Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Records 1 - 20 / 324

  • help
  • print

    Print search results

  • export
    A maximum of 250 titles can be exported. Please, refine your queryYou can also select and export up to 30 titles via your marked list.
  • alert
    We will mail you new results for this query: q=Faber
Check title to add to marked list
Detection of tomato flowers from greenhouse images using colorspace transformations
Afonso, Manya ; Mencarelli, Angelo ; Polder, Gerrit ; Wehrens, Ron ; Lensink, Dick ; Faber, Nanne - \ 2019
In: Progress in Artificial Intelligence. - Springer Verlag (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) LNAI 11804) - ISBN 9783030302405 - p. 146 - 155.
Computer vision in agriculture - Flower detection - Phenotyping

In this paper we propose an image analysis method for detecting and counting tomato flowers from images taken in a greenhouse. Detecting and locating flowers is useful information for tomato growers and breeders, for phenotyping, yield prediction, and for automating procedures such as pollination and spraying. Since the tomato flowers are yellow, we first apply a set of grayscale transformations in which yellow regions stand out, and then threshold and combine them by a logical binary AND operation. Using more than one transform reduces the possibility of spurious detections due to non-flower regions of the image appearing yellow due to illumination conditions. Connected regions larger than a certain threshold are selected as instances belonging to the class flower. Experimental results over images acquired in a greenhouse using a Realsense camera show that this approach could detect flowers with a recall of 0.79 and precision of 0.77, which are comparable to the values reported in literature with higher resolution cameras closer to the flowers being imaged.

Verkenning kennisbehoeftes van agrariërs t.a.v. natuurinclusieve landbouw en het reeds bestaande aanbod van deze kennis : waar is de match, de mismatch en hoe die te overbruggen
Cuperus, Fogelina ; Smit, Elsbeth ; Faber, Jelle ; Casu, Flavia ; Schütt, Jeroen ; Rooij, Sabine van; Doorn, Anne van; Hondebrink, Merel ; Wagenaar, Jan Paul ; Sloot, Peter - \ 2019
Lelystad : Stichting Wageningen Research, Wageningen Plant Research, Business unit Open Teelten (Rapport / Stichting Wageningen Research, Wageningen Plant Research, Business unit Open Teelten WPR-797) - 44
Logistiek in een Circulaire Economie
Akkerman, Renzo ; Beames, A.G. ; Faber, Coen ; Heideveld, Antoine ; Have, Carien van der; Dijkstra, Aranka - \ 2019
Het Groene Brein - 60
biobased economy - logistics - netherlands - supply chain management
Earthworm communities in arable land : effects of crop residue management and field margins
Teixeira de Aguiar Frazão, Joana Frederica - \ 2019
Wageningen University. Promotor(en): L. Brussaard, co-promotor(en): R.G.M. de Goede; J.H. Faber; M.M. Pulleman. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463439312 - 212
Responses of earthworm communities to crop residue management after inoculation of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758)
Frazão, Joana ; Goede, Ron G.M. de; Salánki, Tamás E. ; Brussaard, Lijbert ; Faber, Jack H. ; Hedde, Mickaël ; Pulleman, Mirjam M. - \ 2019
Applied Soil Ecology 142 (2019). - ISSN 0929-1393 - p. 177 - 188.
Arable field - Community weighted mean - Crop residue availability - Rao's quadratic entropy - Tillage - Trait-based approach

