Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Records 1 - 20 / 102

  • help
  • print

    Print search results

  • export

    Export search results

  • alert
    We will mail you new results for this query: q=Hare
Check title to add to marked list
Preweaning nutrient supply alters mammary gland transcriptome expression relating to morphology, lipid accumulation, DNA synthesis and RNA expression in Holstein heifer calves
Hare, K.S. ; Leal, Leonel N. ; Romao, Josue M. ; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J. ; Soberon, F. ; Berends, H. ; Amburgh, Michael E. Van; Martín-Tereso, Javier ; Steele, Michael A. - \ 2019
Wageningen University & Research
Bos taurus - GSE121715 - PRJNA498213
The objective of this study was to analyze the mammary gland transcriptome to determine how preweaning nutrient supply alters the molecular mechanisms that regulate preweaning mammary development. Holstein heifers were fed via milk replacer either an elevated level of nutrient intake (ELE; on average, 5.9 ± 0.2 Mcal ME in 8.4 L of milk replacer (MR)/d, n = 6) or a restricted amount of nutrients (RES; 2.8 ± 0.2 Mcal ME in 4L MR/day, n = 5) for 54 d postnatal, at which point they were slaughtered and samples of mammary parenchyma tissue were obtained. Parenchymal mRNA was analyzed and the fold changes (FC) of 18,111 genes (ELE relative to RES) were uploaded to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software for transcriptomic analysis. Using a threshold of P < 0.05, IPA identified that the FC of 1,931 of 18,811 differentially expressed genes (DEG) could be utilized for the analysis. A total 18 molecular and cellular functions were relevant (P < 0.05) to DE genes arising from the treatments, with Cell Death and Survival, Cellular Movement, Cellular Development, Cellular Growth and Proliferation, and Lipid Metabolism being the 5 most associated functions with DEG. Based on the directional FC of DEG, the mammary gland of ELE heifers was predicted to have increased Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (Z = 2.685) and Accumulation of Lipid (Z = 2.322), while the Synthesis of DNA (Z = -2.137), Transactivation of RNA (Z = -2.254), Expression of RNA (Z = -2.405), Transcription (Z = -2.482) and Transactivation (Z = -2.611) were all predicted to be decreased. Additionally, IPA predicted the activation status of 13 upstream regulators with direct influence on DEG as affected by ELE feeding that were either ligand-dependent nuclear receptors (n = 2), enzyme (n = 1), or transcription regulators (n = 10). Of these, 6 were activated (Z > 2) and 7 were inhibited (Z < -2). In summary, feeding ELE preweaning altered the mammary transcriptome of Holstein heifers affecting cell functions involved in the morphological and physiological development of the mammary gland
The fading boundaries between patient and environmental routes of triazole resistance selection in Aspergillus fumigatus
Buil, Jochem B. ; Hare, Rasmus K. ; Zwaan, Bas J. ; Arendrup, Maiken C. ; Melchers, Willem J.G. ; Verweij, Paul E. - \ 2019
PLoS Pathogens 15 (2019)8. - ISSN 1553-7366 - p. e1007858 - e1007858.
Aspergillus fumigatus is a saprobic fungus that may cause allergic syndromes, chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA), and acute invasive aspergillosis (IA). Many patients suffering from aspergillus diseases benefit from antifungal therapy. Itraconazole, voriconazole, posaconazole, and isavuconazole have been shown to be the most effective compounds for prevention and treatment of the various aspergillus diseases. The use of alternative antifungal drugs, i.e., liposomal amphotericin B, is limited by toxicity and the echinocandins by fungistatic activity, while both also require intravenous access. As a consequence, the triazoles have become the recommended option for first-line therapy and chemoprophylaxis. Unfortunately, the effective use of triazoles has been threatened by the emergence of resistance in A. fumigatus. In voriconazole-treated patients, day 42 survival was 21% lower in voriconazole-resistant IA compared with voriconazole-susceptible infection. As the number of available drug classes is already very limited, some aspergillus diseases, such as central nervous system IA, are virtually untreatable if caused by a triazole-resistant isolate.
Impact of vertebrate communities on Ixodes ricinus-borne disease risk in forest areas
Takumi, Katsuhisa ; Sprong, Hein ; Hofmeester, Tim R. - \ 2019
Parasites & Vectors 12 (2019)1. - ISSN 1756-3305
Anaplasma phagocytophilum - Borrelia burgdorferi (s.l.) - Borrelia miyamotoi - Ixodes ricinus - Lyme borreliosis - Neoehrlichia mikurensis - Transmission dynamics - Vector-borne disease

