Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Hoe rijk is de Waddenzee? : Wageningen Marine Research Regiocentrum Yerseke
    Koning, Susan de - \ 2020
    Visserijnieuws.nl
    De kust opruimen met de Boskalis Beach Clean Up tour: analyse van kenmerken en motivaties van deelnemers (2013-2019)
    Tamis, Jacqueline ; Koning, Susan de - \ 2020
    Den Helder : Wageningen Marine Research (Wageningen Marine Research rapport C046/20) - 60
    Give CRISPR a Chance : the GeneSprout Initiative
    Vangheluwe, Nick ; Swinnen, Gwen ; Koning, Ramon de; Meyer, Prisca ; Houben, Maarten ; Huybrechts, Michiel ; Sajeev, Nikita ; Rienstra, Juriaan ; Boer, Damian - \ 2020
    Trends in Plant Science 25 (2020)7. - ISSN 1360-1385 - p. 624 - 627.
    CRISPR - policy - science communication - young researcher

    Did you know that a group of early-career researchers launched an initiative enabling open dialog on new plant breeding techniques, such as genome editing? We developed a wide-ranging initiative that aims to facilitate public engagement and provide a platform for young plant scientists to encourage participation in science communication.

    Hoe rijk is de Waddenzee?
    Koning, Susan de - \ 2020
    Wageningen Marine Research
    Recent Progress and Recommendations on Celiac Disease From the Working Group on Prolamin Analysis and Toxicity
    Scherf, Katharina A. ; Catassi, Carlo ; Chirdo, Fernando ; Ciclitira, Paul J. ; Feighery, Conleth ; Gianfrani, Carmen ; Koning, Frits ; Lundin, Knut E.A. ; Schuppan, Detlef ; Smulders, Marinus J.M. ; Tranquet, Olivier ; Troncone, Riccardo ; Koehler, Peter - \ 2020
    Frontiers in Nutrition 7 (2020). - ISSN 2296-861X
    barley - celiac disease - gluten - gluten-free diet - Prolamin Working Group - rye - wheat

    Celiac disease (CD) affects a growing number of individuals worldwide. To elucidate the causes for this increase, future multidisciplinary collaboration is key to understanding the interactions between immunoreactive components in gluten-containing cereals and the human gastrointestinal tract and immune system and to devise strategies for CD prevention and treatment beyond the gluten-free diet. During the last meetings, the Working Group on Prolamin Analysis and Toxicity (Prolamin Working Group, PWG) discussed recent progress in the field together with key stakeholders from celiac disease societies, academia, industry and regulatory bodies. Based on the current state of knowledge, this perspective from the PWG members provides recommendations regarding clinical, analytical and legal aspects of CD. The selected key topics that require future multidisciplinary collaborative efforts in the clinical field are to collect robust data on the increasing prevalence of CD, to evaluate what is special about gluten-specific T cells, to study their kinetics and transcriptomics and to put some attention to the identification of the environmental agents that facilitate the breaking of tolerance to gluten. In the field of gluten analysis, the key topics are the precise assessment of gluten immunoreactive components in wheat, rye and barley to understand how these are affected by genetic and environmental factors, the comparison of different methods for compliance monitoring of gluten-free products and the development of improved reference materials for gluten analysis.

    Practical implementation and evaluation of optimal carbon dioxide supply control
    Tarnavas, D. ; Koning, A.N.M. de; Tsafaras, I. ; Stanghellini, C. ; Gonzalez, J.A. - \ 2020
    Acta Horticulturae 1271 (2020). - ISSN 0567-7572 - p. 193 - 197.
    Carbon dioxide - Model - Optimal greenhouse control

