Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Effects of stocking density and immersion time on the performance of oysters in intertidal off-bottom culture
Capelle, Jacob J. ; Hartog, Eva ; Creemers, Jorik ; Heringa, Jouke ; Kamermans, Pauline - \ 2019
Aquaculture International (2019). - ISSN 0967-6120 - 16 p.
Magallana gigas - Crassostrea gigas - Split-plot design - Density dependent - Trestle culture - Shellfish culture
Intertidal culture in meshed bags on trestles is worldwide the most established culture method for oysters. Culturists can affect oyster performance by adjusting stocking density and immersion time, and it can be expected that these factors are not independent. The combined effect of stocking density and immersion time on survival, growth and condition of oysters was investigated on a culture site, where oysters are usually stocked at 8 kg bag−1. Half-grown
oysters were stocked in three biomass densities: 4, 8 and 12 kg bag−1, nested within three immersion times (87%, 76% and 73% of tidal cycle). Chlorophyll-a concentration peaked in summer (~ 3–10 μg l−1) and was low in autumn (~ 1 μg l−1), and high chlorophyll-a levels coincided with oyster spawning period. Survival was not affected by density or immersion time. Shell growth per oyster and biomass production per bag were density dependent—higher at 4 than at 12 kg bag−1—but neither were different from 8 kg bag−1. Growth rates were
negativity related with immersion over the spawning period but showed a (non-significant) positive trend over other periods. At harvest, condition per oyster decreased with stocking density and increased with immersion. There was no interaction between density and immersion. Treatments had a more pronounced effect on meat content than on biomass production. Hence, oysters might be kept at higher stocking densities to increase biomass production during most of the growth cycle but restocked in lower densities, with longer immersion times
prior to harvest to maximize meat content at harvest.
Addendum: The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship
Wilkinson, Mark D. ; Dumontier, Michel ; Aalbersberg, Ijsbrand Jan ; Appleton, Gabrielle ; Axton, Myles ; Baak, Arie ; Blomberg, Niklas ; Boiten, Jan Willem ; Silva Santos, Luiz Bonino Da; Bourne, Philip E. ; Bouwman, Jildau ; Brookes, Anthony J. ; Clark, Tim ; Crosas, Mercè ; Dillo, Ingrid ; Dumon, Olivier ; Edmunds, Scott ; Evelo, Chris T. ; Finkers, Richard ; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra ; Gray, Alasdair J.G. ; Groth, Paul ; Goble, Carole ; Grethe, Jeffrey S. ; Heringa, Jaap ; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Hooft, Rob ; Kuhn, Tobias ; Kok, Ruben ; Kok, Joost ; Lusher, Scott J. ; Martone, Maryann E. ; Mons, Albert ; Packer, Abel L. ; Persson, Bengt ; Rocca-Serra, Philippe ; Roos, Marco ; Schaik, Rene van; Sansone, Susanna Assunta ; Schultes, Erik ; Sengstag, Thierry ; Slater, Ted ; Strawn, George ; Swertz, Morris A. ; Thompson, Mark ; Lei, Johan van der; Mulligen, Erik van; Velterop, Jan ; Waagmeester, Andra ; Wittenburg, Peter ; Wolstencroft, Katherine ; Zhao, Jun ; Mons, Barend - \ 2019
Scientific Data 6 (2019). - ISSN 2052-4463

Next generation physiologically based kinetic (NG-PBK) models in support of regulatory decision making
Paini, A. ; Leonard, J.A. ; Joossens, E. ; Bessems, J.G.M. ; Desalegn, A. ; Dorne, J.L. ; Gosling, J.P. ; Heringa, M.B. ; Klaric, M. ; Kliment, T. ; Kramer, N.I. ; Loizou, G. ; Louisse, J. ; Lumen, A. ; Madden, J.C. ; Patterson, E.A. ; Proença, S. ; Punt, A. ; Setzer, R.W. ; Suciu, N. ; Troutman, J. ; Yoon, M. ; Worth, A. ; Tan, Y.M. - \ 2019
Computational Toxicology 9 (2019). - ISSN 2468-1113 - p. 61 - 72.
