Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    How do land rental markets affect household income? Evidence from rural Jiangsu, P.R. China
    Zhang, Lan ; Feng, Shuyi ; Heerink, Nico ; Qu, Futian ; Kuyvenhoven, Arie - \ 2018
    Land Use Policy 74 (2018). - ISSN 0264-8377 - p. 151 - 165.
    China - Household income - Income components - Income distribution - Land rental market - Quantile regression
    The development of land rental markets in developing countries attracts much attention, but little is known about its impact on household income. This study empirically examines the effects of land rental decisions of farm households on their income and income components, i.e. farm, off-farm and transfer income, taking into account potential endogeneity of land rental decisions. Rural household survey data for 1080 households in 128 villages in Jiangsu Province, China are used to estimate these effects. Quantile regressions are used to examine to what extent effects differ between income groups. Results indicate that lessor households surprisingly obtain lower total income as compared to autarkic households. Among the lessee households, who gain on average from land rentals, the lower income groups obtain the largest total income gains. As to the sources of income, no significant differences in off-farm income between transacting households (i.e. lessee or lessor households) and autarkic households are found while differences in farm income between transacting households are as expected. Transfer income of lessor households is significantly lower than that of autarkic households. We explain these findings from some typical features of the rural land rental market in China and discuss the policy implications.
    Capacity development for food policy analysis: What works best? Adding evidence from IFPRI's experience
    Kuyvenhoven, A. - \ 2018
    Development Policy Review 36 (2018)S1. - ISSN 0950-6764 - p. O113 - O137.
    capacity development - collaborative research - evaluation - food policy - IFPRI - impact assessment - institutional development - training
    This article presents major results of a meta-assessment of experience of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) with different kinds of capacity strengthening (CS) activities for food policy analysis. Collaborative research, on-the-job-training, and ID support for building data systems and analysis came up as best-practice approaches. Equally successful were new initiatives such as visiting fellow programmes, thesis support schemes, and delivering CS work embedded in country or thematic programmes. Challenges emerged as well: how to address the low CS impact of formal training and work with local collaborators, the uncertain results for outreach and strengthening capacity of organizations over individuals, especially in the policy cycle, and the best way to enter into partnerships and create incentives to deliver and sustain CS. Some policy implications are indicated.
    On-farm impact of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI): Evidence and knowledge gaps
    Berkhout, E.D. ; Glover, D.B.A. ; Kuyvenhoven, A. - \ 2015
    Agricultural Systems 132 (2015). - ISSN 0308-521X - p. 157 - 166.
    identifying changes - timor leste - technology - madagascar - productivity - cultivation - adoption - india - yield - dynamics
    The System of Rice Intensification (SRI) is being promoted worldwide, but relatively little is yet known about its impacts at farm level. This article reviews available evidence on the impact of SRI practices in terms of yield and productivity. Adoption of SRI practices necessarily changes the mix and allocation of inputs, in particular of water, seeds, fertiliser and labour. However, SRI impact studies have generally failed to distinguish between technological change – a more productive use of inputs, evidenced by a change in total factor productivity – increases in input use, or selection effects and their respective effects on yields. The studies reviewed point not only to modest increases in rice yields associated with SRI adoption, but also to concurrent increases in labour and fertiliser use. Often SRI is selectively practised on more fertile plots. As a result, no firm evidence on changes in total factor productivity can be discerned, while partial productivities of land and labour show mixed results. Though yields tend to be higher under SRI management, risk also seems to increase, which initially favours adoption by better-endowed farmers and on better soils. Evidence on SRI impact is further complicated by the large diversity of SRI practices associated with different biophysical, socio-economic and institutional circumstances. We conclude by identifying knowledge gaps surrounding the SRI phenomenon, encompassing agro-technical aspects, socio-economic issues and (dis)adoption behaviour.
    Impact Assessment of IFPRI’s Capacity Strengthening Work, 1985-2010
    Kuyvenhoven, A. - \ 2014
    Washington DC : IFPRI (Independent Impact Assessment Report 38) - 106 p.
    Impact Assessment of IFPRI's Capacity-Strengthening Work, 1985-2010
    Kuyvenhoven, A. - \ 2014
    Washington, DC : IFPRI (Independent impact assessment report no. 38)
    Capacity strengthening in food policy research: what works?