Background: The density of questing ticks infected with tick-borne pathogens is an important parameter that determines tick-borne disease risk. An important factor determining this density is the availability of different wildlife species as hosts for ticks and their pathogens. Here, we investigated how wildlife communities contribute to tick-borne disease risk. The density of Ixodes ricinus nymphs infected with Borrelia burgdorferi (sensu lato), Borrelia miyamotoi, Neoehrlichia mikurensis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum among 19 forest sites were correlated to the encounter probability of different vertebrate hosts, determined by encounter rates as measured by (camera) trapping and mathematical modeling. Result: We found that the density of any tick life stage was proportional to the encounter probability of ungulates. Moreover, the density of nymphs decreased with the encounter probability of hare, rabbit and red fox. The density of nymphs infected with the transovarially-transmitted B. miyamotoi increased with the density of questing nymphs and the encounter probability of bank vole. The density of nymphs infected with all other pathogens increased with the encounter probability of competent hosts: bank vole for Borrelia afzelii and N. mikurensis, ungulates for A. phagocytophilum and blackbird for Borrelia garinii and Borrelia valaisiana. The negative relationship we found was a decrease in the density of nymphs infected with B. garinii and B. valaisiana with the encounter probability of wood mouse. Conclusions: Only a few animal species drive the densities of infected nymphs in forested areas. There, foxes and leporids have negative effects on tick abundance, and consequently on the density of infected nymphs. The abundance of competent hosts generally drives the abundances of their tick-borne pathogen. A dilution effect was only observed for bird-associated Lyme spirochetes.[Figure not available: see fulltext.]

Towards optimal 1.5° and 2 °C emission pathways for individual countries : A Finland case study
Sferra, Fabio ; Krapp, Mario ; Roming, Niklas ; Schaeffer, Michiel ; Malik, Aman ; Hare, Bill ; Brecha, Robert - \ 2019
Energy Policy 133 (2019). - ISSN 0301-4215
1.5 °C pathway - Downscaling - Energy sector - Integrated assessment models - Mitigation - Paris agreement

Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) submitted so far under the Paris Agreement are not in line with its long-term temperature goal. To bridge this gap, countries are required to provide regular updates and enhancements of their long-term targets and strategies, based on scientific assessments. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate a policy-support approach for evaluating NDCs and guiding enhanced ambition. The approach rests on deriving national targets in line with the Paris Agreement by downscaling regional results of Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) to the country level. The method of downscaling relies on a reduced complexity IAM: SIAMESE (Simplified Integrated Assessment Model with Energy System Emulator). We apply the approach to an EU28 member state – Finland – with the aim of providing useful insights for policy makers to consider cost-effective mitigation options. Results over the historical period confirm that our approach is valid when national policies are similar to those across the larger IAM region, but must include country-specific circumstances. Strengths and limitations of the approach are discussed. We assess the remaining carbon budget and analyse the different implications of 2 °C and 1.5 °C global warming limits for the emissions pathway and energy mix in Finland over the 21st century.