    In state-of-the-art production of greenhouse crops, the air is enriched to higher than atmospheric carbon dioxide levels to increase photosynthesis and final yield. When there is ventilation, this means that some of the supplied carbon dioxide will be lost. Especially when the available carbon dioxide is not a by-product of heat production (e.g. pure liquid carbon dioxide), the enrichment has a significant cost. Commonly, controlling carbon dioxide level is a simple on/off control depending on the windows opening. Experienced growers try to increase the benefit-cost ratio by using more complicated strategies based on influences of climatic factors, e.g. sun irradiation and wind speed. The settings for the influences are made intuitively and it is hardly possible to get any feedback on the applied strategy; therefore they do not warrant optimal use of carbon dioxide. This study demonstrates as alternative a model-based optimization algorithm. This algorithm estimates the carbon dioxide concentration where the difference between benefits and costs of carbon dioxide dosing is maximized. The greenhouse ventilation rate, as the major determinant of the costs, is estimated from the energy and vapor balance of the greenhouse. The photosynthesis, as the major determinant of the benefits, is simulated as a function of solar radiation and carbon dioxide. The model is implemented in the process computer of a commercial tomato greenhouse. The method gives a reasonable estimation of optimum carbon dioxide concentration in varying conditions. The estimated increase in weekly margin compared to the strategy of the grower could be over 200 € ha-1

    Genomics of heterosis and egg production in White Leghorns
    Amuzu‐Aweh, Esinam Nancy - \ 2020
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): H. Bovenhuis, co-promotor(en): P. Bijma; D.J. de Koning. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789177605300 - 194

    Crossbreeding is practiced extensively in commercial breeding programs of many plant and animal species, in order to exploit heterosis, breed complementarity, and to protect pure line genetic material. The success of commercial crossbreeding schemes depends on identifying and using the right combination of breeds, lines or varieties that produce the desired crossbred offspring. Currently, the selection of pure lines is based on the results of “field tests”, during which the performance of their crossbreds is assessed under typical commercial settings. Field tests are time-consuming, and also constitute a large percent of the costs of commercial crossbreeding programs. The research in this thesis therefore set out mainly to develop models for the accurate prediction of heterosis in White Leghorn crossbreds, using genomic information from their parental pure lines. Predicted heterosis could be used as pre-selection criteria, thus substantially reducing the number of crosses that need to be field-tested. In Chapter 1, I give an overview of the history of selective breeding in laying hens, and introduce heterosis and its genetic basis. In Chapter 2, based on a dominance model, we showed that a genome-wide squared difference in allele frequency between parental pure lines (SDAF) predicts heterosis in egg number (EN) and egg weight (EW) at the line level with an accuracy of ~0.5. With this accuracy, one can reduce the number of field tests by 50%, with only ~4 loss in realised heterosis. In laying hens, selection pressure is highest on the sires. We therefore went further to develop a model to predict heterosis at the individual sire level, in order to exploit the variation between sires from the same line. We found that the within-line variation between sires in our data was very small (0.7% of the variation in predicted heterosis), and most of the variation was explained by across-line differences (90%) (Chapter 3). Quantitative genetic theory shows that heterosis is proportional to SDAF and the dominance effect at a locus. In Chapter 4, we estimated variance components and dominance effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on EN and EW in White Leghorn pure lines. We found that dominance variance accounted for up to 37% of the genetic variance in EN, and up to 4% of that in EW. We then used the estimated dominance effects to calculate dominance-weighted SDAFs for EN and EW between parental pure lines, and showed that prediction of heterosis based on a weighted SDAF would yield considerably different ranking of crosses for each trait, compared with a prediction based on the raw SDAF. This implies that different crosses would be selected depending on the criterion used to predict heterosis. To gain an insight into the genetic architecture of EN and EW, in Chapter 5 we performed genome-wide association studies using data on 16 commercial crossbred populations. We did not identify any significant SNPs for EN, indicating that EN is a highly polygenic trait with no large quantitative trait loci segregating in the populations studied. For EW, however, we identified several significant SNPs. One explanation for these results is that EN has been under intense directional selection for several decades, whereas EW has been under less-intense, stabilising selection. Finally, in the general discussion of this thesis (Chapter 6), I discuss the genomic prediction of heterosis, focusing on possible reasons for the lack of a consensus on the approach to predict heterosis, even after decades of research. I also discuss new opportunities for the genomic prediction of heterosis, considering the advancements in genotyping and computation methods. Lastly, I give an example of the application of results from this thesis in crossbreeding programs.

