Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Ontogenetic niche shifts as a driver of seasonal migration
    Fokkema, Wimke ; Jeugd, Henk P. van der; Lameris, Thomas K. ; Dokter, Adriaan M. ; Ebbinge, Barwolt S. ; Roos, André M. de; Nolet, Bart A. ; Piersma, Theunis ; Olff, Han - \ 2020
    Oecologia 193 (2020)2. - ISSN 0029-8549 - p. 285 - 297.
    Barnacle goose - Dark-bellied brent goose - Humpback whale - Matrix population modelling - Ontogeny - Pacific salmon - Reproduction - Seasonal migration

    Ontogenetic niche shifts have helped to understand population dynamics. Here we show that ontogenetic niche shifts also offer an explanation, complementary to traditional concepts, as to why certain species show seasonal migration. We describe how demographic processes (survival, reproduction and migration) and associated ecological requirements of species may change with ontogenetic stage (juvenile, adult) and across the migratory range (breeding, non-breeding). We apply this concept to widely different species (dark-bellied brent geese (Branta b. bernicla), humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) and migratory Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha) to check the generality of this hypothesis. Consistent with the idea that ontogenetic niche shifts are an important driver of seasonal migration, we find that growth and survival of juvenile life stages profit most from ecological conditions that are specific to breeding areas. We suggest that matrix population modelling techniques are promising to detect the importance of the ontogenetic niche shifts in maintaining migratory strategies. As a proof of concept, we applied a first analysis to resident, partial migratory and fully migratory populations of barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis). We argue that recognition of the costs and benefits of migration, and how these vary with life stages, is important to understand and conserve migration under global environmental change.

    Timing and duration of spring staging of the EurasianGreater White-fronted Goose (Anseralbifronsalbifrons)in relation to sex, age and progress of migration season
    Polakowski, M. ; Jankowiak, L. ; Stepniewski, K. ; Stepniewska, K. ; Kruckenberg, H. ; Ebbinge, B.S. ; Broniszewska, M. ; Cichocka, A. - \ 2019
    Ornis Fennica 96 (2019)1. - ISSN 0030-5685 - p. 24 - 32.
    Amon gArctic-breedin gwaterfowl species, sprin gstopovers are critical to individuals as a means to accumulate fat and nutrient stores to invest in both migration and their breeding attempt in the tundra zone. We studied the influence of possible factors (age, sex, progress of migration season) on the stopover duration of one such species, the Eurasian Greater White-fronted Goose (Anser albifrons albifrons), by analysing records of 1,115 neck-banded birds spotted at their Biebrza Basin stopover site on spring migration in Poland. As expected, because most mature birds are paired, there were no differences between the sexes in stopover duration. Generally, adults stayed for shorter periods than immatures and stopover duration was shorter later in the season. Data from individuals of known age showed that the rate of decrease in stopover duration with season was faster among older than younger geese. Immature birds, still not ready to breed, do not face the pressure to attain breeding condition and therefore may stay longer in the stopover areas. We think these patterns may reflect the greater experience of older birds, as well as the stronger pressure on them to reach the breeding grounds as early as possible. As the breeding season approaches and foraging opportunities at migration sites further up the fly-way become more accessible and of higher quality, geese stay for shorter periods later in the season.