Earthworms are important for soil functioning in arable cropping systems and earthworm species differ in their response to soil tillage and crop residue management. Lumbricus terrestris (Linnaeus, 1758) are rare in intensively tilled arable fields. In two parallel field trials with either non-inversion (NIT) or conventional tillage (CT), we investigated the feasibility of inoculating L. terrestris under different crop residue management (amounts and placement). Simultaneously, we monitored the response of the existing earthworm communities to L. terrestris inoculation and to crop residue treatments in terms of earthworm density, species diversity and composition, ecological groups and functional diversity. L. terrestris densities were not affected by residue management. We were not able to infer effects of the inoculation on the existing earthworm communities since L. terrestris also colonized non-inoculated plots. In NIT and two years after trial establishment, the overall native earthworm density was 1.4 and 1.6 times higher, and the epigeic density 2.5 times higher, in treatments with highest residue application (S 100 ) compared to 25% (S 25 ) or no (S 0 ) crop residues, respectively. Residue management did not affect earthworm species composition, nor the functional trait diversity and composition, except for an increase of the community weighted means of bifide typhlosolis in S 0 compared to S 100 . In CT, however, crop residues did have a strong effect on species composition, ecological groups and functional traits. Without crop residues (S 0 ), epigeic density was respectively 20 and 30% lower than with crop residues placed on the soil surface (S 100 ) or incorporated (I 100 ). Community composition was clearly affected by crop residues. Trait diversity was 2.6 to 3 times larger when crop residues were provided, irrespective of placement. Crop residues in CT also resulted in heavier earthworms and in a shift in the community towards species with a thicker epidermis and cuticle, a feather typhlosolis shape, and a higher average cocoon production rate. We conclude that earthworm communities under conventional tillage respond more strongly to the amount of crop residue than to its placement. Under non-inversion tillage, crop residue amounts affected earthworm communities, but to a smaller degree than under conventional tillage.

Towards valuation of biodiversity in agricultural soils : A case for earthworms
Plaas, Elke ; Meyer-Wolfarth, Friederike ; Banse, Martin ; Bengtsson, Jan ; Bergmann, Holger ; Faber, Jack ; Potthoff, Martin ; Runge, Tania ; Schrader, Stefan ; Taylor, Astrid - \ 2019
Ecological Economics 159 (2019). - ISSN 0921-8009 - p. 291 - 300.
Economic value - Ecosystem engineers - Ecosystem services - Soil biodiversity - Soil management practices - Sustainability

Soil biodiversity is deteriorating in Europe due to an on-going intensification of agriculture, climate change and food production supporting measures of the European Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). Nevertheless, the CAP tries to take biodiversity into account via proposing a range of agri-environmental measures. These ES contribute to food security, climate change mitigation, water retention and plant biomass growth. Healthy soils also help to prevent erosion, desertification, and landslides and to stabilise crop yields. The provision of ES by soil biota is a result of their impact on soil processes in interaction with soil conditions as well as soil management practices of the farmers such as tillage or crop rotations. Some taxa amongst soil biota play key roles in regulating soil processes. With respect to biocontrol of soil-borne pests, the earthworm species Lumbricus terrestris is known to play an important role in suppressing toxigenic plant pathogens, such as Fusarium culmorum and its mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON). We highlight the importance of earthworms for pest control to conceptualise and show how farmers’ management practices influence soil ecosystem services and outline how this can be examined in a socio-ecological context by providing a concrete example of an economical evaluation of ES provided by earthworms.

