growth, and reproduction. Food quantity became important at high food quality only. The strong effect of food quality indicates the potential for a stoichiometric bottleneck in Lake IJsselmeer, resulting in less high quality food for higher trophic levels as a result of re-oligotrophication.
Advies Alterra Huys ten Donk en second opinion rapport Bureau Maerlant
Broekmeyer, Mirjam - \ 2014
Community stoichiometry in a changing world: combined effects of warming and eutrophication on phytoplankton dynamics
Senerpont Domis, L.N. de; Waal, D.B. van de; Helmsing, N.R. ; Donk, E. van; Mooij, W.M. - \ 2014
Ecology 95 (2014)6. - ISSN 0012-9658 - p. 1485 - 1495.
climate-change impacts - planktonic herbivore - re-oligotrophication - water temperature - organic-carbon - fresh-waters - peg-model - lake - zooplankton - productivity
The current changes in our climate will likely have far-reaching consequences for aquatic ecosystems. These changes in the climate, however, do not act alone, and are often accompanied by additional stressors such as eutrophication. Both global warming and eutrophication have been shown to affect the timing and magnitude of phytoplankton blooms. Little is known about the combined effects of rising temperatures and eutrophication on the stoichiometry of entire phytoplankton communities. We exposed a natural phytoplankton spring community to different warming and phosphorus-loading scenarios using a full-factorial design. Our results demonstrate that rising temperatures promote the growth rate of an entire phytoplankton community. Furthermore, both rising temperatures and phosphorus loading stimulated the maximum biomass built up by the phytoplankton community. Rising temperatures led to higher carbon¿:¿nutrient stoichiometry of the phytoplankton community under phosphorus-limited conditions. Such a shift towards higher carbon¿:¿nutrient ratios, in combination with a higher biomass buildup, suggests a temperature-driven increase in nutrient use efficiency, the phytoplankton community. Importantly, with higher carbon¿:¿nutrient stoichiometry, phytoplankton is generally of poorer nutritional value for zooplankton. Thus, although warming may result in higher phytoplankton biomass, this may be accompanied by a stoichiometric mismatch between phytoplankton and their grazers, with possible consequences for the entire aquatic food web.
Het Nieuwste Brabant
Donk, van de, W. ; Dommelen, van, S. ; Janssen, J. ; Leeuwen, W. van; Notermans, M. - \ 2014
Eindhoven : Lecturis i.s.m. Provincie Noord-Brabant - ISBN 9789462260511 - 688 p.
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