    Data from: Agricultural pastures challenge the attractiveness of natural saltmarsh for a migratory goose
    Dokter, A.M. ; Fokkema, Wimke ; Ebbinge, B.S. ; Olff, H. ; Jeugd, Henk P. van der; Nolet, B.A. - \ 2018
    NIOO-KNAW
    pastures - saltmarsh - brent geese - human-goose conflict - accelerometer - GPS tracking - intertidal - habitat switching - migration - fuelling
    Broad-scale land conversions and fertilizer use have dramatically altered the available staging area for herbivorous long-distance migrants. Instead of natural land, these birds rely increasingly on pastures for migratory fuelling and stopover, often conflicting with farming practices. To be able to predict and manage birds’ future habitat use, the relative advantages and disadvantages of natural (e.g. saltmarsh, intertidal) versus anthropogenic staging sites for foraging need to be understood. 2. We compared the migratory staging of brent geese on saltmarsh and pasture sites in spring. Food quality (nitrogen and fibre content), intra-specific antagonistic behaviour, and body weight were quantified at nearby sites in simultaneous seasons. Individuals were tracked with high-resolution GPS and accelerometers to compare timing of migration and time-budgets during fuelling. 3. On pastures, birds rested more and experienced higher ingestion rates, similar or superior food quality and reduced antagonistic interactions than on saltmarsh. 4. Brent geese using fertilized grasslands advanced their fuelling and migration schedules compared to those using saltmarsh. Pasture birds reached heavy weights earlier, departed sooner, and arrived in the Arctic earlier. 5. Intertidal mudflats were frequently visited by saltmarsh birds during the day, and available food there (algae, some seagrass) was of higher quality than terrestrial resources. Availability of intertidal resources was an important factor balancing the otherwise more favourable conditions on pastures relative to saltmarsh. 6. Policy implications: Disadvantages of longer foraging effort, more antagonistic interactions and delayed fuelling schedules on traditional saltmarshes may cause a trend of geese exchanging this traditional niche in favour of pastures, especially in a warming climate that requires advancement of migratory schedules. However, the high quality of intertidal forage allows it to complement terrestrial foraging, potentially removing the incentive for habitat switches to pastures. The relatively high quality of green algae and seagrass, and birds’ remarkable preference for these resources when available, provides a key for managers to create landscapes that can sustain this specialist’s intertidal lifestyle. To keep natural habitats attractive to staging geese with the purpose to prevent conflicts with farming practices, management actions should focus on conservation and restoration of saltmarsh and especially intertidal habitat.
    Data from: Body stores persist as fitness correlate in a long-distance migrant released from food constraints
    Dokter, Adriaan M. ; Fokkema, Wimke ; Bekker, Steven K. ; Bouten, Willem ; Ebbinge, B.S. ; Muskens, G.J.D.M. ; Olff, H. ; Jeugd, Henk P. van der; Nolet, B.A. - \ 2018
    Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW)
    arctic waterfowl - cultivated grassland - recruitment - GPS tracking - migratory fueling - carry-over effects
    Long-distance migratory birds rely on acquisition of body reserves to fuel their migration and reproduction. Breeding success depends on the amount of body reserve acquired prior to migration, which is thought to increase with access to food at the fuelling site. Here we studied how food abundance during fuelling affected time budgets and reproductive success. In a regime of plenty, we expected that (1) limitations on food harvesting would become lifted, allowing birds to frequently idle, and (2) that birds would reach sufficient fuel loads, such that departure weight would no longer affect reproductive success. Our study system comprised brent geese (Branta b. bernicla) staging on high-quality agricultural pastures. Fuelling conditions were assessed by a combination of high-resolution GPS-tracking, acceleration-based behavioural classification, thermoregulation modelling, and measurements of food digestibility and excretion rates. Mark-resighting analysis was used to test for correlations between departure weight and offspring recruitment. Our results confirm that birds loafed extensively, actively postponed fuelling in early spring, and took frequent digestion pauses, suggesting that traditional time constraints on harvest and fuelling rates are absent on modern-day fertilized grasslands. Nonetheless, departure weight remained correlated with recruitment success. The persistence of this correlation after a prolonged stopover with access to abundant high-quality food, suggests that between-individual differences in departure condition are not so much enforced by food quality and availability during stopover, but reflect individual quality and longer-lived life-history traits, such as health status and digestive capacity, which may be developed before the fuelling period.
    Agricultural pastures challenge the attractiveness of natural saltmarsh for a migratory goose
    Dokter, Adriaan M. ; Fokkema, Wimke ; Ebbinge, Barwolt S. ; Olff, Han ; Jeugd, Henk P. van der; Nolet, Bart A. - \ 2018
    Journal of Applied Ecology 55 (2018)6. - ISSN 0021-8901 - p. 2707 - 2718.