In silico - In vitro - PBPK - PBTK - Physiologically based kinetic models - Toxicokinetics

The fields of toxicology and chemical risk assessment seek to reduce, and eventually replace, the use of animals for the prediction of toxicity in humans. In this context, physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling based on in vitro and in silico kinetic data has the potential to a play significant role in reducing animal testing, by providing a methodology capable of incorporating in vitro human data to facilitate the development of in vitro to in vivo extrapolation of hazard information. In the present article, we discuss the challenges in: 1) applying PBK modelling to support regulatory decision making under the toxicology and risk-assessment paradigm shift towards animal replacement; 2) constructing PBK models without in vivo animal kinetic data, while relying solely on in vitro or in silico methods for model parameterization; and 3) assessing the validity and credibility of PBK models built largely using non-animal data. The strengths, uncertainties, and limitations of PBK models developed using in vitro or in silico data are discussed in an effort to establish a higher degree of confidence in the application of such models in a regulatory context. The article summarises the outcome of an expert workshop hosted by the European Commission Joint Research Centre (EC-JRC) – European Union Reference Laboratory for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EURL ECVAM), on “Physiologically-Based Kinetic modelling in risk assessment – reaching a whole new level in regulatory decision-making” held in Ispra, Italy, in November 2016, along with results from an international survey conducted in 2017 and recently reported activities occurring within the PBK modelling field. The discussions presented herein highlight the potential applications of next generation (NG)-PBK modelling, based on new data streams.

Detection of titanium particles in human liver and spleen and possible health implications
Heringa, M.B. ; Peters, R.J.B. ; Bleys, R.L.A.W. ; Lee, M.K. van der; Tromp, P.C. ; Kesteren, P.C.E. van; Eijkeren, J.C.H. van; Undas, A.K. ; Oomen, A.G. ; Bouwmeester, H. - \ 2018
Particle and Fibre Toxicology 15 (2018)1. - ISSN 1743-8977
Human liver - Human spleen - Nanoparticle - Quantification - Risk assessment - Sp-ICP-HRMS - Tissue level - Titanium dioxide
Background: Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is produced at high volumes and applied in many consumer and food products. Recent toxicokinetic modelling indicated the potential of TiO2 to accumulate in human liver and spleen upon daily oral exposure, which is not routinely investigated in chronic animal studies. A health risk from nanosized TiO2 particle consumption could not be excluded then. Results: Here we show the first quantification of both total titanium (Ti) and TiO2 particles in 15 post-mortem human livers and spleens. These low-level analyses were enabled by the use of fully validated (single particle) inductively coupled plasma high resolution mass spectrometry ((sp)ICP-HRMS) detection methods for total Ti and TiO2 particles. The presence of TiO2 in the particles in tissues was confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry. Conclusions: These results prove that TiO2 particles are present in human liver and spleen, with ≥24% of nanosize (< 100 nm). The levels are below the doses regarded as safe in animals, but half are above the dose that is deemed safe for liver damage in humans when taking into account several commonly applied uncertainty factors. With these new and unique human data, we remain with the conclusion that health risks due to oral exposure to TiO2 cannot be excluded.
Effect van dichtheid op groei en ontwikkeling van kokkels op een pilot perceel in het Veerse Meer
Hiele, T. van der; Creemers, J. ; Kamermans, P. ; Heringa, J. - \ 2017
Vlissingen : Delta Academy van Hogeschool Zeeland; University of Applied Sciences - 29 p.
