Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

    Records 1 - 20 / 70

    • help
    • print

      Print search results

    • export

      Export search results

    Check title to add to marked list
    MEMOTE for standardized genome-scale metabolic model testing
    Lieven, Christian ; Beber, Moritz E. ; Olivier, Brett G. ; Bergmann, Frank T. ; Ataman, Meric ; Babaei, Parizad ; Bartell, Jennifer A. ; Blank, Lars M. ; Chauhan, Siddharth ; Correia, Kevin ; Diener, Christian ; Dräger, Andreas ; Ebert, Birgitta E. ; Edirisinghe, Janaka N. ; Faria, José P. ; Feist, Adam M. ; Fengos, Georgios ; Fleming, Ronan M.T. ; García-Jiménez, Beatriz ; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily ; Helvoirt, Wout van; Henry, Christopher S. ; Hermjakob, Henning ; Herrgård, Markus J. ; Kaafarani, Ali ; Kim, Hyun Uk ; King, Zachary ; Klamt, Steffen ; Klipp, Edda ; Koehorst, Jasper J. ; König, Matthias ; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan ; Lee, Dong Yup ; Lee, Sang Yup ; Lee, Sunjae ; Lewis, Nathan E. ; Liu, Filipe ; Ma, Hongwu ; Machado, Daniel ; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan ; Maia, Paulo ; Mardinoglu, Adil ; Medlock, Gregory L. ; Monk, Jonathan M. ; Nielsen, Jens ; Nielsen, Lars Keld ; Nogales, Juan ; Nookaew, Intawat ; Palsson, Bernhard O. ; Papin, Jason A. ; Patil, Kiran R. ; Poolman, Mark ; Price, Nathan D. ; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo ; Richelle, Anne ; Rocha, Isabel ; Sánchez, Benjamín J. ; Schaap, Peter J. ; Malik Sheriff, Rahuman S. ; Shoaie, Saeed ; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus ; Teusink, Bas ; Vilaça, Paulo ; Vik, Jon Olav ; Wodke, Judith A.H. ; Xavier, Joana C. ; Yuan, Qianqian ; Zakhartsev, Maksim ; Zhang, Cheng - \ 2020
    Nature Biotechnology 38 (2020)4. - ISSN 1087-0156 - 1 p.

    An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.

    MEMOTE for standardized genome-scale metabolic model testing
    Lieven, Christian ; Beber, Moritz E. ; Olivier, Brett G. ; Bergmann, Frank T. ; Ataman, Meric ; Babaei, Parizad ; Bartell, Jennifer A. ; Blank, Lars M. ; Chauhan, Siddharth ; Correia, Kevin ; Diener, Christian ; Dräger, Andreas ; Ebert, Birgitta E. ; Edirisinghe, Janaka N. ; Faria, José P. ; Feist, Adam M. ; Fengos, Georgios ; Fleming, Ronan M.T. ; García-Jiménez, Beatriz ; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily ; Helvoirt, Wout van; Henry, Christopher S. ; Hermjakob, Henning ; Herrgård, Markus J. ; Kaafarani, Ali ; Kim, Hyun Uk ; King, Zachary ; Klamt, Steffen ; Klipp, Edda ; Koehorst, Jasper J. ; König, Matthias ; Lakshmanan, Meiyappan ; Lee, Dong Yup ; Lee, Sang Yup ; Lee, Sunjae ; Lewis, Nathan E. ; Liu, Filipe ; Ma, Hongwu ; Machado, Daniel ; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan ; Maia, Paulo ; Mardinoglu, Adil ; Medlock, Gregory L. ; Monk, Jonathan M. ; Nielsen, Jens ; Nielsen, Lars Keld ; Nogales, Juan ; Nookaew, Intawat ; Palsson, Bernhard O. ; Papin, Jason A. ; Patil, Kiran R. ; Poolman, Mark ; Price, Nathan D. ; Resendis-Antonio, Osbaldo ; Richelle, Anne ; Rocha, Isabel ; Sánchez, Benjamín J. ; Schaap, Peter J. ; Malik Sheriff, Rahuman S. ; Shoaie, Saeed ; Sonnenschein, Nikolaus ; Teusink, Bas ; Vilaça, Paulo ; Vik, Jon Olav ; Wodke, Judith A.H. ; Xavier, Joana C. ; Yuan, Qianqian ; Zakhartsev, Maksim ; Zhang, Cheng - \ 2020
    Nature Biotechnology 38 (2020)3. - ISSN 1087-0156 - p. 272 - 276.
    Novel soil quality indicators for the evaluation of agricultural management practices: a biological perspective
    Bongiorno, Giulia - \ 2020
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): L. Brussaard, co-promotor(en): R.G.M. de Goede; P. Mäder; E. Bünemann-König. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463952453 - 277

