Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Fighting Sarcopenia in Ageing European Adults: The Importance of the Amount and Source of Dietary Proteins
    Montiel Rojas, Diego ; Nilsson, Andreas ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Bazzocchi, Alberto ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Berendsen, A.M. ; Madej, Dawid ; Kaluza, Joanna ; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Jennings, Amy ; Fairweather-Tait, Susan ; Battista, Giuseppe ; Capri, Miriam ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Kadi, Fawzi - \ 2020
    Nutrients 12 (2020)12. - ISSN 2072-6643
    While an adequate protein intake is important for the maintenance of muscle mass during ageing, the amount and source of protein necessary for optimal prevention of sarcopenia remains to be determined. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of the amount and source of dietary proteins on sarcopenia risk in a cohort of 65–79-year-old European adults within the frame of the NU-AGE study. A total of 986 participants were included in the analysis. Skeletal muscle index (SMI), assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and handgrip strength (HG) were employed to create a continuous sex-specific sarcopenia risk score (SRS). Total amount together with animal- and plant-derived sources of proteins were obtained from a 7-day food record. Differences in SRS were analysed across groups of total protein intake (<0.8 g/body weight (BW); 0.8–<1.0 g/BW; 1.0–<1.2 g/BW; and ≥1.2 g/BW). The association between SRS and the different sources of protein was assessed using isocaloric substitution models adjusted by demographic, medical, and lifestyle factors. A significant linear dose-response relationship was observed, with a lower SRS linked to higher protein intakes. Based on the isocaloric substitution modelling, a reduced SRS was observed when increasing plant protein to the detriment of animal protein, while holding total protein intake constant. Further, this result remained significant after stratifying the analysis by adherence to different levels of protein intake. Our findings suggest that older adults may benefit from increasing protein intakes above current recommendations. Besides total amount, protein source should be considered when promoting health dietary habits in older adults for the prevention of sarcopenia.
    Associations between Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Gastro-Intestinal Microbiota, Diet, and Cognitive Functioning in Dutch Healthy Older Adults: The NU-AGE Study
    Soest, Annick P.M. Van; Hermes, Gerben D.A. ; Berendsen, Agnes A.M. ; De Rest, Ondine Van; Zoetendal, Erwin G. ; Fuentes, Susana ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. De; Vos, Willem M. De - \ 2020
    Nutrients 12 (2020)11. - ISSN 2072-6643
    Dietary modulation of the gastro-intestinal microbiota is a potential target in improving healthy ageing and age-related functional outcomes, including cognitive decline.We explored the association between diet, gastro-intestinal microbiota and cognition in Dutch healthy older adults of the ‘New dietary strategies addressing the specific needs of the elderly population for healthy
    aging in Europe’ (NU-AGE) study. The microbiota profile of 452 fecal samples from 226 subjects was determined using a 16S ribosomal RNA gene-targeted microarray. Dietary intake was assessed by 7-day food records. Cognitive functioning was measured with an extensive cognitive test battery.
    We observed a dietary and microbial pro- to anti-inflammatory gradient associated with diets richer in animal- or plant-based foods. Fresh fruits, nuts, seeds and peanuts, red and processed meat and grain products were most strongly associated to microbiota composition. Plant-rich diets containing fresh fruits, nuts, seeds and peanuts were positively correlated with alpha-diversity,
    various taxa from the Bacteroidetes phylum and anti-inflammatory species, including those related to Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Eubacterium rectale and E. biforme. Animal product-rich diets associated with pro-inflammatory species, including those related to Ruminococcus gnavus and Collinsella spp..
    Cognition was neither associated with microbiota composition nor alpha-diversity. In conclusion, diets richer in animal- and plant-based foods were related to a pro- and anti-inflammatory microbial profile, while cognition was associated with neither.
    Beneficial Role of Replacing Dietary Saturated Fatty Acids with Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in the Prevention of Sarcopenia: Findings from the NU-AGE Cohort
    Montiel-Rojas, Diego ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Nilsson, Andreas ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Capri, Miriam ; Bazzocchi, Alberto ; Battista, Giuseppe ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. De; Feskens, Edith J.M. ; Berendsen, Agnes A.M. ; Bialecka-Debek, Agata ; Surala, Olga ; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Fairweather-Tait, Susan ; Jennings, Amy ; Capel, Frederic ; Kadi, Fawzi - \ 2020
    Nutrients 12 (2020)10. - ISSN 2072-6643
    Dietary fat subtypes may play an important role in the regulation of muscle mass and function during ageing. The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of isocaloric macronutrient substitutions, including different fat subtypes, on sarcopenia risk in older men and women, while accounting for physical activity (PA) and metabolic risk. A total of 986 participants, aged 65–79 years, completed a 7-day food record and wore an accelerometer for a week. A continuous sex-specific sarcopenia risk score (SRS), including skeletal muscle mass assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and handgrip strength, was derived. The impact of the isocaloric replacement of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) by either mono- (MUFAs) or poly-unsaturated (PUFAs) fatty acids on SRS was determined using regression analysis based on the whole sample and stratified by adherence to a recommended protein intake (1.1 g/BW). Isocaloric reduction of SFAs for the benefit of PUFAs was associated with a lower SRS in the whole population, and in those with a protein intake below 1.1 g/BW, after accounting for age, smoking habits, metabolic disturbances, and adherence to PA guidelines. The present study highlighted the potential of promoting healthy diets with optimised fat subtype distribution in the prevention of sarcopenia in older adults.
    Dietary fibre may mitigate sarcopenia risk: Findings from the NU-AGE cohort of older european adults
    Montiel-Rojas, Diego ; Nilsson, Andreas ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Bazzocchi, Alberto ; Battista, Giuseppe ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. de; Feskens, Edith J.M. ; Berendsen, Agnes ; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Januszko, Olga ; Fairweather-Tait, Susan ; Jennings, Amy ; Nicoletti, Claudio ; Kadi, Fawzi - \ 2020
    Nutrients 12 (2020)4. - ISSN 2072-6643
    C-reactive protein - Exercise - Metabolic syndrome - Muscle mass - Protein intake - Systemic inflammation

    Sarcopenia is characterised by a progressive loss of skeletal muscle mass and physical function as well as related metabolic disturbances. While fibre-rich diets can influence metabolic health outcomes, the impact on skeletal muscle mass and function is yet to be determined, and the moderating effects by physical activity (PA) need to be considered. The aim of the present study was to examine links between fibre intake, skeletal muscle mass and physical function in a cohort of older adults from the NU-AGE study. In 981 older adults (71 ± 4 years, 58% female), physical function was assessed using the short-physical performance battery test and handgrip strength. Skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) was derived using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Dietary fibre intake (FI) was assessed by 7-day food record and PA was objectively determined by accelerometery. General linear models accounting for covariates including PA level, protein intake and metabolic syndrome (MetS) were used. Women above the median FI had significantly higher SMI compared to those below, which remained in fully adjusted models (24.7 ± 0.2% vs. 24.2 ± 0.1%, p = 0.011, η2p = 0.012). In men, the same association was only evident in those without MetS (above median FI: 32.4 ± 0.3% vs. below median FI: 31.3 ± 0.3%, p = 0.005, η2p = 0.035). There was no significant impact of FI on physical function outcomes. The findings from this study suggest a beneficial impact of FI on skeletal muscle mass in older adults. Importantly, this impact is independent of adherence to guidelines for protein intake and PA, which further strengthens the potential role of dietary fibre in preventing sarcopenia. Further experimental work is warranted in order to elucidate the mechanisms underpinning the action of dietary fibre on the regulation of muscle mass.

