Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

    Records 1 - 20 / 528

    • help
    • print

      Print search results

    • export
      A maximum of 250 titles can be exported. Please, refine your queryYou can also select and export up to 30 titles via your marked list.
    Check title to add to marked list
    Wie doodt de agressieve Japanse duizendknoop, de ninja onder de invasieve exoten?
    Dijk, Chris van - \ 2020

    BNDe Japanse duizendknoop is de ninja onder de agressieve planten. Hij is nauwelijks te bestrijden. De wortel beschadigt gebouwen, taluds en rioleringen. Gilze en Rijen komt in december met een plan. Maar is dat wel op tijd?

    Correction to: Rewiring of glucose metabolism defines trained immunity induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein
    Keating, Samuel T. ; Groh, Laszlo ; Thiem, Kathrin ; Bekkering, Siroon ; Li, Yang ; Matzaraki, Vasiliki ; Heijden, Charlotte D.C.C. van der; Puffelen, Jelmer H. van; Lachmandas, Ekta ; Jansen, Trees ; Oosting, Marije ; Bree, L.C.J. de; Koeken, Valerie A.C.M. ; Moorlag, Simone J.C.F.M. ; Mourits, Vera P. ; Diepen, Janna van; Stienstra, Rinke ; Novakovic, Boris ; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G. ; Crevel, Reinout van; Joosten, Leo A.B. ; Netea, Mihai G. ; Riksen, Niels P. - \ 2020
    Journal of Molecular Medicine 98 (2020). - ISSN 0946-2716

    The correct name of the 17th Author is presented in this paper. In the paragraph “Metabolic analysis” of the Method section “an XFp Analyzer” should be changed to “an XFe96 Analyzer”.

    Rewiring of glucose metabolism defines trained immunity induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein
    Keating, Samuel T. ; Groh, Laszlo ; Thiem, Kathrin ; Bekkering, Siroon ; Li, Yang ; Matzaraki, Vasiliki ; Heijden, Charlotte D.C.C. van der; Puffelen, Jelmer H. van; Lachmandas, Ekta ; Jansen, Trees ; Oosting, Marije ; Bree, L.C.J. de; Koeken, Valerie A.C.M. ; Moorlag, Simone J.C.F.M. ; Mourits, Vera P. ; Diepen, Janna van; Stienstra, Rinke ; Novakovic, Boris ; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G. ; Crevel, Reinout van; Joosten, Leo A.B. ; Netea, Mihai G. ; Riksen, Niels P. - \ 2020
    Journal of Molecular Medicine 98 (2020). - ISSN 0946-2716 - p. 819 - 831.
    Atherosclerosis - Cardiovascular disease - Diabetes complications - Glycolysis - Immunometabolism - Inflammation - Trained immunity

    Abstract: Stimulation of monocytes with microbial and non-microbial products, including oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL), induces a protracted pro-inflammatory, atherogenic phenotype sustained by metabolic and epigenetic reprogramming via a process called trained immunity. We investigated the intracellular metabolic mechanisms driving oxLDL-induced trained immunity in human primary monocytes and observed concomitant upregulation of glycolytic activity and oxygen consumption. In two separate cohorts of healthy volunteers, we assessed the impact of genetic variation in glycolytic genes on the training capacity of monocytes and found that variants mapped to glycolytic enzymes PFKFB3 and PFKP influenced trained immunity by oxLDL. Subsequent functional validation with inhibitors of glycolytic metabolism revealed dose-dependent inhibition of trained immunity in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo administration of the glucose metabolism modulator metformin abrogated the ability for human monocytes to mount a trained response to oxLDL. These findings underscore the importance of cellular metabolism for oxLDL-induced trained immunity and highlight potential immunomodulatory strategies for clinical management of atherosclerosis. Key messages: Brief stimulation of monocytes to oxLDL induces a prolonged inflammatory phenotype.This is due to upregulation of glycolytic metabolism.Genetic variation in glycolytic genes modulates oxLDL-induced trained immunity.Pharmacological inhibition of glycolysis prevents trained immunity.

