Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Monitoring emissions from the 2015 Indonesian fires using CO satellite data
    Nechita-Banda, Narcisa ; Krol, Maarten ; Werf, Guido R. Van Der; Kaiser, Johannes W. ; Pandey, Sudhanshu ; Huijnen, Vincent ; Clerbaux, Cathy ; Coheur, Pierre ; Deeter, Merritt N. ; Röckmann, Thomas - \ 2018
    Wageningen University and Research
    inverse modelling - biomass burning - emissions - atmosphere - data - peat
    Inverse modelling results for carbon monoxide (CO) emissions to the atmosphere from the 2015 Indonesian fires (1 August - 15 December 2015). The TM5-4DVAR model was used (http://tm5.sourceforge.net), together with satellite observations from either IASI or MOPITT instruments.
    Monitoring emissions from the 2015 Indonesian fires using CO satellite data
    Nechita-Banda, Narcisa ; Krol, Maarten ; Werf, Guido R. van der; Kaiser, Johannes W. ; Pandey, Sudhanshu ; Huijnen, Vincent ; Clerbaux, Cathy ; Coheur, Pierre ; Deeter, Merritt N. ; Röckmann, Thomas - \ 2018
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B. Biological sciences 373 (2018)1760. - ISSN 0962-8436 - 9 p.
    atmosphere - biomass burning - emissions - peat - satellite data

    Southeast Asia, in particular Indonesia, has periodically struggled with intense fire events. These events convert substantial amounts of carbon stored as peat to atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and significantly affect atmospheric composition on a regional to global scale. During the recent 2015 El Niño event, peat fires led to strong enhancements of carbon monoxide (CO), an air pollutant and well-known tracer for biomass burning. These enhancements were clearly observed from space by the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) and the Measurements of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) instruments. We use these satellite observations to estimate CO fire emissions within an inverse modelling framework. We find that the derived CO emissions for each sub-region of Indonesia and Papua are substantially different from emission inventories, highlighting uncertainties in bottom-up estimates. CO fire emissions based on either MOPITT or IASI have a similar spatial pattern and evolution in time, and a 10% uncertainty based on a set of sensitivity tests we performed. Thus, CO satellite data have a high potential to complement existing operational fire emission estimates based on satellite observations of fire counts, fire radiative power and burned area, in better constraining fire occurrence and the associated conversion of peat carbon to atmospheric CO2 A total carbon release to the atmosphere of 0.35-0.60 Pg C can be estimated based on our results.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The impact of the 2015/2016 El Niño on the terrestrial tropical carbon cycle: patterns, mechanisms and implications'.

    The European aerosol budget in 2006
    Brugh, J.M.J. Aan de; Schaap, M. ; Vignati, E. ; Dentener, F. ; Kahnert, M. ; Sofiev, M. ; Huijnen, V. ; Krol, M.C. - \ 2011
    Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 11 (2011)3. - ISSN 1680-7316 - p. 1117 - 1139.
    general-circulation model - evaluation program emep - light absorbing carbon - air-pollution - sulfuric-acid - sea-salt - tropospheric aerosols - 3-dimensional model - size distributions - particulate matter
    This paper presents the aerosol budget over Europe in 2006 calculated with the global transport model TM5 coupled to the size-resolved aerosol module M7. Comparison with ground observations indicates that the model reproduces the observed concentrations quite well with an expected slight underestimation of PM10 due to missing emissions (e.g. resuspension). We model that a little less than half of the anthropogenic aerosols emitted in Europe are exported and the rest is removed by deposition. The anthropogenic aerosols are removed mostly by rain (95%) and only 5% is removed by dry deposition. For the larger natural aerosols, especially sea salt, a larger fraction is removed by dry processes (sea salt: 70%, mineral dust: 35%). We model transport of aerosols in the jet stream in the higher atmosphere and an import of Sahara dust from the south at high altitudes. Comparison with optical measurements shows that the model reproduces the Ångström parameter very well, which indicates a correct simulation of the aerosol size distribution. However, we underestimate the aerosol optical depth. Because the surface concentrations are close to the observations, the shortage of aerosol in the model is probably at higher altitudes. We show that the discrepancies are mainly caused by an overestimation of wet-removal rates. To match the observations, the wet-removal rates have to be scaled down by a factor of about 5. In that case the modelled ground-level concentrations of sulphate and sea salt increase by 50% (which deteriorates the match), while other components stay roughly the same. Finally, it is shown that in particular events, improved fire emission estimates may significantly improve the ability of the model to simulate the aerosol optical depth. We stress that discrepancies in aerosol models can be adequately analysed if all models would provide (regional) aerosol budgets, as presented in the current study
    The global chemistry transport model TM5: description and evaluation of the tropospheric chemistry version 3.0
    Huijnen, V. ; Williams, J. ; Weele, M. van; Noije, T. van; Krol, M.C. ; Dentener, F. ; Segers, A. ; Houweling, S. ; Peters, W. - \ 2010
    Geoscientific Model Development 3 (2010)2. - ISSN 1991-959X - p. 445 - 473.