Oral intake of added titanium dioxide and its nanofraction from food products, food supplements and toothpaste by the Dutch population
Rompelberg, Cathy ; Heringa, Minne B. ; Donkersgoed, Gerda van; Drijvers, José ; Roos, Agnes ; Westenbrink, Susanne ; Peters, R.J.B. ; Bemmel, M.E.M. van; Brand, Walter ; Oomen, Agnes G. - \ 2016
food supplements - foodproducts - TiO 2 intake - Dutch population - Titanium dioxide - TiO 2 NPs - TiO 2 NPs ranges - bw - TiO 2 - TiO 2 ranges
Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is commonly applied to enhance the white colour and brightness of food products. TiO2 is also used as white pigment in other products such as toothpaste. A small fraction of the pigment is known to be present as nanoparticles (NPs). Recent studies with TiO2 NPs indicate that these particles can have toxic effects. In this paper, we aimed to estimate the oral intake of TiO2 and its NPs from food, food supplements and toothpaste in the Dutch population aged 2 to over 70 years by combining data on food consumption and supplement intake with concentrations of Ti and TiO2 NPs in food products and supplements. For children aged 2–6 years, additional intake via ingestion of toothpaste was estimated. The mean long-term intake to TiO2 ranges from 0.06 mg/kg bw/day in elderly (70+), 0.17 mg/kg bw/day for 7–69-year-old people, to 0.67 mg/kg bw/day in children (2–6 year old). The estimated mean intake of TiO2 NPs ranges from 0.19 μg/kg bw/day in elderly, 0.55 μg/kg bw/day for 7–69-year-old people, to 2.16 μg/kg bw/day in young children. Ninety-fifth percentile (P95) values are 0.74, 1.61 and 4.16 μg/kg bw/day, respectively. The products contributing most to the TiO2 intake are toothpaste (in young children only), candy, coffee creamer, fine bakery wares and sauces. In a separate publication, the results are used to evaluate whether the presence of TiO2 NPs in these products can pose a human health risk.
Oral intake of added titanium dioxide and its nanofraction from food products, food supplements and toothpaste by the Dutch population
Rompelberg, Cathy ; Heringa, Minne B. ; Donkersgoed, Gerda van; Drijvers, José ; Roos, Agnes ; Westenbrink, Susanne ; Peters, Ruud ; Bemmel, Greet van; Brand, Walter ; Oomen, Agnes G. - \ 2016
Nanotoxicology 10 (2016)10. - ISSN 1743-5390 - p. 1404 - 1414.
Food additive E 171 - long-term dietary intake - nanomaterial - probabilistic modelling - TiO

Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is commonly applied to enhance the white colour and brightness of food products. TiO2 is also used as white pigment in other products such as toothpaste. A small fraction of the pigment is known to be present as nanoparticles (NPs). Recent studies with TiO2 NPs indicate that these particles can have toxic effects. In this paper, we aimed to estimate the oral intake of TiO2 and its NPs from food, food supplements and toothpaste in the Dutch population aged 2 to over 70 years by combining data on food consumption and supplement intake with concentrations of Ti and TiO2 NPs in food products and supplements. For children aged 2–6 years, additional intake via ingestion of toothpaste was estimated. The mean long-term intake to TiO2 ranges from 0.06 mg/kg bw/day in elderly (70+), 0.17 mg/kg bw/day for 7–69-year-old people, to 0.67 mg/kg bw/day in children (2–6 year old). The estimated mean intake of TiO2 NPs ranges from 0.19 μg/kg bw/day in elderly, 0.55 μg/kg bw/day for 7–69-year-old people, to 2.16 μg/kg bw/day in young children. Ninety-fifth percentile (P95) values are 0.74, 1.61 and 4.16 μg/kg bw/day, respectively. The products contributing most to the TiO2 intake are toothpaste (in young children only), candy, coffee creamer, fine bakery wares and sauces. In a separate publication, the results are used to evaluate whether the presence of TiO2 NPs in these products can pose a human health risk.