    Genetics of colostrum, milk, and serum antibodies in dairy cattle : Implications for health and production
    Cordero Solórzano, Juan - \ 2020
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): D.J. de Koning; H. Bovenhuis, co-promotor(en): J. Johansson Wensman; H. Parmentier; M. Tråvén. - Wageningen : Wageningen University (Acta Universitatis Agriculturae Sueciae 2020:4) - ISBN 9789177605263 - 18

    Colostrum with sufficient IgG content is essential for the newborn calf, as it requires this passive immunity to survive during its rearing. Failure of passive transfer (FPT) occurs when a calf does not absorb enough antibodies (<10 g/L of IgG in serum) from the colostrum, which besides timely access to colostrum, can be due to low IgG production of the mother or poor IgG absorption of the calf. The aim of this thesis was to explore the genetics of antibody content in colostrum and newborn calf serum and how they correlate with production and health traits. The first three studies were conducted on Swedish Red and Swedish Holstein animals from three experimental farms in Sweden. Colostrum samples from 1313 cows calving from January 2015 to April 2017 were collected. For two of the farms, serum samples from 868 newborn calves were collected at 1 to 12 days after birth. Genetic parameters were estimated for antibody traits (total IgG and natural antibodies (NAb)) and indicators (Brix and Serum Total Protein) in colostrum and calf serum. Colostrum traits had heritabilities ranging from 0.16 to 0.31 with repeatabilities from 0.21 to 0.55. Brix had positive genetic correlations with all the other colostrum traits including total IgG (0.68). Genetic correlations with milk yield, protein and fat were non-significant. A negative genetic correlation was observed for Brix and IgG traits with Lactation Average Somatic Cell Score (LASCS), but it was also non-significant. Calf serum traits had heritabilities from 0.25 to 0.59, with a significant maternal effect accounting for 17 to 27% of the variance. Genetic correlations of calf serum traits and calf health for the first three months of life had a negative tendency, but were non-significant. LASCS for the first lactation of the animals studied as calves was negatively genetically correlated with 3 NAb traits. We also performed Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using an imputed 50K SNP array on colostrum and calf serum. In colostrum, genomic regions were found for Brix, total IgG and NAbs, with candidate genes related to immunity. Similarly, calf serum GWAS revealed QTLs for S-IgG, IgM and IgG NAbs with genes linked to molecule transport, gastric acid and salivary secretion, among others. In the last study, 1,695 milk samples of Holstein Friesian cows from Dutch herds were analyzed for 16 different NAb traits. GWAS were performed using imputed 777K SNP genotypes. For IgM NAb, significant associations were found with candidate genes related to immunoglobulin structure and early B cell development. We have shown that antibodies in colostrum, milk and serum have an important genetic component and we can pinpoint genomic regions that influence these antibodies. Our results suggest that these traits can potentially provide a tool to reduce FPT using genetic selection.

