Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

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    An invitation for more research on transnational corporations and the biosphere
    Folke, Carl ; Österblom, Henrik ; Jouffray, Jean Baptiste ; Lambin, Eric F. ; Adger, Neil ; Scheffer, Marten ; Crona, Beatrice I. ; Nyström, Magnus ; Levin, Simon A. ; Carpenter, Stephen R. ; Anderies, John M. ; Chapin, Stuart ; Crépin, Anne Sophie ; Dauriach, Alice ; Galaz, Victor ; Gordon, Line J. ; Kautsky, Nils ; Walker, Brian H. ; Watson, James R. ; Wilen, James ; Zeeuw, Aart de - \ 2020
    Nature Ecology & Evolution 4 (2020). - ISSN 2397-334X
    Earth System Governance : Science and Implementation Plan of the Earth System Governance Project 2018
    Burch, Sarah ; Gupta, A. ; Yumie Aoki Inoue, Christina ; Kalfagianni, Agni ; Persson, Asa ; Heijden, Jeroen van der; Vervoort, Joost ; Adler, Carolina ; Bloomfield, Michael John ; Djalante, Riyanti ; Dryzek, John S. ; Galaz, Victor ; Gordon, Christopher ; Harmon, Renee ; Jinnah, Sikina ; Kim, Rakhyun E. ; Olsson, Lennart ; Leeuwen, J. van; Ramasar, Vasna ; Wapner, Paul ; Zondervan, Ruben - \ 2019
    Utrecht : Earth System Governance - 128 p.
    Transnational corporations and the challenge of biosphere stewardship
    Folke, Carl ; Österblom, Henrik ; Jouffray, Jean Baptiste ; Lambin, Eric F. ; Adger, W.N. ; Scheffer, Marten ; Crona, Beatrice I. ; Nyström, Magnus ; Levin, Simon A. ; Carpenter, Stephen R. ; Anderies, John M. ; Chapin, Stuart ; Crépin, Anne Sophie ; Dauriach, Alice ; Galaz, Victor ; Gordon, Line J. ; Kautsky, Nils ; Walker, Brian H. ; Watson, James R. ; Wilen, James ; Zeeuw, Aart de - \ 2019
    Nature Ecology & Evolution 3 (2019)10. - ISSN 2397-334X - p. 1396 - 1403.

    Sustainability within planetary boundaries requires concerted action by individuals, governments, civil society and private actors. For the private sector, there is concern that the power exercised by transnational corporations generates, and is even central to, global environmental change. Here, we ask under which conditions transnational corporations could either hinder or promote a global shift towards sustainability. We show that a handful of transnational corporations have become a major force shaping the global intertwined system of people and planet. Transnational corporations in agriculture, forestry, seafood, cement, minerals and fossil energy cause environmental impacts and possess the ability to influence critical functions of the biosphere. We review evidence of current practices and identify six observed features of change towards 'corporate biosphere stewardship', with significant potential for upscaling. Actions by transnational corporations, if combined with effective public policies and improved governmental regulations, could substantially accelerate sustainability efforts.