Priorities and opportunities in the application of the ecosystem services concept in risk assessment for chemicals in the environment
Faber, J.H. ; Marshall, Stuart ; Brink, P.J. van den; Maltby, Lorraine - \ 2019
Science of the Total Environment 651 (2019). - ISSN 0048-9697 - p. 1067 - 1077.
The ecosystem services approach has gained broad interest in regulatory and policy circles for use in ecological risk assessment. Whilst identifying several challenges, scientific experts from European regulatory authorities,
the chemical industry and academia considered the approach applicable to all chemical sectors and potentially contributing to greater ecological relevance for setting and assessing environmental protection goals compared to current European regulatory frameworks for chemicals. These challengeswere addressed in workshops to develop a common understanding across stakeholders on how the ecosystem services concept might be used in chemical risk assessment and what would need to be done to implement it. This paper describes the consensus
outcome of those discussions. Knowledge gaps and research needs were identified and prioritised, exploring the use of novel approaches from ecology, ecotoxicology and ecological modelling. Where applicable, distinction is
made between prospective and retrospective ecological risk assessment. For prospective risk assessment the development of environmental scenarios accounting for chemical exposure and ecological conditions was designated
as a top priority. For retrospective risk assessment the top priority research need was development of reference conditions for key ecosystem services and guidance for their derivation. Both prospective and retrospective
risk assessment would benefit from guidance on the taxa and measurement endpoints relevant to specific ecosystem services and from improved understanding of the relationships between measurement endpoints
fromstandard toxicity tests and the ecosystemservices of interest (i.e. assessment endpoints). The development of mechanistic models, which could serve as ecological production functions, was identified as a priority.
A conceptual framework for future chemical risk assessment based on an ecosystem services approach is presented.
presented.
©
Levende bodem: de basis voor ons leven
Faber, J.H. - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research
”De bodem is het regenwoud van de armen” Hiermee verwoordt de Schotse bioloog M.B. Usher het perfect: je hoeft niet ver te reizen om een grote verscheidenheid aan levende organismen te ontdekken op een klein oppervlak. Als je gewoon een blik onder je voeten werpt, kan dat je stoutste verwachtingen overtreffen. In de grond wemelt het namelijk van het leven. Behalve af en toe een regenworm of pissebed zie je daar normaal gesproken weinig van, aangezien veel bodemdieren slechts enkele millimeters groot zijn en het merendeel nog veel kleiner. Om micro-organismen te bekijken, heb je een microscoop nodig. Een handvol vruchtbare grond bevat echter duizenden soorten, miljarden bacteriën en meters schimmeldraden. Een kleine veertig jaar nadat het bovenstaande citaat werd opgeschreven, is het nog relevanter dan toen, aangezien de bodemkwaliteit over de hele wereld achteruit holt. Dit leidt tot wereldwijde problemen op het gebied van voedselveiligheid, klimaatverandering en -aanpassingsvermogen, waterkwaliteit en bodembiodiversiteit, en vormt zo een bedreiging voor de kwaliteit van ons leven en onze middelen van bestaan.
Removal of organic compounds from shale gas flowback water
Butkovskyi, A. ; Faber, Ann-Hélène ; Wang, Yue ; Grolle, K.C.F. ; Hofman-Caris, Roberta ; Bruning, H. ; Wezel, Annemarie P. van; Rijnaarts, H.H.M. - \ 2018
Water Research 138 (2018). - ISSN 0043-1354 - p. 47 - 55.
Shale gas - Hydraulic fracturing - Flowback water - Dissolved organic carbon; - Aerobic degradation
Ozonation, sorption to granular activated carbon and aerobic degradation were compared as potential treatment methods for removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fractions and selected organic compounds from shale gas flowback water after pre-treatment in dissolved air flotation unit. Flowback water was characterised by high chemical oxygen demand and DOC. Low molecular weight (LMW) acids and neutral compounds were the most abundant organic fractions, corresponding to 47% and 35% of DOC respectively. Ozonation did not change distribution of organic carbon fractions and concentrations of detected individual organic compounds significantly. Sorption to activated carbon targeted removal of individual organic compounds with molecular weight >115 Da, whereas LMW compounds remained largely unaffected. Aerobic degradation was responsible for removal of LMW compounds and partial ammonium removal, whereas formation of intermediates with molecular weight of 200–350 Da was observed. Combination of aerobic degradation for LMW organics removal with adsorption to activated carbon for removal of non-biodegradable organics is proposed to be implemented between pre-treatment (dissolved air floatation) and desalination (thermal or membrane desalination) steps.
ES1406 COST Action: Soil fauna: Key to Soil Organic Matter Dynamics and Fertility. How far have we got?
Jimenez, Juan Jose ; Filser, Juliane ; Barot, S. ; Berg, Matty ; Iglesias Briones, Maria ; Butt, Kevin ; Curiel-Yuste, Jorge ; Deckmyn, Gaby ; Domene, Xavier ; Faber, J.H. ; Frey, B. ; Frossard, Aline ; Frouz, J. ; Grebenc, T. ; Guggenberger, G. ; Hackenberger, Davorka ; Iamandei, Maria ; Jones, D. ; Joschko, Monika ; Krogh, Paul Henning ; team, Keysom - \ 2018
Geophysical Research Abstracts 20 (2018). - ISSN 1029-7006
Soil organic matter (SOM) is key to soil fertility, climate change mitigation, combatting land degradation, and the conservation of above-and below-ground biodiversity and associated ecosystem services like decomposition, nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, detoxification and maintenance of soil physico-chemical properties. SOM dynamics represent the balance between the input of plant material (residues, root-derived materials) and the output through decomposition (OM mineralization) by organisms, erosion and leaching. Approximately 20% of global CO 2 emissions, one third of global CH4 emissions and two thirds of N2O emissions originate from soils. In many soils, most of the macro-aggregate structure is formed by the activities of soil invertebrates and roots, with important consequences for soil organic matter dynamics, carbon sequestration and water infiltration at several spatial and temporal scales. Current models of SOM dynamics are defined in terms of plant residues input and microbial decomposition, overlooking the important contribution of soil fauna. The composition and activity of soil fauna greatly vary with respect to climate and land use. SOM modelling has thus far largely ignored soil fauna due to various reasons: i) hardly existing communication between [C flow centered] biogeochemistry and [organism-centered] soil ecology, ii) lack of [awareness of] data on soil animals (both in the field and from laboratory experiments) and, iii) two different visions by soil ecologists: foodweb vs. self-organization. An international interdisciplinary approach (COST Action ES1406) is the proper platform for both experimentalists and modellers to discuss and provide solutions. This Action has fostered networking and collaboration for improved SOM models by implementing the role of the soil fauna as a basis for sustainable soil management. Key challenges in SOM management, soil fauna and modelling will be addressed and how far have we got thus far to meet the objectives of this Action.