    Global patterns and drivers of ecosystem functioning in rivers and riparian zones
    Tiegs, Scott D. ; Costello, David M. ; Isken, Mark W. ; Woodward, Guy ; McIntyre, Peter B. ; Gessner, Mark O. ; Chauvet, Eric ; Griffiths, Natalie A. ; Flecker, Alex S. ; Acuña, Vicenç ; Albariño, Ricardo ; Allen, Daniel C. ; Alonso, Cecilia ; Andino, Patricio ; Arango, Clay ; Aroviita, Jukka ; Barbosa, Marcus V.M. ; Barmuta, Leon A. ; Baxter, Colden V. ; Bell, Thomas D.C. ; Bellinger, Brent ; Boyero, Luz ; Brown, Lee E. ; Bruder, Andreas ; Bruesewitz, Denise A. ; Burdon, Francis J. ; Callisto, Marcos ; Canhoto, Cristina ; Capps, Krista A. ; Castillo, María M. ; Clapcott, Joanne ; Colas, Fanny ; Colón-Gaud, Checo ; Cornut, Julien ; Crespo-Pérez, Verónica ; Cross, Wyatt F. ; Culp, Joseph M. ; Danger, Michael ; Dangles, Olivier ; Eyto, Elvira De; Derry, Alison M. ; Villanueva, Veronica Díaz ; Douglas, Michael M. ; Elosegi, Arturo ; Encalada, Andrea C. ; Entrekin, Sally ; Espinosa, Rodrigo ; Ethaiya, Diana ; Ferreira, Verónica ; Ferriol, Carmen ; Flanagan, Kyla M. ; Fleituch, Tadeusz ; Follstad Shah, Jennifer J. ; Barbosa, André Frainer ; Friberg, Nikolai ; Frost, Paul C. ; Garcia, Erica A. ; Lago, Liliana García ; Soto, Pavel Ernesto García ; Ghate, Sudeep ; Giling, Darren P. ; Gilmer, Alan ; Gonçalves, José Francisco ; Gonzales, Rosario Karina ; Graça, Manuel A.S. ; Grace, Mike ; Grossart, Hans Peter ; Guérold, François ; Gulis, Vlad ; Hepp, Luiz U. ; Higgins, Scott ; Hishi, Takuo ; Huddart, Joseph ; Hudson, John ; Imberger, Samantha ; Iñiguez-Armijos, Carlos ; Iwata, Tomoya ; Janetski, David J. ; Jennings, Eleanor ; Kirkwood, Andrea E. ; Koning, Aaron A. ; Kosten, Sarian ; Kuehn, Kevin A. ; Laudon, Hjalmar ; Leavitt, Peter R. ; Lemes Da Silva, Aurea L. ; Leroux, Shawn J. ; LeRoy, Carri J. ; Lisi, Peter J. ; MacKenzie, Richard ; Marcarelli, Amy M. ; Masese, Frank O. ; McKie, Brendan G. ; Medeiros, Adriana Oliveira ; Meissner, Kristian ; Miliša, Marko ; Mishra, Shailendra ; Miyake, Yo ; Moerke, Ashley ; Mombrikotb, Shorok ; Mooney, Rob ; Moulton, Tim ; Muotka, Timo ; Negishi, Junjiro N. ; Neres-Lima, Vinicius ; Nieminen, Mika L. ; Nimptsch, Jorge ; Ondruch, Jakub ; Paavola, Riku ; Pardo, Isabel ; Patrick, Christopher J. ; Peeters, Edwin T.H.M. ; Pozo, Jesus ; Pringle, Catherine ; Prussian, Aaron ; Quenta, Estefania ; Quesada, Antonio ; Reid, Brian ; Richardson, John S. ; Rigosi, Anna ; Rincón, José ; Rîşnoveanu, Geta ; Robinson, Christopher T. ; Rodríguez-Gallego, Lorena ; Royer, Todd V. ; Rusak, James A. ; Santamans, Anna C. ; Selmeczy, Géza B. ; Simiyu, Gelas ; Skuja, Agnija ; Smykla, Jerzy ; Sridhar, Kandikere R. ; Sponseller, Ryan ; Stoler, Aaron ; Swan, Christopher M. ; Szlag, David ; Teixeira-De Mello, Franco ; Tonkin, Jonathan D. ; Uusheimo, Sari ; Veach, Allison M. ; Vilbaste, Sirje ; Vought, Lena B.M. ; Wang, Chiao Ping ; Webster, Jackson R. ; Wilson, Paul B. ; Woelfl, Stefan ; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A. ; Yates, Adam G. ; Yoshimura, Chihiro ; Yule, Catherine M. ; Zhang, Yixin X. ; Zwart, Jacob A. - \ 2019
    Science Advances 5 (2019)1. - ISSN 2375-2548 - p. 14966 - 14973.

    River ecosystems receive and process vast quantities of terrestrial organic carbon, the fate of which depends strongly on microbial activity. Variation in and controls of processing rates, however, are poorly characterized at the global scale. In response, we used a peer-sourced research network and a highly standardized carbon processing assay to conduct a global-scale field experiment in greater than 1000 river and riparian sites. We found that Earth's biomes have distinct carbon processing signatures. Slow processing is evident across latitudes, whereas rapid rates are restricted to lower latitudes. Both the mean rate and variability decline with latitude, suggesting temperature constraints toward the poles and greater roles for other environmental drivers (e.g., nutrient loading) toward the equator. These results and data set the stage for unprecedented "next-generation biomonitoring" by establishing baselines to help quantify environmental impacts to the functioning of ecosystems at a global scale.