    Phenotypic and lifestyle determinants of HbA1c in the general population – the Hoorn study
    Wisgerhof, Willem ; Ruijgrok, Carolien ; Braver, Nicole R. Den; Borgonjen—van Den Berg, Karin J. ; Heijden, Amber A.W.A. Van Der; Elders, Petra J.M. ; Beulens, Joline W.J. ; Alssema, Marjan - \ 2020
    PLoS ONE 15 (2020)6. - ISSN 1932-6203

    Aim To investigate the relative contribution of phenotypic and lifestyle factors to HbA1c, independent of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2h post-load glucose (2hPG), in the general population. Methods The study populations included 2309 participants without known diabetes from the first wave of the Hoorn Study (1989) and 2619 from the second wave (2006). Multivariate linear regression models were used to analyze the relationship between potential determinants and HbA1c in addition to FPG and 2hPG. The multivariate model was derived in the first wave of the Hoorn Study, and replicated in the second wave. Results In both cohorts, independent of FPG and 2hPG, higher age, female sex, larger waist circumference, and smoking were associated with a higher HbA1c level. Larger hip circumference, higher BMI, higher alcohol consumption and vitamin C intake were associated with a lower HbA1c level. FPG and 2hPG together explained 41.0% (first wave) and 53.0% (second wave) of the total variance in HbA1c. The combination of phenotypic and lifestyle determinants additionally explained 5.7% (first wave) and 3.9% (second wave). Conclusions This study suggests that, independent of glucose, phenotypic and lifestyle factors are associated with HbA1c, but the contribution is relatively small. These findings contribute to a better understanding of the low correlation between glucose levels and HbA1c in the general population.

    Heritability estimates for 361 blood metabolites across 40 genome-wide association studies
    Hagenbeek, Fiona A. ; Pool, René ; Dongen, Jenny van; Draisma, H.M. ; Jan Hottenga, Jouke ; Willemsen, Gonneke ; Abdellaoui, Abdel ; Fedko, Iryna O. ; Braber, Anouk den; Visser, Pieter Jelle ; Geus, Eco J.C.N. de; Willems van Dijk, Ko ; Verhoeven, Aswin ; Suchiman, H.E. ; Beekman, Marian ; Slagboom, P.E. ; Duijn, Cornelia M. van; Barkey Wolf, J.J.H. ; Cats, D. ; Amin, N. ; Beulens, J.W. ; Bom, J.A. van der; Bomer, N. ; Demirkan, A. ; Hilten, J.A. van; Meessen, J.M.T.A. ; Moed, M.H. ; Fu, J. ; Onderwater, G.L.J. ; Rutters, F. ; So-Osman, C. ; Flier, W.M. van der; Heijden, A.A.W.A. van der; Spek, A. van der; Asselbergs, F.W. ; Boersma, E. ; Elders, P.M. ; Geleijnse, J.M. ; Ikram, M.A. ; Kloppenburg, M. ; Meulenbelt, I. ; Mooijaart, S.P. ; Nelissen, R.G.H.H. ; Netea, M.G. ; Penninx, B.W.J.H. ; Stehouwer, C.D.A. ; Teunissen, C.E. ; Terwindt, G.M. ; Jukema, J.W. ; Reinders, M.J.T. - \ 2020
    Nature Communications 11 (2020)1. - ISSN 2041-1723

    The original version of the Supplementary Information associated with this Article included an incorrect Supplementary Data 1 file, in which additional delimiters were included in the first column for a number of rows, resulting in column shifts for some of these rows. The HTML has been updated to include a corrected version of Supplementary Data 1; the original incorrect version of Supplementary Data 1 can be found as Supplementary Information associated with this Correction. In addition, the original version of this Article contained an error in the author affiliations. An affiliation of Abdel Abdellaoui with Department of Psychiatry, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands was inadvertently omitted. This has now been corrected in both the PDF and HTML versions of the Article.

    Interdisciplinary communication and collaboration as key to improved nutritional care of malnourished older adults across health‐care settings – A qualitative study
    Verwijs, Marije H. ; Puijk‐Hekman, Saskia ; Heijden, Ellen ; Vasse, Emmelyne ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. ; Schueren, Marian A.E. - \ 2020
    Health Expectations (2020). - ISSN 1369-6513
