Living Soil: basis for our life
Faber, J.H. ; Bloem, J. ; Goede, R.G.M. de - \ 2018
Wageningen :
”The soil is the poor man’s tropical rain forest.” These words by the Scottish biologist M.B. Usher are spot on: one does not have to travel far to discover a wide diversity of life forms on a small area. Instead, a look under one’s feet may surpass the stoutest expectations, as soils are teeming with life. Apart from the occasional earthworm or woodlouse, one normally will see little of all that: many soil animals are just a few millimetres in size, the majority is even much smaller. To observe micro-organisms, one needs a microscope. A handful of fertile soil however contains thousands of species, billions of bacteria and meters of fungal hyphae. Nowadays, the above quote is even more relevant than when it was written around 1980, since soils have been deteriorating rapidly worldwide. This threatens the quality of our lives and livelihood by posing global challenges to food safety, climate change and adaptability, water quality and soil biodiversity.
Applying soil health indicators to encourage sustainable soil use : The transition from scientific study to practical application
Griffiths, Bryan S. ; Faber, Jack ; Bloem, Jaap - \ 2018
Sustainability 10 (2018)9. - ISSN 2071-1050
Earthworms - Ecosystem services - Monitoring - Soil food web - Water infiltration

The sustainable management of land for agricultural production has at its core a healthy soil, because this reduces the quantity of external inputs, reduces losses of nutrients to the environment, maximises the number of days when the soil can be worked, and has a pore structure that maximises both the retention of water in dry weather and drainage of water in wet weather. Soil health encompasses the physical, chemical, and biological features, but the use of biological indicators is the least well advanced. Sustainability also implies the balanced provision of ecosystem services, which can be more difficult to measure than single indicators. We describe how the key components of the soil food web contribute to a healthy soil and give an overview of the increasing number of scientific studies that have examined the use of biological indicators. A case study is made of the ecosystem service of water infiltration, which is quite an undertaking to measure directly, but which can be inferred from earthworm abundance and biodiversity which is relatively easy to measure. This highlights the difficulty of putting any monitoring scheme into practice and we finish by providing the considerations in starting a new soil health monitoring service in the UK and in maintaining biological monitoring in The Netherlands.