    Genome-wide association study in newborn calf serum reveals QTL for natural antibodies in Swedish dairy cattle
    Cordero Solorzano, Juan ; Wensman, J.J. ; Tråvén, M. ; Arts, J.A.J. ; Parmentier, H.K. ; Bovenhuis, H. ; Koning, Dirk Jan De - \ 2019
    Failure of passive transfer (FPT) occurs when a newborn calf does not absorb enough antibodies (<10 g/l of IgG) from the colostrum. Some calves absorb antibodies very effectively while others do not. This difference in uptake cannot be explained solely by the time, amount and quality of the colostrum given. Natural antibodies (NAb) are produced without any antigenic stimulation and target self-antigens and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Our objective was to estimate genetic parameters and detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for three NAb isotypes (IgG, IgM and IgA) in newborn calf serum binding keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Two experimental farms were included in the study. Serum samples were collected from 831 calves between 2 to 7 days old, born from January 2015 to April 2017. 70% of the animals were Swedish Red and 30% Swedish Holstein. Antibodies were measured from serum using indirect ELISAs. To estimate genetic parameters, a linear mixed model was run, correcting for antibody concentration of colostrum given, volume of first meal, time of birth to blood sampling time, weight at birth and breed, including genetic effect, maternal effect and Herd-Year-Season of calving with sample storage plate as random effects. An imputed 50K SNP array from a LD 7K array was used for the Genome-wide association study (GWAS), running the same model but including the SNP genotype as a fixed effect. Heritabilities for NAb isotypes in newborn calf serum ranged from 0.20 to 0.53, with a maternal effect ranging from 5 to 30%. Genetic correlations between IgM and IgA ranged from 0.74 to 0.94. The GWAS revealed one QTL on BTA1 for MDP-IgG, comprised of 3 SNPs (-log10(p) = 5.9), one significant and two suggestive, ranging from 1-8 Mbp and another QTL on BTA3 for IgM (KLH and MDP) consisting of 2 suggestive SNPs (-log10(p) = 5.02), from 13-25 Mbp. Our results suggest that natural antibodies can potentially provide an effective tool to reduce FPT using genetic selection.
    Genome-wide association study in colostrum reveals QTL on BTA21 for IgG and IgM natural antibodies in Swedish dairy cattle
    Cordero Solorzano, Juan ; Wensman, J.J. ; Tråvén, M. ; Arts, J.A.J. ; Parmentier, H.K. ; Bovenhuis, H. ; Koning, Dirk Jan De - \ 2019
    In: Abstracts of the 2019 American Dairy Science Association® Annual Meeting. - Cincinnati, Ohio : American Dairy Science Association (Journal of Dairy Science ) - p. 289 - 290.
    Colostrum with sufficient antibodies is essential for the newborn calf,
    as it requires this passive immunity to survive until weaning. High
    variation in the amount of colostrum antibodies in Swedish dairy cows
    has been reported, with a large proportion having low antibody levels.
    Natural antibodies (NAb) are produced without any antigenic stimulation
    and target self-antigens and pathogen-associated molecular patterns
    (PAMPs). Our objective was to estimate genetic parameters and detect
    quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 2 NAb isotypes (IgG, IgM) in colostrum
    binding keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and muramyl dipeptide
    (MDP). Three experimental farms were included in the study, 1719
    colostrum samples from 1313 cows between 1 to 6 parities, calving from
    January 2015 to April 2017 were collected. 70% of the animals were
    Swedish Red and 30% Swedish Holstein. Antibodies were measured
    from colostrum using indirect ELISAs. To estimate genetic parameters, a
    linear mixed model with repeated measures (different calvings from the
    same cow) was run using ASReml 4, correcting for cow parity number,
    time from calving to colostrum sampling and breed, including herdyear-
    season of calving and sample storage plate as random effects. An
    imputed 50K SNP array from a LD 7K array was used for the Genomewide
    association study (GWAS), running the same model but including
    the SNP genotype as a fixed effect. Heritabilities for colostrum NAbs
    ranged from 0.15 to 0.27, with a permanent environment effect for IgG
    isotypes accounting for 30% of the variance and for IgM ranging from
    15 to 19%. Genetic correlations between IgG and IgM ranged from
    0.1 to 0.4. The GWAS revealed one QTL on BTA3 for IgM (KLH and
    MDP), the latter comprised of 7 SNPs (−log10(P) = 4.4), 2 significant
    and 5 suggestive, ranging from 80 to 105 Mbp and another QTL on
    BTA7 for IgG (KLH and MDP) consisting of 3 SNPs (−log10(P) =
    4.1), from 85 to 113 Mbp. Our results suggest that natural antibodies
    can potentially provide an effective tool to improve colostrum quality using genetic selection
    Genome-wide association study for natural antibodies in colostrum of Swedish dairy cattle
    Cordero Solorzano, Juan ; Wensman, J.J. ; Tråvén, M. ; Arts, J.A.J. ; Parmentier, H.K. ; Bovenhuis, H. ; Koning, D.J. de - \ 2019