Data from: Implications of shared predation for space use in two sympatric leporids
Weterings, M.J.A. ; Ewert, Sophie P. ; Peereboom, Jeffrey N. ; Kuipers, Henry J. ; Kuijper, Dries P.J. ; Prins, H.H.T. ; Jansen, P.A. ; Langevelde, F. van; Wieren, S.E. van - \ 2019
alternative prey - habitat characteristics - habitat riskiness - residence time - space race - vegetation structure - Lepus europaeus - Oryctolagus cuniculus - Vulpes vulpes
Spatial variation in habitat riskiness has a major influence on the predator–prey space race. However, the outcome of this race can be modulated if prey shares enemies with fellow prey (i.e., another prey species). Sharing of natural enemies may result in apparent competition, and its implications for prey space use remain poorly studied. Our objective was to test how prey species spend time among habitats that differ in riskiness, and how shared predation modulates the space use by prey species. We studied a one‐predator, two‐prey system in a coastal dune landscape in the Netherlands with the European hare (Lepus europaeus) and European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as sympatric prey species and red fox (Vulpes vulpes) as their main predator. The fine‐scale space use by each species was quantified using camera traps. We quantified residence time as an index of space use. Hares and rabbits spent time differently among habitats that differ in riskiness. Space use by predators and habitat riskiness affected space use by hares more strongly than space use by rabbits. Residence time of hare was shorter in habitats in which the predator was efficient in searching or capturing prey species. However, hares spent more time in edge habitat when foxes were present, even though foxes are considered ambush predators. Shared predation affected the predator–prey space race for hares positively, and more strongly than the predator–prey space race for rabbits, which were not affected. Shared predation reversed the predator–prey space race between foxes and hares, whereas shared predation possibly also released a negative association and promoted a positive association between our two sympatric prey species. Habitat riskiness, species presence, and prey species’ escape mode and foraging mode (i.e., central‐place vs. noncentral‐place forager) affected the prey space race under shared predation.
Implications of shared predation for space use in two sympatric leporids
Weterings, Martijn J.A. ; Ewert, Sophie P. ; Peereboom, Jeffrey N. ; Kuipers, Henry J. ; Kuijper, Dries P.J. ; Prins, Herbert H.T. ; Jansen, Patrick A. ; Langevelde, Frank van; Wieren, Sipke E. van - \ 2019
Ecology and Evolution 9 (2019)6. - ISSN 2045-7758 - p. 3457 - 3469.
Spatial variation in habitat riskiness has a major influence on the predator–prey space race. However, the outcome of this race can be modulated if prey shares enemies with fellow prey (i.e., another prey species). Sharing of natural enemies may result in apparent competition, and its implications for prey space use remain poorly studied. Our objective was to test how prey species spend time among habitats that differ in riskiness, and how shared predation modulates the space use by prey species. We studied a one‐predator, two‐prey system in a coastal dune landscape in the Netherlands with the European hare (Lepus europaeus) and European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as sympatric prey species and red fox (Vulpes vulpes) as their main predator. The fine‐scale space use by each species was quantified using camera traps. We quantified residence time as an index of space use. Hares and rabbits spent time differently among habitats that differ in riskiness. Space use by predators and habitat riskiness affected space use by hares more strongly than space use by rabbits. Residence time of hare was shorter in habitats in which the predator was efficient in searching or capturing prey species. However, hares spent more time in edge habitat when foxes were present, even though foxes are considered ambush predators. Shared predation affected the predator–prey space race for hares positively, and more strongly than the predator–prey space race for rabbits, which were not affected. Shared predation reversed the predator–prey space race between foxes and hares, whereas shared predation possibly also released a negative association and promoted a positive association between our two sympatric prey species. Habitat riskiness, species presence, and prey species’ escape mode and foraging mode (i.e., central‐place vs. noncentral‐place forager) affected the prey space race under shared predation.
Good practice in food-related neuroimaging
Smeets, Paul A.M. ; Dagher, Alain ; Hare, Todd A. ; Kullmann, Stephanie ; Laan, Laura N. van der; Poldrack, Russell A. ; Preissl, Hubert ; Small, Dana ; Stice, Eric ; Veldhuizen, Maria G. - \ 2019
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 109 (2019)3. - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 491 - 503.
aroma - data sharing - food choice - food viewing - functional magnetic resonance imaging - good practice - neuroimaging - satiation - taste

The use of neuroimaging tools, especially functional magnetic resonance imaging, in nutritional research has increased substantially over the past 2 decades. Neuroimaging is a research tool with great potential impact on the field of nutrition, but to achieve that potential, appropriate use of techniques and interpretation of neuroimaging results is necessary. In this article, we present guidelines for good methodological practice in functional magnetic resonance imaging studies and flag specific limitations in the hope of helping researchers to make the most of neuroimaging tools and avoid potential pitfalls. We highlight specific considerations for food-related studies, such as how to adjust statistically for common confounders, like, for example, hunger state, menstrual phase, and BMI, as well as how to optimally match different types of food stimuli. Finally, we summarize current research needs and future directions, such as the use of prospective designs and more realistic paradigms for studying eating behavior.