The FAIR Guiding Principles for scientific data management and stewardship : Comment
Wilkinson, Mark D. ; Dumontier, Michel ; Aalbersberg, Ijsbrand Jan ; Appleton, Gabrielle ; Axton, Myles ; Baak, Arie ; Blomberg, Niklas ; Boiten, Jan Willem ; Silva Santos, Luiz Bonino Da; Bourne, Philip E. ; Bouwman, Jildau ; Brookes, Anthony J. ; Clark, Tim ; Crosas, Mercè ; Dillo, Ingrid ; Dumon, Olivier ; Edmunds, Scott ; Evelo, Chris T. ; Finkers, Richard ; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra ; Gray, Alasdair J.G. ; Groth, Paul ; Goble, Carole ; Grethe, Jeffrey S. ; Heringa, Jaap ; Hoen, Peter A.C. 't; Hooft, Rob ; Kuhn, Tobias ; Kok, Ruben ; Kok, Joost ; Lusher, Scott J. ; Martone, Maryann E. ; Mons, Albert ; Packer, Abel L. ; Persson, Bengt ; Rocca-Serra, Philippe ; Roos, Marco ; Schaik, Rene van; Sansone, Susanna Assunta ; Schultes, Erik ; Sengstag, Thierry ; Slater, Ted ; Strawn, George ; Swertz, Morris A. ; Thompson, Mark ; Lei, Johan van der; Mulligen, Erik van; Velterop, Jan ; Waagmeester, Andra ; Wittenburg, Peter ; Wolstencroft, Katherine ; Zhao, Jun ; Mons, Barend - \ 2016
Scientific Data 3 (2016). - ISSN 2052-4463

There is an urgent need to improve the infrastructure supporting the reuse of scholarly data. A diverse set of stakeholders-representing academia, industry, funding agencies, and scholarly publishers-have come together to design and jointly endorse a concise and measureable set of principles that we refer to as the FAIR Data Principles. The intent is that these may act as a guideline for those wishing to enhance the reusability of their data holdings. Distinct from peer initiatives that focus on the human scholar, the FAIR Principles put specific emphasis on enhancing the ability of machines to automatically find and use the data, in addition to supporting its reuse by individuals. This Comment is the first formal publication of the FAIR Principles, and includes the rationale behind them, and some exemplar implementations in the community.

Return of the icecream men. A discrete hotelling game
Abudaldah, Nabi ; Heijman, W.J.M. ; Heringa, Pieter ; Mouche, P.H.M. van - \ 2015
Romanian Journal of Regional Science 9 (2015)2. - ISSN 1843-8520 - p. 39 - 48.
discrete Hotelling game - Maple - Nash equilibrium
We consider a finite symmetric game in strategic form between two players which can be interpreted as a discrete variant of the Hotelling game in a one or two-dimensional space. As the analytical investigation of this game is tedious, we simulte with Maple and formulate some conjectures. In addition we present a short literature overview.
Verslag studiereis aquacultuur Spanje
Hiele, T. van der; Malta, E.J. ; Heringa, J. ; Houcke, J. van - \ 2013
Aquacultuur 28 (2013)2. - ISSN 1382-2764 - p. 20 - 27.
aquacultuur - zeeaquacultuur - marien milieu - viskwekerijen - algenteelt - schaal- en schelpdierenteelt - schaal- en schelpdierenvisserij - spanje - aquaculture - marine aquaculture - marine environment - fish farms - algae culture - shellfish culture - shellfish fisheries - spain
Zeeuwse aquacultuurondernemers zijn in januari 2013 vier dagen naar de regio Cadiz en Huelva in Spanje afgereisd om kennis te maken met de aquacultuuractiviteiten en te leren van de ervaringen daar. Deze studiereis is georganiseerd in het kader van het inmiddels afgeronde RAAK Internationaal project 'Het zoute goud', waarvan HZ University of Applied Sciences penvoerder was. De studiereis naar Spanje vormde samen met een slotsymposium de afsluiting van dit project.
The economic impact of multifunctional agriculture in Dutch regions: An input-output model
Heringa, P.W. ; Heide, C.M. van der; Heijman, W.J.M. - \ 2013
NJAS Wageningen Journal of Life Sciences 64-65 (2013). - ISSN 1573-5214 - p. 59 - 66.
Multifunctional agriculture is a broad concept lacking a precise definition. Moreover, little is known about the societal importance of multifunctional agriculture. This paper is an empirical attempt to fill this gap. To this end, an input-output model was constructed for multifunctional agriculture in several regions in the Netherlands. The definition used included four multifunctional agricultural activities: (i) green care, (ii) tourism, recreation and education, (iii) on-farm sales, and (iv) green services. Multiplier values – indicating the chain impacts of these multifunctional activities in the rest of the economy – were calculated for four regions in the Netherlands. The results showed that, in terms of output and employment, multifunctional agriculture was not a main driver for economic growth. Moreover, from the input-output model it appeared that multifunctional agriculture led in particular to more expenditure in the agricultural sector itself, rather than in any other economic sector. The indirect feedback effects of multifunctional agriculture on the non-agricultural sectors in the Dutch economy appeared rather small. The input-output model also showed that multiplier values differed over the regions, mainly due to differences in the composition of multifunctional activities. Although the absolute size of employment in multifunctional agriculture was very small, the employment per unit of output was high, especially when compared with the employment/production rate in primary agriculture.