    Kuyvenhoven, A. - \ 2014
    In: Real and Integer. Thirty Essays on Economics, Development and Michiel Keyzer / Merbis, M., van Wesenbeeck, L., Amsterdam : VU Amsterdam, SOW - p. 71 - 76.
    Beyond the Horizon of RIO +20 : Science for Sustainable Development
    Cloetingh, S.A.P.L. ; Bressers, J.T.A. ; Dam-Mieras, M.C.E. van; Faure, M.G. ; Hajer, M.A. ; Hooimeijer, P. ; Kuyvenhoven, A. ; Leemans, R. ; Santen, R. van - \ 2012
    Den Haag : KNAW - ISBN 9789069846514 - 80
    International Food Policy Research Institute (2012): 2011 Global Food Policy Report
    Kuyvenhoven, A. - \ 2012
    Food Security 4 (2012). - ISSN 1876-4517 - p. 679 - 681.
    Impact of Access to Credit on Farm Productivity of Fruit and Vegetable Growers in Chile
    Reyes, A. ; Lensink, B.W. ; Kuyvenhoven, A. ; Moll, H. - \ 2012
    The objective of this paper is to analyze the factors that determine productivity of fruit and vegetable growers in central Chile, focusing especially on the effect of short-term credit on farm productivity for market-oriented farmers. We explicitly test for possible selection bias using a panel data set from a survey conducted in 2006 and 2008 with 177 farmers. Our results indicate that short-term credit does not have an impact on farm productivity, while other factors as education and the type of activity do. These results suggest that other providers of credit, such as informal credit institutions, may relax short-term credit constraints in rural financial markets in Chile.
    Dynamics of Investment for Market-Oriented Farmers in Chile
    Reyes, A. ; Kuyvenhoven, A. ; Lensink, R. ; Moll, H.A.J. - \ 2012
    In: 28th International Conference of Agricultural Economists The Global Bio-Economy, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil, 18 - 24 August, 2012. - Foz do Iguacu, Brazil : - p. 224 - 224.
    Using panel data from a survey conducted in 2006 and 2008 of 177 market-oriented farmers in central Chile, we investigate investment under imperfect capital markets. Specifically we determine the impact of formal credit constraints on fixed investment. By controlling for endogeneity problems, we find credit constraints to have a significant negative impact on fixed investment. In addition, a time trend is significant, which we understand as evidence of the impact of the global financial crisis of 2007.
    Determinants of labour mobility within smallholder farms in western Kenya and implications for labour use efficiency
    Kamau, M. ; Burger, C.P.J. ; Giller, K.E. ; Kuyvenhoven, A. - \ 2012
    African Journal of Agricultural Research 7 (2012)23. - ISSN 1991-637X - p. 3375 - 3384.
    Significant gains can be made if smallholder farms’ households can change their livelihood strategy. This paper is concerned with how smallholder farmers allocate labour within their farms and the barriers to cropping activities with higher outcomes. Efficiency of households in labour use across the farm was evaluated by comparing labour returns across various crops while controlling the variability in bio-physical characteristics of plots. The expectation was that returns to a single factor of production would be equal, an indication that households are likely to benefit from interventions aimed at improving their livelihood. The results obtained reveal that farmers allocate comparatively, more labour to food crops than to market-oriented crops. This suggests that labour mobility within smallholder farms is constrained. Interventions which reduce the marketing costs for food and cash crops; increase participation in labour markets; and improve other rural markets like the financial will, relax the labour constraint thereby empowering smallholder farms’ households to allocate labour more efficiently on their farms.
    Book Review "The African Food System and its Interaction with Human health and Nutrition"
    Kuyvenhoven, A. - \ 2011
    Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture 50 (2011). - ISSN 0049-8599 - p. 389 - 393.
    Developing countries and EU agricultural and food policy
    Kuyvenhoven, A. ; Stolwijk, H. - \ 2011
    In: EU policy for agriculture, food and rural areas; 2nd revised edition / Oskam, A.J., Meester, G., Silvis, H., Wageningen : Wageningen Academic Publishers - ISBN 9789086861187 - p. 121 - 138.