    general-circulation model - dry deposition parameterization - organic-compound emissions - mozaic airborne program - gas-phase reactions - air-quality models - interannual variability - atmospheric chemistry - photochemical data - tracer transport
    We present a comprehensive description and benchmark evaluation of the tropospheric chemistry version of the global chemistry transport model TM5 (Tracer Model 5, version TM5-chem-v3.0). A full description is given concerning the photochemical mechanism, the interaction with aerosol, the treatment of the stratosphere, the wet and dry deposition parameterizations, and the applied emissions. We evaluate the model against a suite of ground-based, satellite, and aircraft measurements of components critical for understanding global photochemistry for the year 2006. The model exhibits a realistic oxidative capacity at a global scale. The methane lifetime is ~8.9 years with an associated lifetime of methyl chloroform of 5.86 years, which is similar to that derived using an optimized hydroxyl radical field. The seasonal cycle in observed carbon monoxide (CO) is well simulated at different regions across the globe. In the Northern Hemisphere CO concentrations are underestimated by about 20 ppbv in spring and 10 ppbv in summer, which is related to missing chemistry and underestimated emissions from higher hydrocarbons, as well as to uncertainties in the seasonal variation of CO emissions. The model also captures the spatial and seasonal variation in formaldehyde tropospheric columns as observed by SCIAMACHY. Positive model biases over the Amazon and eastern United States point to uncertainties in the isoprene emissions as well as its chemical breakdown. Simulated tropospheric nitrogen dioxide columns correspond well to observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument in terms of its seasonal and spatial variability (with a global spatial correlation coefficient of 0.89), but TM5 fields are lower by 25–40%. This is consistent with earlier studies pointing to a high bias of 0–30% in the OMI retrievals, but uncertainties in the emission inventories have probably also contributed to the discrepancy. TM5 tropospheric nitrogen dioxide profiles are in good agreement (within ~0.1 ppbv) with in situ aircraft observations from the INTEX-B campaign over (the Gulf of) Mexico. The model reproduces the spatial and seasonal variation in background surface ozone concentrations and tropospheric ozone profiles from the World Ozone and Ultraviolet Radiation Data Centre to within 10 ppbv, but at several tropical stations the model tends to underestimate ozone in the free troposphere. The presented model results benchmark the TM5 tropospheric chemistry version, which is currently in use in several international cooperation activities, and upon which future model improvements will take place
    Effects of process conditions during expander processing and pelleting on starch modification and pellet quality of tapioca
    Thomas, M. ; Huijnen, P.T.H.J. ; Vliet, T. van; Zuilichem, D.J. van; Poel, A.F.B. van der - \ 1999
    Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture 79 (1999). - ISSN 0022-5142 - p. 1481 - 1494.
    Agritourism in France; the example of dutch campers and caravanners at a farm in Departement Cantal.
    Huijnen, S. ; Kloeze, J.W. te; Caalders, J. - \ 1997
    In: FUTRO Workshop 'Battle for the Tourist' (1997)
    Agritourism in France: the example of Dutch campers and caravanners at a farm in Département Cantal.
    Kloeze, J.W. te; Huijnen, S. ; Caalders, J. - \ 1997
    In: The battle for the tourist, Eindhoven, 1997, A book of papers of the EIRASS - p. 429 - 442.
    Starch gelatinization after expander treatment.
    Thomas, M. ; Huijnen, P. ; Poel, A.F.B. van der - \ 1995
    In: Research WFPC 1995; Victam Int.; 12th Feed Industry Show, Utrecht (1995)
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