Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

    Records 1 - 5 / 5

    • help
    • print

      Print search results

    • export

      Export search results

    Check title to add to marked list
    Microbial strains isolated from CO 2 -venting Kolumbo submarine volcano show enhanced co-tolerance to acidity and antibiotics
    Mandalakis, Manolis ; Gavriilidou, Asimenia ; Polymenakou, Paraskevi N. ; Christakis, Christos A. ; Nomikou, Paraskevi ; Medvecký, Matej ; Kilias, Stephanos P. ; Kentouri, Maroudio ; Kotoulas, Georgios ; Magoulas, Antonios - \ 2019
    Marine Environmental Research 144 (2019). - ISSN 0141-1136 - p. 102 - 110.
    Acidification - Antibiotic/acid tolerance - Bacteria - Extreme environments - Heavy metals - Marine microbial ecology - Pseudomonas - Submarine volcanoes

    As ocean acidification intensifies, there is growing global concern about the impacts that future pH levels are likely to have on marine life and ecosystems. By analogy, a steep decrease of seawater pH with depth is encountered inside the Kolumbo submarine volcano (northeast Santorini) as a result of natural CO 2 venting, making this system ideal for ocean acidification research. Here, we investigated whether the increase of acidity towards deeper layers of Kolumbo crater had any effect on relevant phenotypic traits of bacterial isolates. A total of 31 Pseudomonas strains were isolated from both surface- (SSL) and deep-seawater layers (DSL), with the latter presenting a significantly higher acid tolerance. In particular, the DSL strains were able to cope with H + levels that were 18 times higher. Similarly, the DSL isolates exhibited a significantly higher tolerance than SSL strains against six commonly used antibiotics and As(III). More importantly, a significant positive correlation was revealed between antibiotics and acid tolerance across the entire set of SSL and DSL isolates. Our findings imply that Pseudomonas species with higher resilience to antibiotics could be favored by the prospect of acidifying oceans. Further studies are required to determine if this feature is universal across marine bacteria and to assess potential ecological impacts.

    Low-dose addition of silver nanoparticles stresses marine plankton communities
    Tsiola, Anastasia ; Toncelli, Claudio ; Fodelianakis, Stilianos ; Michoud, Grégoire ; Bucheli, Thomas D. ; Gavriilidou, Asimenia ; Kagiorgi, Margarita ; Kalantzi, Ioanna ; Knauer, Katja ; Kotoulas, Georgios ; Mylona, Kyriaki ; Papadopoulou, Eleftheria ; Psarra, Stella ; Santi, Ioulia ; Tsapakis, Manolis ; Daffonchio, Daniele ; Pergantis, Spiros A. ; Pitta, Paraskevi - \ 2018
    Environmental Science: Nano covers the benefits... 5 (2018)8. - ISSN 2051-8153 - p. 1965 - 1980.

    The release of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is expected to rise in the near future, with possible negative effects on aquatic life and enhancement of microbial resistance against AgNPs. However, a realistic evaluation of the toxicity of AgNPs to the marine ecosystem is currently missing. Therefore, we designed a mesocosm experiment to assess the impact of AgNP exposure on natural microbial plankton community dynamics in a coastal marine site at environmentally relevant concentrations. We monitored changes in the composition of the planktonic community, from viruses to protists. Further, we analyzed the concentration and properties of AgNPs for the total time of exposure. We found that the addition of AgNPs even at a low dose affected the plankton communities. Specifically, the growth of Synechococcus was inhibited and bacterial community composition significantly changed. Additionally, the amount of a lysogeny-related gene increased and viral auxiliary metabolic genes that are involved in cyanobacterial photosynthesis decreased, revealing a damaged photosynthetic potential after AgNP exposure. Microbial plankton was significantly affected due to both increased dissolved silver ions and decreased AgNP size. Our results highlight that the release of AgNPs alters the functioning of the marine food web by hampering important viral and bacterial processes.