Phylogeographic distribution of human and hare Francisella tularenses susp. holarctica strains in the Netherlands and its pathology in European brown hares (Lepus europaeus)
Koene, M.G.J. ; Rijks, Jolianne M. ; Maas, Miriam ; Ruuls, R.C. ; Engelsma, M.Y. ; Tulden, P.W. van; Kik, Marja ; IJzer, Jooske ; Notermans, Daan ; Vries, Maaike de; Fanoy, Ewout ; Pijnacker, Roan ; Spierenburg, Marcel A.H. ; Bavelaar, Herjan ; Berkhout, Hanneke ; Sankatsing, Sanjay ; Diepersloot, Rob ; Myrtennas, Kerstin ; Granberg, Malin ; Forsman, Mats ; Roest, H.I.J. ; Gröne, Andrea - \ 2019
Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology 9 (2019). - ISSN 2235-2988 - 11 p.
Sequence-based typing of Francisella tularensis has led to insights in the evolutionary developments of tularemia. In Europe, two major basal clades of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica exist, with a distinct geographical distribution. Basal clade B.6 is primarily found in Western Europe, while basal clade B.12 occurs predominantly in the central and eastern parts of Europe. There are indications that tularemia is geographically expanding and that strains from the two clades might differ in pathogenicity, with basal clade B.6 strains being potentially more virulent than basal clade B.12. This study provides information on genotypes detected in the Netherlands during 2011–2017. Data are presented for seven autochthonous human cases and for 29 European brown hares (Lepus europaeus) with laboratory confirmed tularemia. Associated disease patterns are described for 25 European brown hares which underwent post-mortem examination. The basal clades B.6 and B.12 are present both in humans and in European brown hares in the Netherlands, with a patchy geographical distribution. For both genotypes the main pathological findings in hares associated with tularemia were severe (sub)acute necrotizing hepatitis and splenitis as well as necrotizing lesions and hemorrhages in several other organs. Pneumonia was significantly more common in the B.6 than in the B.12 cases. In conclusion, the two major basal clades present in different parts in Europe are both present in the Netherlands. In hares found dead, both genotypes were associated with severe acute disease affecting multiple organs. Hepatitis and splenitis were common pathological findings in hares infected with either genotype, but pneumonia occurred significantly more frequently in hares infected with the B.6 genotype compared to hares infected with the B.12 genotype.
Preweaning nutrient supply alters mammary gland transcriptome expression relating to morphology, lipid accumulation, DNA synthesis, and RNA expression in Holstein heifer calves
Hare, K.S. ; Leal, L.N. ; Romao, J.M. ; Hooiveld, G.J. ; Soberon, F. ; Berends, H. ; Amburgh, M.E. Van; Martín-Tereso, J. ; Steele, M.A. - \ 2019
Journal of Dairy Science 102 (2019)3. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. 2618 - 2630.
Holstein - mammary parenchyma - metabolizable energy - preweaning - transcriptome

