Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Records 1 - 14 / 14

  • help
  • print

    Print search results

  • export

    Export search results

  • alert
    We will mail you new results for this query: q=Furness
Check title to add to marked list
How conflict shapes evolution in poeciliid fishes
Furness, Andrew I. ; Pollux, Bart J.A. ; Meredith, Robert W. ; Springer, Mark S. ; Reznick, David N. - \ 2019
Nature Communications 10 (2019)1. - ISSN 2041-1723

In live-bearing animal lineages, the evolution of the placenta is predicted to create an arena for genomic conflict during pregnancy, drive patterns of male sexual selection, and increase the rate of speciation. Here we test these predictions of the viviparity driven conflict hypothesis (VDCH) in live-bearing poecilid fishes, a group showing multiple independent origins of placentation and extreme variation in male sexually selected traits. As predicted, male sexually selected traits are only gained in lineages that lack placentas; while there is little or no influence of male traits on the evolution of placentas. Both results are consistent with the mode of female provisioning governing the evolution of male attributes. Moreover, it is the presence of male sexually selected traits (pre-copulatory), rather than placentation (post-copulatory), that are associated with higher rates of speciation. These results highlight a causal interaction between female reproductive mode, male sexual selection and the rate of speciation, suggesting a role for conflict in shaping diverse aspects of organismal biology.