    Developments in soil biology and methods to characterize soil organic carbon have the potential to deliver novel soil quality indicators that can help to identify soil management practices that sustain soil productivity and environmental resilience. This thesis aimed at investigating the suitability of a range of soil biological and biochemical parameters as novel soil quality indicators for agricultural management. The soil parameters, selected through a literature review, comprised different labile organic carbon fractions (hydrophilic dissolved organic carbon (Hy-DOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), permanganate oxidizable carbon (POXC), hot water extractable carbon (HWEC) and particulate organic matter carbon (POMC), ordered here from the smallest to the largest proportion of the total organic carbon), soil disease suppressiveness measured with a Pythium-Cress bioassay, nematode communities characterized with amplicon sequencing and qPCR, and microbial community level physiological profiling (CLPP) measured with MicroRespTM. We tested the sensitivity of the novel indicators to tillage and organic matter addition in 10 European long-term field experiments, and assessed their relationship with already existing soil quality indicators linked to soil functioning. Lastly, the results of these experimental chapters are interpreted relative to each other and to the broader body of literature on soil quality assessments. Moreover, pros and cons of the novel indicators are discussed, and possibilities and needs for future research are outlined. Reduced tillage increased carbon availability, disease suppressiveness, nematode richness and diversity, the stability and maturity of the food web, and microbial activity and functional diversity. Organic matter addition had a weaker role in sustaining soil quality, possibly due to the different compositions of the organic matter inputs in the long-term field experiments that were sampled. Random forest analysis showed that POXC was the indicator that discriminates soil management most, and structural equation modelling showed its central role in nutrient cycling, carbon sequestration, biodiversity conservation, erosion control and disease regulation/suppression. The novel indicators proposed here have great potential to improve existing soil quality assessment schemes, but their usefulness is still to be validated and optimized.

    Towards an integrative understanding of soil biodiversity
    Thakur, Madhav P. ; Phillips, Helen R.P. ; Brose, Ulrich ; Vries, Franciska T. De; Lavelle, Patrick ; Loreau, Michel ; Mathieu, Jerome ; Mulder, Christian ; Putten, Wim H. Van der; Rillig, Matthias C. ; Wardle, David A. ; Bach, Elizabeth M. ; Bartz, Marie L.C. ; Bennett, Joanne M. ; Briones, Maria J.I. ; Brown, George ; Decaëns, Thibaud ; Eisenhauer, Nico ; Ferlian, Olga ; Guerra, Carlos António ; König-Ries, Birgitta ; Orgiazzi, Alberto ; Ramirez, Kelly S. ; Russell, David J. ; Rutgers, Michiel ; Wall, Diana H. ; Cameron, Erin K. - \ 2020
    Biological Reviews 95 (2020)2. - ISSN 1464-7931 - p. 350 - 364.
    alpha diversity - beta diversity - biodiversity theory - metacommunity theory - neutral theory - niche theory - spatial scale - species–energy relationship - theory of island biogeography

    Soil is one of the most biodiverse terrestrial habitats. Yet, we lack an integrative conceptual framework for understanding the patterns and mechanisms driving soil biodiversity. One of the underlying reasons for our poor understanding of soil biodiversity patterns relates to whether key biodiversity theories (historically developed for aboveground and aquatic organisms) are applicable to patterns of soil biodiversity. Here, we present a systematic literature review to investigate whether and how key biodiversity theories (species–energy relationship, theory of island biogeography, metacommunity theory, niche theory and neutral theory) can explain observed patterns of soil biodiversity. We then discuss two spatial compartments nested within soil at which biodiversity theories can be applied to acknowledge the scale-dependent nature of soil biodiversity.