    accelerometer - brent geese - GPS tracking - habitat switching - human–goose conflict - migration - pastures - saltmarsh

    Broad-scale land conversions and fertilizer use have dramatically altered the available staging area for herbivorous long-distance migrants. Instead of natural land, these birds rely increasingly on pastures for migratory fuelling and stopover, often conflicting with farming practices. To predict and manage birds’ future habitat use, the relative advantages and disadvantages of natural (e.g. saltmarsh, intertidal) versus anthropogenic staging sites for foraging need to be understood. We compared the migratory staging of brent geese on saltmarsh and pasture sites in spring. Food quality (nitrogen and fibre content), antagonistic behaviour, and body weight were quantified at nearby sites in simultaneous seasons. Individuals were tracked with high-resolution GPS and accelerometers to compare timing of migration and time budgets during fuelling. On pastures, birds rested more and experienced higher ingestion rates, similar or superior food quality and reduced antagonistic interactions than on saltmarsh. Brent geese using fertilized grasslands advanced their fuelling and migration schedules compared to those using saltmarsh. Pasture birds reached heavy weights earlier, departed sooner, and arrived in the Arctic earlier. Intertidal mudflats were frequently visited by saltmarsh birds during the day, and available food there (algae, some seagrass) was of higher quality than terrestrial resources. Availability of intertidal resources was an important factor balancing the otherwise more favourable conditions on pastures relative to saltmarsh. Synthesis and applications. Disadvantages of longer foraging effort, more antagonistic interactions and delayed fuelling schedules on traditional saltmarshes may cause geese to exchange this traditional niche in favour of pastures, especially in a warming climate that requires advancement of migratory schedules. However, due to its high quality, intertidal forage can complement terrestrial foraging, potentially removing the incentive for habitat switches to pastures. The relatively high quality of green algae and seagrass, and birds’ remarkable preference for these resources when available, provides a key for managers to create landscapes that can sustain this specialist’s intertidal lifestyle. To keep natural habitats attractive to staging geese with the purpose of preventing conflicts with farming practices, management actions should focus on conservation and restoration of saltmarsh and especially intertidal habitat.

    Body stores persist as fitness correlate in a long-distance migrant released from food constraints
    Dokter, Adriaan M. ; Fokkema, Wimke ; Bekker, Steven K. ; Bouten, Willem ; Ebbinge, Barwolt S. ; Müskens, Gerard ; Olff, Han ; Jeugd, Henk P. van der; Nolet, Bart A. - \ 2018
    Behavioral Ecology 29 (2018)5. - ISSN 1045-2249 - p. 1157 - 1166.
    arctic waterfowl - carry-over effects - cultivated grassland - GPS tracking - migratory fueling - recruitment

    Long-distance migratory birds rely on the acquisition of body stores to fuel their migration and reproduction. Breeding success depends on the amount of body stores acquired prior to migration, which is thought to increase with access to food at the fueling site. Here, we studied how food abundance during fueling affected time budgets and reproductive success. In a regime of plenty, we expected that 1) limitations on food harvesting would become lifted, allowing birds to frequently idle, and 2) birds would reach sufficient fuel loads, such that departure weight would no longer affect reproductive success. Our study system comprised brent geese (Branta b. bernicla) staging on high-quality agricultural pastures. Fueling conditions were assessed by a combination of high-resolution GPS tracking, acceleration-based behavioral classification, thermoregulation modeling, and measurements of food digestibility and excretion rates. Mark-resighting analysis was used to test for correlations between departure weight and offspring recruitment. Our results confirm that birds loafed extensively, actively postponed fueling in early spring, and took frequent digestion pauses, suggesting that traditional time constraints on harvest and fueling rates are absent on modern-day fertilized grasslands. Nonetheless, departure weight remained correlated with recruitment success. The persistence of this correlation after a prolonged stopover with access to abundant high-quality food, suggests that between-individual differences in departure condition are not so much enforced by food quality and availability during stopover, but reflect individual quality and longer-lived life-history traits, such as health status and digestive capacity, which may be developed before the fueling period.