    In: Book of abstracts of the 70th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science (EAAP). - Wageningen Academic Publishers (Book of Abstracts ) - ISBN 9789086863396 - p. 448 - 448.
    Colostrum with sufcient antibodies is essential for the newborn calf, as it requires this passive immunity to survive until weaning. High variation in the amount of colostrum antibodies in Swedish dairy cows has been reported, with a large proportion having low antibody levels. Natural antibodies (NAb) are produced without any antigenic stimulation and target self-antigens and pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Our objective was to estimate genetic parameters and detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) for two NAb isotypes (IgG, IgM) in colostrum binding keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and muramyl dipeptide (MDP). Three experimental farms were included in the study, 1,719 colostrum samples from 1,313 cows between 1 to 6 parities, calving from January 2015 to April 2017 were collected. 70% of the animals were Swedish Red and 30% Swedish Holstein. Antibodies were measured from colostrum using indirect ELISAs. To estimate genetic parameters, a linear mixed model with repeated measures (different calvings from the same cow) was run using ASReml 4, correcting for cow parity number, time from calving to colostrum sampling and breed, including Herd-Year-Season of calving and sample storage plate as random effects. An imputed 50k SNP array from a LD 7K array was used for the Genome-wide association study (GWAS), running the same model but including the SNP genotype as a xed effect. Heritabilities for colostrum NAbs ranged from 0.15 to 0.27, with a permanent environment effect for IgG isotypes accounting for 30% of the variance and for IgM ranging from 15 to 19%. Genetic correlations between IgG and IgM ranged from 0.1 to 0.4. The GWAS revealed one QTL on BTA3 for IgM (KLH and MDP), the latter comprised of 7 SNPs (-log10(p)=4.4), two signicant and ve suggestive, ranging from 80-105 Mbp and another QTL on BTA7 for IgG (KLH and MDP) consisting of 3 SNPs (-log10(p)=4.1), from 85-113 Mbp. Our results suggest that natural antibodies can potentially provide an effective tool to improve colostrum quality using genetic selection.
    Te veel suikers naar bloemen en vruchten gaat ten koste van productie : Temperatuurcorrectie belangrijk instrument voor sturing
    Heuvelink, E. ; Koning, A. de; Kierkels, T. - \ 2019
    Onder Glas 16 (2019)3. - p. 37 - 39.
    Hoe behaal je een maximale opbrengst? Het vergt balanceren tussen de productie op korte termijn en voldoende productiecapaciteit op de langere termijn. Dit speelt bij elk gewas waarvan je maar een deel oogst, zoals vruchtgroenten en snijbloemen. Maar het meeste is bekend bij tomaat.
    Normen en waarden van belang in dialoog over opvolging mosselconvenant
    Koning, Susan de; Steins, N.A. ; Leuverink, Cecile - \ 2019
    Nature Today
    The development of reed composite fiber boards using partially bio-based, formaldehyde- and monomeric isocyanate-free resins
    Keijsers, E.R.P. ; Oever, M.J.A. van den; Dam, J.E.G. van; Lansbergen, Aad ; Koning, Cor ; Akker, Harald van der - \ 2019
    Reinforced Plastics (2019). - ISSN 0034-3617
    The transition towards a bio-based economy increases the demand for wood biomass. The increasing use of wood as raw material for paper, building materials and energy production results in increasing prices. Other types of biomass, e.g. reed released in nature conservation practice, could provide an alternative for the use of wood in e.g. particle boards. Particle board production plants have a relatively small capacity compared to e.g. pulping facilities for paper production. Combined with the high transportation costs of alternative fiber sources, due to low bulk density, the use of locally available raw material for particle board production is economically essential. In several countries wheat straw-based particle board material is currently produced using MDI-glue. Because of the high price of wheat straw in the Netherlands, other raw materials are of interest. Reed is a possible alternative, as large amounts of reed can be made available through nature conservation practice. Currently the value of this reed is negative and burning in nature is no longer allowed.
    Natuurmonumenten together with DSM, intends to convert the biomass released in nature conservation practice (ca. 175.000 t/y reed, grass, straw and woody biomass) into high quality feedstock for the bioeconomy and to contribute in this way to an enhanced sustainability of The Netherlands. This project investigates the technical and economic feasibility of using reed and a new (partially) bio-based resin in the production of fiber composite boards.
    Van insect naar vis
    Haenen, O.L.M. ; Borghuis, A. ; Weerman, E. - \ 2019
    Visionair : het vakblad van sportvisserij Nederland 13 (2019)53. - ISSN 1569-7533 - p. 42 - 43.
    In juni 2019 werd door onze koning het grootste kweekbedrijf van insectenlarven ter wereld, PROTIX, geopend. In eerdere uitgaven van Visionair werd aandacht besteed aan de potentie van insecten(larven) die hier als grondstof voor de aquacul-tuur worden gekweekt.
    Gist is koning
    Notebaart, R.A. - \ 2019