    New directions in earth system governance research
    Burch, Sarah ; Gupta, A. ; Inoue, C. ; Kalfagianni, Agni ; Persson, Asa ; Gerlak, Andrea K. ; Ishii, Atsushi ; Patterson, James ; Pickering, Jonathan ; Scobie, M. ; Heijden, Jeroen van der; Vervoort, J. ; Adler, Carolina ; Bloomfield, Michael ; Djalante, Riyante ; Dryzek, John ; Galaz, Victor ; Gordon, Christopher ; Harmon, Renée ; Jinnah, Sikina ; Kim, Rakhyun E. ; Olsson, Lennart ; Leeuwen, J. van; Ramasar, Vasna ; Wapner, Paul ; Zondervan, R. - \ 2019
    Earth System Governance 1 (2019). - ISSN 2589-8116 - 18 p.
    Governance - Research networks - Earth system - Transformation
    The Earth System Governance project is a global research alliance that explores novel, effective governance mechanisms to cope with the current transitions in the biogeochemical systems of the planet. A decade after its inception, this article offers an overview of the project's new research framework (which is built upon a review of existing earth system governance research), the goal of which is to continue to stimulate a pluralistic, vibrant and relevant research community. This framework is composed of contextual conditions (transformations, inequality, Anthropocene and diversity), which capture what is being observed empirically, and five sets of research lenses (architecture and agency, democracy and power, justice and allocation, anticipation and imagination, and adaptiveness and reflexivity). Ultimately the goal is to guide and inspire the systematic study of how societies prepare for accelerated climate change and wider earth system change, as well as policy responses.
    Private governance of ocean resources
    Groeneveld, R.A. ; Bush, S.R. ; Bailey, M.L. - \ 2017
    In: Handbook on the Economics and Management of Sustainable Oceans / Nunes, Paulo A.L.D., Svensson, Lisa E., Markandya, Anil, Edward Elgar Publishing - ISBN 9781786430717 - p. 416 - 428.
    The United Nations (UN) post-2015 development agenda (United Nations 2015) calls for the establishment of a global partnership for sustainable development, ‘bringing together Governments, civil society, the private sector, the United Nations system and other actors and mobilizing all available resources’ (Art. 39). The agenda thereby explicitly acknowledges that in addition to governments, private companies and civil society have a pivotal role to play in attaining the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The natural resource economics literature has traditionally applied a strict dichotomy between public actors (that is, governments) and private institutions, notably markets: markets take care of the allocation of private goods and services, while governments uphold the legal framework within which markets operate and correct market failures such as public goods, monopolies, and limited excludability of natural resources (see, for example, Perman et al. 2011; Tietenberg and Lewis 2012). The task of managing ocean resources has thus in recent history fallen squarely on the shoulders of the nation state. However, we have seen for complex systems, such as fisheries and marine ecosystems, that this dichotomy does not always hold (Ostrom 2010). Rather, the work of Ostrom and others (for example, Folke et al. 2005; Galaz et al. 2012) points to what is referred to as polycentric governance, where private and community institutional structures, sometimes integrated with and sometimes separate from the state, are offering new solutions to global governance challenges. These developments are blurring the strict separation of responsibilities between states, companies and, to an increasing extent, civil society.
    Bright spots: seeds of a good Anthropocene
    Bennett, Elena M. ; Solan, Martin ; Biggs, Reinette ; McPhearson, Timon ; Norström, Albert V. ; Olsson, Per ; Pereira, Laura ; Peterson, Garry D. ; Raudsepp-Hearne, Ciara ; Biermann, Frank ; Carpenter, Stephen R. ; Ellis, Erle C. ; Hichert, Tanja ; Galaz, Victor ; Lahsen, Myanna ; Milkoreit, Manjana ; Martin López, Berta ; Nicholas, Kimberly A. ; Preiser, Rika ; Vince, Gaia ; Vervoort, Joost M. ; Xu, Jianchu - \ 2016
    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 14 (2016)8. - ISSN 1540-9295 - p. 441 - 448.

    The scale, rate, and intensity of humans’ environmental impact has engendered broad discussion about how to find plausible pathways of development that hold the most promise for fostering a better future in the Anthropocene. However, the dominance of dystopian visions of irreversible environmental degradation and societal collapse, along with overly optimistic utopias and business-as-usual scenarios that lack insight and innovation, frustrate progress. Here, we present a novel approach to thinking about the future that builds on experiences drawn from a diversity of practices, worldviews, values, and regions that could accelerate the adoption of pathways to transformative change (change that goes beyond incremental improvements). Using an analysis of 100 initiatives, or “seeds of a good Anthropocene”, we find that emphasizing hopeful elements of existing practice offers the opportunity to: (1) understand the values and features that constitute a good Anthropocene, (2) determine the processes that lead to the emergence and growth of initiatives that fundamentally change human–environmental relationships, and (3) generate creative, bottom-up scenarios that feature well-articulated pathways toward a more positive future.

    COMMENTARY: Climate engineering reconsidered
    Barrett, S. ; Lenton, T.M. ; Millner, A. ; Tavoni, A. ; Carpenter, S. ; Anderies, J.M. ; Chapin, F.S. ; Crepin, A.S. ; Daily, G. ; Ehrlich, P. ; Folke, C. ; Galaz, V. ; Hughes, T. ; Kautsky, N. ; Lambin, E.F. ; Naylor, R. ; Nyborg, K. ; Polasky, S. ; Scheffer, M. ; Wilen, J. ; Xepapadeas, A. ; Zeeuw, A. de - \ 2014
    Nature Climate Change 4 (2014)7. - ISSN 1758-678X - p. 527 - 529.
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