    De Hongerwinter
    Zwarte, Ingrid de - \ 2019
    Global distribution of earthworm diversity
    Phillips, Helen R.P. ; Guerra, Carlos A. ; Bartz, Marie L.C. ; Briones, Maria J.I. ; Brown, George ; Crowther, Thomas W. ; Ferlian, Olga ; Gongalsky, Konstantin B. ; Hoogen, Johan Van Den; Krebs, Julia ; Orgiazzi, Alberto ; Routh, Devin ; Schwarz, Benjamin ; Bach, Elizabeth M. ; Bennett, Joanne ; Brose, Ulrich ; Decaëns, Thibaud ; König-Ries, Birgitta ; Loreau, Michel ; Mathieu, Jérôme ; Mulder, Christian ; Putten, Wim H. Van Der; Ramirez, Kelly S. ; Rillig, Matthias C. ; Russell, David ; Rutgers, Michiel ; Thakur, Madhav P. ; Vries, Franciska T. De; Wall, Diana H. ; Wardle, David A. ; Arai, Miwa ; Ayuke, Fredrick O. ; Baker, Geoff H. ; Beauséjour, Robin ; Bedano, José C. ; Birkhofer, Klaus ; Blanchart, Eric ; Blossey, Bernd ; Bolger, Thomas ; Bradley, Robert L. ; Callaham, Mac A. ; Capowiez, Yvan ; Caulfield, Mark E. ; Choi, Amy ; Crotty, Felicity V. ; Dávalos, Andrea ; Diaz Cosin, Darío J. ; Dominguez, Anahí ; Duhour, Andrés Esteban ; Eekeren, Nick Van; Emmerling, Christoph ; Falco, Liliana B. ; Fernández, Rosa ; Fonte, Steven J. ; Fragoso, Carlos ; Franco, André L.C. ; Fugère, Martine ; Fusilero, Abegail T. ; Gholami, Shaieste ; Gundale, Michael J. ; Gutiérrez Lopez, Monica ; Hackenberger, Davorka K. ; Hernández, Luis M. ; Hishi, Takuo ; Holdsworth, Andrew R. ; Holmstrup, Martin ; Hopfensperger, Kristine N. ; Lwanga, Esperanza Huerta ; Huhta, Veikko ; Hurisso, Tunsisa T. ; Iannone, Basil V. ; Iordache, Madalina ; Joschko, Monika ; Kaneko, Nobuhiro ; Kanianska, Radoslava ; Keith, Aidan M. ; Kelly, Courtland A. ; Kernecker, Maria L. ; Klaminder, Jonatan ; Koné, Armand W. ; Kooch, Yahya ; Kukkonen, Sanna T. ; Lalthanzara, H. ; Lammel, Daniel R. ; Lebedev, Iurii M. ; Li, Yiqing ; Jesus Lidon, Juan B. ; Lincoln, Noa K. ; Loss, Scott R. ; Marichal, Raphael ; Matula, Radim ; Moos, Jan Hendrik ; Moreno, Gerardo ; Mor n-Ríos, Alejandro ; Muys, Bart ; Neirynck, Johan ; Norgrove, Lindsey ; Novo, Marta ; Nuutinen, Visa ; Nuzzo, Victoria ; Mujeeb Rahman, P. ; Pansu, Johan ; Paudel, Shishir ; Pérès, Guénola ; Pérez-Camacho, Lorenzo ; Piñeiro, Raúl ; Ponge, Jean François ; Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz ; Rebollo, Salvador ; Rodeiro-Iglesias, Javier ; Rodríguez, Miguel ; Roth, Alexander M. ; Rousseau, Guillaume X. ; Rozen, Anna ; Sayad, Ehsan ; Schaik, Loes Van; Scharenbroch, Bryant C. ; Schirrmann, Michael ; Schmidt, Olaf ; Schröder, Boris ; Seeber, Julia ; Shashkov, Maxim P. ; Singh, Jaswinder ; Smith, Sandy M. ; Steinwandter, Michael ; Talavera, José A. ; Trigo, Dolores ; Tsukamoto, Jiro ; Valença, Anne W. De; Vanek, Steven J. ; Virto, Iñigo ; Wackett, Adrian A. ; Warren, Matthew W. ; Wehr, Nathaniel H. ; Whalen, Joann K. ; Wironen, Michael B. ; Wolters, Volkmar ; Zenkova, Irina V. ; Zhang, Weixin ; Cameron, Erin K. ; Eisenhauer, Nico - \ 2019
    Science 366 (2019)6464. - ISSN 0036-8075 - p. 480 - 485.

