Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Effects of age and environment on adaptive immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) vaccination in dairy goats in relation to paratuberculosis control strategies
Koets, Ad ; Ravesloot, Lars ; Ruuls, Robin ; Dinkla, Annemieke ; Eisenberg, Susanne ; Lievaart-Peterson, Karianne - \ 2019
Veterinary Sciences 6 (2019)3. - ISSN 2306-7381
Diagnostics - Immunity - Mycobacterium - Paratuberculosis - Vaccination

Paratuberculosis infection is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). In the Netherlands, 75% herd level prevalence of caprine paratuberculosis has been estimated, and vaccination is the principal control strategy applied. Most goat dairy farms with endemic paratuberculosis systematically vaccinate goat kids in the first months of life with a commercially available whole cell MAP vaccine. We hypothesized that the development of adaptive immune responses in goats vaccinated at young age depends on the environment they are raised in, and this has implications for the application of immune diagnostic tests in vaccinated dairy goats. We evaluated the early immune response to vaccination in young goat kids sourced from a MAP unsuspected non-vaccinated herd and raised in a MAP-free environment. Subsequently we compared these with responses observed in birth year and vaccination matched adult goats raised on farms with endemic paratuberculosis. Results indicated that initial adaptive immune responses to vaccination are limited in a MAP-free environment. In addition, adult antibody positive vaccinated goats raised in a MAP endemic environment are less likely to be IS900 PCR-positive as compared to antibody negative herd mates. We conclude that test-and-cull strategies in a vaccinated herd are currently not feasible using available immune diagnostic tests.

Age-related distribution and dynamics of T-cells in blood and lymphoid tissues of goats
Baliu-Piqué, Mariona ; Kurniawan, Henry ; Ravesloot, Lars ; Verheij, Myrddin W. ; Drylewicz, Julia ; Lievaart-Peterson, Karianne ; Borghans, José A.M. ; Koets, Ad ; Tesselaar, Kiki - \ 2019
Developmental and Comparative Immunology 93 (2019). - ISSN 0145-305X - p. 1 - 10.
Deuterium - Development - Goat - Mathematical modelling - Neonatal adaptive immunity - Stable isotope labelling - T-cell turnover - T-lymphocytes

Neonatal mammals have increased disease susceptibility and sub-optimal vaccine responses. This raises problems in both humans and farm animals. The high prevalence of paratuberculosis in goats and the lack of an effective vaccine against it have a strong impact on the dairy sector, and calls for vaccines optimized for the neonatal immune system. We characterized the composition of the T-cell pool in neonatal kids and adult goats and quantified their turnover rates using in vivo deuterium labelling. From birth to adulthood, CD4+ T-cells were the predominant subset in the thymus and lymph nodes, while spleen and bone marrow contained mainly CD8+ lymphocytes. In blood, CD4+ T-cells were the predominant subset during the neonatal period, while CD8+ T-cells predominated in adults. We observed that thymic mass and cellularity increased during the first 5 months after birth, but decreased later in life. Deuterium labelling revealed that T-cell turnover rates in neonatal kids are considerably higher than in adult animals.

Paratuberculose in (melk)geiten : Nieuwe inzichten en praktische handvatten
Lievaart-Peterson, K. ; Bokma-Bakker, M.H. ; Luttikholt, S. ; Koets, A.P. ; Weber, M. ; Vellema, P. ; Antonis, A.F.G. - \ 2017
Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research - 8 p.
Paratuberculose in de melkgeitenhouderij : van literatuurscan naar innovatief onderzoek
Lievaart-Peterson, K. ; Antonis, A.F.G. ; Vellema, P. ; Luttikholt, S. ; Willemsen, P.T.J. ; Schuiling, E. ; Koets, A. ; Bokma-Bakker, M.H. - \ 2014
paratuberculose - herkauwers - melkproducerende dieren - geiten - geitenhouderij - diergezondheid - ziektebestrijding - dierziektepreventie - paratuberculosis - ruminants - milk yielding animals - goats - goat keeping - animal health - disease control - animal disease prevention
De besmettelijke ziekte paratuberculose komt vooral voor bij herkauwers. De Gezondheidsdienst voor Dieren (GD) schat dat ongeveer 80 procent van de Nederlandse commerciële melkgeitenbedrijven met de infectie te maken heeft. De ziekte kan op bedrijven tot belangrijke bedrijfseconomische schade leiden, vooral door melkproductieverlies, een verhoogde uitval en vervroegde vervanging. Beheersing van van deze aandoening om de bedrijfseconomische en de welzijnsschade terug te dringen is het doel. Het project ‘Paratuberculose in de melkgeitenhouderij’ geeft die beheersing een nieuwe impuls.
Epizootic of ovine congenital malformations associated with Schmallenberg virus infection
Brom, R. van der; Luttikholt, S.J. ; Lievaart-Peterson, K. ; Peperkamp, N.H.M.T. ; Mars, M.H. ; Poel, W.H.M. van der; Vellema, P. - \ 2012
Tijdschrift voor Diergeneeskunde 137 (2012)2. - ISSN 0040-7453 - p. 106 - 111.
schapenhouderij - lammeren - lammerenziekten - misvormingen - veterinaire praktijk - schmallenbergvirus - virusziekten - orthobunyavirus - sheep farming - lambs - lamb diseases - malformations - veterinary practice - schmallenberg virus - viral diseases - orthobunyavirus - cache valley virus - akabane virus - bluetongue virus - small ruminants - newborn lambs - sheep - arthrogryposis - disease - pathology - fever
Epizootic outbreaks of congenital malformations in sheep are rare and have, to the best of our knowledge, never been reported before in Europe. This paper describes relevant preliminary findings from the first epizootic outbreak of ovine congenital malformations in the Netherlands. Between 25 November and 20 December 2011, congenital malformations in newborn lambs on sheep farms throughout the country were reported to the Animal Health Service in Deventer. Subsequently, small ruminant veterinary specialists visited these farms and collected relevant information from farmers by means of questionnaires. The deformities varied from mild to severe, and ewes were reported to have given birth to both normal and deformed lambs; both male and female lambs were affected. Most of the affected lambs were delivered at term. Besides malformed and normal lambs, dummy lambs, unable to suckle, were born also on these farms. None of the ewes had shown clinical signs during gestation or at parturition. Dystocia was common, because of the lambs' deformities. Lambs were submitted for post-mortem examination, and samples of brain tissue were collected for virus detection. The main macroscopic findings included arthrogryposis, torticollis, scoliosis and kyphosis, brachygnathia inferior, and mild-to-marked hypoplasia of the cerebrum, cerebellum and spinal cord. Preliminary data from the first ten affected farms suggest that nutritional deficiencies, intoxication, and genetic factors are not likely to have caused the malformations. Preliminary diagnostic analyses of precolostral serum samples excluded border disease virus, bovine viral diarrhoea virus, and bluetongue virus. In December 2011, samples of brain tissue from 54 lambs were sent to the Central Veterinary Institute of Wageningen University Research, Lelystad. Real-time PCR detected the presence of a virus, provisionally named the Schmallenberg virus, in brain tissue from 22 of the 54 lambs, which originated from seven of eight farms that had submitted lambs for post-mortem examination. This Schmallenberg virus was first reported in Germany and seems to be related to the Shamonda, Aino, and Akabane viruses, all of which belong to the Simbu serogroup of the genus Orthobunyavirus of the family Bunyaviridae. These preliminary findings suggest that the Schmallenberg virus is the most likely cause of this epizootic of ovine congenital malformations, which is the first such outbreak reported in Europe
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