    Mediterranean diet intervention alters the gut microbiome in older people reducing frailty and improving health status : The NU-AGE 1-year dietary intervention across five European countries
    Ghosh, Tarini Shankar ; Rampelli, Simone ; Jeffery, Ian B. ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Neto, Marta ; Capri, Miriam ; Giampieri, Enrico ; Jennings, Amy ; Candela, Marco ; Turroni, Silvia ; Zoetendal, Erwin G. ; Hermes, Gerben D.A. ; Elodie, Caumon ; Brugere, Corinne Malpuech ; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle ; Berendsen, Agnes M. ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. De; Feskens, Edith J.M. ; Kaluza, Joanna ; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Bielak, Marta Jeruszka ; Comte, Blandine ; Maijo-Ferre, Monica ; Nicoletti, Claudio ; Vos, Willem M. de; Fairweather-Tait, Susan ; Cassidy, Aedin ; Brigidi, Patrizia ; Franceschi, Claudio ; O'Toole, Paul W. - \ 2020
    Gut 69 (2020)7. - ISSN 0017-5749
    ageing - diet - enteric bacterial microflora - inflammation - intestinal bacteria

    Objective: Ageing is accompanied by deterioration of multiple bodily functions and inflammation, which collectively contribute to frailty. We and others have shown that frailty co-varies with alterations in the gut microbiota in a manner accelerated by consumption of a restricted diversity diet. The Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) is associated with health. In the NU-AGE project, we investigated if a 1-year MedDiet intervention could alter the gut microbiota and reduce frailty. Design: We profiled the gut microbiota in 612 non-frail or pre-frail subjects across five European countries (UK, France, Netherlands, Italy and Poland) before and after the administration of a 12-month long MedDiet intervention tailored to elderly subjects (NU-AGE diet). Results: Adherence to the diet was associated with specific microbiome alterations. Taxa enriched by adherence to the diet were positively associated with several markers of lower frailty and improved cognitive function, and negatively associated with inflammatory markers including C-reactive protein and interleukin-17. Analysis of the inferred microbial metabolite profiles indicated that the diet-modulated microbiome change was associated with an increase in short/branch chained fatty acid production and lower production of secondary bile acids, p-cresols, ethanol and carbon dioxide. Microbiome ecosystem network analysis showed that the bacterial taxa that responded positively to the MedDiet intervention occupy keystone interaction positions, whereas frailty-associated taxa are peripheral in the networks. Conclusion: Collectively, our findings support the feasibility of improving the habitual diet to modulate the gut microbiota which in turn has the potential to promote healthier ageing.

    Changing from a Western to a Mediterranean-style diet does not affect iron or selenium status : results of the New Dietary Strategies Addressing the Specific Needs of the Elderly Population for Healthy Aging in Europe (NU-AGE) 1-year randomized clinical trial in elderly Europeans
    Jennings, Amy ; Tang, Jonathan ; Gillings, Rachel ; Perfecto, Antonio ; Dutton, John ; Speakman, Jim ; Fraser, William D. ; Nicoletti, Claudio ; Berendsen, Agnes A.M. ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. de; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Jeruszka-Bielak, Marta ; Caumon, Elodie ; Caille, Aurélie ; Ostan, Rita ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J. - \ 2020
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 111 (2020)1. - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 98 - 109.
    elderly - Europeans - fish - iron - meat - Mediterranean-style diet - randomized controlled trial - selenium

    BACKGROUND: Mediterranean diets limit red meat consumption and increase intakes of high-phytate foods, a combination that could reduce iron status. Conversely, higher intakes of fish, a good source of selenium, could increase selenium status. OBJECTIVES: A 1-y randomized controlled trial [New Dietary Strategies Addressing the Specific Needs of the Elderly Population for Healthy Aging in Europe (NU-AGE)] was carried out in older Europeans to investigate the effects of consuming a Mediterranean-style diet on indices of inflammation and changes in nutritional status. METHODS: Selenium and iron intakes and status biomarkers were measured at baseline and after 1 y in 1294 people aged 65-79 y from 5 European countries (France, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, and the United Kingdom) who had been randomly allocated either to a Mediterranean-style diet or to remain on their habitual, Western diet. RESULTS: Estimated selenium intakes increased significantly with the intervention group (P < 0.01), but were not accompanied by changes in serum selenium concentrations. Iron intakes also increased (P < 0.001), but there was no change in iron status. However, when stratified by study center, there were positive effects of the intervention on iron status for serum ferritin for participants in Italy (P = 0.04) and France (P = 0.04) and on soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) for participants in Poland (P < 0.01). Meat intake decreased and fish intake increased to a greater degree in the intervention group, relative to the controls (P < 0.01 for both), but the overall effects of the intervention on meat and fish intakes were mainly driven by data from Poland and France. Changes in serum selenium in the intervention group were associated with greater changes in serum ferritin (P = 0.01) and body iron (P = 0.01), but not sTfR (P = 0.73); there were no study center × selenium status interactions for the iron biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS: Consuming a Mediterranean-style diet for 1 y had no overall effect on iron or selenium status, although there were positive effects on biomarkers of iron status in some countries. The NU-AGE trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01754012.

    NEOTROPICAL XENARTHRANS: a data set of occurrence of xenarthran species in the Neotropics
