Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Vitamin D-related genes, blood vitamin D levels and colorectal cancer risk in western european populations
Fedirko, Veronika ; Mandle, Hannah B. ; Zhu, Wanzhe ; Hughes, David J. ; Siddiq, Afshan ; Ferrari, Pietro ; Romieu, Isabelle ; Riboli, Elio ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas ; Duijnhoven, Fränzel J.B. Van; Siersema, Peter D. ; Tjønneland, Anne ; Olsen, Anja ; Perduca, Vittorio ; Carbonnel, Franck ; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine ; Kühn, Tilman ; Johnson, Theron ; Krasimira, Aleksandrova ; Trichopoulou, Antonia ; Makrythanasis, Periklis ; Thanos, Dimitris ; Panico, Salvatore ; Krogh, Vittorio ; Sacerdote, Carlotta ; Skeie, Guri ; Weiderpass, Elisabete ; Colorado-Yohar, Sandra ; Sala, Núria ; Barricarte, Aurelio ; Sanchez, Maria Jose ; Quirós, Ramón ; Amiano, Pilar ; Gylling, Björn ; Harlid, Sophia ; Perez-Cornago, Aurora ; Heath, Alicia K. ; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K. ; Aune, Dagfinn ; Freisling, Heinz ; Murphy, Neil ; Gunter, Marc J. ; Jenab, Mazda - \ 2019
Nutrients 11 (2019)8. - ISSN 2072-6643
Colorectal neoplasms - Incidence - Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) - Vitamin D

Higher circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (25(OH)D) have been found to be associated with lower risk for colorectal cancer (CRC) in prospective studies. Whether this association is modified by genetic variation in genes related to vitamin D metabolism and action has not been well studied in humans. We investigated 1307 functional and tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; individually, and by gene/pathway) in 86 vitamin D-related genes in 1420 incident CRC cases matched to controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. We also evaluated the association between these SNPs and circulating 25(OH)D in a subset of controls. We confirmed previously reported CRC risk associations between SNPs in the VDR, GC, and CYP27B1 genes. We also identified additional associations with 25(OH)D, as well as CRC risk, and several potentially novel SNPs in genes related to vitamin D transport and action (LRP2, CUBN, NCOA7, and HDAC9). However, none of these SNPs were statistically significant after Benjamini-Hochberg (BH) multiple testing correction. When assessed by a priori defined functional pathways, tumor growth factor β(TGFβ) signaling was associated with CRC risk (P ≤ 0.001), with most statistically significant genes being SMAD7 (PBH = 0.008) and SMAD3 (PBH = 0.008), and 18 SNPs in the vitamin D receptor (VDR) binding sites (P = 0.036). The 25(OH)D-gene pathway analysis suggested that genetic variants in the genes related to VDR complex formation and transcriptional activity are associated with CRC depending on 25(OH)D levels (interaction P = 0.041). Additional studies in large populations and consortia, especially with measured circulating 25(OH)D, are needed to confirm our findings.

Wet and dry tropical forests show opposite successional pathways in wood density but converge over time
Poorter, L. ; Rozendaal, Danaë ; Bongers, F. ; Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S. ; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica María ; Álvarez, Francisco S. ; Andrade, José Luís ; Villa, Luis Felipe Arreola ; Balvanera, Patricia ; Becknell, Justin M. ; Bentos, Tony V. ; Bhaskar, Radika ; Boukili, Vanessa ; Brancalion, Pedro H.S. ; Broadbent, Eben N. ; César, Ricardo Gomes ; Chave, Jerome ; Chazdon, Robin L. ; Colletta, Gabriel Dalla ; Craven, Dylan ; Jong, Ben H.J. de; Denslow, Julie S. ; Dent, Daisy H. ; DeWalt, Saara J. ; García, Elisa Díaz ; Dupuy, Juan M. ; Durán, Sandra M. ; Espírito Santo, Mário Marcos ; Fandiño, María C. ; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson ; Finegan, Bryan ; Moser, Vanessa Granda ; Hall, Jefferson S. ; Hernández-Stefanoni, José Luis ; Jakovac, A.C. ; Junqueira, André B. ; Kennard, Deborah ; Lebrija-Trejos, Edwin ; Letcher, Susan G. ; Lohbeck, M.W.M. ; Lopez, Omar R. ; Marín-Spiotta, Erika ; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel ; Martins, Sebastião Venâncio ; Massoca, Paulo E.S. ; Meave, Jorge A. ; Mesquita, Rita ; Mora, Francisco ; Souza Moreno, Vanessa De; Müller, Sandra C. ; Muñoz, Rodrigo ; Muscarella, Robert ; Oliveira Neto, Silvio Nolasco De; Nunes, Yule Roberta Ferreira ; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana ; Paz, Horacio ; Pena Claros, M. ; Piotto, Daniel ; Ruíz, Jorge ; Sanaphre-Villanueva, Lucía ; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo ; Schwartz, Naomi B. ; Steininger, Marc K. ; Thomas, William Wayt ; Toledo, Marisol ; Uriarte, Maria ; Breugel, Michiel van; Wal, Hans van der - \ 2019
secondary succession - community assembly - community-weighted mean - wood density - Neotropics - tropical forest - Latin America
We analyse how community wood density (WD) recovers during secondary tropical forest succession. In wet forests succession proceeds from low to high WD, in dry forests from high to low WD, resulting in convergence of community WD of dry and wet forests over time, as vegetation cover builds up.
Wet and dry tropical forests show opposite successional pathways in wood density but converge over time
Poorter, Lourens ; Rozendaal, Danaë M.A. ; Bongers, Frans ; Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S. de; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica María ; Álvarez, Francisco S. ; Andrade, José Luís ; Villa, Luis Felipe Arreola ; Balvanera, Patricia ; Becknell, Justin M. ; Bentos, Tony V. ; Bhaskar, Radika ; Boukili, Vanessa ; Brancalion, Pedro H.S. ; Broadbent, Eben N. ; César, Ricardo G. ; Chave, Jerome ; Chazdon, Robin L. ; Colletta, Gabriel Dalla ; Craven, Dylan ; Jong, Ben H.J. de; Denslow, Julie S. ; Dent, Daisy H. ; DeWalt, Saara J. ; García, Elisa Díaz ; Dupuy, Juan Manuel ; Durán, Sandra M. ; Espírito Santo, Mário M. ; Fandiño, María C. ; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson ; Finegan, Bryan ; Moser, Vanessa Granda ; Hall, Jefferson S. ; Hernández-Stefanoni, José Luis ; Jakovac, Catarina C. ; Junqueira, André B. ; Kennard, Deborah ; Lebrija-Trejos, Edwin ; Letcher, Susan G. ; Lohbeck, Madelon ; Lopez, Omar R. ; Marín-Spiotta, Erika ; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel ; Martins, Sebastião V. ; Massoca, Paulo E.S. ; Meave, Jorge A. ; Mesquita, Rita ; Mora, Francisco ; Souza Moreno, Vanessa de; Müller, Sandra C. ; Muñoz, Rodrigo ; Muscarella, Robert ; Oliveira Neto, Silvio Nolasco de; Nunes, Yule R.F. ; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana ; Paz, Horacio ; Peña-Claros, Marielos ; Piotto, Daniel ; Ruíz, Jorge ; Sanaphre-Villanueva, Lucía ; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo ; Schwartz, Naomi B. ; Steininger, Marc K. ; Thomas, William Wayt ; Toledo, Marisol ; Uriarte, Maria ; Utrera, Luis P. ; Breugel, Michiel van; Sande, Masha T. van der; Wal, Hans van der; Veloso, Maria D.M. ; Vester, Hans F.M. ; Vieira, Ima C.G. ; Villa, Pedro Manuel ; Williamson, G.B. ; Wright, S.J. ; Zanini, Kátia J. ; Zimmerman, Jess K. ; Westoby, Mark - \ 2019
Nature Ecology & Evolution 3 (2019). - ISSN 2397-334X - p. 928 - 934.