Data from: Maternal size and body condition predict the amount of post-fertilization maternal provisioning in matrotrophic fish
Hagmayer, A. ; Furness, Andrew I. ; Reznick, David N. ; Pollux, B.J.A. - \ 2018
live-bearing - matrotrophy - placenta - placentotrophy - superfetation - viviparity
Maternal effects often provide a mechanism for adaptive transgenerational phenotypic plasticity. The maternal phenotype can profoundly influence the potential for such environmentally-induced adjustments of the offspring phenotype, causing correlations between offspring and maternal traits. Here we study potential effects of the maternal phenotype on offspring provisioning prior to and during gestation in the matrotrophic live-bearing fish species Poeciliopsis retropinna. Specifically, we examine how maternal traits such as body fat, lean mass and length relate to pre- (i.e. allocation to the egg prior to fertilization) and post-fertilization (i.e. allocation to the embryo during pregnancy) maternal provisioning and how this ultimately affects offspring size and body composition at birth. We show that pre- and post-fertilization maternal provisioning is associated with maternal length and body fat, but not with maternal lean mass. Maternal length is proportionally associated with egg mass at fertilization and offspring mass at birth, notably without changing the ratio of pre- to post-fertilization maternal provisioning. This ratio, referred to as the matrotrophy index (MI), is often used to quantify the level of matrotrophy. By contrast, the proportion of maternal body fat is positively associated with post-fertilization, but not pre-fertilization, maternal provisioning and consequently is strongly positively correlated with the MI. We furthermore found that the composition of embryos changes throughout pregnancy. Females invest first in embryo lean mass, then allocate fat reserves to embryos very late in pregnancy. We argue that this delay in fat allocation may be adaptive, because it delays an unnecessary high reproductive burden to the mother during earlier stages of pregnancy, potentially leading to a more slender body shape and improved locomotor performance. In conclusion, our study suggests that (i) offspring size at birth is a plastic trait that is predicted by both maternal length and body fat, and (ii) the MI is a plastic trait that is predicted solely by the proportion of maternal body fat. It herewith provides new insights into the potential maternal causes and consequences of embryo provisioning during pregnancy in matrotrophic live-bearing species.
Why do parent-offspring conflicts evolve? How matrotrophy and altriciality give rise to all pre- and post-natal conflicts
Dekker, M.L. ; Furness, Andrew ; Reznick, David ; Pollux, B.J.A. - \ 2018
Why do parent-offspring conflicts evolve? How matrotrophy and altriciality give rise to all pre- and post-natal conflicts
Dekker, M.L. ; Furness, Andrew ; Reznick, David ; Pollux, B.J.A. - \ 2018
Maternal effects in a placental live-bearing fish
Hagmayer, A. ; Furness, Andrew I. ; Reznick, D.N. ; Pollux, B.J.A. - \ 2018
Maternal effects often provide a mechanism for adaptive transgenerational phenotypic plasticity. The maternal phenotype can profoundly influence the potential for environmentally-induced adjustments of the offspring phenotype, causing correlations between offspring and maternal traits.
We studied the effects of maternal phenotype on offspring phenotype prior to and during the pregnancy in the placental live-bearing fish species Poeciliopsis retropinna collected from the Rio Terraba in Costa Rica. Specifically, we examined how maternal traits such as body fat, lean mass and length influence pre- and post-fertilization maternal provisioning and how this ultimately affects offspring size and body composition at birth.
We found that maternal length proportionally increases egg mass at fertilization and offspring mass at birth, whereas maternal body fat increases offspring mass at birth but does not affect egg mass at fertilization. We furthermore found temporal variation in embryo composition during gestation, with females investing first in embryo somatic lean mass and allocating fat reserves to the embryos only very late in pregnancy. This delay in fat allocation is arguably adaptive, because it postpones an unnecessary high reproductive burden to the mother to late pregnancy. We conclude that offspring provisioning is a plastic phenotypic trait that is strongly determined by maternal phenotype.
Maternal effects in a placental live-bearing fish
Hagmayer, A. ; Furness, Andrew I. ; Reznick, D.N. ; Pollux, B.J.A. - \ 2018
Maternal effects often provide a mechanism for adaptive transgenerational phenotypic plasticity. The maternal phenotype can profoundly influence the potential for such environmentally-induced adjustments of the offspring phenotype, causing correlations between offspring and maternal traits across a variety of taxa. We studied the effects of maternal phenotype on offspring provisioning prior to and during pregnancy in the placental live-bearing fish species Poeciliopsis retropinna. Specifically, we examined how maternal traits such as body fat, lean mass and length influence pre- (i.e. allocation to eggs prior to fertilization) and post-fertilization (i.e. allocation to embryos during pregnancy) maternal provisioning and how this ultimately affects offspring size and body composition at birth. We found that maternal length proportionally increases egg mass at fertilization and offspring mass at birth, notably without changing the ratio of pre- to post-fertilization maternal provisioning. By contrast, maternal body fat strongly increases the amount of post-fertilization maternal provisioning and hence offspring mass at birth. We furthermore found that females invest first in embryo lean mass, and allocate fat reserves to embryos only very late in pregnancy. We propose the delay in fat allocation to be adaptive, because it delays an unnecessary high reproductive burden to the mother earlier in pregnancy. Our study herewith suggests that offspring provisioning is a phenotypically plastic trait that is strongly determined by maternal phenotype.



Maternal size and body condition predict the amount of post-fertilization maternal provisioning in matrotrophic fish
Hagmayer, Andres ; Furness, Andrew I. ; Reznick, David N. ; Pollux, Bart J.A. - \ 2018
Ecology and Evolution 8 (2018)24. - ISSN 2045-7758 - p. 12386 - 12396.
live-bearing - maternal effect - matrotrophy - placenta - placentotrophy - Poeciliidae - superfetation - viviparity