DNA-onderzoek
Faber, Zwanet ; Oldenbroek, J.K. ; Schurink, A. - \ 2018
De Blaarkopper 19 (2018)1. - p. 20 - 20.
Groei en productie van zwarte els in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Copini, P. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-10) - 47
In the Netherlands growth and yield research on black alder was done on a limited scale from 1965 to 1990. This regards two studies by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute; together with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, this comprises a dataset of 14 plots with 59 recordings. In addition, the information from 518 stands of the Fourth National Forest Inventory was used. For the development of top height htop with age t Jansen’s et al. polymorphic model with site index h50 and four additional parameters fitted best. The diameter at a height of 7 m (d7) was estimated from data of the Fourth National Forest Inven-tory. The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was described with a model of Jansen et al., a power function in htop and the estimated value for d7. From a stand height of 7 m upwards, the basal area increment (iG) was also described by Jansen’s et al. model based on a power function with t, year of recording (yor), and the stand density of Hart (S %). For S% > 15.7 the basal area increment decreases non-linear with increasing S %. The model contains a correction factor for yor, although this was not significant, as the year of recording (yor), turned out to be not significant. The effect of thinning on the diameter after thinning was modelled with the La Bastide-Faber model. The models were used to construct a yield table with five site classes and one thinning intensity.
Groei en productie van ruwe berk in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-13) - 41
In the Netherlands growth and yield research on silver birch was done from 1982 to 1994. This includes studies by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute and by Wageningen University. To-gether with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, this comprises a dataset of 43 plots with 132 recordings. For the development of top height htop with age t Cieszewski’s polymorphic model with site index h50 and three additional parameters fitted best.The diameter at a height of 7 m (d7) was estimated with the plot data and with the data of the Fourth National Forest Inventory, and the average of both estimates was chosen. The diameter develop-ment up to stand height of 7 m was described with a model of Jansen et al., a power function in htop and the estimated value for d7. From a stand height of 7 m upwards, the basal area increment (iG) was also described by Jansen’s et al. model based on a power function with h50, t, year of recording (yor), and the stand density of Hart (S %). For S% > 19.5 the basal area increment decreases non-lin-ear with increasing S %. The model contains a correction factor for yor, although this was not signifi-cant, as the year of recording (yor), turned out to be not significant. The effect of thinning on the di-ameter after thinning was modelled with the La Bastide-Faber model.The models were used to construct a yield table with five site classes and one thinning intensity.
Groei en productie van gewone esdoorn in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-12) - 41
In the Netherlands growth and yield research on sycamore was done from 1976 to 2001. This includes studies by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute and by Wageningen University. To-gether with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, this comprises a dataset of 32 plots with 113 recordings. For the development of top height htop with age t Cieszewski’s polymorphic model with site index h50 and three additional parameters fitted best.The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was described with a model of Jansen et al., a power function in htop and initial spacing (N0). From a stand height of 7 m upwards, the basal area in-crement (iG) was described by Jansen’s et al. model based on a power function with htop, t, year of re-cording (yor), and the stand density of Hart (S %). For S% > 16.3 the basal area increment decreases non-linearly with increasing %. The model contains a correction factor for yor, although this was not significant, as the year of recording (yor), turned out to be not significant. The effect of thinning on the diameter after thinning was modelled with the La Bastide-Faber model.The models were used to construct a yield table with five site classes and one thinning intensity.
Groei en productie van es in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Goudzwaard, L. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-11) - 43