Tropical forests are converted at an alarming rate for agricultural use and pastureland, but also regrow naturally through secondary succession. For successful forest restoration, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of secondary succession. These mechanisms may vary across forest types, but analyses across broad spatial scales are lacking. Here, we analyse forest recovery using 1,403 plots that differ in age since agricultural abandonment from 50 sites across the Neotropics. We analyse changes in community composition using species-specific stem wood density (WD), which is a key trait for plant growth, survival and forest carbon storage. In wet forest, succession proceeds from low towards high community WD (acquisitive towards conservative trait values), in line with standard successional theory. However, in dry forest, succession proceeds from high towards low community WD (conservative towards acquisitive trait values), probably because high WD reflects drought tolerance in harsh early successional environments. Dry season intensity drives WD recovery by influencing the start and trajectory of succession, resulting in convergence of the community WD over time as vegetation cover builds up. These ecological insights can be used to improve species selection for reforestation. Reforestation species selected to establish a first protective canopy layer should, among other criteria, ideally have a similar WD to the early successional communities that dominate under the prevailing macroclimatic conditions.

Biodiversity recovery of Neotropical secondary forests
Rozendaal, Danaë M.A. ; Bongers, Frans ; Aide, T.M. ; Alvarez-Dávila, Esteban ; Ascarrunz, Nataly ; Balvanera, Patricia ; Becknell, Justin M. ; Bentos, Tony V. ; Brancalion, Pedro H.S. ; Cabral, George A.L. ; Calvo-Rodriguez, Sofia ; Chave, Jerome ; César, Ricardo G. ; Chazdon, Robin L. ; Condit, Richard ; Dallinga, Jorn S. ; Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S. De; Jong, Ben de; Oliveira, Alexandre De; Denslow, Julie S. ; Dent, Daisy H. ; Dewalt, Saara J. ; Dupuy, Juan Manuel ; Durán, Sandra M. ; Dutrieux, Loïc P. ; Espírito-Santo, Mario M. ; Fandino, María C. ; Fernandes, G.W. ; Finegan, Bryan ; García, Hernando ; Gonzalez, Noel ; Moser, Vanessa Granda ; Hall, Jefferson S. ; Hernández-Stefanoni, José Luis ; Hubbell, Stephen ; Jakovac, Catarina C. ; Hernández, Alma Johanna ; Junqueira, André B. ; Kennard, Deborah ; Larpin, Denis ; Letcher, Susan G. ; Licona, Juan-Carlos ; Lebrija-trejos, Edwin ; Marín-Spiotta, Erika ; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel ; Massoca, Paulo E.S. ; Meave, Jorge A. ; Mesquita, Rita C.G. ; Mora, Francisco ; Müller, Sandra C. ; Muñoz, Rodrigo ; Oliveira Neto, Silvio Nolasco De; Norden, Natalia ; Nunes, Yule R.F. ; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana ; Ortiz-Malavassi, Edgar ; Ostertag, Rebecca ; Peña-Caros, Marielos ; Pérez-García, Eduardo A. ; Piotto, Daniel ; Powers, Jennifer S. ; Aguilar-Cano, José ; Rodriguez-Buritica, Susana ; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Jorge ; Romero-Romero, Marco Antonio ; Ruíz, Jorge ; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo ; Almeida, Arlete Silva De; Silver, Whendee L. ; Schwartz, Naomi B. ; Thomas, William Wayt ; Toledo, Marisol ; Uriarte, Maria ; Sá Sampaio, Everardo Valadares De; Breugel, Michiel van; Wal, Hans van der; Martins, Sebastião Venâncio ; Veloso, Maria D.M. ; Vester, Hans F.M. ; Vicentini, Alberto ; Vieira, Ima C.G. ; Villa, Pedro ; Williamson, G.B. ; Zanini, Kátia J. ; Zimmerman, Jess ; Poorter, Lourens - \ 2019
Science Advances 5 (2019)3. - ISSN 2375-2548 - 10 p.
Old-growth tropical forests harbor an immense diversity of tree species but are rapidly being cleared, while secondary forests that regrow on abandoned agricultural lands increase in extent. We assess how tree species richness and composition recover during secondary succession across gradients in environmental conditions and anthropogenic disturbance in an unprecedented multisite analysis for the Neotropics. Secondary forests recover remarkably fast in species richness but slowly in species composition. Secondary forests take a median time of five decades to recover the species richness of old-growth forest (80% recovery after 20 years) based on rarefaction analysis. Full recovery of species composition takes centuries (only 34% recovery after 20 years). A dual strategy that maintains both old-growth forests and species-rich secondary forests is therefore crucial for biodiversity conservation in human-modified tropical landscapes.
One-carbon metabolism biomarkers and risk of urothelial cell carcinoma in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
Vrieling, Alina ; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B. ; Ros, Martine M. ; Kampman, Ellen ; Aben, Katja K. ; Büchner, Frederike L. ; Jansen, Eugène H. ; Roswall, Nina ; Tjønneland, Anne ; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine ; Cadeau, Claire ; Chang-Claude, Jenny ; Kaaks, Rudolf ; Weikert, Steffen ; Boeing, Heiner ; Trichopoulou, Antonia ; Lagiou, Pagona ; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios ; Sieri, Sabina ; Palli, Domenico ; Panico, Salvatore ; Peeters, Petra H. ; Weiderpass, Elisabete ; Skeie, Guri ; Jakszyn, Paula ; Chirlaque, María Dolores ; Ardanaz, Eva ; Sánchez, María José ; Ehrnström, Roy ; Malm, Johan ; Ljungberg, Börje ; Khaw, Kay Tee ; Wareham, Nick J. ; Brennan, Paul ; Johansson, Mattias ; Riboli, Elio ; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. - \ 2019
International Journal of Cancer 145 (2019)9. - ISSN 0020-7136 - p. 2349 - 2359.
B-vitamins - biomarker - folate - nested case–control - urothelial cell carcinomas