    Erratum to: The sponge microbiome project
    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas ; Nielsen, Shaun ; Amir, Amnon ; Gonzalez, Antonio ; Ackermann, Gail L. ; Cerrano, Carlo ; Astudillo-Garcia, Carmen ; Easson, Cole ; Sipkema, Detmer ; Liu, Fang ; Steinert, Georg ; Kotoulas, Giorgos ; McCormack, Grace P. ; Feng, Guofang ; Bell, James J. ; Vicente, Jan ; Björk, Johannes R. ; Montoya, Jose M. ; Olson, Julie B. ; Reveillaud, Julie ; Steindler, Laura ; Pineda, Mari Carmen ; Marra, Maria V. ; Ilan, Micha ; Taylor, Michael W. ; Polymenakou, Paraskevi ; Erwin, Patrick M. ; Schupp, Peter J. ; Simister, Rachel L. ; Knight, Rob ; Thacker, Robert W. ; Costa, Rodrigo ; Hill, Russell T. ; Lopez-Legentil, Susanna ; Dailianis, Thanos ; Ravasi, Timothy ; Hentschel, Ute ; Li, Zhiyong ; Webster, Nicole S. ; Thomas, Torsten - \ 2018
    GigaScience 7 (2018)12. - ISSN 2047-217X
    The sponge microbiome project
    Moitinho-Silva, Lucas ; Nielsen, Shaun ; Amir, Amnon ; Gonzalez, Antonio ; Ackermann, Gail L. ; Cerrano, Carlo ; Astudillo-Garcia, Carmen ; Easson, Cole ; Sipkema, Detmer ; Liu, Fang ; Steinert, Georg ; Kotoulas, Giorgos ; McCormack, Grace P. ; Feng, Guofang ; Bell, James J. ; Vicente, Jan ; Björk, Johannes R. ; Montoya, Jose M. ; Olson, Julie B. ; Reveillaud, Julie ; Steindler, Laura ; Pineda, Mari Carmen ; Marra, Maria V. ; Ilan, Micha ; Taylor, Michael W. ; Polymenakou, Paraskevi ; Erwin, Patrick M. ; Schupp, Peter J. ; Simister, Rachel L. ; Knight, Rob ; Thacker, Robert W. ; Costa, Rodrigo ; Hill, Russell T. ; Lopez-Legentil, Susanna ; Dailianis, Thanos ; Ravasi, Timothy ; Hentschel, Ute ; Li, Zhiyong ; Webster, Nicole S. ; Thomas, Torsten - \ 2017
    GigaScience 6 (2017)10. - ISSN 2047-217X
    16S rRNA gene - Archaea - Bacteria - Marine sponges - Microbial diversity - Microbiome - Symbiosis
    Marine sponges (phylum Porifera) are a diverse, phylogenetically deep-branching clade known for forming intimate partnerships with complex communities of microorganisms. To date, 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies have largely utilised different extraction and amplification methodologies to target the microbial communities of a limited number of sponge species, severely limiting comparative analyses of sponge microbial diversity and structure. Here, we provide an extensive and standardised dataset that will facilitate sponge microbiome comparisons across large spatial, temporal, and environmental scales. Samples from marine sponges (n = 3569 specimens), seawater (n = 370), marine sediments (n = 65) and other environments (n = 29) were collected from different locations across the globe. This dataset incorporates at least 268 different sponge species, including several yet unidentified taxa. The V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced from extracted DNA using standardised procedures. Raw sequences (total of 1.1 billion sequences) were processed and clustered with (i) a standard protocol using QIIME closed-reference picking resulting in 39 543 operational taxonomic units (OTU) at 97% sequence identity, (ii) a de novo clustering using Mothur resulting in 518 246 OTUs, and (iii) a new high-resolution Deblur protocol resulting in 83 908 unique bacterial sequences. Abundance tables, representative sequences, taxonomic classifications, and metadata are provided. This dataset represents a comprehensive resource of sponge-associated microbial communities based on 16S rRNA gene sequences that can be used to address overarching hypotheses regarding host-associated prokaryotes, including host specificity, convergent evolution, environmental drivers of microbiome structure, and the sponge-associated rare biosphere.
    QTL affecting morphometric traits and stress response in the gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata).
    Boulton, G.S. ; Massault, C. ; Ross, D.J. ; Koning, D.J. de; Haley, C.S. ; Bovenhuis, H. ; Batargias, C. ; Canario, A. ; Kotoulas, G. ; Tsigenopoulos, C.S. - \ 2011
    Aquaculture 319 (2011)1-2. - ISSN 0044-8486 - p. 58 - 66.
    bass dicentrarchus-labrax - high stocking density - sea-bream - crowding stress - rainbow-trout - genetic-parameters - complex pedigrees - atlantic salmon - carcass traits - air exposure
    incipient selective breeding programme. This study, which examined the genetic architecture of seabream morphology and stress response to confinement, takes a step toward the use of marker assisted selection in this species. Major loci affecting these traits were mapped, using data from 460 offspring derived from seven paternal and 73 maternal half-sib families. Fish were killed following a four-hour confinement experiment to induce stress, after which 15 morphometric measurements were collected and blood was sampled for DNA extraction and plasma cortisol level determination. Heritabilities for the morphometric traits were moderate to high (0.24–0.58), with genetic and phenotypic correlations between the traits generally very high. However, the heritability of plasma cortisol level was not significantly different from zero. A population-specific genetic linkage map was built for 56 microsatellite markers, comprising 16 linkage groups (LG) and ten unlinked markers. Half-sib and variance components QTL analyses detected a single genome-wide significant QTL (SaimbcF7b), a single unlinked marker explaining 13–23% of the phenotypic variance in the majority of the morphometric traits. Several other putative QTL were identified for morphometric traits (on LG 4a, 7, 9, 18, A, C, F and I), along with two other QTL (LG10 and B) that were suggestive for stress response. Fitting body weight as a covariate for the morphometric traits resulted in three genome-wide significant QTL affecting aspects of body shape independent of overall body size. For stress response we only identified suggestive evidence for QTL. These findings contribute to understanding the genetic regulation of important economic traits in seabream.
    Check title to add to marked list

    Show 20 50 100 records per page

     
    Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.