    Santos, Paloma Marques ; Bocchiglieri, Adriana ; Chiarello, Adriano Garcia ; Paglia, Adriano Pereira ; Moreira, Adryelle ; Souza, Agnis Cristiane de; Abba, Agustin Manuel ; Paviolo, Agustin ; Gatica, Ailin ; Medeiro, Akyllan Zoppi ; Costa, Alan Nilo ; Gallina, Alberto Gonzalez ; Yanosky, Alberto A. ; Jesus, Alejandro ; Bertassoni, Alessandra ; Rocha, Alessandro ; Bovo, Alex Augusto Abreu ; Bager, Alex ; Mol, Alexandra Cravino ; Martensen, Alexandre Camargo ; Faustino, Alexandre Casagrande ; Lopes, Alexandre Martins Costa ; Percequillo, Alexandre Reis ; Vogliotti, Alexandre ; Keuroghlian, Alexine ; Colina, María Alicia de la; Devlin, Allison L. ; García-Olaechea, Alvaro ; Sánchez, Amadeo ; Srbek-Araujo, Ana Carolina ; Ochoa, Ana Cecilia ; Oliveira, Ana Cristina Mendes ; Lacerda, Ana Cristyna Reis ; Campelo, Ana Kellen Nogueira ; Oliveira Paschoal, Ana Maria de; Costa, Ana Raíssa Cunha ; Meiga, Ana Yoko Ykeuti ; Jesus, Anamélia Souza ; Feijó, Anderson ; Hirsch, André ; Silva, André Luiz Ferreira da; Botelho, André Luis Moura ; Regolin, André Luis ; Lanna, André Monnerat ; Nunes, André Valle ; Kindel, Andreas ; Moraes, Andreia Magro ; Gatti, Andressa ; Noss, Andrew J. ; Nobre, Andrezza Bellotto ; Montanarin, Anelise ; Deffaci, Ângela Camila ; Albuquerque, Anna Carolina Figueiredo de; Oliveira, Anne Karoline de; Mangione, Antonio Marcelo ; Pontes, Antonio Rossano Mendes ; Bertoldi, Ariane Teixeira ; Calouro, Armando Muniz ; Desbiez, Arnaud L.J. ; Fernandes, Arthur ; Ferreguetti, Atilla Colombo ; Silva, Maria Augusta Andrade da; Zimbres, Barbara ; Luciano, Beatriz Fernandes Lima ; Thoisy, Benoit de; Niebuhr, Bernardo Brandão S. ; Papi, Bernardo ; Gómez-Valencia, Bibiana ; Santos, Bráulio A. ; Lima, Breno Campelo ; Oliveira, Bruna Gomes ; Santos, Bruna Silva ; Campos, Bruno Augusto Torres Parahyba ; Leles, Bruno ; Albuquerque França, Bruno Rodrigo de; Lim, Burton ; Oliveira, Caetano Troncoso ; Cantagallo, Camila ; Lara, Camila Clozato ; Lima, Camila Silveira ; Gestich, Carla Cristina ; Melo-Soares, Carla Danielle de; Peres, Carlos A. ; Kasper, Carlos Benhur ; Candia-Gallardo, Carlos ; Angelo, Carlos De; Fragoso, Carlos Eduardo ; Freitas, Carlos Henrique de; Salvador, Carlos Henrique ; Brocardo, Carlos R. ; Melo, Carolina Depolito ; Leuchtenberger, Caroline ; Braga, Caryne ; Sánchez-Lalinde, Catalina ; Bueno, Cecília ; Luna, Cecília Licarião ; Rojano, Cesar ; Hurtado, Cindy Meliza ; Santos, Cinthya Chiva dos; Tellaeche, Cintia ; Rosa, Clarissa ; Campos, Claudia Bueno de; Silva, Cláudia Regina ; Kanda, Claudia Zukeran ; Jenkins, Clinton N. ; McDonough, Colleen ; Trinca, Cristiano Trapé ; Cunha, Cristina Jaques da; Widmer, Cynthia Elisa ; Santos, Cyntia ; Buscariol, Daiane ; Carreira, Daiane Cristina ; Carvalho, Danianderson Rodrigues ; Silva Ferraz, Daniel da; Casali, Daniel ; Thornton, Daniel ; Vasconcellos, Daniela Rodrigues ; Barcelos, Daniele ; Brown, Danielle ; Ramos, Daniella Leal ; Moreira, Danielle Oliveira ; Yogui, Débora Regina ; Faria, Deborah ; Sana, Denis Alessio ; Mattia, Denise Lidoro de; Henz, Denison José ; Friedeberg, Diana B. ; Carvalho, Diana Letícia Kruger Pacheco ; Astúa, Diego ; Queirolo, Diego ; Varela, Diego M. ; Eaton, Donald P. ; Dias, Douglas Matos ; Rivadeneira, Edgar Federico ; Rocha, Ednaldo Cândido ; Abreu-Júnior, Edson Fiedler de; Carrano, Eduardo ; Santos, Eduardo Marques ; Setz, Eleonore Zulnara Freire ; Carvalho, Elildo Alves Ribeiro ; Almeida Chiquito, Elisandra de; Matos Cardoso, Elizandra de; Mendonça, Eloisa Neves ; Bastiani, Elvira D'; Vieira, Emerson M. ; Ramalho, Emiliano Esterci ; Guijosa-Guadarrama, Emiliano ; González, Enrique ; Maggiorini, Erica Vanessa ; Fischer, Erich ; Aguiar, Erick Francisco ; Castro, Érika Paula ; Peña-Cuéllar, Erika de la; Viveiros de Castro, Ernesto B. ; Brítez, Evelyn Beatriz ; Vanderhoeven, Ezequiel Andres ; Pedó, Ezequiel ; Rocha, Fabiana Lopes ; Girardi, Fabiane ; Oliveira Roque, Fabio de; Mazim, Fábio Dias ; Barros, Fabio Monteiro de; Martello, Felipe ; Fantacini, Felipe Moreli ; Pedrosa, Felipe ; Peters, Felipe Bortolotto ; Abra, Fernanda Delborgo ; Azevedo, Fernanda Cavalcanti de; Silva Santos, Fernanda da; Silva, Fernanda Guedes da; Teixeira, Fernanda Zimmermann ; Perini, Fernando Araujo ; Passos, Fernando C. ; Carvalho, Fernando ; Azevedo, Fernando Cesar Cascelli de; Pinho, Fernando Ferreira de; Gonçalves, Fernando ; Lima, Fernando ; Contreras-Moreno, Fernando M. ; Pedroni, Fernando ; Tortato, Fernando Rodrigo ; Santos, Filipe Pereira Rego ; Caruso, Flavia ; Tirelli, Flávia Pereira ; Miranda, Flávia Regina ; Rodrigues, Flávio Henrique Guimarães ; Ubaid, Flávio Kulaif ; Palmeira, Francesca Belem Lopes ; Silva, Franciane Almeida da; Grotta-Neto, Francisco ; Souza, Franco Leandro de; Costa, Francys Emanuelle ; Pérez-Garduza, Freddy ; Delsuc, Frédéric ; Lemos, Frederico ; Pinto, Fredy Ramirez ; Boaglio, Gabriel Ivan ; Massocato, Gabriel Fávero ; Preuss, Gabriel ; Hofmann, Gabriel Selbach ; Aguiar, Gabriel Lima ; Oliveira, Gabriela Schuck ; Duarte, Gabriela Teixeira ; Beca, Gabrielle ; Giné, Gastón Andrés Fernandez ; Batista, Graziele Oliveira ; Gil, Guillermo Eduardo ; Gonsioroski, Gustavo ; Secco, Helio ; Medeiros, Hugo Reis ; Coelho, Igor Pfeifer ; Franceschi, Ingridi Camboim ; Bernardi, Itiberê ; Torre, Antonio de la; Zocche, Jairo José ; Seibert, Jardel Brandão ; Faria Falcão, Jéssica Caroline de; Dias, Jéssica Helena Mangueira ; Nodari, Joana Zorzal ; Oliveira, João Alves ; Giovanelli, João Gabriel Ribeiro ; Favoretti, João Paulo Pandini ; Polisar, John ; Sponchiado, Jonas ; Cherem, Jorge José ; Ramírez, José Fernando Moreira ; Toledo, José Julio de; Duarte, José Maurício Barbanti ; Matos, Jose Roberto de; Arrabal, Juan Pablo ; Faria Oshima, Júlia Emi de; Ribeiro, Juliana Fernandes ; Bogoni, Juliano André ; Pacheco, Julio Javier Chacón ; Schuchmann, Karl L. ; Ferraz, Katia M.P.M.B. ; Santos Everton, Laís dos; Bailey, Larissa L. ; Gonçalves, Larissa Oliveira ; Cullen, Laury ; Andrade, Layla Reis de; Trevelin, Leonardo Carreira ; Bonjorne, Lilian ; Almeida Rodrigues, Livia de; Leuzinger, Lucas ; Perillo, Lucas Neves ; Araújo, Luciana Souza ; Hufnagel, Ludmila ; Ribeiro, Ludmilla Oliveira ; Bernardo, Luis Renato Rezende ; Oliveira-Santos, Luiz Gustavo Rodrigues ; Varzinczak, Luiz Henrique ; Borges, Luiz Henrique Medeiros ; Guimarães, Luiza Neves ; Möcklinghoff, Lydia ; Oliveira, Marcela Alvares ; Magioli, Marcelo ; Assis Jardim, Márcia Maria de; Oliveira, Márcio Leite de; Tortato, Marcos Adriano ; Dums, Marcos ; Iezzi, Maria Eugenia ; Pereira, Maria João Ramos ; Jorge, Maria Luísa ; Castro Morini, Maria Santina de; Landis, Mariana Bueno ; Xavier, Mariana Sampaio ; Barros, Marília A.S. ; Silva, Marina Lima da; Rivero, Marina ; Zanin, Marina ; Marques, Marinêz Isaac ; Alves, Mario Henrique ; Bitetti, Mario S. Di; Alvarez, Martín R. ; Graipel, Maurício Eduardo ; Godoi, Mauricio Neves ; Benedetti, Maximiliano Augusto ; Beltrão, Mayara Guimarães ; Monteiro, Miguel Coutinho Moretta ; Paula, Milton José de; Perilli, Miriam Lucia Lages ; Silva, Murillo Prado da; Villar, Nacho ; Albuquerque, Natasha Moraes De; Canassa, Nathália F. ; Filho, Newton Mota ; Rosa Oliveira, Nicole da; Pasqualotto, Nielson ; Cáceres, Nilton Carlos ; Attias, Nina ; Favarini, Marina Ochoa ; Ribeiro, Otávio Santi ; Gonçalves, Pablo Rodrigues ; Rocha, Patrício Adriano da; Condé, Paula Alves ; Akkawi, Paula ; Cruz, Paula ; Lira, Paula Koeler ; Ferreira, Paula Modenesi ; Arroyo-Gerala, Paulina ; Hartmann, Paulo Afonso ; Tarso Zuquim Antas, Paulo de; Marinho, Paulo Henrique ; Faria Peres, Pedro Henrique de; Peña-Mondragón, Juan Luis ; Lombardi, Pryscilla Moura ; Souza Laurindo, Rafael de; Alves, Rafael Souza Cruz ; Grangeiro, Raissa Danielle Praxedes ; Silva, Ramon Lima ; Beltrão-Mendes, Raone ; Bonikowski, Renata Twardowsky Ramalho ; Reppucci, Juan ; Arrais, Ricardo Corassa ; Sampaio, Ricardo ; Sartorello, Ricardo ; Bovendorp, Ricardo Siqueira ; McNab, Roan ; Hack, Robson Odeli Espíndola ; Magalhães, Rodolfo Assis ; Araújo, Rodrigo Costa ; Almeida Nobre, Rodrigo de; Pérez, Rodrigo Raúl León ; Massara, Rodrigo Lima ; Paula, Rogério Cunha de; Anleu, Rony García ; Marques, Rosane Vieira ; Dornas, Rubem ; Rolim, Samir Gonçalves ; Cavalcanti, Sandra M.C. ; Lima, Saulo Ramos ; Ballari, Sebastián A. ; Santamaría, Silvia Benito ; Silva, Sofia Marques ; Age, Stefani Gabrieli ; Godim, Tayana ; Sobral-Souza, Thadeu ; Maccarini, Thiago Bernardes ; Rodrigues, Thiago Ferreira ; Piovezan, Ubiratan ; Cunha Tavares, Valéria da; Quiroga, Verónica Andrea ; Krepschi, Victor Gasperotto ; Filho, Vilmar Picinatto ; Galvão Bastazini, Vinícius Augusto ; Oliveira Gasparotto, Vinicius Peron de; Orsini, Vinicius Santana ; Guedes Layme, Viviane Maria ; Hannibal, Wellington ; Dáttilo, Wesley ; Carvalho, William Douglas de; Loughry, William James ; Blanco, Yamil Edgardo Di; Núñez-Regueiro, Mauricio M. ; Giubbina, Marina Furlan ; Passamani, Marcelo ; Alagão Querido, Luciano Carramaschi de; Costa Toledo, Gustavo Alvez da; Ribeiro, Igor Kintopp ; Quintilham, Lucas ; Bustos, Soledad de; Maza, Javier de la; Lima Neto, Jorge Ferreira ; Kossel de Andrade Silva, Katyucha Von; Sartorello, Leonardo ; Rampim, Lilian Elaine ; Marás, Gustavo A. ; Camino, Micaela ; Freitas-Junior, Mozart ; Perovic, Pablo Gaston ; Paolino, Roberta Montanheiro ; Ferreira, Scarlat Dalva ; Towns, Valeria ; Esperandio, Isadora Beraldi ; Aximoff, Izar ; Beduschi, Júlia ; Guenther, Mariana ; Cassia Bianchi, Rita de; Keuroghlian-Eaton, Sean ; Mendes, Sérgio Lucena ; Fatima Cunha, Lerrane de; Cirignoli, Sebastián ; Ciocheti, Giordano ; Prado, Helena Alves do; Fernandes-Ferreira, Hugo ; Mendes de Sena, Liana Mara ; Yamane, Marcelo Hideki ; Brennand, Pamella G.G. ; Silva, Rayana Diniz da; Escobar, Santiago ; Endo, Whaldener ; Hurtado, Rafael Reyna ; Gontijo, Nila Rássia Costa ; Marsh, Laura K. ; Severo, Magnus Machado ; Pardo, Julia Martinez ; Costa, Sebastián Andrés ; Melo, Geruza Leal ; Santana, Gindomar Gomes ; Miranda Mourão, Guilherme de; Gaspari, Gustavo Gabirele ; Duarte, Herbert ; Cabral, Hugo ; Silva, Leonardo Henrique da; Mendonça, Luana ; Barbosa, Lucas Lobo ; Santos, Manuela Vieira dos; Moraes, Marcela Figuerêdo Duarte ; Gordo, Marcelo ; Versiani, Natalia Fraguas ; Cantero, Nicolás ; Pays, Olivier ; Guedes, Patrícia Gonçalves ; Colas-Rosas, Paul François ; Ribeiro, Paulo ; Renaud, Pierre Cyril ; Hoogesteijn, Rafael Jan ; Ayala, Rodrigo ; Cunha, Rogério Grassetto Teixeira da; Schaub, Roxane ; Laurito, Sabrina ; Betkowski, Samuel Eurich ; Cortez, Sara ; Silva, Shirley Seixas Pereira ; Oliveira, Tadeu Gomes de; Spironello, Wilson Roberto ; Gengler, Nicholas ; Hidalgo, Mircea Mihart ; Juárez, Rugieri ; Iglesias, Jesús A. ; Anacleto, Teresa Cristina ; Souza Fialho, Marcos de; Cavicchioli, Guilherme ; Beccato, Maria Angélica Barbosa ; Silva, Marcelo da; Neto, Omar Correia ; Lopes, Karine Galisteo Diemer ; Godoy, Leandro Perez ; Luiz, Micheli Ribeiro ; Rojas Bonzi, Viviana B. ; Ferreira, Guilherme Braga ; Oliveira, Marcelo Juliano Rabelo ; Hinojosa, Javier ; Oliveira, Luiz Flamarion Barbosa de; Nagy-Reis, Mariana Baldy ; Ramirez, Sixto Fernández ; Concone, Henrique Villas Boas ; Mourthe, Italo ; Martínez-Lanfranco, Juan A. ; Zanoni, Juliani Bruna ; Moreira, Tainah Cruz ; Guarderas, Zoila Vega ; Bazilio, Sérgio ; Cervini, Marcelo ; Pinheiro, Marcell Soares ; Morato, Ronaldo Gonçalves ; Peroni, Nivaldo ; Trigo, Tatiane Campos ; Machado, Ricardo Bomfim ; Gaspari, Fernando ; Koenemann, Joceleia G. ; Rudolf, Juan Carlos ; Benchimol, Maíra ; Vieira, Marcus Vinícius ; Retta, Lucía Martínez ; Santiago, Pablo Gerardo Fernández ; Ciccia, Paula Gonzalez ; Estrela, Pedro Cordeiro ; Carvalho, Santiago ; Esbérard, Carlos Eduardo Lustosa ; Cruz, Yaribeth Bravata de la; Castro-Prieto, Jessica ; Braga, Ricardo Miranda ; Cartes, Jose Luis ; Andrade-Núñez, María José ; Denkiewicz, Natalia Mariana ; Falconi, Nereyda ; Pezzuti, Juarez Carlos Brito ; Castillo Cordero, Hugo Fernando del; Sousa, Luziene Conceição de; Gaspari Júnior, Roque Lázaro de; Santos-Filho, Manoel ; Almeida, Josué Santos ; Thompson, Jeffrey J. ; Santos, Juliana Silveira dos; Pereira-Ribeiro, Juliane ; Burs, Kathrin ; Silva, Kena Ferrari Moreira da; Velilla, Marianela ; Silva, Marina Xavier da; Sancha, Noé U. de la; Pinheiro, Paula Fabiana ; Castilho, Pedro Volkmer de; Bercê, William ; Assis, Julia Camara ; Tonetti, Vinicius Rodrigues ; Alves-Eigenheer, Milene ; Chinem, Simonne ; Honda, Laura K. ; Godoy Bergallo, Helena de; Alberici, Vinicius ; Wallace, Robert ; Campos Krauer, Juan Manuel ; Ribeiro, Milton Cezar ; Galetti, Mauro - \ 2019
    Ecology 100 (2019)7. - ISSN 0012-9658
    biodiversity hotspot - cingulata - forest fragmentation - habitat loss - neotropical mammals - neotropical region - pilosa - xenarthra

    Xenarthrans—anteaters, sloths, and armadillos—have essential functions for ecosystem maintenance, such as insect control and nutrient cycling, playing key roles as ecosystem engineers. Because of habitat loss and fragmentation, hunting pressure, and conflicts with domestic dogs, these species have been threatened locally, regionally, or even across their full distribution ranges. The Neotropics harbor 21 species of armadillos, 10 anteaters, and 6 sloths. Our data set includes the families Chlamyphoridae (13), Dasypodidae (7), Myrmecophagidae (3), Bradypodidae (4), and Megalonychidae (2). We have no occurrence data on Dasypus pilosus (Dasypodidae). Regarding Cyclopedidae, until recently, only one species was recognized, but new genetic studies have revealed that the group is represented by seven species. In this data paper, we compiled a total of 42,528 records of 31 species, represented by occurrence and quantitative data, totaling 24,847 unique georeferenced records. The geographic range is from the southern United States, Mexico, and Caribbean countries at the northern portion of the Neotropics, to the austral distribution in Argentina, Paraguay, Chile, and Uruguay. Regarding anteaters, Myrmecophaga tridactyla has the most records (n = 5,941), and Cyclopes sp. have the fewest (n = 240). The armadillo species with the most data is Dasypus novemcinctus (n = 11,588), and the fewest data are recorded for Calyptophractus retusus (n = 33). With regard to sloth species, Bradypus variegatus has the most records (n = 962), and Bradypus pygmaeus has the fewest (n = 12). Our main objective with Neotropical Xenarthrans is to make occurrence and quantitative data available to facilitate more ecological research, particularly if we integrate the xenarthran data with other data sets of Neotropical Series that will become available very soon (i.e., Neotropical Carnivores, Neotropical Invasive Mammals, and Neotropical Hunters and Dogs). Therefore, studies on trophic cascades, hunting pressure, habitat loss, fragmentation effects, species invasion, and climate change effects will be possible with the Neotropical Xenarthrans data set. Please cite this data paper when using its data in publications. We also request that researchers and teachers inform us of how they are using these data

    Mass Spectrometry Data Processing
    Neumann, Steffen ; Yanes, Oscar ; Mumm, Roland ; Franceschi, Pietro - \ 2019
    In: Metabolomics / Wehrens, Ron, Salek, Reza, Chapman and Hall/CRC - ISBN 9781315370583 - p. 73 - 99.