    Background
    Malnutrition is a risk factor for impaired functionality and independence. For optimal treatment of malnourished older adults (OA), close collaboration and communication between all stakeholders involved (OA, their caregivers and health‐care and welfare professionals) is important. This qualitative study assesses current collaboration and communication in nutritional care over the continuum of health‐care settings and provides recommendations for improvement.
    Methods
    Eleven structured focus group interviews and five individual interviews took place in three regions across the Netherlands from November 2017 until February 2018, including OA, caregivers and health‐care and welfare professionals. Various aspects of collaboration and communication between all stakeholders were discussed. Interviews were transcribed and analysed using a thematic approach.
    Results
    Six main themes emerged: causes of malnutrition, knowledge and awareness, recognition and diagnosis of malnutrition, communication, accountability and food preparation and supply. Physical and social aspects were recognized as important risk factors for malnutrition. Knowledge and awareness regarding malnutrition were acknowledged as being insufficient among all involved. This may impair timely recognition and diagnosis. Responsibility for nutritional care and its communication to other disciplines are low. Food preparation and supply in hospitals, rehabilitation centres and home care are below expected standards.
    Conclusion
    Many stakeholders are involved in nutritional care of OA, and lack of communication and collaboration hinders continuity of nutritional care over health‐care settings. Lack of knowledge is an important risk factor. Establishing one coordinator of nutritional care is suggested to improve collaboration and communication across health‐care settings.
    Long-term thermal sensitivity of Earth's tropical forests
    Sullivan, Martin J.P. ; Lewis, Simon L. ; Affum-Baffoe, Kofi ; Castilho, Carolina ; Costa, Flávia ; Sanchez, Aida Cuni ; Ewango, Corneille E.N. ; Hubau, Wannes ; Marimon, Beatriz ; Monteagudo-Mendoza, Abel ; Qie, Lan ; Sonké, Bonaventure ; Martinez, Rodolfo Vasquez ; Baker, Timothy R. ; Brienen, Roel J.W. ; Feldpausch, Ted R. ; Galbraith, David ; Gloor, Manuel ; Malhi, Yadvinder ; Aiba, Shin Ichiro ; Alexiades, Miguel N. ; Almeida, Everton C. ; Oliveira, Edmar Almeida de; Dávila, Esteban Álvarez ; Loayza, Patricia Alvarez ; Andrade, Ana ; Vieira, Simone Aparecida ; Aragão, Luiz E.O.C. ; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro ; Arets, Eric J.M.M. ; Arroyo, Luzmila ; Ashton, Peter ; Aymard C, Gerardo ; Baccaro, Fabrício B. ; Banin, Lindsay F. ; Baraloto, Christopher ; Camargo, Plínio Barbosa ; Barlow, Jos ; Barroso, Jorcely ; Bastin, Jean François ; Batterman, Sarah A. ; Beeckman, Hans ; Begne, Serge K. ; Bennett, Amy C. ; Berenguer, Erika ; Berry, Nicholas ; Blanc, Lilian ; Boeckx, Pascal ; Bogaert, Jan ; Bonal, Damien ; Bongers, Frans ; Bradford, Matt ; Brearley, Francis Q. ; Brncic, Terry ; Brown, Foster ; Burban, Benoit ; Camargo, José Luís ; Castro, Wendeson ; Céron, Carlos ; Ribeiro, Sabina Cerruto ; Moscoso, Victor Chama ; Chave, Jerôme ; Chezeaux, Eric ; Clark, Connie J. ; Souza, Fernanda Coelho de; Collins, Murray ; Comiskey, James A. ; Valverde, Fernando