The objective of this study was to analyze the mammary gland transcriptome to determine how preweaning nutrient supply alters the molecular mechanisms that regulate preweaning mammary development. Holstein heifers were fed via milk replacer (MR) either an elevated level of nutrient intake (ELE; on average, 5.9 ± 0.2 Mcal of ME in 8.4 L of MR/d, n = 6) or a restricted amount of nutrients (RES; 2.8 ± 0.2 Mcal of ME in 4 L of MR/d, n = 5) for 54 d after birth, at which point they were slaughtered and samples of mammary parenchyma tissue were obtained. Parenchymal mRNA was analyzed, and the fold change (FC) of 18,111 genes (ELE relative to RES) was uploaded to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software (Qiagen Bioinformatics, Redwood City, CA) for transcriptomic analysis. Using a threshold of P < 0.05, IPA identified that the FC of 1,931 of 18,811 differentially expressed genes (DEG) could be used for the analysis. A total of 18 molecular and cellular functions were relevant to DEG arising from the treatments; the 5 functions most associated with DEG were cell death and survival, cellular movement, cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation, and lipid metabolism. Based on the directional FC of DEG, the mammary gland of ELE heifers was predicted to have increased epithelial-mesenchymal transition (Z = 2.685) and accumulation of lipid (Z = 2.322), whereas the synthesis of DNA (Z = −2.137), transactivation of RNA (Z = −2.254), expression of RNA (Z = −2.405), transcription (Z = −2.482), and transactivation (Z = −2.611) were all predicted to be decreased. Additionally, IPA predicted the activation status of 13 upstream regulators with direct influence on DEG as affected by ELE feeding that were ligand-dependent nuclear receptors (n = 2), enzymes (n = 1), or transcription regulators (n = 10). Of these, 6 were activated (Z > 2) and 7 were inhibited (Z < −2). In summary, feeding ELE preweaning altered the mammary transcriptome of Holstein heifers, affecting cell functions involved in the morphological and physiological development of the mammary gland.

Extending Near-Term Emissions Scenarios to Assess Warming Implications of Paris Agreement NDCs
Gutschow, J. ; Jeffery, Mairi L. ; Hare, Bill ; Schaeffer, M. - \ 2018
Earth's Future 6 (2018). - ISSN 2328-4277 - p. 1242 - 1259.
In the Paris Agreement countries have agreed to act together to hold global warming well below 2°C over preindustrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit warming to 1.5°C. To assess if the world is on track to meet this long‐term temperature goal, countries' pledged emissions reductions (Nationally Determined Contributions, NDCs) need to be analyzed for their implied warming. Several research groups and nongovernmental organizations have estimated this warming and arrived at very different results but have invariably concluded that the current pledges are inadequate to hold warming below 2°C, let alone 1.5°C. In this paper we analyze different methods to estimate 2100 global mean temperature rise implied by countries' NDCs, which often only specify commitments until 2030. We present different methods to extend near‐term emissions pathways that have been developed by the authors or used by different research groups and nongovernmental organizations to estimate 21st century warming consequences of Paris Agreement commitments. The abilities of these methods to project both low and high warming scenarios in line with the scenario literature is assessed. We find that the simpler methods are not suitable for temperature projections while more complex methods can produce results consistent with the energy and economic scenario literature. We further find that some methods can have a strong high or low temperature bias depending on parameter choices. The choice of methods to evaluate the consistency of aggregated NDC commitments is very important for reviewing progress toward the Paris Agreement's long‐term temperature goal.
1.5°C Hotspots : Climate hazards, vulnerabilities, and impacts
Schleussner, Carl-Friedrich ; Deryng, Delphine ; Haen, Sarah D'; Hare, William ; Lissner, Tabea ; Ly, Mouhamed ; Nauels, Alexander ; Noblet, Melinda ; Pfleiderer, Peter ; Pringle, Patrick ; Rokitzki, Martin ; Saeed, Fahad ; Schaeffer, Michiel ; Serdeczny, Olivia ; Thomas, Adelle - \ 2018
Annual Review of Environment and Resources 43 (2018). - ISSN 1543-5938 - p. 135 - 163.
1.5°C - extreme weather events - hotspots - sea level rise - small islands - vulnerability

Differentiating the impacts of climate change between 1.5°C and 2°C requires a regional and sector-specific perspective. Whereas for some regions and sectors the difference in climate variables might be indistinguishable from natural variability, other areas especially in the tropics and subtropics will experience significant shifts. In addition to region-specific changes in climatic conditions, vulnerability and exposure also differ substantially across the world. Even small differences in climate hazards can translate into sizeable impact differences for particularly vulnerable regions or sectors. Here, we review scientific evidence of regional differences in climate hazards at 1.5°C and 2°C and provide an assessment of selected hotspots of climate change, including small islands as well as rural, urban, and coastal areas in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, that are particularly affected by the additional 0.5°C global mean temperature increase. We interlink these with a review of the vulnerability and exposure literature related to these hotspots to provide an integrated perspective on the differences in climate impacts between 1.5°C and 2°C.

