Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    In-situ observations using tagged animals
    Roquet, F. ; Boehme, L. ; Bester, M.N. ; Bornemann, H. ; Brasseur, S.M.J.M. ; Charrassin, J.B. ; Costa, D. ; Fedak, M.A. ; Guinet, C. ; Hall, A. ; Harcourt, R. ; Hindell, M.A. ; Kovacs, K.M. ; Lea, M.A. ; Lovell, P. ; Lowther, A. ; Lyderson, C. ; Mcmahon, C. ; Picard, B. ; Reverdin, G. ; Vincent, C. - \ 2017
    - 5 p.
    Marine mammals help gather information on some of the harshest environments on the planet, through the use of miniaturized ocean sensors glued on their fur. Since 2004, hundreds of diving marine animals, mainly Antarctic and Arctic seals, have been fitted with a new generation of Argos tags developed by the Sea Mammal Research Unit of the University of St Andrews in Scotland, UK. These tags investigate the at-sea ecology of these animals while simultaneously collecting valuable oceanographic data. Some of the study species travel thousands of kilometres continuously diving to great depths (up to 2100 m). The resulting data are now freely available to the global scientific community at http://www.meop.net. Despite great progress in their reliability and data accuracy, the current generation of loggers while approaching standard ARGO quality specifications have yet to match them. Yet, improvements are underway; they involve updating the technology, implementing a more systematic phase of calibration and taking benefit of the recently acquired knowledge on the dynamical response of sensors. Together these efforts are rapidly transforming animal tagging into one of the most important sources of oceanographic data in polar regions and in many coastal areas
    Environmental and physiological determinants of successful foraging by naive southern elephant seal pups during their first trip to sea
    Hindell, M.A. ; McConnell, B.J. ; Fedak, M.A. ; Slip, D.J. ; Burton, H.R. ; Reijnders, P.J.H. ; McMahon, C.R. - \ 1999
    Canadian Journal of Zoology 77 (1999)11. - ISSN 0008-4301 - p. 1807 - 1821.
    The ability to forage successfully during their first trip to sea is fundamental to the ultimate survival of newly weaned southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina). However, there is considerable variation in the body mass and fat content of seal pups at weaning, which results in some individuals having larger energy and oxygen stores than others, which may confer advantages on them. The diving behaviour of 21 newly weaned seals was studied using satellite relayed data loggers. Seals were captured at Macquarie Island in December 1995 and 1996, approximately 4 weeks after weaning. Two groups of seals were specifically targeted: a heavy group from the top quartile of weaning masses (n = 6) and a light group from the lower quartile (n = 15). Most of the seals made dives in excess of 100 m depth and 5 min before final departure from the island. However, for the first 60-80 d, all of the seals exhibited behaviour quite distinct from the patterns reported for older conspecifics, and made relatively shallow (100 +/- 39 m; mean +/- SD) and short (5.7 +/- 1.23 min) dives. During this time the seals spent 74.3 +/- 12.6 of each day diving, and the depth of the dives did not follow any diurnal pattern. The diving behaviour of all seals changed abruptly whenthey started on their return to land. During this time their behaviour was more like that of adults: they made deeper (159 +/- 9 m) and longer dives (9.01 +/- 1.69 min) than previously, and the dives showed a strong diurnal pattern in depth. There is no obvious explanation for this change in behaviour, although its abrupt nature suggests that it is unlikely to have been due to physiological changes in the seals. The size of the seals at weaning was an important influence on diving behaviour. Heavy weaners made significantly deeper (130 +/- 40 m) and longer dives (7.36 +/- 0.55 min) than light weaners (88 +/- 32 m and 5.04 +/- 0.64 min, respectively). This indicates that smaller seals are constrained to some extent by their physiological capabilities, which perhaps requires some individuals to adopt different foraging strategies. VA:IBN
    Diving behaviour in newly weaned southern elephant seals during their first trip to sea
    Hindell, M.A. ; McConnell, B.J. ; Slip, D.J. ; Fedak, M.A. ; Burton, H.R. ; Reijnders, P.J.H. - \ 1998
    In: World marine mammal science conference, Monaco, January, 1998
    Close encounters of four kinds: movement patterns of recently weaned elephant seal pups from Macquarie Isands
    Fedak, M.A. ; McConnell, B.J. ; Slip, D.J. ; Hindell, M.A. ; Reijnders, P.J.H. ; Burton, H.R. - \ 1998
    In: World marine mammal science conference, Monaco, January 1998
    Diving behaviour in newly weaned southern elephant seals during their first trip to sea
    Hindell, M.A. ; McConnell, B.J. ; Slip, D.J. ; Fedak, M.A. ; Burton, H.R. ; Reijnders, P.J.H. - \ 1998
    In: Abstract. World Marine Mammal Science Conference, Monaco, January
    Close encouters of four kinds: movement patterns of recently weaned elephant seal pups from Macquarie Isands
    Fedak, M.A. ; McConnell, B.J. ; Slip, D.J. ; Hindell, M.A. ; Reijnders, P.J.H. ; Burton, H.R. - \ 1998
    In: Abstract. World Marine Mammal Science Conference, Monaco, January 1998
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