    Breeding in a den of thieves : Pros and cons of nesting close to egg predators
    Fouw, Jimmy de; Bom, Roeland A. ; Klaassen, Raymond H.G. ; Müskens, Gerard J.D.M. ; Vries, Peter P. de; Popov, Igor Yu ; Kokorev, Yakov I. ; Ebbinge, Bart ; Nolet, Bart A. - \ 2016
    Ecosphere 7 (2016)6. - ISSN 2150-8925
    Branta bernicla bernicla - Clutch size - Dark-bellied brent goose - Guanofication - Gulls - Lemming cycle - Nest association hypothesis - Partial nest predation - Taimyr

    Breeding success of many Arctic-breeding bird populations varies with lemming cycles due to prey switching behavior of generalist predators. Several bird species breed on islands to escape from generalist predators like Arctic fox Vulpes lagopus, but little is known about how these species interact. We studied brent geese Branta bernicla bernicla that share islands with gulls (Larus spec.) in Taimyr, Siberia (Russia). On one hand, gulls are egg predators, which occasionally steal an egg when incubating geese leave the nest for foraging bouts. On the other hand, gulls import marine resources to the islands, enriching the soil with their guano. We considered three hypotheses regarding clutch size of brent geese after partial nest predation. According to the "predator proximity hypothesis", clutch size is expected to be smallest close to gulls, because of enhanced predator exposure. Conversely, clutch size is expected to be largest close to gulls, because of the supposedly better feeding conditions close to gulls, which might reduce nest recess times of geese and hence egg predation risk ("guano hypothesis"). Furthermore, gulls may defend their nesting territory, and thus nearby goose nests might benefit from this protection against other gulls ("nest association hypothesis"). We mapped goose and gull nests toward the end of the goose incubation period. In accordance with the latter two hypotheses, goose clutch size decreased with distance to the nearest gull nest in all but the lemming peak year. In the lemming peak year, clutch size was consistently high, indicating that partial nest predation was nearly absent. By mapping food quantity and quality, we found that nitrogen availability was indeed higher closer to gull nests, reflecting guanofication. Unlike predicted by the nest association hypothesis, a predation pressure experiment revealed that egg predation rate decreased with distance to the focal gull nests. We therefore propose that higher food availability close to gulls enables female geese to reduce nest recess time, limiting egg predation by gulls.

    What Can Stable Isotope Analysis of Top Predator Tissues Contribute to Monitoring of Tundra Ecosystems?
    Ehrich, Dorothee ; Ims, Rolf A. ; Yoccoz, Nigel G. ; Lecomte, Nicolas ; Killengreen, Siw T. ; Fuglei, Eva ; Rodnikova, Anna Y. ; Ebbinge, Barwolt S. ; Menyushina, Irina E. ; Nolet, Bart A. ; Pokrovsky, Ivan G. ; Popov, Igor Y. ; Schmidt, Niels M. ; Sokolov, Aleksandr A. ; Sokolova, Natalya A. ; Sokolov, Vasily A. - \ 2015
    Ecosystems 18 (2015)3. - ISSN 1432-9840 - p. 404 - 416.
    arctic tundra - diet - ecological indicator - food web - monitoring - predator - stable isotopes - Vulpes lagopus

    Understanding how climate change and increasing human impacts may exert pressure on ecosystems and threaten biodiversity requires efficient monitoring programs. Indicator species have been proposed as useful tools, and predators and their diet may be particularly suitable. The vast and remote arctic tundra represents a good case study as shifts in ecosystem states are presently occurring, and monitoring is a major challenge. Here we assess what stable isotopes reflecting the diet of the arctic fox, a widespread and highly flexible top predator, can contribute to effective monitoring of the vertebrate prey basis of Arctic tundra. We used data collected over 2–5 years from six sites in the Eurasian Arctic and Greenland. Stable isotope signatures of arctic fox winter fur reflected both spatial and temporal variability in the composition of the vertebrate prey basis. Clear contrasts were apparent in the importance of marine resources, as well as of small rodents and their multiannual density fluctuations. Some important resources could however not be separated because of confounding isotopic signatures. Moreover, except for preferred prey, the proportions of prey in the diet may not necessarily reflect the relative importance of species in the community of available prey. Knowing these limitations, we suggest that the arctic fox diet as inferred from stable isotopes could serve as one of several key targets in ecosystem-based monitoring programs.