In the Netherlands growth and yield research on ash was done from 1949 to 1988. This in-cludes studies by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute and by Wageningen University. Together with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, all this comprises a da-taset of 41 plots with 150 recordings. For the development of top height htop with age t, Cieszewski’s polymorphic model with site index h50 and three additional parameters fitted best.The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was described with a linear function in htop and tree distance. From a stand height of 7 m and up, the basal area increment (iG) was described by Jan-sen’s et al. model based on a power function with h50, htop, t, year of recording (yor), and the stand density of Hart (S %). For S% > 16.7 the basal area increment strongly decreases non-linearly with in-creasing %. The model contains a correction factor for yor, but this was not significant, nor was htop. The effect of thinning on the diameter after thinning was modelled with a modified La Bastide-Faber model. The models were used to construct yield tables for with five site classes and one thinning in-tensity.
Groei en productie van Amerikaanse eik in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-9) - 41
In the Netherlands growth and yield research on red oak was done from 1949 to 1988. This includes studies by Becking and by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute. Together with the perma-nent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, all this comprises a dataset of 58 plots with 306 recordings. For the development of top height htop with age t, Jansen & Hildebrand’s poly-morphic model with site index h70 and three additional parameters fitted best.The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was described with a linear function in htop and initial density (N0). From a stand height of 7 m and up, the basal area increment (iG) was described by Jansen’s et al. model based on a power function with htop, t, year of recording (yor), and the stand density index of Hart (S %). For S% > 19.1 the basal area increment drops strongly non-linear with in-creasing S%. The model contains a correction factor for yor, which was not significant. The effect of thinning on the diameter after thinning, was modelled with a modified La Bastide-Faber model. The model was used to construct yield tables for with five site classes and one thinning intensity
Groei en productie van Oostenrijkse den in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-7) - 96
In the Netherlands, growth and yield research on Austrian pine was done from 1925 to 1990. This include studies by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute. Together with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, all this comprises a dataset of 117 plots with 486 recordings. For the development of top height htop over age (t), Jansen & Hildebrand’s model with asymptote and 3 additional parameters fitted best. As site index, top height at 50 year (h50) was chosen. The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was best described with a power func-tion based on htop, the density after refinements (NR), and h50. From a stand height of 7 m and up, the basal area increment (iG) was best described by a power function based on htop, t, and the stand den-sity index of Hart (S%). For S % > 28.7 the basal area increment drops with increasing S %. The effect of thinning on diameter after thinning was modelled with a modified La Bastide-Faber model. With all models together, a stand projection model was constructed, which follows the measured stand development reasonably well. The model was used to construct yield tables with seven site classes and six thinning intensities.
Groei en productie van Corsicaanse den in Nederland
Jansen, J.J. ; Oosterbaan, A. ; Mohren, G.M.J. ; Ouden, J. den - \ 2018
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research (FEM Groei en Productie rapport 2018-6) - 109
In the Netherlands, growth and yield research on Corsican pine was done from 1925 to 1990. This includes studies by Becking and by the Dorschkamp/IBN research institute. Together with the permanent sample plots from the timber prognosis system HOSP, all this comprises a dataset of 193 plots with 869 recordings. For the development of top height htop over age (t), Jansen & Hilde-brand’s model with asymptote and 3 additional parameters fitted best. As site index, top height at 50 year (h50) was chosen. The diameter development up to stand height of 7 m was best described with a Gompertz function based on htop, the density after refinements (NR), and h50. From a stand height of 7 m and up, the basal area increment (iG) was best described by a power function based on htop, t, and the stand density index of Hart (S %). For S % > 22.4 the basal area increment drops with increas-ing S %. The year of recording in relation with Brunchorstia dieback was also included in the model. The effect of thinning on diameter after thinning was modelled with a modified La Bastide-Faber model. With all models together, a stand projection model was constructed, which follows the meas-ured stand development reasonably well. The model was used to construct yield tables with seven site classes and six thinning intensities.
Check title to add to marked list
<< previous | next >>

Show 20 50 100 records per page

 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.