    Credit constraints in rural financial markets in Chile: determinants and consequences
    Reyes, A. - \ 2011
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): Arie Kuyvenhoven; Robert Lensink, co-promotor(en): Henk Moll. - [S.l.] : S.n. - ISBN 9789461730398 - 185
    ontwikkelingseconomie - plattelandsontwikkeling - boeren - krediet - landbouwkrediet - toegang - financiële instellingen - financieel landbouwbeleid - informele sector - markteconomieën - groenteteelt - fruitteelt - chili - zuid-amerika - development economics - rural development - farmers - credit - agricultural credit - access - financial institutions - agricultural financial policy - informal sector - market economies - vegetable growing - fruit growing - chile - south america

    Using data from two surveys carried out in 2006 and 2008 on 177 farmers in Chile, this study measures access to credit and empirically determine the effects of credit constraints on investment and production for market-oriented farmers in central Chile. More specifically, four issues are dealt with: (1) to identify the main factors that influence access to credit for market-oriented farmers, (2) to determine whether informal financial institutions act as complements to or substitutes for farmers’ strategies for funding, (3) to determine the effect of credit constraint by formal financial institutions on farm productivity, and (4) to identify the factors limiting investment in farms.

    In approaching these objectives two innovative methods are used throughout. First, qualitative information collected in interviews is used to identify three categories of credit constraints from both the demand and supply side of the credit market, namely, quantity, risk, and transaction-cost constraints. Second, a panel-data structure is used in all econometric analysis in this study, which allows us to obtain estimators that are more efficient than those based on cross-sectional analysis only.

    Results show that 16.4% and 13.6% of the sample felt credit constrained in 2006 and 2008, respectively, with most farmers being quantity rationed (10.7% and 9.6%, respectively). A much lower share of farmers is constrained by risk (2.8% and 3.4%, respectively) and transaction cost (2.8% and 0.6%, respectively). Despite of its low level, credit constraint status has a significant effect on investment decision. In contrast, credit constraints do not have an impact on farm productivity. These outcomes reveals long term market imperfections, most probably because the only providers of long-term credit are commercial banks for whom long-term lending is considerable risky.

    Sustainable natural resource use in rural China: Recent trends and policies
    Qu, F. ; Kuyvenhoven, A. ; Shi, X. ; Heerink, N. - \ 2011
    China Economic Review 22 (2011)4. - ISSN 1043-951X - p. 444 - 460.
    land conversion program - conservation set-aside - heihe river-basin - environmental degradation - northwest china - water markets - impacts - green - grain - poverty
    In this paper we provide an overview of recent trends in the availability and quality of land and water resources in rural China, and examine the common presumption that rural resources are rapidly degrading in China. Data based on consistent definitions and measurement methods that have recently become available are used to that end. In addition, we analyse the impact of new policy initiatives to introduce market-based instruments and new institutions to address land degradation and water scarcity problems. We find that the decline in cultivated area has accelerated in the beginning of the new century. Ecological recovery programs, not urbanization and industrialization, are the major factors causing this decline. Ecological recovery programs are also a major force behind the increase in forest land area and the reduction of water erosion. Modest successes can be observed in the protection of wetlands and (until the mid-1980s) for the average quality of cultivated land. On the other hand, degradation of natural grassland and wind erosion have become much more severe in recent decades. In northern China, particularly in the 3-H (Hai and Luan, Huai and Huang) river basins, the availability of water has tightened. Groundwater tables have fallen considerably in the Hai river basin, because farmers increasingly rely on groundwater for irrigation. Evidence on other parts of northern China is mixed. Pollution of surface water is getting worse since the beginning of the 1990s in two major lakes in southern China and until recently in the rivers in northern China. Water quality problems in the larger rivers in southern China are less severe and getting less. These problems are to a large extent caused by agriculture-based non-point source pollution, especially in the major lakes and reservoirs. The sloping land conversion program, water pricing, and the establishment of water user associations and payments for environmental service projects are used as cases to examine the introduction of market-based instruments and new institutions. We argue that less government interference in the implementation of these instruments and institutions is likely to enhance ecological as well the economic benefits. Moreover, supportive measures to improve the functioning of land and labor markets are usually needed to ensure the sustainability of the impact of interventions.
    Seasonality, precautionary savings and health uncertainty: Evidence from farm households in central Kenya
    Ndirangu, L. ; Burger, C.P.J. ; Moll, H.A.J. ; Kuyvenhoven, A. - \ 2010
    African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics 5 (2010)2. - ISSN 1993-3738 - p. 340 - 352.