    Ook online verschenen als: Wie gist beheerst, beheerst de toekomst van bier

    Genome-wide association study identifies loci influencing natural antibody titers in milk of Dutch Holstein-Friesian cattle
    Cordero-Solorzano, Juan ; Parmentier, Henk K. ; Arts, Joop A.J. ; Poel, Jan van der; Koning, Dirk Jan de; Bovenhuis, Henk - \ 2019
    Journal of Dairy Science 102 (2019)12. - ISSN 0022-0302 - p. 11092 - 11103.
    dairy cattle - genome-wide association study - immunoglobulin - natural antibody

    Natural antibodies (NAb) are produced without any antigenic stimulation as a part of the innate immune system and provide a first line of defense against pathogens. Hence, they may be a useful trait when estimating an animal's potential immune competence and in selection for disease resistance. The aim of this study was to identify genomic regions associated with different NAb traits in milk and potentially describe candidate genes. Milk samples from 1,695 first-lactation Holstein Friesian cows with titer measurements for keyhole limpet hemocyanin, lipopolysaccharide, lipoteichoic acid, and peptidoglycan-binding total NAb and isotypes IgG1, IgM, and IgA were used. Genome-wide association study analyses were performed using imputed 777K SNP genotypes, accounting for relationships using pedigree information. Functional enrichment analysis was performed on the significantly associated genomic regions to look for candidate genes. For IgM NAb, significant associations (false discovery rate <0.05) were found on Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 17, 18, and 21 with candidate genes related to immunoglobulin structure and early B cell development. For IgG1, associations were found on BTA3, and we confirmed a quantitative trait loci on BTA21 previously reported for IgG NAb in serum. Our results provide new insights into the regulation of milk NAb that will help unravel the complex relationship between milk immunoglobulins and disease resistance in dairy cattle.

    Eikenbomen kreunen en steunen
    Vliet, A.J.H. van - \ 2019
    Voor de erkende eikel is het nu nog te vroeg
    Vliet, A.J.H. van - \ 2019
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