Published associations between dietary folate and bladder cancer risk are inconsistent. Biomarkers may provide more accurate measures of nutrient status. This nested case–control analysis within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) investigated associations between pre-diagnostic serum folate, homocysteine, vitamins B6 and B12 and the risk of urothelial cell carcinomas of the bladder (UCC). A total of 824 patients with newly diagnosed UCC were matched with 824 cohort members. Serum folate, homocysteine, and vitamins B6 and B12 were measured. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for total, aggressive, and non-aggressive UCC were estimated using conditional logistic regression with adjustment for smoking status, smoking duration and intensity, and other potential confounders. Additionally, statistical interaction with smoking status was assessed. A halving in serum folate concentrations was moderately associated with risk of UCC (OR: 1.18; 95% CI: 0.98–1.43), in particular aggressive UCC (OR: 1.34; 95% CI: 1.02–1.75; p-heterogeneity = 0.19). Compared to never smokers in the highest quartile of folate concentrations, this association seemed only apparent among current smokers in the lowest quartile of folate concentrations (OR: 6.26; 95% CI: 3.62–10.81, p-interaction = 0.07). Dietary folate was not associated with aggressive UCC (OR: 1.26; 95% CI: 0.81–1.95; p-heterogeneity = 0.14). No association was observed between serum homocysteine, vitamins B6 and B12 and risk of UCC. This study suggests that lower serum folate concentrations are associated with increased UCC risk, in particular aggressive UCC. Residual confounding by smoking cannot be ruled out and these findings require confirmation in future studies with multiple measurements.

Combined Effect of Light and Temperature on the Production of Saxitoxins in Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii Strains
Mesquita, Marcella C.B. ; Lürling, Miquel ; Dorr, Fabiane ; Pinto, Ernani ; Marinho, Marcelo M. - \ 2019
Toxins 11 (2019)1. - ISSN 2072-6651 - 15 p.
cyanobacteria - cyanotoxins - intraspecific variability - saxitoxins

Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii is a potentially toxic freshwater cyanobacterium that can tolerate a wide range of light and temperature. Due to climatic changes, the interaction between light and temperature is studied in aquatic systems, but no study has addressed the effect of both variables on the saxitoxins production. This study evaluated the combined effect of light and temperature on saxitoxins production and cellular quota in C. raciborskii. Experiments were performed with three C. raciborskii strains in batch cultures under six light intensities (10, 40, 60, 100, 150, and 500 μmol of photons m-2 s-1) and four temperatures (15, 20, 25, and 30 °C). The growth of C. raciborskii strains was limited at lower temperatures and the maximum growth rates were obtained under higher light combined with temperatures equal or above 20 °C, depending on the strain. In general, growth was highest at 30 °C at the lower light intensities and equally high at 25 °C and 30 °C under higher light. Highest saxitoxins concentration and cell-quota occurred at 25 °C under high light intensities, but were much lower at 30 °C. Hence, increased temperatures combined with sufficient light will lead to higher C. raciborskii biomass, but blooms could become less toxic in tropical regions.

Short communication: detection and molecular characterization of hepatitis E virus in domestic animals of São Tomé and Príncipe
Mesquita, João Rodrigo ; Istrate, Claudia ; Santos-Ferreira, Nânci L. ; Ferreira, Ana S. ; Abreu-Silva, Joana ; Veiga, José ; Poel, Wim H.M. van der; Nascimento, Maria S.J. - \ 2019
Tropical Animal Health and Production 51 (2019). - ISSN 0049-4747 - p. 481 - 485.
Domestic animals - Hepatitis E virus - São Tomé e Príncipe - Zoonoses

As in most of the African continent, the status of hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection in domestic animals in São Tomé and Príncipe, an archipelago off the western equatorial coast of Central Africa, is also completely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the presence of HEV among domestic animals in São Tomé and Príncipe. A total of 93 stool samples from different animal species (goat, cow, pig, chicken, duck, and monkey) were tested for HEV RNA using two real-time RT-PCR assays, followed by a nested RT-PCR assay for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. A total of six samples (1 cow stool and 5 pig stools) were found to be positive for HEV RNA of which one pig stool was positive by broad spectrum nested RT-PCR. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the retrieved sequence clustered within HEV subgenotype 3f, similar to zoonotic strains of European countries and posing interesting questions on past introduction of European HEV into São Tomé and Príncipe archipelago. This is the first report describing the presence and molecular characterization of HEV in São Tomé and Príncipe.

