Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Infection incidence, kernel colonisation, and mycotoxin accumulation in durum wheat inoculated with Fusarium sporotrichioides, F. langsethiae or F. poae at different growth stages
Nazari, L. ; Pattori, E. ; Somma, S. ; Manstretta, V. ; Waalwijk, C. ; Moretti, A. ; Meca, G. ; Rossi, V. - \ 2019
European Journal of Plant Pathology 153 (2019)3. - ISSN 0929-1873 - p. 715 - 729.
Fusarium head blight - HT-2 - Nivalenol - Small-grain cereals - T-2

A 2-year field experiment was conducted to determine the effects of Fusarium sporotrichioides, F. langsethiae, or F. poae on durum wheat plants artificially inoculated at different growth stages. The percentage of symptomatic kernels was similar among the three species, but incidence of infected kernels was lower for F. langsethiae. Kernel colonization was higher when plants were inoculated before and during anthesis for F. sporotrichioides and F. poae, but unaffected by timing of inoculation for F. langsethiae. Production of T-2/HT-2 toxins was higher for F. sporotrichioides than for F. langsethiae. Significant accumulations of nivalenol were detected for F. poae. Across all three species, there was a weak correlation (r = 0.16; P = 0.031) between the incidences of symptomatic and infected kernels, but a stronger correlation (r = 0.53; P < 0.001) between infection incidence and the quantity of fungal DNA (species-specific) in kernels. Mycotoxin content was correlated (r > 0.58; P < 0.007) with infection incidence or fungal DNA in kernels, but only for F. sporotrichioides and F. poae.

Comparison of three modelling approaches for predicting deoxynivalenol contamination in winter wheat
Liu, Cheng ; Manstretta, Valentina ; Rossi, Vittorio ; Fels-Klerx, H.J. van der - \ 2018
Toxins 10 (2018)7. - ISSN 2072-6651
Cereal grains - DON - Food safety - Forecast - Mycotoxin - Validation

Forecasting models for mycotoxins in cereal grains during cultivation are useful for pre-harvest and post-harvest mycotoxin management. Some of such models for deoxynivalenol (DON) in wheat, using two different modelling techniques, have been published. This study aimed to compare and cross-validate three different modelling approaches for predicting DON in winter wheat using data from the Netherlands as a case study. To this end, a published empirical model was updated with a new mixed effect logistic regression method. A mechanistic model for wheat in Italy was adapted to the Dutch situation. A new Bayesian network model was developed to predict DON in wheat. In developing the three models, the same dataset was used, including agronomic and weather data, as well as DON concentrations of individual samples in the Netherlands over the years 2001–2013 (625 records). Similar data from 2015 and 2016 (86 records) were used for external independent validation. The results showed that all three modelling approaches provided good accuracy in predicting DON in wheat in the Netherlands. The empirical model showed the highest accuracy (88%). However, this model is highly location and data-dependent, and can only be run if all of the input data are available. The mechanistic model provided 80% accuracy. This model is easier to implement in new areas given similar mycotoxin-producing fungal populations. The Bayesian network model provided 86% accuracy. Compared with the other two models, this model is easier to implement when input data are incomplete. In future research, the three modelling approaches could be integrated to even better support decision-making in mycotoxin management.

The arabidopsis leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase BIR3 negatively regulates BAK1 receptor complex formation and stabilizes BAK1
Imkampe, Julia ; Halter, Thierry ; Huang, Shuhua ; Schulze, Sarina ; Mazzotta, Sara ; Schmidt, Nikola ; Manstretta, Raffaele ; Postel, Sandra ; Wierzba, Michael ; Yang, Yong ; Dongen, Walter M.A.M. van; Stahl, Mark ; Zipfel, Cyril ; Goshe, Michael B. ; Clouse, Steven ; Vries, Sacco C. de; Tax, Frans ; Wang, Xiaofeng ; Kemmerling, Birgit - \ 2017
The Plant Cell 29 (2017)9. - ISSN 1040-4651 - p. 2285 - 2303.
BAK1 is a coreceptor and positive regulator of multiple ligand binding leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases (LRR-RKs) and is involved in brassinosteroid (BR)-dependent growth and development, innate immunity, and cell death control. The BAK1-interacting LRR-RKs BIR2 and BIR3 were previously identified by proteomics analyses of in vivo BAK1 complexes. Here, we show that BAK1-related pathways such as innate immunity and cell death control are affected by BIR3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. BIR3 also has a strong negative impact on BR signaling. BIR3 directly interacts with the BR receptor BRI1 and other ligand binding receptors and negatively regulates BR signaling by competitive inhibition of BRI1. BIR3 is released from BAK1 and BRI1 after ligand exposure and directly affects the formation of BAK1 complexes with BRI1 or FLAGELLIN SENSING2. Double mutants of bak1 and bir3 show spontaneous cell death and constitutive activation of defense responses. BAK1 and its closest homolog BKK1 interact with and are stabilized by BIR3, suggesting that bak1 bir3 double mutants mimic the spontaneous cell death phenotype observed in bak1 bkk1 mutants via destabilization of BIR3 target proteins. Our results provide evidence for a negative regulatory mechanism for BAK1 receptor complexes in which BIR3 interacts with BAK1 and inhibits ligand binding receptors to prevent BAK1 receptor complex formation.
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