What is the effect of spatial proximity on research collaboration in a small country? A gravity model for co-authored publications
Heringa, P.W. ; Horlings, E. ; Heijman, W.J.M. - \ 2013
Wageningen University, WASS
In this study we fit a gravity model for knowledge production, where the number of co-authored publications is explained by the size of the affiliated organisations and the physical distance between them. We analyse 2247 publications on drinking water and wastewater in the period 2006-2008 with at least one author affiliation in the Netherlands. At this small spatial level we find a robust and significant effect in the expected direction: the larger the distance between two organisations, the less publications they co-author together. We extend the model and show that organisations of the same type (academia, governmental bodies, etc.) also collaborate more.
Effect of combining in vitro estrogenicity data with kinetic characteristics of estrogenic compounds on the invivo predictive value
Punt, A. ; Brand, W. ; Murk, A.J. ; Wezel, A.P. van; Schriks, M. ; Heringa, M.B. - \ 2013
Toxicology in Vitro 27 (2013)1. - ISSN 0887-2333 - p. 44 - 51.
rat uterotrophic bioassay - human-liver-microsomes - bisphenol-a - physicochemical properties - er-alpha - antiestrogenic activity - drug-discovery - receptor-alpha - oecd program - binding
With the ultimate aim of increasing the utility of in vitro assays for toxicological risk assessment, a method was developed to calculate in vivo estrogenic potencies from in vitro estrogenic potencies of compounds by taking into account systemic availability. In vitro estrogenic potencies of three model compounds (bisphenol A, genistein, and 4-nonylphenol) relative to ethinylestradiol (EE2), determined with the estrogen receptor alpha (ERa) transcriptional activation assay using hER-HeLa-9903 cells, were taken from literature and used to calculate the EE2 equivalent (EE2EQ) effect doses in the predominantly ERa-dependent rat uterotrophic assay. Compound-specific differences in hepatic clearance relative to the reference compound EE2 were determined in vitro to examine whether in vivo estrogenic potencies reported in literature could be more accurately estimated. The EE2EQ doses allowed to predict in vivo uterotrophic responses within a factor of 6-25 and the inclusion of the hepatic clearance further improved the prediction with a factor 1.6-2.1 for especially genistein and bisphenol A. Yet, the model compounds still were less potent in vivo than predicted based on their EE2 equivalent estrogenic potency and hepatic clearance. For further improvement of the in vitro to in vivo predictive value of in vitro assays, the relevance of other kinetic characteristics should be studied, including binding to carrier proteins, oral bioavailability and the formation of estrogenic metabolites
The economic impact of multifunctional agriculture in The Netherlands: A regional input-output model
Heringa, P.W. ; Heide, C.M. van der; Heijman, W.J.M. - \ 2012
Multifunctional agriculture is a broad concept lacking a precise and uniform definition. Moreover, little is known about the societal importance of multifunctional agriculture. This paper is an empirical attempt to fill this gap. To this end, an input-output model is constructed for multifunctional agriculture in the Netherlands. The definition used includes four multifunctional agricultural activities: (i) green care, (ii) tourism, recreation and education, (iii) on-farm sales, and (iv) green services. Multiplier values – indicating the chain impacts of these multifunctional activities in the rest of the economy – are calculated for four Dutch regions. The results show that, in terms of output and employment, multifunctional agriculture is not a main driver for economic growth. Moreover, from the input-output model it appears that multifunctional agriculture leads in particular to more expenditures in the agricultural sector itself, rather than in any other economic sector. As such, the indirect feedback effects of multifunctional agriculture on the non-agricultural sectors in the Dutch economy are rather small. The input-output model also show that multiplier values differ over the regions, mainly due to differences in the composition of multifunctional activities. And although the absolute size of employment in multifunctional agriculture is very small, the employment per unit of output is high, especially when compared to the employment/production rate in primary agriculture.