Cornejo ; Medina, Massiel Corrales ; Costa, Lola da; Dančák, Martin ; Dargie, Greta C. ; Davies, Stuart ; Cardozo, Nallaret Davila ; Haulleville, Thales de; Medeiros, Marcelo Brilhante de; Aguila Pasquel, Jhon Del; Derroire, Géraldine ; Fiore, Anthony Di; Doucet, Jean Louis ; Dourdain, Aurélie ; Droissant, Vincent ; Duque, Luisa Fernanda ; Ekoungoulou, Romeo ; Elias, Fernando ; Erwin, Terry ; Esquivel-Muelbert, Adriane ; Fauset, Sophie ; Ferreira, Joice ; Llampazo, Gerardo Flores ; Foli, Ernest ; Ford, Andrew ; Gilpin, Martin ; Hall, Jefferson S. ; Hamer, Keith C. ; Hamilton, Alan C. ; Harris, David J. ; Hart, Terese B. ; Hédl, Radim ; Herault, Bruno ; Herrera, Rafael ; Higuchi, Niro ; Hladik, Annette ; Coronado, Eurídice Honorio ; Huamantupa-Chuquimaco, Isau ; Huasco, Walter Huaraca ; Jeffery, Kathryn J. ; Jimenez-Rojas, Eliana ; Kalamandeen, Michelle ; Djuikouo, Marie Noël Kamdem ; Kearsley, Elizabeth ; Umetsu, Ricardo Keichi ; Kho, Lip Khoon ; Killeen, Timothy ; Kitayama, Kanehiro ; Klitgaard, Bente ; Koch, Alexander ; Labrière, Nicolas ; Laurance, William ; Laurance, Susan ; Leal, Miguel E. ; Levesley, Aurora ; Lima, Adriano J.N. ; Lisingo, Janvier ; Lopes, Aline P. ; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela ; Lovejoy, Tom ; Lovett, Jon C. ; Lowe, Richard ; Magnusson, William E. ; Malumbres-Olarte, Jagoba ; Manzatto, Ângelo Gilberto ; Marimon, Ben Hur ; Marshall, Andrew R. ; Marthews, Toby ; Almeida Reis, Simone Matias de; Maycock, Colin ; Melgaço, Karina ; Mendoza, Casimiro ; Metali, Faizah ; Mihindou, Vianet ; Milliken, William ; Mitchard, Edward T.A. ; Morandi, Paulo S. ; Mossman, Hannah L. ; Nagy, Laszlo ; Nascimento, Henrique ; Neill, David ; Nilus, Reuben ; Vargas, Percy Núñez ; Palacios, Walter ; Camacho, Nadir Pallqui ; Peacock, Julie ; Pendry, Colin ; Peñuela Mora, Maria Cristina ; Pickavance, Georgia C. ; Pipoly, John ; Pitman, Nigel ; Playfair, Maureen ; Poorter, Lourens ; Poulsen, John R. ; Poulsen, Axel Dalberg ; Preziosi, Richard ; Prieto, Adriana ; Primack, Richard B. ; Ramírez-Angulo, Hirma ; Reitsma, Jan ; Réjou-Méchain, Maxime ; Correa, Zorayda Restrepo ; Sousa, Thaiane Rodrigues de; Bayona, Lily Rodriguez ; Roopsind, Anand ; Rudas, Agustín ; Rutishauser, Ervan ; Abu Salim, Kamariah ; Salomão, Rafael P. ; Schietti, Juliana ; Sheil, Douglas ; Silva, Richarlly C. ; Espejo, Javier Silva ; Valeria, Camila Silva ; Silveira, Marcos ; Simo-Droissart, Murielle ; Simon, Marcelo Fragomeni ; Singh, James ; Soto Shareva, Yahn Carlos ; Stahl, Clement ; Stropp, Juliana ; Sukri, Rahayu ; Sunderland, Terry ; Svátek, Martin ; Swaine, Michael D. ; Swamy, Varun ; Taedoumg, Hermann ; Talbot, Joey ; Taplin, James ; Taylor, David ; Steege, Hans Ter; Terborgh, John ; Thomas, Raquel ; Thomas, Sean C. ; Torres-Lezama, Armando ; Umunay, Peter ; Gamarra, Luis Valenzuela ; Heijden, Geertje van der; Hout, Peter van der; Meer, Peter van der; Nieuwstadt, Mark van; Verbeeck, Hans ; Vernimmen, Ronald ; Vicentini, Alberto ; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães ; Torre, Emilio Vilanova ; Vleminckx, Jason ; Vos, Vincent ; Wang, Ophelia ; White, Lee J.T. ; Willcock, Simon ; Woods, John T. ; Wortel, Verginia ; Young, Kenneth ; Zagt, Roderick ; Zemagho, Lise ; Zuidema, Pieter A. ; Zwerts, Joeri A. ; Phillips, Oliver L. - \ 2020
    Science 368 (2020)6493. - ISSN 0036-8075 - p. 869 - 874.