Maternal effects often provide a mechanism for adaptive transgenerational phenotypic plasticity. The maternal phenotype can profoundly influence the potential for such environmentally induced adjustments of the offspring phenotype, causing correlations between offspring and maternal traits. Here, we study potential effects of the maternal phenotype on offspring provisioning prior to and during gestation in the matrotrophic live-bearing fish species Poeciliopsis retropinna. Specifically, we examine how maternal traits such as body fat, lean mass, and length relate to pre- (i.e., allocation to the egg prior to fertilization) and post-fertilization (i.e., allocation to the embryo during pregnancy) maternal provisioning and how this ultimately affects offspring size and body composition at birth. We show that pre- and post-fertilization maternal provisioning is associated with maternal length and body fat, but not with maternal lean mass. Maternal length is proportionally associated with egg mass at fertilization and offspring mass at birth, notably without changing the ratio of pre- to post-fertilization maternal provisioning. This ratio, referred to as the matrotrophy index (MI), is often used to quantify the level of matrotrophy. By contrast, the proportion of maternal body fat is positively associated with post-fertilization, but not pre-fertilization, maternal provisioning and consequently is strongly positively correlated with the MI. We furthermore found that the composition of embryos changes throughout pregnancy. Females invest first in embryo lean mass, and then allocate fat reserves to embryos very late in pregnancy. We argue that this delay in fat allocation may be adaptive, because it delays an unnecessary high reproductive burden to the mother during earlier stages of pregnancy, potentially leading to a more slender body shape and improved locomotor performance. In conclusion, our study suggests that (a) offspring size at birth is a plastic trait that is predicted by both maternal length and body fat, and (b) the MI is a plastic trait that is predicted solely by the proportion of maternal body fat. It herewith provides new insights into the potential maternal causes and consequences of embryo provisioning during pregnancy in matrotrophic live-bearing species.

Matrotrophy and altriciality: two reproductive modes that lead to the emergence of parent-offspring conflicts
Dekker, M.L. ; Furness, A. ; Reznick, D.N. ; Pollux, B.J.A. - \ 2017
Diet studies of seabirds: a review and recomendations
Barrett, R. ; Camphuysen, C.J. ; Anker-Nilssen, T. ; Chardine, J.W. ; Furness, R.W. ; Garthe, S. ; Hueppop, O. ; Leopold, M.F. - \ 2007
ICES Journal of Marine Science 64 (2007)9. - ISSN 1054-3139 - p. 1675 - 1691.
cormorants phalacrocorax-carbo - fulmars fulmarus-glacialis - double-crested cormorants - black-legged kittiwakes - fatty-acid signatures - skuas stercorarius-skua - stable-isotope analysis - dipper cinclus-cinclus - white-chinned petrels - gull larus-argentatus
We review the different methods that are used to collect dietary data from marine birds. We consider their limitations and practicalities and emphasize critical data gaps in our knowledge of the feeding ecology of seabirds (namely diets outside breeding seasons). To enhance comparability of findings among studies, species, and oceanographic regions, we make recommendations on standards for the reporting of results in the literature.
Storing and transmitting traceability data across the food supply chain
Vernede, R. ; Wienk, I.M. - \ 2006
In: Improving traceability in food processing and distribution / Smith, I., Furness, A., Cambridge [etc.] : Woodhead Publishing Ltd. - ISBN 1855739593 - p. 183 - 198.
Using traceability systems to optimise business performance
Verdenius, F. - \ 2006
In: Improving traceability in food processing and distribution / Smith, I., Furness, A., Cambridge [etc.] : Woodhead Publishing Ltd. - ISBN 1855739593 - p. 26 - 51.
Dealing with bottlenecks in traceability systems
Koenderink, N.J.J.P. ; Hulzebos, J.L. - \ 2006
In: Improving traceability in food processing and distribution / Smith, I., Furness, A., Cambridge [etc.] : Woodhead Publishing Ltd. - ISBN 1855739593 - p. 88 - 106.
Modelling food supply chains for tracking and tracing
Hulzebos, J.L. ; Koenderink, N.J.J.P. - \ 2006
In: Improving traceability in food processing and distribution / Smith, I., Furness, A., Cambridge [etc.] : Woodhead Publishing Ltd. - ISBN 1855739593 - p. 67 - 87.
Optimising supply chain using traceability systems
Scheer, F.P. - \ 2006
In: Improving traceability in food processing and distribution / Smith, I., Furness, A., Cambridge [etc.] : Woodhead Publishing Ltd. - ISBN 1855739593 - p. 52 - 64.
Check title to add to marked list

Show 20 50 100 records per page

 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.