Data from: Food quality and quantity is more important in explaining foraging of an intermediate-sized mammalian herbivore than predation risk or competition
Weterings, M.J.A. ; Moonen, Sander ; Prins, H.H.T. ; Wieren, S.E. van; Langevelde, F. van - \ 2018
accelerometer - prey behaviour - GPS - herbivore - plant resources - space use - Lepus europaeus
During times of high activity by predators and competitors, herbivores may be forced to forage in patches of low-quality food. However, the relative importance in determining where and what herbivores forage still remains unclear, especially for small and intermediate-sized herbivores. Our objective was to test the relative importance of predator and competitor activity, and forage quality and quantity on the proportion of time spent in a vegetation type and the proportion of time spent foraging by the intermediate-sized herbivore European hare (Lepus europaeus). We studied red fox (Vulpes vulpes) as a predator species and European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as a competitor. We investigated the time spent at a location and foraging time of hare using GPS with accelerometers. Forage quality and quantity was analysed based on hand-plucked samples of a selection of the locally most important plant species in the diet of hare. Predator and competitor activity was investigated using a network of camera traps. Hares spent a higher proportion of time in vegetation types that contained a higher percentage of fibres (i.e., NDF). Besides, hares spent a higher proportion of time in vegetation types that contained relatively low food quantity and quality of forage (i.e., high percentage of fibres) during days that foxes (Vulpes vulpes) were more active. Also during days that rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were more active, hares spent a higher proportion of time foraging in vegetation types that contained a relatively low quality of forage. Although predation risk affected space use and foraging behaviour, and competition affected foraging behaviour, our study shows that food quality and quantity more strongly affected space use and foraging behaviour than predation risk or competition. It seems that we need to reconsider the relative importance of the landscape of food in a world of fear and competition.
Food quality and quantity are more important in explaining foraging of an intermediate-sized mammalian herbivore than predation risk or competition
Weterings, Martijn J.A. ; Moonen, Sander ; Prins, Herbert H.T. ; Wieren, Sipke E. van; Langevelde, Frank van - \ 2018
Ecology and Evolution 8 (2018)16. - ISSN 2045-7758 - p. 8419 - 8432.
During times of high activity by predators and competitors, herbivores may be forced to forage in patches of low‐quality food. However, the relative importance in determining where and what herbivores forage still remains unclear, especially for small‐ and intermediate‐sized herbivores. Our objective was to test the relative importance of predator and competitor activity, and forage quality and quantity on the proportion of time spent in a vegetation type and the proportion of time spent foraging by the intermediate‐sized herbivore European hare (Lepus europaeus). We studied red fox (Vulpes vulpes) as a predator species and European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) as a competitor. We investigated the time spent at a location and foraging time of hare using GPS with accelerometers. Forage quality and quantity were analyzed based on hand‐plucked samples of a selection of the locally most important plant species in the diet of hare. Predator activity and competitor activity were investigated using a network of camera traps. Hares spent a higher proportion of time in vegetation types that contained a higher percentage of fibers (i.e., NDF). Besides, hares spent a higher proportion of time in vegetation types that contained relatively low food quantity and quality of forage (i.e., high percentage of fibers) during days that foxes (Vulpes vulpes) were more active. Also during days that rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) were more active, hares spent a higher proportion of time foraging in vegetation types that contained a relatively low quality of forage. Although predation risk affected space use and foraging behavior, and competition affected foraging behavior, our study shows that food quality and quantity more strongly affected space use and foraging behavior than predation risk or competition. It seems that we need to reconsider the relative importance of the landscape of food in a world of fear and competition.