    The sensitivity of tropical forest carbon to climate is a key uncertainty in predicting global climate change. Although short-term drying and warming are known to affect forests, it is unknown if such effects translate into long-term responses. Here, we analyze 590 permanent plots measured across the tropics to derive the equilibrium climate controls on forest carbon. Maximum temperature is the most important predictor of aboveground biomass (-9.1 megagrams of carbon per hectare per degree Celsius), primarily by reducing woody productivity, and has a greater impact per °C in the hottest forests (>32.2°C). Our results nevertheless reveal greater thermal resilience than observations of short-term variation imply. To realize the long-term climate adaptation potential of tropical forests requires both protecting them and stabilizing Earth's climate.

    Competition influences tree growth, but not mortality, across environmental gradients in Amazonia and tropical Africa
    Rozendaal, Danaë M.A. ; Phillips, Oliver L. ; Lewis, Simon L. ; Affum-Baffoe, Kofi ; Alvarez-Davila, Esteban ; Andrade, Ana ; Aragão, Luiz E.O.C. ; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro ; Baker, Timothy R. ; Bánki, Olaf ; Brienen, Roel J.W. ; Camargo, José Luis C. ; Comiskey, James A. ; Djuikouo Kamdem, Marie Noël ; Fauset, Sophie ; Feldpausch, Ted R. ; Killeen, Timothy J. ; Laurance, William F. ; Laurance, Susan G.W. ; Lovejoy, Thomas ; Malhi, Yadvinder ; Marimon, Beatriz S. ; Marimon Junior, Ben Hur ; Marshall, Andrew R. ; Neill, David A. ; Núñez Vargas, Percy ; Pitman, Nigel C.A. ; Poorter, Lourens ; Reitsma, Jan ; Silveira, Marcos ; Sonké, Bonaventure ; Sunderland, Terry ; Taedoumg, Hermann ; Steege, Hans ter; Terborgh, John W. ; Umetsu, Ricardo K. ; Heijden, Geertje M.F. van der; Vilanova, Emilio ; Vos, Vincent ; White, Lee J.T. ; Willcock, Simon ; Zemagho, Lise ; Vanderwel, Mark C. - \ 2020
    Ecology 101 (2020)7. - ISSN 0012-9658
    climatic water deficit - competition - forest dynamics - mortality - neighborhood effects - soil fertility - trait-based models - tree growth - tropical forest - wood density

    Competition among trees is an important driver of community structure and dynamics in tropical forests. Neighboring trees may impact an individual tree’s growth rate and probability of mortality, but large-scale geographic and environmental variation in these competitive effects has yet to be evaluated across the tropical forest biome. We quantified effects of competition on tree-level basal area growth and mortality for trees ≥10-cm diameter across 151 ~1-ha plots in mature tropical forests in Amazonia and tropical Africa by developing nonlinear models that accounted for wood density, tree size, and neighborhood crowding. Using these models, we assessed how water availability (i.e., climatic water deficit) and soil fertility influenced the predicted plot-level strength of competition (i.e., the extent to which growth is reduced, or mortality is increased, by competition across all individual trees). On both continents, tree basal area growth decreased with wood density and increased with tree size. Growth decreased with neighborhood crowding, which suggests that competition is important. Tree mortality decreased with wood density and generally increased with tree size, but was apparently unaffected by neighborhood crowding. Across plots, variation in the plot-level strength of competition was most strongly related to plot basal area (i.e., the sum of the basal area of all trees in a plot), with greater reductions in growth occurring in forests with high basal area, but in Amazonia, the strength of competition also varied with plot-level wood density. In Amazonia, the strength of competition increased with water availability because of the greater basal area of wetter forests, but was only weakly related to soil fertility. In Africa, competition was weakly related to soil fertility and invariant across the shorter water availability gradient. Overall, our results suggest that competition influences the structure and dynamics of tropical forests primarily through effects on individual tree growth rather than mortality and that the strength of competition largely depends on environment-mediated variation in basal area.

    De Cubaanse aquacultuursector
    Heijden, P.G.M. van der; Verdecia Batista, Pedro - \ 2020
    Aquacultuur 35 (2020)1. - ISSN 1382-2764 - p. 34 - 41.
    Hieronder een schets van de aquacultuursector in Cuba. De productie van garnalenlarven zoals die in Yaguanabo Shrimp Hatchery (Cuba’s enige broedhuis voor garnalen) plaatsvindt, wordt in meer detail beschreven.
    Healthy is (not) tasty? Implicit and explicit associations between food healthiness and tastiness in primary school-aged children and parents with a lower socioeconomic position
    Heijden, Amy van der; Molder, Hedwig te; Graaf, Cees de; Jager, Gerry - \ 2020
    Food Quality and Preference 84 (2020). - ISSN 0950-3293
    Explicit associations - Food healthiness - Food tastiness - Implicit associations - Lower socioeconomic position - Primary school-aged children