    The high prevalence of risks in low income economies makes managing uncertainty critical for productivity and survival. This paper analyzes seasonal changes in farm households’ per capita consumption and saving in response to weather and health shocks. Using a sample of 196 households in central Kenya, it tests the notion that people save most of their transitory income, and examines their precautionary saving motives. The results show that the propensity to save out of transitory income is about a fifth of what the permanent income hypothesis postulates. The propensity to save differs by wealth, with the poor exhibiting stronger precautionary motives towards rainfall variability. But the wealth effect is weak, suggesting that the asset base is vulnerable even for the better-off. However, precautionary savings tend to increase with wealth among HIV/AIDS affected households. Since illness is associated with higher consumption, and therefore less investment, we find more volatile consumption for HIV/AIDS affected households.
    CGIAR Review 2009 IFPRI Country Development Strategy Research
    Kuyvenhoven, A. - \ 2010
    Brussels : European Commission - 64 p.
    Sustainable natural resource use in rural China: Trends and policies
    Qu, F. ; Kuyvenhoven, A. ; Shi, X. ; Heerink, N. - \ 2010
    - p. 1 - 35.
    In this paper we provide an overview of recent trends in the availability and quality of land and water resources in rural China, and examine the common presumption that rural resources are rapidly degrading in China. Data based on consistent definitions and measurement methods that have recently become available are used to that end. In addition, we analyse the impact of new policy initiatives to introduce market-based instruments and new institutions to address land degradation and water scarcity problems. We find that the decline in cultivated area has accelerated in the beginning of the new century. Ecological recovery programs, not urbanization and industrialization, are the major factor causing this decline. Ecological recovery programs are also a major force behind the increase in forest land area and the reduction of water erosion. Modest successes can be observed in the protection of wetlands and (until the mid-1980s) for the average quality of cultivated land. On the other hand, degradation of natural grassland and wind erosion have become much more severe in recent decades. In northern China, particularly in the 3-H (Hai & Luan, Huai and Huang) river basins, the availability of water has tightened. Groundwater tables have fallen considerably in the Hai river basin, because farmers increasingly rely on groundwater for irrigation. Evidence on other parts of northern China is mixed. Pollution of surface water is getting worse since the beginning of the 1990s in two major lakes in southern China and until recently in the rivers in northern China. Water quality problems in the larger rivers in southern China are less severe and getting less. These problems are to a large extent caused by agriculture-based non-point source pollution, especially in the major lakes and reservoirs. The sloping land conversion program, water pricing, and the establishment of water user associations and payments for environmental services projects are used as cases to examine the introduction of market-based instruments and new institutions. We argue that less government interference in the implementation of these instruments and institutions is likely to enhance ecological as well the economic benefits. Moreover, supportive measures to improve the functioning of land and labor markets are usually needed to ensure the sustainability of the impact of interventions
    Impact of land fragmentation on rice producers' technical efficiency in South-East China
    Tan, S. ; Heerink, N. ; Kuyvenhoven, A. ; Qu Futian, F. - \ 2010
    NJAS Wageningen Journal of Life Sciences 57 (2010). - ISSN 1573-5214 - p. 117 - 123.
    plot size - agriculture - frontier - scale - productivity - inefficiency - bangladesh - credit - model - cost
    Rice farming is important for income generation in large parts of China and Asia. This paper uses detailed household, crop- and plot-level data to investigate the levels and determinants of rice producers’ technical efficiency for three villages with different characteristics in a major rice-growing area of South-East China, focusing in particular on the impact of land fragmentation. Empirical results obtained by applying a stochastic frontier model showed statistically significant differences in technology level among villages, with the remotest village having the lowest technology level. Within villages average technical efficiency was generally high, ranging from 0.80 to 0.91 for the three types of rice that are grown in the region. For late-rice producers, no statistically significant variation was found in their technical efficiencies. Land fragmentation was found to be an important determinant of technical efficiency in early-rice and one-season rice production. An increase in average plot size increased rice farmers’ technical efficiency. Given average plot size, an increase in the number of plots was found to increase technical efficiency, indicating the presence of variation effects. A larger distance between homesteads and plots contributed to technical inefficiency in early-rice production. The high levels of technical efficiency found in our study support the view that to raise rice productivity in the long run, new technologies need to be introduced.
    Developing countries and EU agricultural and food policy: opportunities and threats
    Kuyvenhoven, A. ; Stolwijk, H. - \ 2010
    In: EU policy for agriculture, food and rural areas / Oskam, A.J., Meester, G., Silvis, H., Wageningen : Wageningen Academic Publishers - ISBN 9789086861187 - p. 117 - 134.
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