    This chapter focuses on the mass spectrometry data processing workflow. The first step consists of processing the raw MS data, leading to a feature matrix amenable for statistical analysis. The raw MS files contain the list of spectra acquired during the run, and each spectrum contains many pairs. In the field of metabolite fingerprinting, Direct Infusion Mass Spectrometry and Flow Injection Mass Spectrometry can be used to complement chromatography-based MS techniques. To reduce this complexity, several feature detection algorithms have been developed. A feature is characterized by a retention time, an m/z value and an intensity. In microarray data analysis it is relatively straightforward to compare the expression of some genes in one sample against the expression in a second one, because the RNA is hybridized to a particular “known” probe sequence. In case an accurate-mass spectrometer has been used, it is also important to determine the mass accuracy in the measurements.
    Statistics: The Essentials
    Wehrens, H.R.M.J. ; Franceschi, Pietro - \ 2019
    In: Metabolomics: Practical Guide to Design and Analysis / Wehrens, Ron, Salek, Reza, New York : Chapman and Hall - ISBN 9781315370583 - 28 p.
    A basic understanding of statistics is essential in analyzing metabolomics data. In particular, the reasons behind common assumptions made in statistical inference, such as normally distributed data, should be understood. Because of the highly multivariate nature of metabolomics data, multiple-testing issues arise and should be dealt with appropriately. Multivariate analysis and visualization methods are easily applied now that they are commonly available in many software packages, but the interpretation of the results, and in particular the choices of data pretreatment and model selection, are less easily understood. This chapter discusses the basics of these and some other approaches.
    Study Design and Preparation
    Franceschi, Pietro ; Yanes, Oscar ; Wehrens, H.R.M.J. - \ 2019
    In: Metabolomics: Practical Guide to Design and Analysis / Wehrens, Ron, Salek, Reza, New York : Chapman and Hall - ISBN 9781315370583 - 19 p.
    When designing a study there are several important considerations to be taken into account, irrespective of the measurement technology. The most important element is to precisely define the goals of the study. Even though these goals can be quite general, they must be more explicit than just expressing the desire to get to know the system under study. One easy rule of thumb is to think about the conditions under which the experiment can be called a success: “Finally, we are able to understand why this treatment leads to an upregulation of this particular metabolic pathway!” or “We have confirmed our hypothesis that compound X is not present in muscle tissue but is quite abundantly present in liver tissue.” If you are able to define a successful experiment, your goals are testable. The more specific your research questions, the more likely it is that you will find a clear answer, based on your experimental results. The definition of the research question will also direct the choice of the most suitable experimental design and, consequently, will shape the data analysis plan, which is a critical part of metabolomics.
    The Elderly-Nutrient Rich Food Score Is Associated With Biochemical Markers of Nutritional Status in European Older Adults
    Kramer, Charlotte S. ; Szmidt, Maria K. ; Sicinska, Ewa ; Brzozowska, Anna ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. De; Berendsen, Agnes A.M. - \ 2019
    Frontiers in Nutrition 6 (2019). - ISSN 2296-861X
    Background: In order to prevent age-related degenerative diseases in the aging population, their diets should be nutrient dense. For this purpose, the Elderly-Nutrient rich food (E-NRF7.3) score has been developed to assess nutrient density of diets by capturing dietary reference values for older adults. To demonstrate its practical importance such score should be validated against markers of nutritional status and health. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine the association between the E-NRF7.3 score and markers of nutritional status and inflammation. Design: This study was carried out in a sample of the NU-AGE study including 242 Dutch and 210 Polish men and women, aged 65–79 years. Dietary intake was assessed by means of 7-day food records and structured questionnaires collected data on supplement use, lifestyle, and socio-economic information. Baseline measurements included anthropometrics, physical and cognitive function tests, and a fasting venipuncture. E-NRF7.3 scores were calculated to estimate nutrient density of foods and the diet. Associations between the E-NRF7.3 scores and micronutrient status of vitamin D, folate, vitamin B12, homocysteine, and c-reactive protein (CRP) were examined using linear regression analysis while adjusting for confounders. Results: Each one unit increase in E-NRF7.3 score was associated with a 2.2% increase in serum folate in Dutch and 1.6% increase in Polish participants in the fully adjusted models (both p < 0.01). Each one unit increase in E-NRF7.3 was significantly associated with a 1.5% decrease in homocysteine levels in Dutch participants (p < 0.01), whereas, a 0.9% increase in vitamin B12 levels was observed in Polish participants only (p < 0.01). Higher E-NRF7.3 scores were not associated with vitamin D or CRP levels. Adjustment for potential confounders did not substantially alter these results. Discussion: The E-NRF7.3 was developed to reflect dietary intake of relevant nutrients for older adults. Its association with markers of nutritional status could be confirmed for folate (both populations), vitamin B12 (Poland only), and homocysteine (the Netherlands only). There was no association with vitamin D and CRP. To further demonstrate its validity and practical implication, future studies should include a wider range of nutritional status makers, health outcomes, and inflammation markers.