A national FFQ for the Netherlands (the FFQ-NL1.0): development and compatibility with existing Dutch FFQs
Eussen, Simone ; Dongen, M.C.J.M. van; Wijckmans, N.E. ; Meijboom, S. ; Brants, H.A.M. ; Vries, J.H.M. de; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B. ; Geelen, M.M.E.E. ; Sluik, D. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Ocke, M.C. ; Dagnelie, P.C. - \ 2018
Public Health Nutrition 21 (2018)12. - ISSN 1368-9800 - p. 2221 - 2229.
Objective In the Netherlands, various FFQs have been administered in large cohort studies, which hampers comparison and pooling of dietary data. The present study aimed to describe the development of a standardized Dutch FFQ, FFQ-NL1.0, and assess its compatibility with existing Dutch FFQs. Design Dutch FFQTOOLTM was used to develop the FFQ-NL1.0 by selecting food items with the largest contributions to total intake and explained variance in intake of energy and thirty-nine nutrients in adults aged 25–69 years from the Dutch National Food Consumption Survey (DNFCS) 2007–2010. Compatibility with the Maastricht-FFQ, Wageningen-FFQ and EPICNL-FFQ was assessed by comparing the number of food items, the covered energy and nutrient intake, and the covered variance in intake. Results FFQ-NL1.0 comprised 160 food items, v. 253, 183 and 154 food items for the Maastricht-FFQ, Wageningen-FFQ and EPICNL-FFQ, respectively. FFQ-NL1.0 covered ≥85 % of energy and all nutrients reported in the DNFCS. Covered variance in intake ranged from 57 to 99 % for energy and macronutrients, and from 45 to 93 % for micronutrients. Differences between FFQ-NL1.0 and the other FFQs in covered nutrient intake and covered variance in intake were <5 % for energy and all macronutrients. For micronutrients, differences between FFQ-NL and other FFQs in covered level of intake were <15 %, but differences in covered variance were much larger, the maximum difference being 36 %. Conclusions The FFQ-NL1.0 was compatible with other FFQs regarding energy and macronutrient intake. However, compatibility for covered variance of intake was limited for some of the micronutrients. If implemented in existing cohorts, it is advised to administer the old and the new FFQ in combination to derive calibration factors.
Impact of prediagnostic smoking and smoking cessation on colorectal cancer prognosis : A meta-analysis of individual patient data from cohorts within the CHANCES consortium
Ordóñez-Mena, J.M. ; Walter, V. ; Schöttker, B. ; Jenab, M. ; O'Doherty, M.G. ; Kee, F. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, B. ; Peeters, P.H.M. ; Stricker, B.H. ; Ruiter, R. ; Hofman, A. ; Söderberg, S. ; Jousilahti, P. ; Kuulasmaa, K. ; Freedman, N.D. ; Wilsgaard, T. ; Wolk, A. ; Nilsson, L.M. ; Tjønneland, A. ; Quirós, J.R. ; Duijnhoven, F.J.B. van; Siersema, P.D. ; Boffetta, P. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Brenner, H. - \ 2018
Annals of Oncology 29 (2018)2. - ISSN 0923-7534 - p. 472 - 483.
Colorectal neoplasms - Meta-analysis - Smoking - Smoking cessation - Survival
Background: Smoking has been associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality in previous studies and might also be associated with prognosis after CRC diagnosis. However, current evidence on smoking in association with CRC prognosis is limited. Patients and methods: For this individual patient data meta-analysis, sociodemographic and smoking behavior information of 12 414 incident CRC patients (median age at diagnosis: 64.3 years), recruited within 14 prospective cohort studies among previously cancer-free adults, was collected at baseline and harmonized across studies. Vital status and causes of death were collected for a mean follow-up time of 5.1 years following cancer diagnosis. Associations of smoking behavior with overall and CRC-specific survival were evaluated using Cox regression and standard meta-analysis methodology. Results: A total of 5229 participants died, 3194 from CRC. Cox regression revealed significant associations between former [hazard ratio (HR)=1.12; 95 % confidence interval (CI)=1.04-1.20] and current smoking (HR=1.29; 95% CI=1.04-1.60) and poorer overall survival compared with never smoking. Compared with current smoking, smoking cessation was associated with improved overall (HR<10 years=0.78; 95% CI=0.69-0.88; HR≥10 years=0.78; 95% CI=0.63-0.97) and CRC-specific survival (HR≥10 years=0.76; 95% CI=0.67-0.85). Conclusion: In this large meta-analysis including primary data of incident CRC patients from 14 prospective cohort studies on the association between smoking and CRC prognosis, former and current smoking were associated with poorer CRC prognosis compared with never smoking. Smoking cessation was associated with improved survival when compared with current smokers. Future studies should further quantify the benefits of nonsmoking, both for cancer prevention and for improving survival among CRC patients, in particular also in terms of treatment response.
Circulating concentrations of vitamin D in relation to pancreatic cancer risk in European populations