Brucella suis infection in dog fed raw meat, the Netherlands
Dijk, Marloes A.M. van; Engelsma, Marc Y. ; Visser, Vanessa X.N. ; Spierenburg, Marcel A.H. ; Holtslag, Marjolijn E. ; Willemsen, Peter T.J. ; Wagenaar, Jaap A. ; Broens, Els M. ; Roest, Hendrik I.J. - \ 2018
Emerging Infectious Diseases 24 (2018)6. - ISSN 1080-6040 - p. 1127 - 1129.
A Brucella suis biovar 1 infection was diagnosed in a dog without typical exposure risks, but the dog had been fed a raw meat–based diet (hare carcasses imported from Argen-tina). Track and trace investigations revealed that the most likely source of infection was the dog’s raw meat diet.
Effects of predation risk and habitat characteristics on European hare
Weterings, Martijn J.A. - \ 2018
Wageningen University. Promotor(en): H.H.T. Prins, co-promotor(en): F. van Langevelde; S.E. van Wieren. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463438681 - 182
Systematic variation of membrane casting parameters to control the structure of thermo-responsive isoporous membranes
Mocan, Merve ; Wahdat, Hares ; Kooij, Hanne M. van der; Vos, Wiebe M. de; Kamperman, Marleen - \ 2018
Journal of Membrane Science 548 (2018). - ISSN 0376-7388 - p. 502 - 509.
Block copolymer self-assembly - Fully reversible thermo-responsive nanoporous isoporous block copolymer membranes - PS-PNIPAM block copolymers - RAFT polymerization - Self-assembly and non-solvent induced phase separation (SNIPS) method
Fouling is a critical issue in membrane process operation as it greatly compromises the efficiency of the treatment processes. A promising approach to overcome this problem is the production of easy-to-clean membranes by incorporating stimuli-responsive pores. In this study, we fabricated thermo-responsive polystyrene-b-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) (PS-b-PNIPAM) block copolymer membranes using the self-assembly and non-solvent induced phase separation (SNIPS) method and systematically varied several membrane casting parameters, i.e. evaporation time, polymer concentration, solvent type and water content, to obtain nano- and isoporous membranes. Membranes with a disordered surface were obtained for PS selective solvents, whereas isoporous membranes were obtained when the block copolymers were dissolved in PNIPAM selective solvent mixtures. Using 1,4-dioxane/ tetrahydrofuran mixtures resulted in isoporous membranes for a large parameter space, indicating the robustness of structure formation in the PS-b-PNIPAM system. Permeability tests at various temperatures demonstrated fully reversible thermo-responsive behavior of the membranes.
Ten key short-term sectoral benchmarks to limit warming to 1.5º C
Kuramochi, Takeshi ; Hoehne, N.E. ; Schaeffer, M. ; Cantzler, Jasmin ; Hare, William ; Deng, Yvonne ; Sterl, Sebastian ; Hagemann, Markus ; Rocha, Marcia ; Yanguas-Parra, Paola Andrea ; Mir, Goher-Ur-Rehman ; Wong, Lindee ; El-Laboudy, Tarik ; Wouters, Karlien ; Deryng, Delphine ; Blok, Kornelis - \ 2018
Climate Policy 18 (2018)3. - ISSN 1469-3062 - p. 287 - 305.
Benchmarking - COP21 - mitigation scenarios - Paris Agreement - technological change - transition - UNFCCC - 1.5º C
This article identifies and quantifies the 10 most important benchmarks for climate action to be taken by 2020–2025 to keep the window open for a 1.5°C-consistent GHG emission pathway. We conducted a comprehensive review of existing emissions scenarios, scanned all sectors and the respective necessary transitions, and distilled the most important short-term benchmarks for action in line with the long-term perspective of the required global low-carbon transition. Owing to the limited carbon budget, combined with the inertia of existing systems, global energy economic models find only limited pathways to stay on track for a 1.5°C world consistent with the long-term temperature goal of the Paris Agreement.
Piecing Together the Adaptation Puzzle for Small Island States
Lissner, Tabea K. ; Schleussner, Carl Friedrich ; Serdeczny, Olivia ; Baarsch, Florent ; Schaeffer, Michiel ; Hare, Bill - \ 2017
In: Climate Change Adaptation in Pacific Countries / Filho, W.L., Cham : Springer (Climate Change Management ) - ISBN 9783319500935 - p. 325 - 337.
Climate impacts - Database - Knowledge integration