    A Novel Approach to Improve the Estimation of a Diet Adherence Considering Seasonality and Short Term Variability – The NU-AGE Mediterranean Diet Experience
    Giampieri, Enrico ; Ostan, Rita ; Guidarelli, Giulia ; Salvioli, Stefano ; Berendsen, A.M. ; Brzozowska, Anna ; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Jennings, Amy ; Meunier, Nathalie ; Caumon, Elodie ; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J. ; Sicinska, Ewa ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Franceschi, Claudio ; Santoro, Aurelia - \ 2019
    Frontiers in Physiology 10 (2019). - ISSN 1664-042X
    In this work we present a novel statistical approach to improve the assessment of the adherence to a 1-year nutritional intervention within the framework of the NU-AGE project. This was measured with a single adherence score based on 7-days food records, under limitations on the number of observations per subject and time frame of intervention. The results of the NU-AGE dietary intervention were summarized by variations of the NU-AGE index as described in the NU-AGE protocol. Food and nutrient intake of all participants was assessed by means of 7-days food records at recruitment and after 10 to 14 months of intervention (depending on the subject availability). Sixteen food groups and supplementations covering the dietary goals of the NU-AGE diet have been used to estimate the NU-AGE index before and after the intervention. The 7-days food record is a reliable tool to register food intakes, however, as with other tools used to assess lifestyle dietary compliance, it is affected by uncertainty in this estimation due to the possibility that the observed week is not fully representative of the entire intervention period. Also, due to logistic limitations, the effects of seasonality can never be completely removed. These variabilities, if not accounted for in the index estimation, will reduce the statistical power of the analyses. In this work we discuss a method to assess these uncertainties and thus improve the resulting NU-AGE index. The proposed method is based on Hierarchical Bayesian Models. This model explicitly includes country-specific averages of the NU-AGE index, index variation induced by the dietary intervention, and country based seasonality. This information is used to evaluate the NU-AGE index uncertainty and thus to estimate the “real” NU-AGE index for each subject, both before and after the intervention. These corrections reduce the possibility of misinterpreting measurement variability as real information, improving the power of the statistical tests that are performed with the resulting index. The results suggest that this method is able to reduce the short term and seasonal variability of the measured index in the context of multicenter dietary intervention trials. Using this method to estimate seasonality and variability would allow one to obtain better measurements from the subjects of a study, and be able to simplify the scheduling of diet assessments.
    Gender-specific association of body composition with inflammatory and adipose-related markers in healthy elderly Europeans from the NU-AGE study
    Santoro, Aurelia ; Guidarelli, Giulia ; Ostan, Rita ; Giampieri, Enrico ; Fabbri, Cristina ; Bertarelli, Claudia ; Nicoletti, Claudio ; Kadi, Fawzi ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. De; Feskens, Edith ; Berendsen, Agnes ; Brzozowska, Anna ; Januszko, Olga ; Kozlowska, Katarzyna ; Fairweather-Tait, Susan ; Jennings, Amy ; Meunier, Nathalie ; Caumon, Elodie ; Napoli, Alessandro ; Mercatelli, Daniele ; Battista, Giuseppe ; Capri, Miriam ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Bazzocchi, Alberto - \ 2019
    European Radiology 29 (2019)9. - ISSN 0938-7994 - p. 4968 - 4979.
    ObjectivesThe aim of this work was to examine the cross-sectional relationship between body composition (BC) markers for adipose and lean tissue and bone mass, and a wide range of specific inflammatory and adipose-related markers in healthy elderly Europeans. Methods A whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan was made in 1121 healthy (65–79 years) women and men from five European countries of the “New dietary strategies addressing the specific needs of elderly population for a healthy aging in Europe” project (NCT01754012) cohort to measure markers of adipose and lean tissue and bone mass. Pro-inflammatory (IL-6, IL-6Rα, TNF-α, TNF-R1, TNF-R2, pentraxin 3, CRP, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, albumin) and anti-inflammatory (IL-10, TGF-β1) molecules as well as adipose-related markers such as leptin, adiponectin, ghrelin, and resistin were measured by magnetic bead-based multiplex-specific immunoassays and biochemical assays. Results BC characteristics were different in elderly women and men, and more favorable BC markers were associated with a better adipose-related inflammatory profile, with the exception of skeletal muscle mass index. No correlation was found with the body composition markers and circulating levels of some standard pro- and anti-inflammatory markers like IL-6, pentraxin 3, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-6Rα, glycoprotein 130, TNF-α-R1, and TNF-α-R2.Conclusions The association between BC and inflammatory and adipose-related biomarkers is crucial in decoding aging and pathophysiological processes, such as sarcopenia. DXA can help in understanding how the measurement of fat and muscle is important, making the way from research to clinical practice.
    Mediterranean-Style Diet Improves Systolic Blood Pressure and Arterial Stiffness in Older Adults
    Jennings, A. ; Berendsen, A.M. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Brzozowska, A. ; Sicinska, Ewa ; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Meunier, N. ; Caumon, Elodie ; Malpuech-Brugère, Corinne ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Ostan, Rita ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Gillings, Rachel ; O'Neill, C.M. ; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J. ; Minihane, Anne-Marie ; Cassidy, Aedin - \ 2019
    Hypertension 73 (2019)3. - ISSN 0194-911X - p. 578 - 586.
    We aimed to determine the effect of a Mediterranean-style diet, tailored to meet dietary recommendations for older adults, on blood pressure and arterial stiffness. In 12 months, randomized controlled trial (NU-AGE [New Dietary Strategies Addressing the Specific Needs of Elderly Population for Healthy Aging in Europe]), blood pressure was measured in 1294 healthy participants, aged 65 to 79 years, recruited from 5 European centers, and arterial stiffness in a subset of 225 participants. The intervention group received individually tailored standardized dietary advice and commercially available foods to increase adherence to a Mediterranean diet. The control group continued on their habitual diet and was provided with current national dietary guidance. In the 1142 participants who completed the trial (88.2%), after 1 year the intervention resulted in a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure (−5.5 mm Hg; 95% CI, −10.7 to −0.4; P=0.03), which was evident in males (−9.2 mm Hg, P=0.02) but not females (−3.1 mm
    BRAZIL ROAD-KILL: a data set of wildlife terrestrial vertebrate road-kills
    Grilo, Clara ; Coimbra, Michely R. ; Cerqueira, Rafaela C. ; Barbosa, Priscilla ; Dornas, Rubem A.P. ; Gonçalves, Larissa O. ; Teixeira, Fernanda Z. ; Coelho, Igor Pfeifer ; Schmidt, Brenda R. ; Pacheco, Diana L.K. ; Schuck, Gabriela ; Esperando, Isadora B. ; Anza, Juan A. ; Beduschi, Júlia ; Oliveira, Nicole R. ; Pinheiro, Paula F. ; Bager, Alex ; Secco, Helio ; Guerreiro, Marcello ; Carvalho, Carine F. ; Veloso, Aline C. ; Custódio, Ana E.I. ; Marçal, Oswaldo ; Ciocheti, Giordano ; Assis, Julia ; Ribeiro, Milton Cezar ; Francisco, Beatriz S.S. ; Cherem, Jorge J. ; Trigo, Tatiane C. ; Jardim, Márcia M.A. ; Franceschi, Ingridi C. ; Espinosa, Caroline ; Tirelli, Flávia P. ; Rocha, Vlamir J. ; Sekiama, Margareth L. ; Barbosa, Gedimar P. ; Rossi, Helen R. ; Moreira, Tainah C. ; Cervini, Marcelo ; Rosa, Clarissa Alves ; Silva, Lucas Gonçalves ; Ferreira, Claudia M.M. ; César, Augusto ; Casella, Janaina ; Mendes, Sérgio L. ; Zina, Juliana ; Bastos, Deivson F.O. ; Souza, Ricardo A.T. ; Hartmann, Paulo A. ; Deffaci, Angela C.G. ; Mulinari, Jéssica ; Luzzi, Siane C. ; Rezzadori, Tiago ; Kolcenti, Cassiane ; Reis, Tiago Xavier ; Fonseca, Vanessa S.C. ; Giorgi, Camilo F. ; Migliorini, Raissa P. ; Kasper, Carlos Benhur ; Bueno, Cecília ; Sobanski, Marcela ; Pereira, Ana P.F.G. ; Andrade, Fernanda A.G. ; Fernandes, Marcus E.B. ; Corrêa, Luiz L.C. ; Nepomuceno, Adriana ; Banhos, Aureo ; Hannibal, Wellington ; Fonseca, Rogério ; Costa, Lizit A. ; Medici, Emilia P. ; Croce, Aline ; Werther, Karin ; Oliveira, Juliana P. ; Ribeiro, Julia M. ; Santi, Mariele de; Kawanami, Aline E. ; Perles, Livia ; Couto, Caroline do; Figueiró, Daniela S. ; Eizirik, Eduardo ; Correia, Antonio A. ; Corrêa, Fabio M. ; Queirolo, Diego ; Quagliatto, André L. ; Saranholi, Bruno H. ; Galetti, Pedro M. ; Rodriguez-Castro, Karen G. ; Braz, Vivian S. ; França, Frederico G.R. ; Buss, Gerson ; Rezini, Josias A. ; Lion, Marília B. ; Cheida, Carolina C. ; Lacerda, Ana C.R. ; Freitas, Carlos Henrique ; Venâncio, Fernando ; Adania, Cristina H. ; Batisteli, Augusto F. ; Hegel, Carla G.Z. ; Mantovani, José A. ; Rodrigues, Flávio H.G. ; Bagatini, Tathiana ; Curi, Nelson H.A. ; Emmert, Luciano ; Erdmann, Renato H. ; Costa, Raoni R.G.F. ; Martinelli, Agustín ; Santos, Clarice V.F. ; Kindel, Andreas - \ 2018
    Ecology 99 (2018)11. - ISSN 0012-9658 - 1 p.