    Betrouwbaarheid van aantalsschattingen van schadeveroorzakende watervogelsoorten - Deel 2 : Watervogels
    Ebbinge, B.S. ; Goedhart, P.W. ; Kiers, M.A. ; Naeff, H.S.D. - \ 2014
    Alterra Wageningen UR / Fauna fonds (Alterra rapport 2427) - 138
    fauna - wildbeheer - schade - ganzen - watervogels - populatiedichtheid - monitoring - zintuiglijke waarneming - vergelijkingen - fauna - wildlife management - damage - geese - waterfowl - population density - monitoring - organolepsis - comparisons
    Tellingen van ganzen en zwanen worden in Nederland sinds 1993 verricht door Sovon en sinds 2005 door de KNJV, met als voornaamste doel een schatting te geven van totale aantallen. Hier is onderzocht in hoeverre de Sovon-tellingen en KNJV-tellingen van watervogels tussen 2005 en 2010 verschillen. Ook worden aandachtspunten bij het tellen van 11 soorten schadeveroorzakende watervogels beschreven. Vergelijking van de telprotocollen levert belangrijke verschillen op die een verklaring zouden kunnen vormen voor uiteenlopende telresultaten. Op grond van de geanalyseerde gegevens is het niet mogelijk de werkelijk aanwezige aantallen nauwkeurig te bepalen, omdat daarvoor validatie met behulp van onafhankelijke tellingen noodzakelijk is. Tot slot worden er aanbevelingen gedaan ter verbetering van telprotocollen door Sovon en KNJV.
    De rotgans
    Ebbinge, B.S. - \ 2014
    Mens en Vogel 52 (2014)4. - ISSN 0770-1314 - p. 20 - 27.
    Ganzenonderzoeker Bart Ebbinge snapt weinig van Nederlands provincialisme : "hoeveel ganzen willen we eigenlijk"
    Maanen, G. van; Ebbinge, B.S. - \ 2014
    Bionieuws 24 (2014)6. - ISSN 0924-7734 - p. 2 - 2.
    ganzen - begrazing - natuurbeleid - geese - grazing - nature conservation policy
    Roepen dat er te veel of te weinig ganzen zijn, heeft niet veel zin. Ganzenonderzoeker Ebbinge pleit voor het vaststellen van acceptabele aantallen.
    Neue Untersuchungsergebnisse zum alter von dunkelbäuchigen Ringelgänsen Branta b. bernicla
    Brix, M. ; Ebbinge, B.S. - \ 2014
    Seevögel 35 (2014)2. - ISSN 0722-2947 - p. 20 - 21.
    Een leven met rotganzen (interview met Bart Ebbinge )
    Kleis, R. ; Ebbinge, B.S. - \ 2014
    Resource: weekblad voor Wageningen UR 8 (2014)16. - ISSN 1874-3625 - p. 10 - 10.
    ganzen - fauna - wetenschappelijk onderzoek - siberië - publicaties - geese - fauna - scientific research - siberia - publications
    Veertig jaar onderzocht Bart Ebbinge (Alterra) rotganzen. Hier in ons land, maar vooral ook op zijn vele expedities naar Siberië, waar de vogels in de zomer broeden. Op 7 april vond bij uitgeverij Atlas in Amsterdam de presentatie plaats van De rotgans, een weerslag van vier decennia studie. De rotgans, paperback, 368 blz, ISBN 9789045091600
    Brent goose colonies near snowy owls: Internest distances in relation to breeding arctic fox densities
    Kharitonov, S.P. ; Ebbinge, B.S. ; Fouw, J. de - \ 2013
    Biology Bulletin / Russian Academy of Sciences 40 (2013)1. - ISSN 1062-3590 - p. 45 - 51.
    rough-legged buzzards - peregrine falcons - taimyr peninsula - lemmings
    It was shown that in the years when the numbers of the Arctic foxes are high, even though the lemming numbers are high as well, Brent geese nest considerably closer to owls' nests than in the years with low Arctic fox numbers. At values of the Arctic fox densities greater than one breeding pair per 20 km(2), the factor of lemming numbers ceases to affect the distance between owl and geese nests. This distance becomes dependent on the Arctic fox density (numbers). When the Arctic fox density is greater than the pronounced threshold, the owl-Brent internest distance is inversely and linearly related to the Arctic fox density. DOI: 10.1134/S106235901301007X
    Population development and breeding success of Dark-bellied Brent Geese Branta b. bernicla from 1991-2011
    Ebbinge, B.S. ; Blew, J. ; Clausen, P. ; Günther, K. ; Hall, C. ; Holt, C. ; Koffijberg, K. ; Drean-Quénec'Hdu, S. Le; Mahéo, R. ; Pihl, S. - \ 2013
    Wildfowl 2013 (2013)3. - ISSN 0954-6324 - p. 74 - 89.