    Soil organisms, including earthworms, are a key component of terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about their diversity, their distribution, and the threats affecting them. We compiled a global dataset of sampled earthworm communities from 6928 sites in 57 countries as a basis for predicting patterns in earthworm diversity, abundance, and biomass. We found that local species richness and abundance typically peaked at higher latitudes, displaying patterns opposite to those observed in aboveground organisms. However, high species dissimilarity across tropical locations may cause diversity across the entirety of the tropics to be higher than elsewhere. Climate variables were found to be more important in shaping earthworm communities than soil properties or habitat cover. These findings suggest that climate change may have serious implications for earthworm communities and for the functions they provide.

    BrAPI-an application programming interface for plant breeding applications
    Selby, Peter ; Abbeloos, Rafael ; Backlund, Jan Erik ; Basterrechea Salido, Martin ; Bauchet, Guillaume ; Benites-Alfaro, Omar E. ; Birkett, Clay ; Calaminos, Viana C. ; Carceller, Pierre ; Cornut, Guillaume ; Vasques Costa, Bruno ; Edwards, Jeremy D. ; Finkers, Richard ; Yanxin Gao, Star ; Ghaffar, Mehmood ; Glaser, Philip ; Guignon, Valentin ; Hok, Puthick ; Kilian, Andrzej ; König, Patrick ; Lagare, Jack Elendil B. ; Lange, Matthias ; Laporte, Marie Angélique ; Larmande, Pierre ; LeBauer, David S. ; Lyon, David A. ; Marshall, David S. ; Matthews, Dave ; Milne, Iain ; Mistry, Naymesh ; Morales, Nicolas ; Mueller, Lukas A. ; Neveu, Pascal ; Papoutsoglou, Evangelia ; Pearce, Brian ; Perez-Masias, Ivan ; Pommier, Cyril ; Ramírez-González, Ricardo H. ; Rathore, Abhishek ; Raquel, Angel Manica ; Raubach, Sebastian ; Rife, Trevor ; Robbins, Kelly ; Rouard, Mathieu ; Sarma, Chaitanya ; Scholz, Uwe ; Sempéré, Guilhem ; Shaw, Paul D. ; Simon, Reinhard ; Verouden, Maikel - \ 2019
    Bioinformatics 35 (2019)20. - ISSN 1367-4803 - p. 4147 - 4155.

    MOTIVATION: Modern genomic breeding methods rely heavily on very large amounts of phenotyping and genotyping data, presenting new challenges in effective data management and integration. Recently, the size and complexity of datasets have increased significantly, with the result that data are often stored on multiple systems. As analyses of interest increasingly require aggregation of datasets from diverse sources, data exchange between disparate systems becomes a challenge. RESULTS: To facilitate interoperability among breeding applications, we present the public plant Breeding Application Programming Interface (BrAPI). BrAPI is a standardized web service API specification. The development of BrAPI is a collaborative, community-based initiative involving a growing global community of over a hundred participants representing several dozen institutions and companies. Development of such a standard is recognized as critical to a number of important large breeding system initiatives as a foundational technology. The focus of the first version of the API is on providing services for connecting systems and retrieving basic breeding data including germplasm, study, observation, and marker data. A number of BrAPI-enabled applications, termed BrAPPs, have been written, that take advantage of the emerging support of BrAPI by many databases. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: More information on BrAPI, including links to the specification, test suites, BrAPPs, and sample implementations is available at https://brapi.org/. The BrAPI specification and the developer tools are provided as free and open source.