    1988–2017 - amphibians - birds - Brazil - mammals - reptiles - road effects - road mortality - road survey - species occurrence - wildlife-vehicle collisions

    Mortality from collision with vehicles is the most visible impact of road traffic on wildlife. Mortality due to roads (hereafter road-kill) can affect the dynamic of populations of many species and can, therefore, increase the risk of local decline or extinction. This is especially true in Brazil, where plans for road network upgrading and expansion overlaps biodiversity hotspot areas, which are of high importance for global conservation. Researchers, conservationists and road planners face the challenge to define a national strategy for road mitigation and wildlife conservation. The main goal of this dataset is a compilation of geo-referenced road-kill data from published and unpublished road surveys. This is the first Data Paper in the BRAZIL series (see ATLANTIC, NEOTROPICAL, and BRAZIL collections of Data Papers published in Ecology), which aims make public road-kill data for species in the Brazilian Regions. The dataset encompasses road-kill records from 45 personal communications and 26 studies published in peer-reviewed journals, theses and reports. The road-kill dataset comprises 21,512 records, 83% of which are identified to the species level (n = 450 species). The dataset includes records of 31 amphibian species, 90 reptile species, 229 bird species, and 99 mammal species. One species is classified as Endangered, eight as Vulnerable and twelve as Near Threatened. The species with the highest number of records are: Didelphis albiventris (n = 1,549), Volatinia jacarina (n = 1,238), Cerdocyon thous (n = 1,135), Helicops infrataeniatus (n = 802), and Rhinella icterica (n = 692). Most of the records came from southern Brazil. However, observations of the road-kill incidence for non-Least Concern species are more spread across the country. This dataset can be used to identify which taxa seems to be vulnerable to traffic, analyze temporal and spatial patterns of road-kill at local, regional and national scales and also used to understand the effects of road-kill on population persistence. It may also contribute to studies that aims to understand the influence of landscape and environmental influences on road-kills, improve our knowledge on road-related strategies on biodiversity conservation and be used as complementary information on large-scale and macroecological studies. No copyright or proprietary restrictions are associated with the use of this data set other than citation of this Data Paper.

    Changes in Dietary Intake and Adherence to the NU-AGE Diet Following a One-Year Dietary Intervention among European Older Adults-Results of the NU-AGE Randomized Trial
    Berendsen, A.M. ; Rest, O. van de; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Ostan, R. ; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Brzozowska, A. ; Stelmaszczyk-Kusz, A. ; Jennings, A. ; Gillings, Rachel ; Cassidy, A. ; Caille, A. ; Caumon, Elodie ; Malpuech-Brugère, Corinne ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de - \ 2018
    Nutrients 10 (2018). - ISSN 2072-6643
    Background: The Mediterranean Diet has been proposed as an effective strategy to reduce inflammaging, a chronic low grade inflammatory status, and thus, to slow down the aging process. We evaluated whether a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern specifically targeting dietary recommendations of people aged over 65 years (NU-AGE diet) could be effective to shift dietary intake of older adults towards a healthful diet. Methods: Adults aged 65–80 years across five EU-centers were randomly assigned to a NU-AGE diet group or control group. The diet group followed one year of NU-AGE dietary intervention specifying consumption of 15 food groups plus the use of a vitamin D supplement. Participants in the diet group received counselling and individually tailored dietary advice, food products and a vitamin D supplement. Dietary intake was assessed by means of seven-day food records at baseline and one-year follow-up. A continuous NU-AGE index (0–160 points) was developed to assess NU-AGE diet adherence. Results: In total 1296 participants were randomized and 1141 participants completed the intervention (571 intervention, 570 control). After one year, the diet group improved mean intake of 13 out of 16 NU-AGE dietary components (p < 0.05), with a significant increase in total NU-AGE index (difference in mean change = 21.3 ± 15.9 points, p < 0.01). Conclusions: The NU-AGE dietary intervention, based on dietary recommendations for older adults, consisting of individual dietary counselling, free healthy foods and a vitamin D supplement, may be a feasible strategy to improve dietary intake in an aging European population.
    A Cross-Sectional Analysis of Body Composition Among Healthy Elderly From the European NU-AGE Study: Sex and Country Specific Features
    Santoro, Aurelia ; Bazzocchi, Alberto ; Guidarelli, Giulia ; Ostan, Rita ; Giampieri, Enrico ; Mercatelli, Daniele ; Scurti, M. ; Berendsen, A.M. ; Surala, Olga ; Jennings, Amy ; Meunier, Nathalie ; Caumon, Elodie ; Gillings, Rachel ; Kadi, Fawzi ; Capel, Frederic ; Cashman, Kevin D. ; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de; Battista, Giuseppe ; Salvioli, Stefano ; Franceschi, Claudio - \ 2018
    Frontiers in Physiology 9 (2018). - ISSN 1664-042X - 16 p.
    Body composition (BC) is an emerging important factor for the characterization of metabolic status. The assessment of BC has been studied in various populations and diseases such as obesity, diabetes, endocrine diseases as well as physiological and paraphysiological conditions such as growth and aging processes, and physical training. A gold standard technique for the assessment of human BC at molecular level is represented by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), which is able to precisely assess the body mass (and areal bone mineral density-aBMD) on a regional and whole-body basis. For the first time, within the framework of the NU-AGE project, BC has been assessed by means of a whole-body DXA scan in 1121 sex-balanced free-living, apparently healthy older adults aged 65–79 years enrolled in 5 European countries (Italy, France, United Kingdom, Netherlands, and Poland). The aim of this analysis is to provide a complete profile of BC in healthy elderly participants from five European countries and to investigate country- and sex-related differences by state-of-the-art DXA technology. To compare BC data collected in different centers, specific indexes and ratios have been used. Non-parametric statistical tests showed sex-specific significant differences in certain BC parameters. In particular, women have higher fat mass (FM) (Fat/Lean mass ratio: by 67%, p < 2.2e-16) and lower lean mass (Lean Mass index: by -18%, p < 2.2e-16) than men. On the other hand, men have higher android FM than women (Android/gynoid FM ratio: by 56%, p < 2.2e-16). Interesting differences also emerged among countries. Polish elderly have higher FM (Fat/Lean mass ratio: by 52%, p < 2.2e-16) and lower lean mass (Skeletal Mass index: by -23%, p < 2.2e-16) than elderly from the other four countries. At variance, French elderly show lower FM (Fat/Lean mass ratio: by -34%, p < 2.2e-16) and higher lean mass (Skeletal Mass index: by 18%, p < 2.2e-16). Moreover, five BC profiles in women and six in men have been identified by a cluster analysis based on BC parameters. Finally, these data can serve as reference for normative average and variability of BC in the elderly populations across Europe.