Duijnhoven, Fränzel J.B. van; Jenab, Mazda ; Hveem, Kristian ; Siersema, Peter D. ; Fedirko, Veronika ; Duell, Eric J. ; Kampman, Ellen ; Halfweeg, Anouk ; Kranen, Henk J. van; Ouweland, Jody M.W. van den; Weiderpass, Elisabete ; Murphy, Neil ; Langhammer, Arnulf ; Ness-Jensen, Eivind ; Olsen, Anja ; Tjønneland, Anne ; Overvad, Kim ; Cadeau, Claire ; Kvaskoff, Marina ; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine ; Katzke, Verena A. ; Kühn, Tilman ; Boeing, Heiner ; Trichopoulou, Antonia ; Kotanidou, Anastasia ; Kritikou, Maria ; Palli, Domenico ; Agnoli, Claudia ; Tumino, Rosario ; Panico, Salvatore ; Matullo, Giuseppe ; Peeters, Petra ; Brustad, Magritt ; Olsen, Karina Standahl ; Lasheras, Cristina ; Obón-Santacana, Mireia ; Sánchez, María José ; Dorronsoro, Miren ; Chirlaque, Maria Dolores ; Barricarte, Aurelio ; Manjer, Jonas ; Almquist, Martin ; Renström, Frida ; Ye, Weimin ; Wareham, Nick ; Khaw, Kay Tee ; Bradbury, Kathryn E. ; Freisling, Heinz ; Aune, Dagfinn ; Norat, Teresa ; Riboli, Elio ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B. - \ 2018
International Journal of Cancer 142 (2018)6. - ISSN 0020-7136 - p. 1189 - 1201.
Cancer epidemiology - Nested case-control study - Pancreatic cancer - Vitamin D
Evidence from in vivo, in vitro and ecological studies are suggestive of a protective effect of vitamin D against pancreatic cancer (PC). However, this has not been confirmed by analytical epidemiological studies. We aimed to examine the association between pre-diagnostic circulating vitamin D concentrations and PC incidence in European populations. We conducted a pooled nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) and the Nord-Trøndelag Health Study's second survey (HUNT2) cohorts. In total, 738 primary incident PC cases (EPIC n=626; HUNT2 n=112; median follow-up=6.9 years) were matched to 738 controls. Vitamin D [25(OH)D2 and 25(OH)D3 combined] concentrations were determined using isotope-dilution liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Conditional logistic regression models with adjustments for body mass index and smoking habits were used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI). Compared with a reference category of >50 to 75 nmol/L vitamin D, the IRRs (95% CIs) were 0.71 (0.42-1.20); 0.94 (0.72-1.22); 1.12 (0.82-1.53) and 1.26 (0.79-2.01) for clinically pre-defined categories of ≤25; >25 to 50; >75 to 100; and >100 nmol/L vitamin D, respectively (p for trend=0.09). Corresponding analyses by quintiles of season-standardized vitamin D concentrations also did not reveal associations with PC risk (p for trend=0.23). Although these findings among participants from the largest combination of European cohort studies to date show increasing effect estimates of PC risk with increasing pre-diagnostic concentrations of vitamin D, they are not statistically significant.
Evaluating dietary supply of microminerals as a premix in a complete plant ingredient-based diet to juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)
Prabhu, P.A.J. ; Schrama, J.W. ; Fontagné-Dicharry, S. ; Mariojouls, C. ; Surget, A. ; Bueno de Mesquita, M. ; Geurden, I. ; Kaushik, Sadasivam J. - \ 2018
Aquaculture Nutrition 24 (2018)1. - ISSN 1353-5773 - p. 539 - 547.
Fishmeal replacement - Micro minerals - Premix - Rainbow trout - Requirement - Supplement - Trace minerals
Two basal diets M0 and V0 were formulated with marine and plant based ingredient composition. Seven experimental diets were prepared from the two basal diets namely M0, M100, V0, V30, V60, V100 and V150 by incorporating different levels of a micromineral premix (Cu, Fe, Mn, Se and Zn). Triplicate groups of rainbow trout (initial weight: 20 g) reared at 17°C were fed one of each diet to apparent visual satiation over 12 weeks. Among the V diet fed fish, growth and feed intake exhibited maximal response at V60 level of premix inclusion; Apparent availability coefficient of Fe, Cu and Zn decreased linearly with increasing level of premix whereas apparent availability coefficient of Mn and Se was unaffected. The available dietary concentration in basal V0 diet was for Fe, 20.6; Cu, 2.8; Mn, 6.5; Zn, 17.3 and Se, 0.195 (in mg/kg DM) and in the M0 diet for Fe, 63.3; Cu, 5.2; Mn, 2.9; Zn, 35.2 and Se, 0.87 (in mg/kg DM). In reference to NRC (Nutrient requirements of fish and shrimp. Washington, DC: National Research Council, The National Academies Press, 2011) recommendations, the V0 basal diet accounted for 34.3%, 92.9%, 53.9%, 115% and 130.2% and the contribution from M0 diet for 105.5%, 173.3%, 24.2%, 234.7% and 580% of the minimal dietary inclusion levels of Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn and Se to rainbow trout, respectively. However, data on whole body mineral contents showed that normal levels were maintained only for Cu and Mn through supply from basal V0 diet. For Zn and Se, available supply even from the highest supplemented diet (V150) was not sufficient to maintain normal body mineral levels of rainbow trout in the present study. On the whole, optimal dietary inclusion levels of microminerals are altered while using fishmeal-free diets for rainbow trout.
Reply to Schöngart et al. : Forest resilience variation across Amazonian floodplains
Flores, B.M. ; Holmgren Urba, Milena ; Xu, Chi ; Nes, Egbert H. van; Jakovac, Catarina C. ; Mesquita, Rita C.G. ; Scheffer, Marten - \ 2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 114 (2017)41. - ISSN 0027-8424 - p. E8552 - E8554.
Self-rated health and all-cause and cause-specific mortality of older adults. Individual data meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies in the CHANCES Consortium
Bamia, Christina ; Orfanos, Philippos ; Juerges, H. ; Schöttker, Ben ; Brenner, Hermann ; Lorbeer, Roberto ; Aadahl, Mette ; Matthews, Charles E. ; Bueno-de Mesquita, H.B. ; Groot, C.P.G.M. de - \ 2017
Maturitas 103 (2017). - ISSN 0378-5122 - p. 37 - 44.
Objectives
To evaluate, among the elderly, the association of self-rated health (SRH) with mortality, and to identify determinants of self-rating health as “at-least-good”.