    The host response of IBS patients to allogenic and autologous faecal microbiota transfer
    Holster, Savanne ; Hooiveld, G.J.E.J. ; Brummer, Robert-Jan ; König, Julia - \ 2019
    Wageningen University
    GSE138297 - Homo sapiens - PRJNA575360
    In this randomised placebo-controlled trial, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients were treated with faecal material from a healthy donor (n=8, allogenic FMT) or with their own faecal microbiota (n=8, autologous FMT). The faecal transplant was administered by whole colonoscopy into the caecum (30 g of stool in 150 ml sterile saline). Two weeks before the FMT (baseline) as well as two and eight weeks after the FMT, the participants underwent a sigmoidoscopy, and biopsies were collected at a standardised location (20-25 cm from the anal verge at the crossing with the arteria iliaca communis) from an uncleansed sigmoid. In patients treated with allogenic FMT, predominantly immune response-related genes sets were induced, with the strongest response two weeks after FMT. In patients treated with autologous FMT, predominantly metabolism-related gene sets were affected.
    Allogenic Faecal Microbiota Transfer Induces Immune-Related Gene Sets in the Colon Mucosa of Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Holster, Savanne ; Hooiveld, Guido J. ; Repsilber, Dirk ; Vos, Willem M. de; Brummer, Robert J. ; König, Julia - \ 2019
    Biomolecules 9 (2019)10. - ISSN 2218-273X
    faecal microbiota transplantation - gene expression - host-microbe interaction - irritable bowel syndrome - microbiota

    Faecal microbiota transfer (FMT) consists of the introduction of new microbial communities into the intestine of a patient, with the aim of restoring a disturbed gut microbiota. Even though it is used as a potential treatment for various diseases, it is unknown how the host mucosa responds to FMT. This study aims to investigate the colonic mucosa gene expression response to allogenic (from a donor) or autologous (own) FMT in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In a recently conducted randomised, double-blinded, controlled clinical study, 17 IBS patients were treated with FMT by colonoscopy. RNA was isolated from colonic biopsies collected by sigmoidoscopy at baseline, as well as two weeks and eight weeks after FMT. In patients treated with allogenic FMT, predominantly immune response-related gene sets were induced, with the strongest response two weeks after the FMT. In patients treated with autologous FMT, predominantly metabolism-related gene sets were affected. Furthermore, several microbiota genera showed correlations with immune-related gene sets, with different correlations found after allogenic compared to autologous FMT. This study shows that the microbe-host response is influenced by FMT on the mucosal gene expression level, and that there are clear differences in response to allogenic compared to autologous FMT.

    Genome analysis of the marine bacterium Labrenzia sp. strain 011, a potential protective agent of mollusks
    Moghaddam, Jamshid Amiri ; Dávila-Céspedes, Antonio ; Alanjary, Mohammad ; Blom, Jochen ; König, Gabriele M. ; Schäberle, Till F. - \ 2019
    Data 4 (2019)1. - ISSN 2306-5729
    Antimicrobial - Comparative genomics - Draft genome - Labrenzia - Oyster disease - Roseovarius crassostreae

    The marine bacterium Labrenzia sp. strain 011 was isolated from the coastal sediment of Kronsgaard, Germany. The Labrenzia species are suggested to be protective agents of mollusks. Labrenzia sp. strain 011 produces specialized metabolites, which showed activity against a range of microorganisms, thereunder strong inhibitory effects against Pseudoroseovarius crassostreae DSM 16,950 (genus Roseovarius), the causative agent of oyster disease. The genome of Labrenzia sp. strain 011 was sequenced and assembled into 65 contigs, has a size of 5.1 Mbp, and a G+C content of 61.6%. A comparative genome analysis defined Labrenzia sp. strain 011 as a distinct new species within the genus Labrenzia, whereby 44% of the genome was contributed to the Labrenzia core genome. The genomic data provided here is expected to contribute to a deeper understanding of the mollusk-protective role of Labrenzia spp.