    Many people implicitly (automatically) believe that unhealthy foods are tastier than healthy foods, even when they explicitly (deliberately) report that they don't. It is unclear whether this ‘unhealthy = tasty intuition’ is already present in childhood. Children from families with a lower socioeconomic position (SEP) consume poorer diets than children from families with a higher SEP. Paradoxically, populations with a lower SEP are underrepresented in research and least reached by lifestyle interventions. This study explored implicit and explicit associations between healthiness, tastiness and liking of foods in primary school-aged children and parents with a lower SEP. These associations and an estimate of dietary intake were assessed with implicit association tests and paper-and-pencil questionnaires, developed and adapted specifically for this target group. Participants were recruited at Dutch food banks. Results of 37 parent-child dyads indicated that children and parents implicitly associated healthy foods and tastiness more strongly with each other than healthy foods and not tasty (D = −0.19, p =.03 and D = −0.46, p <.001, respectively). Explicitly, parents showed similar results, while children rated pictures of unhealthy foods as tastier than pictures of healthy foods. Following the discrepancy between our hypotheses, results, and more unhealthy eating habits that often prevail in families with a lower SEP, potential explanations are discussed. We address the possibility that an internalised social norm was exposed, rather than an intrinsic belief. We propose that this research calls for in-depth qualitative research on food-related preferences and norms in the everyday life of low SEP families.

    Integration of epidemiologic, pharmacologic, genetic and gut microbiome data in a drug–metabolite atlas
    Liu, Jun ; Lahousse, Lies ; Nivard, Michel G. ; Bot, Mariska ; Chen, Lianmin ; Klinken, Jan Bert van; Thesing, Carisha S. ; Beekman, Marian ; Akker, Erik Ben van den; Slieker, Roderick C. ; Waterham, Eveline ; Kallen, Carla J.H. van der; Boer, Irene de; Li-Gao, Ruifang ; Vojinovic, Dina ; Amin, Najaf ; Radjabzadeh, Djawad ; Kraaij, Robert ; Alferink, Louise J.M. ; Murad, Sarwa Darwish ; Uitterlinden, André G. ; Willemsen, Gonneke ; Pool, Rene ; Milaneschi, Yuri ; Heemst, Diana van; Suchiman, H.E. ; Rutters, Femke ; Elders, Petra J.M. ; Beulens, Joline W.J. ; Heijden, Amber A.W.A. van der; Greevenbroek, Marleen M.J. van; Arts, Ilja C.W. ; Onderwater, Gerrit L.J. ; Maagdenberg, Arn M.J.M. van den; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O. ; Hankemeier, Thomas ; Terwindt, Gisela M. ; Stehouwer, Coen D.A. ; Geleijnse, Johanna M. ; ‘t Hart, Leen M. ; Slagboom, Eline P. ; Dijk, Ko Willems van; Zhernakova, Alexandra ; Fu, Jingyuan ; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H. ; Boomsma, Dorret I. ; Demirkan, Ayşe ; Stricker, Bruno H.C. ; Duijn, Cornelia M. van - \ 2020
    Nature Medicine 26 (2020)1. - ISSN 1078-8956 - p. 110 - 117.

    Progress in high-throughput metabolic profiling provides unprecedented opportunities to obtain insights into the effects of drugs on human metabolism. The Biobanking BioMolecular Research Infrastructure of the Netherlands has constructed an atlas of drug–metabolite associations for 87 commonly prescribed drugs and 150 clinically relevant plasma-based metabolites assessed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The atlas includes a meta-analysis of ten cohorts (18,873 persons) and uncovers 1,071 drug–metabolite associations after evaluation of confounders including co-treatment. We show that the effect estimates of statins on metabolites from the cross-sectional study are comparable to those from intervention and genetic observational studies. Further data integration links proton pump inhibitors to circulating metabolites, liver function, hepatic steatosis and the gut microbiome. Our atlas provides a tool for targeted experimental pharmaceutical research and clinical trials to improve drug efficacy, safety and repurposing. We provide a web-based resource for visualization of the atlas (http://bbmri.researchlumc.nl/atlas/).