    Nutrimetabolomics: An Integrative Action for Metabolomic Analyses in Human Nutritional Studies
    Ulaszewska, Marynka M. ; Weinert, Christoph H. ; Trimigno, Alessia ; Portmann, Reto ; Andres Lacueva, Cristina ; Badertscher, René ; Brennan, Lorraine ; Brunius, Carl ; Bub, Achim ; Capozzi, Francesco ; Cialiè Rosso, Marta ; Cordero, Chiara E. ; Daniel, Hannelore ; Durand, Stéphanie ; Egert, Bjoern ; Ferrario, Paola G. ; Feskens, Edith J.M. ; Franceschi, Pietro ; Garcia-Aloy, Mar ; Giacomoni, Franck ; Giesbertz, Pieter ; González-Domínguez, Raúl ; Hanhineva, Kati ; Hemeryck, Lieselot Y. ; Kopka, Joachim ; Kulling, Sabine E. ; Llorach, Rafael ; Manach, Claudine ; Mattivi, Fulvio ; Migné, Carole ; Münger, Linda H. ; Ott, Beate ; Picone, Gianfranco ; Pimentel, Grégory ; Pujos-Guillot, Estelle ; Riccadonna, Samantha ; Rist, Manuela J. ; Rombouts, Caroline ; Rubert, Josep ; Skurk, Thomas ; Sri Harsha, Pedapati S.C. ; Meulebroek, Lieven Van; Vanhaecke, Lynn ; Vázquez-Fresno, Rosa ; Wishart, David ; Vergères, Guy - \ 2018
    Molecular Nutrition & Food Research 63 (2018)1. - ISSN 1613-4125
    GC–MS - LC–MS - metabolomics - NMR - nutrition
    The life sciences are currently being transformed by an unprecedented wave of developments in molecular analysis, which include important advances in instrumental analysis as well as biocomputing. In light of the central role played by metabolism in nutrition, metabolomics is rapidly being established as a key analytical tool in human nutritional studies. Consequently, an increasing number of nutritionists integrate metabolomics into their study designs. Within this dynamic landscape, the potential of nutritional metabolomics (nutrimetabolomics) to be translated into a science, which can impact on health policies, still needs to be realized. A key element to reach this goal is the ability of the research community to join, to collectively make the best use of the potential offered by nutritional metabolomics. This article, therefore, provides a methodological description of nutritional metabolomics that reflects on the state-of-the-art techniques used in the laboratories of the Food Biomarker Alliance (funded by the European Joint Programming Initiative “A Healthy Diet for a Healthy Life” (JPI HDHL)) as well as points of reflections to harmonize this field. It is not intended to be exhaustive but rather to present a pragmatic guidance on metabolomic methodologies, providing readers with useful “tips and tricks” along the analytical workflow.
    A Mediterranean-like dietary pattern with Vitamin D3 (10 μg/d) supplements reduced the rate of bone loss in older Europeans with osteoporosis at baseline : Results of a 1-y randomized controlled trial
    Jennings, Amy ; Cashman, Kevin D. ; Gillings, Rachel ; Cassidy, Aedin ; Tang, Jonathan ; Fraser, William ; Dowling, Kirsten G. ; Hull, George L.J. ; Berendsen, Agnes A.M. ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. de; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Wierzbicka, Elzbieta ; Ostan, Rita ; Bazzocchi, Alberto ; Battista, Giuseppe ; Caumon, Elodie ; Meunier, Nathalie ; Malpuech-Brugère, Corinne ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Santoro, Aurelia ; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J. - \ 2018
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 108 (2018)3. - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 633 - 640.
    bone - Mediterranean diet - older adults - Osteoporosis - Vitamin D supplementation

    Background: The Mediterranean diet (MD) is widely recommended for the prevention of chronic disease, but evidence for a beneficial effect on bone health is lacking. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a Mediterranean-like dietary pattern [NU-AGE (New Dietary Strategies Addressing the Specific Needs of the Elderly Population for Healthy Aging in Europe)] on indexes of inflammation with a number of secondary endpoints, including bone mineral density (BMD) and biomarkers of bone and collagen degradation in a 1-y multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT; NU-AGE) in elderly Europeans. Design: An RCT was undertaken across 5 European centers. Subjects in the intervention group consumed the NU-AGE diet for 1 y by receiving individually tailored dietary advice, coupled with supplies of foods including whole-grain pasta, olive oil, and a vitamin D3 supplement (10 μg/d). Participants in the control group were provided with leaflets on healthy eating available in their country. Results: A total of 1294 participants (mean ± SD age: 70.9 ±4.0 y; 44% male) were recruited to the study and 1142 completed the 1-y trial. The Mediterranean-like dietary pattern had no effect on BMD (site-specific or whole-body); the inclusion of compliance to the intervention in the statistical model did not change the findings. There was also no effect of the intervention on the urinary biomarkers free pyridinoline or free deoxypyridinoline. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D significantly increased and parathyroid hormone decreased (P < 0.001) in the MD compared with the control group. Subgroup analysis of individuals with osteoporosis at baseline (site-specific BMD T-score ≤ -2.5 SDs) showed that the MD attenuated the expected decline in femoral neck BMD (n = 24 and 30 in MD and control groups, respectively; P = 0.04) but had no effect on lumbar spine or whole-body BMD. Conclusions: A 1-y intervention of the Mediterranean-like diet together with vitamin D3 supplements (10 μg/d) had no effect on BMD in the normal age-related range, but it significantly reduced the rate of loss of bone at the femoral neck in individuals with osteoporosis. The NU-AGE trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01754012.

    Cross-Sectional Analysis of the Correlation Between Daily Nutrient Intake Assessed by 7-Day Food Records and Biomarkers of Dietary Intake Among Participants of the NU-AGE Study
    Ostan, Rita ; Guidarelli, Giulia ; Giampieri, Enrico ; Lanzarini, Catia ; Berendsen, Agnes A.M. ; Januszko, Olga ; Jennings, Amy ; Lyon, Noëlle ; Caumon, Elodie ; Gillings, Rachel ; Sicinska, Ewa ; Meunier, Nathalie ; Feskens, Edith J.M. ; Pietruszka, Barbara ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. de; Fairweather-Tait, Susan ; Capri, Miriam ; Franceschi, Claudio ; Santoro, Aurelia - \ 2018
    Frontiers in Physiology 9 (2018). - ISSN 1664-042X
    Methods for measuring diet composition and quantifying nutrient intake with sufficient validity are essential to study the association between nutrition and health outcomes and risk of diseases. 7-day food records provides a quantification of food actually and currently consumed and is interesting for its use in intervention studies to monitor diet in a short-term period and to guide participants toward changing their intakes. The objective of this study is to analyze the correlation/association between the daily intake of selected nutrients (collected by a 7-day food records plus a mineral/vitamin supplementation questionnaire) and estimates of energy expenditure as well as blood and urine biomarkers of dietary intakes in 1,140 healthy elderly subjects (65–79 years) at baseline of the NU-AGE intervention study (NCT01754012, clinicaltrials.gov). The results show that: the daily intake of energy correlated significantly with predicted total energy expenditure (pTEE) (ρ = 0.459, p < 0.001, and q < 0.001); protein intake correlated significantly with the ratio of 24 h urinary urea to creatinine excretion (ρ = 0.143 for total protein intake, ρ = 0.296 for animal protein intake, and ρ = 0.359 for protein intake/body weight, p < 0.001 and q < 0.001 for each correlation); vitamin B12 and folate intakes correlated significantly with their serum concentrations (ρ = 0.151 and ρ = 0.363, respectively; p < 0.001 and q < 0.001 for each correlation); sodium and potassium intakes correlated significantly with their 24 h urinary excretion (ρ = 0.298 and ρ = 0.123, respectively; p < 0.001 and q < 0.001 for each correlation); vitamin B12 and folate intakes were negatively associated with plasma homocysteine measure (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, respectively); stratifying subjects by gender, the correlations between energy intake and pTEE and between potassium intake and its 24 h urinary excretion lost their significance in women. Even if the plasma and urinary levels of these nutrients depend on several factors, the significant correlations between daily reported intake of nutrients (protein, vitamin B12, folate, and sodium) and their blood/urinary markers confirmed that the 7-day food records (plus a supplementation questionnaire) provides reliable data to evaluate short-term current dietary intake in European elderly subjects and it can be exploited to guide and monitor NU-AGE participants through the shift of their diet according NU-AGE recommendations.
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