    The Effect of Allogenic Versus Autologous Fecal Microbiota Transfer on Symptoms, Visceral Perception and Fecal and Mucosal Microbiota in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Study
    Holster, Savanne ; Lindqvist, Carl Mårten ; Repsilber, Dirk ; Salonen, Anne ; Vos, Willem M. de; König, Julia ; Brummer, Robert J. - \ 2019
    Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology 10 (2019)4. - ISSN 2155-384X - p. e00034 - e00034.

    OBJECTIVES: Fecal microbiota transfer (FMT) is suggested as a potential treatment for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We aimed to study the effect of allogenic and autologous FMT on IBS symptoms, visceral sensitivity, and compositional changes in fecal and mucosa-adherent microbiota. METHODS: Seventeen patients with IBS were randomized either to receive fecal material from a healthy donor (allogenic) or to receive their own fecal material (autologous). The fecal material was administered into the cecum by whole colonoscopy after bowel cleansing. RESULTS: No significant differences were found between the allogenic and the autologous FMT regarding symptom scores. However, symptom scores of patients receiving allogenic fecal material significantly decreased after FMT compared with baseline (P = 0.02), which was not the case in the autologous group (P = 0.16). Visceral sensitivity was not affected except for a small beneficial effect on urge scores in the autologous group (P < 0.05). While both fecal and mucosa-adherent microbiota of some patients shifted to their respective donor's fecal microbiota, some patients showed no relevant microbial changes after allogenic FMT. Large compositional shifts in fecal and mucosa-adherent microbiota also occurred in the autologous group. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that a single FMT by colonoscopy may have beneficial effects in IBS; however, the allogenic fecal material was not superior to the autologous fecal material. This suggests that bowel cleansing prior to the colonoscopy and/or processing of the fecal material as part of the FMT routine contribute to symptoms and gut microbiota composition changes in IBS.

    Environmental and sustainability education in the Benelux region
    Poeck, Katrien Van; Wals, Arjen E.J. ; König, Ariane - \ 2018
    Environmental Education Research 24 (2018)9. - ISSN 1350-4622 - p. 1229 - 1233.
    Environmental and sustainability education in the Benelux countries : research, policy and practices at the intersection of education and societal transformation
    Poeck, Katrien Van; König, Ariane ; Wals, Arjen E.J. - \ 2018
    Environmental Education Research 24 (2018)9. - ISSN 1350-4622 - p. 1234 - 1249.
    Belgium - Environmental and sustainability education - Luxembourg - policy - research - The Netherlands

    As an introductory article of a Special Issue on Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE) in the Benelux region, this paper provides an overview of ESE research, policy and practice in Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxembourg. It discusses the different contributions in this collection with regard to how the central theme of this issue, the relation between education and societal transformation, is approached in each paper. The main characteristics of the ESE research fields in the Benelux are described in general terms, and placed within the context of how ESE policy and practice are organised in these countries. Next, different conceptualisations of the relation between educational and political spaces reflected in the collection are discussed and the varied contributions to this issue are positioned in relation to three distinguished traditions of approaching the place of democracy in ESE. The authors conclude with commenting on how this relates to different approaches to the research-policy-practice interface.

    Consensus report: faecal microbiota transfer – clinical applications and procedures
    König, J. ; Siebenhaar, A. ; Högenauer, C. ; Arkkila, P. ; Nieuwdorp, M. ; Norén, T. ; Ponsioen, C.Y. ; Rosien, U. ; Rossen, N.G. ; Satokari, R. ; Stallmach, A. ; Vos, W. de; Keller, J. ; Brummer, R.J. - \ 2017
    Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics 45 (2017)2. - ISSN 0269-2813 - p. 222 - 239.