    The Dark-bellied Brent Goose Branta bernicla bernicla is the largest of the six Brent Goose populations, which collectively number around 600,000 birds globally. After a major decline to 16,500 geese in 1958, numbers recovered during the 1970s and 1980s to a peak of c. 330,000 individuals between 1992 and 1994. From 1994 onwards the population declined again to 200,000–250,000. This decline has been attributed to poor breeding, associated with faltering cycles of Siberian Brown Lemming Lemmus sibiricus (predominantly) and Palearctic Collared Lemming Dicrostonyx torquatus abundance on the breeding grounds on the Taimyr Peninsula, where lemmings are a main food resource for potential predators of goslings. Darkbellied Brent Geese only breed well in peak lemming years (Summers & Underhill 1991), and this usually occurs every three years, but the frequent failure since 1994 of lemming numbers to peak (except in 2005) has resulted in the absence of very good breeding years for the geese (Nolet et al. 2013). The mid-winter distribution has shown a marked shift towards France over the last decade. France currently supports 50% of the population in January, Great Britain 35–40%, the Netherlands 15–20%, and Germany and Denmark 2%. In spring, almost the entire population gathers in the Wadden Sea, leaving only 4% of the population in Great Britain, and virtually none in France, with the Dutch part of the Wadden Sea supporting 40–45%, the German section 45–50% and Denmark 6%.
    Flexibility in faithfulness of Dark-bellied Brent Geese, Branta b. bernicla to moulting sites
    Ebbinge, B.S. ; Prokosch, P. ; Spaans, B. ; Müskens, G.J.D.M. ; Bom, R. ; Kokorev, Y. ; Syroechkovskiy, E.E. - \ 2013
    Wildfowl 2013 (2013)3. - ISSN 0954-6324 - p. 116 - 134.
    The distribution of Dark-bellied Brent Geese Branta b. bernicla moulting on the Taimyr Peninsula, in the Russian arctic, varies between years depending on whether the birds had a successful breeding season. Counts made of moulting flocks show that major shifts in numbers occur, particularly in non-breeding years, when in line with Salomonsen’s (1968) hypothesis a higher proportion of the population moults further north. For instance, the delta of the Lower Taimyr River in the northern part of the Taimyr Peninsula held 10-times more moulting Dark-bellied Brent Geese in 1989, a non-breeding year, than it did in the good 1990 breeding season. At a more local scale, in good breeding years family groups with small goslings tend to move away from breeding islands in the Pyasina Delta, western Taimyr, to avoid gosling predation by Taimyr Gulls Larus taimyrensis which nest in colonies on the same islands, whereas in poor breeding years adult geese concentrate on these same islands to moult and avoid the mainland sites used for moulting in good breeding years. Failed breeders have greater freedom than parent birds to choose where to moult as successful breeders remain with their goslings to protect and guide them to the safest nursery and moult areas. Re-captures of ringed Darkbellied Brent Geese at a moulting site in the Pyasina Delta found that, in poor breeding years, up to one-fifth the birds had moulted at the site previously, but that the majority of ringed birds known to be still alive were not site-faithful to their moulting grounds.
    Year-round itinerary of a GPS-tracked Brent Goose Branta b. bernicla that visited the Bassin d'Arcachon, France
    Dokter, A.M. ; Ebbinge, B.S. - \ 2013
    Wildfowl 2013 (2013)3. - ISSN 0954-6324 - p. 135 - 141.