Study Design
Individual data on SRH and important covariates were obtained for 424,791 European and Unites States residents, ≥60 years at recruitment (1982-2008), in eight prospective studies in the Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES). In each study, adjusted mortality ratios (hazard ratios, HRs) in relation to SRH were calculated and subsequently combined with random-effect meta-analyses.

Main outcome measures
All-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality.

Results
Within the median 12.5 years of follow-up, 93,014 (22%) deaths occurred. SRH “fair” or “poor” vs. “at-least-good” was associated with increased mortality: HRs 1.46 (95% CI 1·23-1.74) and 2.31 (1.79-2.99), respectively. These associations were evident: for cardiovascular and, to a lesser extent, cancer mortality, and within-study, within-subgroup analyses. Accounting for lifestyle, sociodemographic, somatometric factors and, subsequently, for medical history explained only a modest amount of the unadjusted associations. Factors favourably associated with SRH were: sex (males), age (younger-old), education (high), marital status (married/cohabiting), physical activity (active), body mass index (non-obese), alcohol consumption (low to moderate) and previous morbidity (absence).

Conclusion
SRH provides a quick and simple tool for assessing health and identifying groups of elders at risk of early mortality that may be useful also in clinical settings. Modifying determinants of favourably rating health, e.g. by increasing physical activity and/or by eliminating obesity, may be important for older adults to “feel healthy” and “be healthy”.
Floodplains as an Achilles' heel of Amazonian forest resilience
Flores, Bernardo M. ; Holmgren Urba, Milena ; Xu, Chi ; Nes, Egbert H. van; Conte Jakovac, Catarina ; Mesquita, Rita C.G. ; Scheffer, Marten - \ 2017
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 114 (2017)17. - ISSN 0027-8424 - p. 4442 - 4446.
Climate change - Drought - Fire - Tropical forest - Tropical savanna

The massive forests of central Amazonia are often considered relatively resilient against climatic variation, but this view is challenged by the wildfires invoked by recent droughts. The impact of such fires that spread from pervasive sources of ignition may reveal where forests are less likely to persist in a drier future. Here we combine field observations with remotely sensed information for the whole Amazon to show that the annually inundated lowland forests that run through the heart of the system may be trapped relatively easily into a fire-dominated savanna state. This lower forest resilience on floodplains is suggested by patterns of tree cover distribution across the basin, and supported by our field and remote sensing studies showing that floodplain fires have a stronger and longer-lasting impact on forest structure as well as soil fertility. Although floodplains cover only 14% of the Amazon basin, their fires can have substantial cascading effects because forests and peatlands may release large amounts of carbon, and wildfires can spread to adjacent uplands. Floodplains are thus an Achilles' heel of the Amazon system when it comes to the risk of large-scale climatedriven transitions.

Demographic Drivers of Aboveground Biomass Dynamics During Secondary Succession in Neotropical Dry and Wet Forests
Rozendaal, Danaë M.A. ; Chazdon, Robin L. ; Arreola-Villa, Felipe ; Balvanera, Patricia ; Bentos, Tony V. ; Dupuy, Juan M. ; Hernández-Stefanoni, J.L. ; Jakovac, Catarina C. ; Lebrija-Trejos, Edwin E. ; Lohbeck, Madelon ; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel ; Massoca, Paulo E.S. ; Meave, Jorge A. ; Mesquita, Rita C.G. ; Mora, Francisco ; Pérez-García, Eduardo A. ; Romero-Pérez, I.E. ; Saenz-Pedroza, Irving ; Breugel, Michiel van; Williamson, G.B. ; Bongers, Frans - \ 2017
Ecosystems 20 (2017)2. - ISSN 1432-9840 - p. 340 - 353.
Biomass accumulation - carbon sink - forest dynamics - Neotropics - second-growth tropical forest - species’ dominance - tree demography

The magnitude of the carbon sink in second-growth forests is expected to vary with successional biomass dynamics resulting from tree growth, recruitment, and mortality, and with the effects of climate on these dynamics. We compare aboveground biomass dynamics of dry and wet Neotropical forests, based on monitoring data gathered over 3–16 years in forests covering the first 25 years of succession. We estimated standing biomass, annual biomass change, and contributions of tree growth, recruitment, and mortality. We also evaluated tree species’ contributions to biomass dynamics. Absolute rates of biomass change were lower in dry forests, 2.3 and 1.9 Mg ha−1 y−1, after 5–15 and 15–25 years after abandonment, respectively, than in wet forests, with 4.7 and 6.1 Mg ha−1 y−1, in the same age classes. Biomass change was largely driven by tree growth, accounting for at least 48% of biomass change across forest types and age classes. Mortality also contributed strongly to biomass change in wet forests of 5–15 years, whereas its contribution became important later in succession in dry forests. Biomass dynamics tended to be dominated by fewer species in early-successional dry than wet forests, but dominance was strong in both forest types. Overall, our results indicate that biomass dynamics during succession are faster in Neotropical wet than dry forests, with high tree mortality earlier in succession in the wet forests. Long-term monitoring of second-growth tropical forest plots is crucial for improving estimates of annual biomass change, and for enhancing understanding of the underlying mechanisms and demographic drivers.