    Background: Faecal microbiota transplantation or transfer (FMT) aims at replacing or reinforcing the gut microbiota of a patient with the microbiota from a healthy donor. Not many controlled or randomised studies have been published evaluating the use of FMT for other diseases than Clostridium difficile infection, making it difficult for clinicians to decide on a suitable indication. Aim: To provide an expert consensus on current clinical indications, applications and methodological aspects of FMT. Methods: Well-acknowledged experts from various countries in Europe have contributed to this article. After literature review, consensus has been achieved by repetitive circulation of the statements and the full manuscript among all authors with intermittent adaptation to comments (using a modified Delphi process). Levels of evidence and agreement were rated according to the GRADE system. Consensus was defined a priori as agreement by at least 75% of the authors. Results: Key recommendations include the use of FMT in recurrent C. difficile infection characterised by at least two previous standard treatments without persistent cure, as well as its consideration in severe and severe-complicated C. difficile infection as an alternative to total colectomy in case of early failure of antimicrobial therapy. FMT in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and metabolic syndrome should only be performed in research settings. Conclusions: Faecal microbiota transplantation or transfer is a promising treatment for a variety of diseases in which the intestinal microbiota is disturbed. For indications other than C. difficile infection, more evidence is needed before more concrete recommendations can be made.

    Flowers of Resistance: : Citizen science, ecological democracy and the transgressive education paradigm
    Wals, A.E.J. ; Peters, Michael A. - \ 2017
    In: Sustainability Science: / König, Ariane, Ravetz, Jerome, Routledge (Key Issues in Environment and Sustainability ) - ISBN 9781138659285
    When democracy can be hijacked, power corrupts and capitalism penetrates deeply into society, including into our schools, what prospects still exist for education for a more sustainable world? Democracy is painfully slow and open to manipulation: the question must be asked whether it is up to the task in the new global environment where action is through agreement of interest-based states. And yet in a post-truth world there are important issues that yoke science as empirical truth with democracy that we might christen ecological democracy which provides the warrant and justification for civil action, and demonstrates the new power of citizen science groups that can act autonomously in the interest of their local communities. In this paper, which is a short version of a more comprehensive chapter published in a book edited by Ariane König, titled “Sustainability Science: Key Issues” published by Routledge[1], we seek comfort, inspiration and support from emerging forms of ecological democracy, civic science and transgressive education. The latter invites conflict and disruption as mechanisms to break with stubborn, unsustainable routines, that encourage people to leave their comfort zone. The resulting discomfort can be generative when it invites people to explore other options, to build new alliances or to re-think what they always thought to be normal or true. Learning on the edge of one’s comfort zones amidst a plurality of ideas, can help us interrogate and rethink the way we frame – or are made to frame – our experiences, as well as our cultural narratives and associated encultured and embodied ontological pre-dispositions.
    Developing a framework for critical assessment of stakeholder engagement activities
    Kipling, Richard P. ; König, H. ; Helming, Katharina ; Seddaiu, Giovanna ; Köchy, Martin ; Graversgaard, Morten ; Pol, A. van den - \ 2017
    In: Book of abstracts MACSUR 2017 Scientific Conference. - Berlin : - p. 71 - 71.
    Human intestinal barrier function in health and disease
    König, Julia ; Wells, Jerry ; Cani, Patrice D. ; García-Ródenas, Clara L. ; MacDonald, Tom ; Mercenier, Annick ; Whyte, Jacqueline ; Troost, Freddy J. ; Brummer, Robert-Jan - \ 2016
    Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology 7 (2016)10. - ISSN 2155-384X
    The gastrointestinal tract consists of an enormous surface area that is optimized to efficiently absorb nutrients, water, and electrolytes from food. At the same time, it needs to provide a tight barrier against the ingress of harmful substances, and protect against a reaction to omnipresent harmless compounds. A dysfunctional intestinal barrier is associated with various diseases and disorders. In this review, the role of intestinal permeability in common disorders such as infections with intestinal pathogens, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, obesity, celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and food allergies will be discussed. In addition, the effect of the frequently prescribed drugs proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on intestinal permeability, as well as commonly used methods to assess barrier function will be reviewed.
    Correlating the Gut Microbiome to Health and Disease
    Marques, T.M. ; Holster, S. ; Wall, R. ; König, J. ; Brummer, R.J. ; Vos, Willem de - \ 2016
    In: The Gut-Brain Axis Dietary, Probiotic, and Prebiotic Interventions on the Microbiota Elsevier Inc. Academic Press - ISBN 9780128025444 - p. 261 - 291.
    Gut microbiota - Immune system-related diseases - Intestinal diseases - Metabolic diseases - Nervous system-related diseases - Therapies for gut microbiota modulation