    Heritability estimates for 361 blood metabolites across 40 genome-wide association studies
    Hagenbeek, Fiona A. ; Pool, René ; Dongen, Jenny van; Draisma, Harmen H.M. ; Hottenga, Jouke Jan ; Willemsen, Gonneke ; Abdellaoui, Abdel ; Fedko, Iryna O. ; Braber, Anouk den; Visser, Pieter Jelle ; Geus, Eco J.C.N. de; Willems van Dijk, Ko ; Verhoeven, Aswin ; Suchiman, H.E. ; Beekman, Marian ; Slagboom, Eline P. ; Duijn, Cornelia M. van; Barkey Wolf, J.J.H. ; Cats, D. ; Amin, N. ; Beulens, J.W. ; Bom, J.A. van der; Bomer, N. ; Demirkan, A. ; Hilten, J.A. van; Meessen, J.M.T.A. ; Moed, M.H. ; Fu, J. ; Onderwater, G.L.J. ; Rutters, F. ; So-Osman, C. ; Flier, W.M. van der; Heijden, A.A.W.A. van der; Spek, A. van der; Asselbergs, F.W. ; Boersma, E. ; Elders, P.M. ; Geleijnse, J.M. ; Ikram, M.A. ; Kloppenburg, M. ; Meulenbelt, I. ; Mooijaart, S.P. ; Nelissen, R.G.H.H. ; Netea, M.G. ; Penninx, B.W.J.H. ; Stehouwer, C.D.A. ; Teunissen, C.E. ; Terwindt, G.M. ; Jukema, J.W. ; Reinders, M.J.T. - \ 2020
    Nature Communications 11 (2020)1. - ISSN 2041-1723

    Metabolomics examines the small molecules involved in cellular metabolism. Approximately 50% of total phenotypic differences in metabolite levels is due to genetic variance, but heritability estimates differ across metabolite classes. We perform a review of all genome-wide association and (exome-) sequencing studies published between November 2008 and October 2018, and identify >800 class-specific metabolite loci associated with metabolite levels. In a twin-family cohort (N = 5117), these metabolite loci are leveraged to simultaneously estimate total heritability (h2 total), and the proportion of heritability captured by known metabolite loci (h2 Metabolite-hits) for 309 lipids and 52 organic acids. Our study reveals significant differences in h2 Metabolite-hits among different classes of lipids and organic acids. Furthermore, phosphatidylcholines with a high degree of unsaturation have higher h2 Metabolite-hits estimates than phosphatidylcholines with low degrees of unsaturation. This study highlights the importance of common genetic variants for metabolite levels, and elucidates the genetic architecture of metabolite classes.

    Understanding voluntary program performance : Introducing the diffusion network perspective
    Heijden, Jeroen van der - \ 2020
    Regulation & Governance 14 (2020)1. - ISSN 1748-5983 - p. 44 - 62.
    built environment - club theory - qualitative comparative analysis - urban climate governance - voluntary program

    Voluntary programs have rapidly become a means for the public, private, and third sectors to regulate and govern complex societal problems. Following the rapid and widespread emergence of these programs, scholars have been active in mapping, exploring, and interrogating their design and performance. Considerable advances have been made in describing program design and context conditions, and the actors involved in the voluntary program that relate to program performance. Less is known, however, about how these conditions affect program performance. Starting with one of the dominant theories on voluntary programs, the club theory perspective, this article seeks to understand how different program design conditions interact to affect the performance of 26 voluntary programs for low carbon building and city development in Australia, the Netherlands, and the United States. Applying qualitative comparative analysis, the study finds that the club theory perspective has limited explanatory power for this specific set of cases. Iterative rounds of analysis indicate that a diffusion network perspective is the best complementary perspective for explaining the performance of this set of programs. The article concludes that, in situations of a non-homogeneous market of voluntary program participants, a focus on the programs’ diffusion networks helps to explain their performance. This has implications for the design and implementation of such programs.