Pre-diagnostic meat and fibre intakes in relation to colorectal cancer survival in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
Ward, Heather A. ; Norat, Teresa ; Overvad, Kim ; Dahm, Christina C. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B. ; Jenab, Mazda ; Fedirko, Veronika ; Duijnhoven, Fränzel J.B. Van; Skeie, Guri ; Romaguera-Bosch, Dora ; Tjonneland, Anne ; Olsen, Anja ; Carbonnel, Franck ; Affret, Aurélie ; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine ; Katzke, Verena ; Kühn, Tilman ; Aleksandrova, Krassimira ; Boeing, Heiner ; Trichopoulou, Antonia ; Lagiou, Pagona ; Bamia, Christina ; Palli, Domenico ; Sieri, Sabina ; Tumino, Rosario ; Naccarati, Alessio ; Mattiello, Amalia ; Peeters, Petra H. ; Weiderpass, Elisabete ; Åsli, Lene Angell ; Jakszyn, Paula ; Ramón Quirós, J. ; Sánchez, María José ; Dorronsoro, Miren ; Huerta, José María ; Barricarte, Aurelio ; Jirström, Karin ; Ericson, Ulrika ; Johansson, Ingegerd ; Gylling, Björn ; Bradbury, Kathryn E. ; Khaw, Kay Tee ; Wareham, Nicholas J. ; Stepien, Magdalena ; Freisling, Heinz ; Murphy, Neil ; Cross, Amanda J. ; Riboli, Elio - \ 2016
The British journal of nutrition 116 (2016)2. - ISSN 0007-1145 - p. 316 - 325.
Cancer survival - Cohorts - Colorectal cancers - Diets - European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
Improvements in colorectal cancer (CRC) detection and treatment have led to greater numbers of CRC survivors, for whom there is limited evidence on which to provide dietary guidelines to improve survival outcomes. Higher intake of red and processed meat and lower intake of fibre are associated with greater risk of developing CRC, but there is limited evidence regarding associations with survival after CRC diagnosis. Among 3789 CRC cases in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, pre-diagnostic consumption of red meat, processed meat, poultry and dietary fibre was examined in relation to CRC-specific mortality (n 1008) and all-cause mortality (n 1262) using multivariable Cox regression models, adjusted for CRC risk factors. Pre-diagnostic red meat, processed meat or fibre intakes (defined as quartiles and continuous grams per day) were not associated with CRC-specific or all-cause mortality among CRC survivors; however, a marginal trend across quartiles of processed meat in relation to CRC mortality was detected (P 0·053). Pre-diagnostic poultry intake was inversely associated with all-cause mortality among women (hazard ratio (HR)/20 g/d 0·92; 95 % CI 0·84, 1·00), but not among men (HR 1·00; 95 % CI 0·91, 1·09) (P for heterogeneity=0·10). Pre-diagnostic intake of red meat or fibre is not associated with CRC survival in the EPIC cohort. There is suggestive evidence of an association between poultry intake and all-cause mortality among female CRC survivors and between processed meat intake and CRC-specific mortality; however, further research using post-diagnostic dietary data is required to confirm this relationship.
Land use as a filter for species composition in Amazonian secondary forests
Conte Jakovac, Catarina ; Bongers, Frans ; Kuijper, Thomas ; Mesquita, Rita C.G. ; Peña-Claros, Marielos - \ 2016
Journal of Vegetation Science 27 (2016)6. - ISSN 1100-9233 - p. 1104 - 1116.
Brazil - Cecropia - Fire - Landscape composition - Phosphorus - Slash-and-burn - Soil - Sprouting - Succession - Vismia - α-Diversity - β-Diversity

Questions: Secondary succession in the tropics can follow alternative pathways. Land-use history is known to engender alternative successional communities, but the underlying mechanisms driving and sustaining divergence remain unclear. In this study we aim to answer the following questions: (1) does previous land use act as a filter for species composition in secondary forests; and (2) what are the relative roles of management practices, soil properties and landscape composition in determining species composition?. Location: Central Amazon, Brazil. Methods: We sampled trees, shrubs and palms (≥1cm diameter) in 38 early secondary forests (5 yr after abandonment) located along gradients of land-use intensity in five shifting cultivation landscapes. We measured the diameter and height of each sampled plant, identified it to species or morpho-species level and checked if it was resprouting or not. At each secondary forest we also collected soil samples for chemical and physical analyses and estimated the amount of old-growth forest surrounding it (landscape composition). Results: We found that previous land-use intensity determined species composition. With increasing land-use intensity, management practices of cut-and-burn and associated reduction in soil quality filtered out seed-dependent species and favoured strong sprouters and species that can cope with low nutrient availability. Landscape composition had a weak effect on species assemblages. We found specific species assemblages and indicator species associated with different levels of previous land-use intensity. As a consequence of these local filters, species α- and β-diversity decreased and therefore early successional communities became more similar to each other. Conclusion: Species composition of successional forests is strongly determined by different land-use intensities. Dispersal limitation has a limited effect on determining the composition of the dominant species. Filtering effects of management practices and soil quality determine the species dominating the canopy at early stages of succession and narrow down the range of species able to colonize and establish. This study highlights how land use shapes successional communities and suggests that alternative successional pathways are determined at early stages of succession. Therefore, accounting for land-use history is crucial to improve the understanding of tropical secondary succession. We present a list of indicator species for different levels of previous land-use intensity that can be used to support conservation and restoration decisions in the Amazon.

Anthropometry and the risk of lung cancer in EPIC
Dewi, Nikmah Utami ; Boshuizen, Hendriek C. ; Johansson, Mattias ; Vineis, Paolo ; Kampman, Ellen ; Steffen, Annika ; Tjønneland, Anne ; Halkjær, Jytte ; Overvad, Kim ; Severi, Gianluca ; Fagherazzi, Guy ; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine ; Kaaks, Rudolf ; Li, Kuanrong ; Boeing, Heiner ; Trichopoulou, Antonia ; Bamia, Christina ; Klinaki, Eleni ; Tumino, Rosario ; Palli, Domenico ; Mattiello, Amalia ; Tagliabue, Giovanna ; Peeters, Petra H. ; Vermeulen, Roel ; Weiderpass, Elisabete ; Gram, Inger Torhild ; Huerta, José María ; Agudo, Antonio ; Sánchez, María José ; Ardanaz, Eva ; Dorronsoro, Miren ; Quirós, José Ramón ; Sonestedt, Emily ; Johansson, Mikael ; Grankvist, Kjell ; Key, Tim ; Khaw, Kay Tee ; Wareham, Nick ; Cross, Amanda J. ; Norat, Teresa ; Riboli, Elio ; Fanidi, Anouar ; Muller, David ; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B. - \ 2016
American Journal of Epidemiology 184 (2016)2. - ISSN 0002-9262 - p. 129 - 139.
body mass index - lung cancer - obesity - smoking - waist circumference - waist to hip ratio - waist-to-height ratio