Aquavlan - voor een duurzame toekomst van aquacultuur in Vlaanderen en Zeeland
Schneider, O. ; Abbink, W. ; Duijn, A. van; Poelman, M. ; Nevajan, N. ; Heringa, J. ; Blom-Zandstra, G. ; Teerlinck, S. ; Ghekiere, G. - \ 2010
Aquacultuur 25 (2010)2. - ISSN 1382-2764 - p. 7 - 10.
visteelt - aquacultuur - visserijbeleid - visserij - fish culture - aquaculture - fishery policy - fisheries
De toekomst van de visteelt in Nederland was één van de thema's die begin 2010 binnen de Nederlandse aquacultuursector veel aandacht trok. Op dit moment is dit thema ook bij onze buren in Vlaanderen actueel. In dit artikel wordt het project AquaVlan belicht dat zich tussen Nederland en België afspeelt. AquaVlan richt zich op de duurzame kweek van schelpdieren, vissen en zilte groenten. Het algemeen projectdoel is het leggen van de fundamenten van een economisch, sociaal en ecologisch duurzame aquacultuursector binnen de Grensregio, zodat de huidige, zeer beperkte, aquaculuursector kan uitgroeien tot een sector van economische betekenis. Het Interreg IVa programma, Vlaamse provincies, de Vlaamse Overheid en de provincie Zeeland financiëren het project.
Workbook Institutional Economics and Economic Organisation Theory; an integrated approach
Slangen, L.H.G. ; Heringa, P.W. - \ 2009
Wageningen : Wageningen Academic Publishers - ISBN 9789086861200 - 176
instellingen - economische theorie - sociaal-economische organisatie - contracten - eigendomsrechten - eigendom - institutionele economie - economische organisatietheorie - institutions - economic theory - socioeconomic organization - contracts - property rights - ownership - institutional economics - economic organization theory
SEQATOMS: a web tool for identifying missing regions in PDB in sequence context
Brandt, B.W. ; Heringa, J. ; Leunissen, J.A.M. - \ 2008
Nucleic acids research 36 (2008)2. - ISSN 0305-1048 - p. W255 - W259.
protein data-bank - intrinsic disorder - database - prediction - archive
With over 46 000 proteins, the Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the most important database with structural information of biological macromolecules. PDB files contain sequence and coordinate information. Residues present in the sequence can be absent from the coordinate section, which means their position in space is unknown. Similarity searches are routinely carried out against sequences taken from PDB SEQRES. However, there no distinction is made between residues that have a known or unknown position in the 3D protein structure. We present a FASTA sequence database that is produced by combining the sequence and coordinate information. All residues absent from the PDB coordinate section are masked with lower-case letters, thereby providing a view of these residues in the context of the entire protein sequence, which facilitates inspecting `missing¿ regions. We also provide a masked version of the CATH domain database. A user-friendly BLAST interface is available for similarity searching. In contrast to standard (stand-alone) BLAST output, which only contains upper-case letters, our output retains the lower-case letters of the masked regions. Thus, our server can be used to perform BLAST searching case-sensitively. Here, we have applied it to the study of missing regions in their sequence context
Aquacultuuropleidingen in Nederland: wat, waar en hoe?
Verdegem, M.C.J. ; Scheerboom, J. ; Heringa, J. ; Goldsborough, D.G. ; Schlaman, G.L.H. ; Heijden, P.G.M. van der - \ 2007
Aquacultuur 22 (2007)2. - ISSN 1382-2764 - p. 19 - 25.
aquacultuur - visserij - onderwijs - agrarisch onderwijs - beroepsopleiding - aquaculture - fisheries - education - agricultural education - vocational training
Overzicht van opleidingen op het gebied van aquacultuur in Nederland
Deelrapport B-2: Amenagement de la Reserve de la Biosphere Boucle du Baoule.
Heringa, A.C. ; Geerling, C. ; Havinga, R. ; Mandele, H.M. van de; Wijngaarden, W. van - \ 1987
Unknown Publisher - 77 p.
Deelrapport B-1: Utilisation du Gibier.
Bie, S. de; Geerling, C. ; Heringa, A.C. - \ 1987
Unknown Publisher - 109 p.
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