Island states are especially at risk of climate impacts and are already feeling the effects of rising sea levels, acidification, climate extremes and other impacts. Small islands face several unique challenges: They usually have limited resources to react, but are exceptionally exposed due to their physical setting and limited livelihood options. In addition, they are remote and not easily reached in time of crisis, making adaptation an imperative. This contribution presents the concept for an integrated database on climate impacts and adaptation, focussing specifically on the requirements of small island states. The database contains information on climate impact projections, linked to examples of existing adaptation projects. The database provides a structured overview of success-factors and limitations, piecing together fragmented knowledge and fostering knowledge exchange across regions in order to support science-based adaptation. While adaptation experience is increasing, including an evolving understanding of prerequisites and limitations to specific forms of adaptation, knowledge is still fragmented, due to the mostly local nature of adaptation. Island states across the world can benefit from a structured exchange, focussing on the transferability of success-criteria for adaptation. An improved knowledge base is also important for other regions, which will face similar challenges in the coming years.

Environmental surveillance during an outbreak of tularaemia in hares, the Netherlands, 2015
Janse, Ingmar ; Maas, M. ; Rijks, J.M. ; Koene, M. ; Plaats, R.Q. van der; Engelsma, M. ; Tas, P.W.L. ; Braks, M. ; Stroo, A. ; Notermans, D.W. ; Vries, M.C. de; Reubsaet, F.A.G. ; Fanoy, E. ; Swaan, C.M. ; Kik, M.J. ; Ijzer, J. ; Jaarsma, R.I. ; Wieren, S. van; Roda Husman, A.M. de; Passel, M. van; Roest, H. ; Giessen, J. van der - \ 2017
Eurosurveillance 22 (2017)35. - ISSN 1025-496X
Tularaemia, a disease caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis, is a re-emerging zoonosis in the Netherlands. After sporadic human and hare cases occurred in the period 2011 to 2014, a cluster of F. tularensis-infected hares was recognised in a region in the north of the Netherlands from February to May 2015. No human cases were identified, including after active case finding. Presence of F. tularensis was investigated in potential reservoirs and transmission routes, including common voles, arthropod vectors and surface waters. F. tularensis was not detected in common voles, mosquito larvae or adults, tabanids or ticks. However, the bacterium was detected in water and sediment samples collected in a limited geographical area where infected hares had also been found. These results demonstrate that water monitoring could provide valuable information regarding F. tularensis spread and persistence, and should be used in addition to disease surveillance in wildlife.
Climate change impacts in Sub-Saharan Africa : from physical changes to their social repercussions
Serdeczny, Olivia ; Adams, Sophie ; Baarsch, Florent ; Coumou, Dim ; Robinson, Alexander ; Hare, William ; Schaeffer, Michiel ; Perrette, Mahé ; Reinhardt, Julia - \ 2017
Regional Environmental Change 17 (2017)6. - ISSN 1436-3798 - p. 1585 - 1600.
Climate change - Impacts - Sub-Saharan Africa - Vulnerability

The repercussions of climate change will be felt in various ways throughout both natural and human systems in Sub-Saharan Africa. Climate change projections for this region point to a warming trend, particularly in the inland subtropics; frequent occurrence of extreme heat events; increasing aridity; and changes in rainfall—with a particularly pronounced decline in southern Africa and an increase in East Africa. The region could also experience as much as one meter of sea-level rise by the end of this century under a 4 °C warming scenario. Sub-Saharan Africa’s already high rates of undernutrition and infectious disease can be expected to increase compared to a scenario without climate change. Particularly vulnerable to these climatic changes are the rainfed agricultural systems on which the livelihoods of a large proportion of the region’s population currently depend. As agricultural livelihoods become more precarious, the rate of rural–urban migration may be expected to grow, adding to the already significant urbanization trend in the region. The movement of people into informal settlements may expose them to a variety of risks different but no less serious than those faced in their place of origin, including outbreaks of infectious disease, flash flooding and food price increases. Impacts across sectors are likely to amplify the overall effect but remain little understood.

Check title to add to marked list
<< previous | next >>

Show 20 50 100 records per page

 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.