The associations of body mass index (BMI) and other anthropometric measurements with lung cancer were examined in 348,108 participants in the European Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) between 1992 and 2010. The study population included 2,400 case patients with incident lung cancer, and the average length of follow-up was 11 years. Hazard ratios were calculated using Cox proportional hazard models in which we modeled smoking variables with cubic splines. Overall, there was a significant inverse association between BMI (weight (kg)/height (m)2) and the risk of lung cancer after adjustment for smoking and other confounders (for BMI of 30.0-34.9 versus 18.5-25.0, hazard ratio = 0.72, 95% confidence interval: 0.62, 0.84). The strength of the association declined with increasing follow-up time. Conversely, after adjustment for BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio were significantly positively associated with lung cancer risk (for the highest category of waist circumference vs. the lowest, hazard ratio = 1.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.05, 1.50). Given the decline of the inverse association between BMI and lung cancer over time, the association is likely at least partly due to weight loss resulting from preclinical lung cancer that was present at baseline. Residual confounding by smoking could also have influenced our findings.

A national FFQ for the Netherlands (the FFQ-NL 1.0): validation of a comprehensive FFQ for adults
Sluik, D. ; Geelen, M.M.E.E. ; Vries, J.H.M. de; Eussen, S.J.P.M. ; Brants, H.A.M. ; Meijboom, S. ; Dongen, Martien C.J.M. van; Bueno-de Mesquita, H.B. ; Veer, P. van 't; Feskens, E.J.M. - \ 2016
The British journal of nutrition 116 (2016)5. - ISSN 0007-1145 - p. 913 - 923.
A standardised, national, 160-item FFQ, the FFQ-NL 1.0, was recently developed for Dutch epidemiological studies. The objective was tovalidate the FFQ-NL 1.0 against multiple 24-h recalls (24hR) and recovery and concentration biomarkers. The FFQ-NL 1.0 was filled out by383 participants (25–69 years) from the Nutrition Questionnaires plus study. For each participant, one to two urinary and blood samples andone to five (mean 2·7) telephone-based 24hR were available. Group-level bias, correlation coefficients, attenuation factors, de-attenuatedcorrelation coefficients and ranking agreement were assessed. Compared with the 24hR, the FFQ-NL 1.0 estimated the intake of energy andmacronutrients well. However, it underestimated intakes of SFA and trans-fatty acids and alcohol and overestimated intakes of most vitaminsby >5%. The median correlation coefficient was 0·39 for energy and macronutrients, 0·30 for micronutrients and 0·30 for food groups. TheFFQ underestimated protein intake by an average of 16% and K by 5 %, relative to their urinary recovery biomarkers. Attenuation factors were0·44 and 0·46 for protein and K, respectively. Correlation coefficients were 0·43–0·47 between (fatty) fish intake and plasma EPA and DHA and0·24–0·43 between fruit and vegetable intakes and plasma carotenoids. In conclusion, the overall validity of the newly developed FFQ-NL 1.0was acceptable to good. The FFQ-NL 1.0 is well suited for future use within Dutch cohort studies among adults.
Quantification of the smoking-associated cancer risk with rate advancement periods : Meta-analysis of individual participant data from cohorts of the CHANCES consortium
Ordóñez-Mena, José Manuel ; Schöttker, Ben ; Mons, Ute ; Jenab, Mazda ; Freisling, Heinz ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas ; O'Doherty, Mark G. ; Scott, Angela ; Kee, Frank ; Stricker, Bruno H. ; Hofman, Albert ; Keyser, Catherine E. de; Ruiter, Rikje ; Söderberg, Stefan ; Jousilahti, Pekka ; Kuulasmaa, Kari ; Freedman, Neal D. ; Wilsgaard, Tom ; Groot, Lisette C.P.G.M. de; Kampman, Ellen ; Håkansson, Niclas ; Orsini, Nicola ; Wolk, Alicja ; Nilsson, Lena Maria ; Tjønneland, Anne ; Pajak, Andrzej ; Malyutina, Sofia ; Kubínová, Růžena ; Tamosiunas, Abdonas ; Bobak, Martin ; Katsoulis, Michail ; Orfanos, Philippos ; Boffetta, Paolo ; Trichopoulou, Antonia ; Brenner, Hermann - \ 2016
BMC Medicine 14 (2016)1. - ISSN 1741-7015
Cancer - Cohort - Incidence - Meta-analysis - Mortality - Smoking

Background: Smoking is the most important individual risk factor for many cancer sites but its association with breast and prostate cancer is not entirely clear. Rate advancement periods (RAPs) may enhance communication of smoking related risk to the general population. Thus, we estimated RAPs for the association of smoking exposure (smoking status, time since smoking cessation, smoking intensity, and duration) with total and site-specific (lung, breast, colorectal, prostate, gastric, head and neck, and pancreatic) cancer incidence and mortality. Methods: This is a meta-analysis of 19 population-based prospective cohort studies with individual participant data for 897,021 European and American adults. For each cohort we calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for the association of smoking exposure with cancer outcomes using Cox regression adjusted for a common set of the most important potential confounding variables. RAPs (in years) were calculated as the ratio of the logarithms of the HRs for a given smoking exposure variable and age. Meta-analyses were employed to summarize cohort-specific HRs and RAPs. Results: Overall, 140,205 subjects had a first incident cancer, and 53,164 died from cancer, during an average follow-up of 12 years. Current smoking advanced the overall risk of developing and dying from cancer by eight and ten years, respectively, compared with never smokers. The greatest advancements in cancer risk and mortality were seen for lung cancer and the least for breast cancer. Smoking cessation was statistically significantly associated with delays in the risk of cancer development and mortality compared with continued smoking. Conclusions: This investigation shows that smoking, even among older adults, considerably advances, and cessation delays, the risk of developing and dying from cancer. These findings may be helpful in more effectively communicating the harmful effects of smoking and the beneficial effect of smoking cessation.

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