    Adherence to a food group-based dietary guideline and incidence of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes
    Braver, Nicolette R. den; Rutters, Femke ; Kortlever - van der Spek, Andrea L.J. ; Ibi, Dorina ; Looman, Moniek ; Geelen, Anouk ; Elders, Petra ; Heijden, Amber A. van der; Brug, Johannes ; Lakerveld, Jeroen ; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S. ; Beulens, Joline W.J. - \ 2020
    European Journal of Nutrition 59 (2020). - ISSN 1436-6207 - p. 2159 - 2169.
    Dietary pattern - Dutch healthy diet index 2015 - Intermediate hyperglycemia - Prediabetes - Type 2 diabetes

    Purpose: In this study, we investigated the association between adherence to the Dutch Healthy Diet index 2015 (DHD15-index) and incidence of prediabetes (preT2D) and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) in a representative sample for the general Dutch population. Methods: Two prospective cohort studies, The Hoorn and The New Hoorn Study, were used for data analyses. In total, data from 2951 participants without diabetes at baseline (mean age 56.5 ± 7.5 years; 49.6% male) were harmonized. Baseline dietary intake was assessed with validated Food Frequency Questionnaires and adherence to the DHD15-index was calculated (range 0–130). PreT2D and T2D were classified according to the WHO criteria 2011. Poisson regression was used to estimate prevalence ratios between participant scores on the DHD15-index and preT2D and T2D, adjusted for follow-up duration, energy intake, socio-demographic, and lifestyle factors. Change in fasting plasma glucose levels (mmol/L) over follow-up was analysed using linear regression analyses, additionally adjusted for baseline value. Results: During a mean follow-up of 6.3 ± 0.7 years, 837 participants developed preT2D and 321 participants developed T2D. The highest adherence to the DHD15-index was significantly associated with lower T2D incidence [model 3, PRT3vsT1: 0.70 (0.53; 0.92), ptrend = 0.01]. The highest adherence to the DHD15-index pointed towards a lower incidence of preT2D [PRT3vsT1: 0.87 (0.74; 1.03), ptrend = 0.11]. Higher adherence to the DHD15-index was not associated with change in fasting plasma glucose levels [β10point: − 0.012 (− 0.034; 0.009)mmol/L]. Conclusion: The present study showed that the highest compared to the lowest adherence to the DHD15-index was associated with a lower T2D incidence, and pointed towards a lower incidence of preT2D. These results support the benefits of adhering to the guidelines in T2D prevention.

    The influence of temperature on Atlantic mackerel egg development
    Heijden, Luuk van der - \ 2019
    Centrum voor Visserijonderzoek (CVO) (CVO report / Centrum voor Visserijonderzoek CVO report 19.019) - 11 p.
    Improving the temperature stability of an incubation system for fish eggs
    Heijden, Luuk van der - \ 2019
    Centrum voor Visserijonderzoek (CVO) (CVO report / Centrum voor Visserijonderzoek CVO report 19.018) - 12 p.
    Energietransitie: geothermie voor productie van vis en groenten met aquaponics
    Henfling, J.W. ; Heijden, P.G.M. van der - \ 2019
    Aquacultuur 34 (2019)4. - ISSN 1382-2764 - p. 27 - 32.
    Op 30 september werd de aquaponics kas van het Europese Geofood project bij de glastuinbouw eenheid van WUR in Bleiswijk formeel in werking gesteld. Geofood verenigt IJslandse, Sloveense en Nederlandse onderzoekinstellingen en private partijen in de ambitie om te komen tot grootschalige circulaire land- en tuinbouw verwarmd met energie uit diepe aardlagen. Ook de Nederlandse tuinbouw onder glas moet in het kader van de energietransitie van het gas af en bovendien geheel circulair worden. Enkele redactieleden van Aquacultuur waren bij de opening van de aquaponics opstelling aanwezig. Hieronder een verslag.
    Healthy is (not) tasty? Implicit and explicit associations between food healthiness andtastiness in primary school-aged children and parents with a lower socioeconomic position
    Heijden, A. van der; Molder, H.F.M. te; Graaf, C. de; Jager, G. - \ 2019
    - 1 p.
    Kweek van Yellowtail Kingfish in recirculatiesystemen
    Heijden, P.G.M. van der; Rohaan, A.C. - \ 2019
    Aquacultuur 34 (2019)3. - ISSN 1382-2764 - p. 35 - 38.
    Fisheries and Aquaculture for Food Security in Indonesia final Report : FAFI Project
    Heijden, P.G.M. van der - \ 2019
    Wageningen Centre for Development Innovation (WCDI-190-083 ) - 30 p.
    Check title to add to marked list
    << previous | next >>

    Show 20 50 100 records per page

     
    Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.