    The gut microbiota is a complex ecosystem consisting of a diverse population of prokaryotes that has a symbiotic relationship with its host; thus it plays a vital role for the host's health. Our understanding of the effect of the gut microbiome in health and disease has grown substantially over the past 2 decades, mostly because of recent advances in sequencing and other high-throughput technologies. Given its high metabolic potential, close proximity to the intestinal mucosa, and interaction with the immune system, it is not surprising that the gut microbiome is an important partaker in human health. Evidence to the importance of the gut microbiome in human health and disease is the growing number of conditions now linked to changes in the resident gut microbiota, including recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, colorectal cancer, allergies, neurological diseases, and metabolic diseases. Research into this field of the association of the gut microbiome with health and disease continues to expand at a rapid pace as we come to accept the gut microbiome as our "second genome." Targeting the gut microbiome to restore/modulate its composition with the use of antibiotics, probiotics, prebiotics, and even fecal microbiota transplantation is considered a promising future strategy for the development of new solutions in the treatment of various diseases associated with an imbalance in microbiota composition and functioning.

    Knowledge brokerage for impact assessment of land use scenarios in inner Mongolia, China : Extending and testing the FoPIA approach
    König, Hannes J. ; Podhora, Aranka ; Zhen, Lin ; Helming, Katharina ; Yan, Huimin ; Du, Bingzhen ; Wübbeke, Jost ; Wang, Chao ; Klinger, Julie ; Chen, Cheng ; Uthes, Sandra - \ 2015
    Sustainability 7 (2015)5. - ISSN 2071-1050 - p. 5027 - 5049.
    Expert knowledge - Impact assessment - Knowledge brokerage - Landscape functioning - Policy support - Sustainable development

    While land serves numerous societal functions and contributes to sustainable development, it is often unclear how these functions are affected by political decisions and common drivers of land use change, such as economic development, climate change and demographic change. This study evaluates alternative land use scenarios in reference to a rural region of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region (China), where various processes and decisions have historically triggered unsustainable development. The scientifically tested "Framework for Participatory Impact Assessment (FoPIA)" method is developed further to address specific features of the case study region, and its function as a knowledge-brokerage (KB) tool is evaluated. Three scenarios are developed and analysed in expert workshops. Abstract: While land serves numerous societal functions and contributes to sustainable development, it is often unclear how these functions are affected by political decisions and common drivers of land use change, such as economic development, climate change and demographic change. This study evaluates alternative land use scenarios in reference to a rural region of Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region (China), where various processes and decisions have historically triggered unsustainable development. The scientifically tested "Framework for Participatory Impact Assessment (FoPIA)" method is developed further to address specific features of the case study region, and its function as a knowledge-brokerage (KB) tool is evaluated. Three scenarios are developed and analysed in expert workshops.

    Evolving protocols for research in equitation science
    Pierard, M. ; Hall, C. ; Konig von Borstel, U. ; Averis, A. ; Hawson, L. ; Mclean, A. ; Nevison, C. ; Visser, E.K. ; McGreevy, P. - \ 2015
    Journal of Veterinary Behavior 10 (2015)3. - ISSN 1558-7878 - p. 255 - 266.
    Within the emerging discipline of Equitation Science, the application of consistent methodology, including robust objective measures, is required for sound scientific evaluation. This report aims to provide an evaluation of current methodology and to propose some initial guidelines for future research. The value of research, especially that involving small sample sizes, can be enhanced by the application of consistent methodology and reporting enabling results to be compared across studies. This article includes guidelines for experimental design in studies involving the ridden horse. Equine ethograms currently used are reviewed and factors to be considered in the development of a ridden-horse ethogram are evaluated. An assessment of methods used to collect behavioral and physiological data is included and the use of equipment for measurements (e.g., rein-tension and pressure-sensing instruments) is discussed. Equitation science is a new discipline, subject to evolving viewpoints on research foci and design. Technological advances may improve the accuracy and detail of measurements but must be used within appropriate and valid experimental designs.
    Check title to add to marked list
    << previous | next >>

    Show 20 50 100 records per page

     
    Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.