    The year-round itinerary for a Dark-bellied Brent Goose Branta b. bernicla is described for a bird fitted with a GPS tracking device at Terschelling Island, the Netherlands, in spring 2012. Spring migration commenced when the bird left the Dutch Wadden Sea on 27 May and continued until it reached the Taimyr Peninsula in arctic Russia on 8 June. During the summer months it moved along the coast of the Taimyr Peninsula, prior to moulting on Taimyr Island to the north of the peninsula in July. During autumn migration it frequented eelgrass Zostera sp. beds around Langeness Island in Schleswig- Holstein, Germany and then proceeded to the Bassin d’Arcachon in France, another famous eelgrass area, where it remained from 18 October 2012–12 January 2013 before returning to feed on grassland polders on Terschelling Island in January 2013. The timing of the location data showed that the bird flew large distances in short periods of time during migration. Over the year it covered c. 4,600 km during local movements and c. 15,000 km on migration. The results form part of a larger study investigating the importance of non-breeding habitats (particularly eelgrass vegetation) for the species.
    Proceedings of the 14th meeting of the Goose Specialist Group of the IUCN Species Survival Commission and Wetlands International
    Ebbinge, B.S. - \ 2013
    Ornis Norvegica 36 (2013). - ISSN 1892-9737 - p. 14 - 14.
    Faltering lemming cycles reduce productivity and population size of a migratory Arctic goose species
    Nolet, B.A. ; Bauer, S. ; Feige, N. ; Kokorev, Y. ; Popov, I.Y. ; Ebbinge, B.S. - \ 2013
    Journal of Animal Ecology 82 (2013)4. - ISSN 0021-8790 - p. 804 - 813.
    geese branta-bernicla - nyctea-scandiaca nests - brent geese - clutch size - climate-change - b.-bernicla - reproductive-performance - trophic interactions - incubation behavior - northeastern taimyr
    1. The huge changes in population sizes of Arctic-nesting geese offer a great opportunity to study population limitation in migratory animals. In geese, population limitation seems to have shifted from wintering to summering grounds. There, in the Arctic, climate is rapidly changing, and this may impact reproductive performance, and perhaps population size of geese, both directly (e.g. by changes in snow melt) or indirectly (e.g. by changes in trophic interactions). 2. Dark-bellied brent geese (Branta bernicla bernicla L.) increased 20-fold since the 1950s. Its reproduction fluctuates strongly in concert with the 3-year lemming cycle. An earlier analysis, covering the growth period until 1988, did not find evidence for density dependence, but thereafter the population levelled off and even decreased. The question is whether this is caused by changes in lemming cycles, population density or other factors like carry-over effects. 3. Breeding success was derived from proportions of juveniles. We used an information-theoretical approach to investigate which environmental factors best explained the variation in breeding success over nearly 50 years (1960–2008). We subsequently combined GLM predictions of breeding success with published survival estimates to project the population trajectory since 1991 (year of maximum population size). In this way, we separated the effects of lemming abundance and population density on population development. 4. Breeding success was mainly dependent on lemming abundance, the onset of spring at the breeding grounds, and the population size of brent goose. No evidence was found for carryover effects (i.e. effects of conditions at main spring staging site). Negative density dependence was operating at a population size above c. 200 000 individuals, but the levelling off of the population could be explained by faltering lemming cycles alone. 5. Lemmings have long been known to affect population productivity of Arctic-nesting migratory birds and, more recently, possibly population dynamics of resident bird species, but this is the first evidence for effects of lemming abundance on population size of a migratory bird species. Why lemming cycles are faltering in the last two decades is unclear, but this may be associated with changes in winter climate at Taimyr Peninsula (Siberia). Key-words: bird migration, climate change, dark-bellied brent goose, density dependence, reproductive success
    Natural heritage of Taimyr: challenges for its conservation and sustainable use
    Mazurov, Y.L. ; Ebbinge, B.S. ; Pakina, A. ; Pedroli, G.B.M. - \ 2012
    Socially scientific magazine : "Geography, Environment, Sustainability" 3 (2012)5. - ISSN 2071-9388 - p. 88 - 103.
    The article discusses the natural heritage of Taimyr (northern Siberia) within the perspective of the environmental conditions of the region. The assessment of its significance is based on the results of many years of Russian-Dutch ecological expeditions. Issues discussed are the responsibility for the preservation of heritage, the interests of the local indigenous peoples, and the role of public authorities. Based on the results of a pilot project, the feasibility of developing ecotourism as one of the most effective forms of sustainable use of the heritage is demonstrated. Key words: natural heritage, Taimyr, Arctic, protected areas, indigenous people, Russian-Dutch expeditions, ecotourism
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