Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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A global database for metacommunity ecology, integrating species, traits, environment and space
Jeliazkov, Alienor ; Mijatovic, Darko ; Chantepie, Stéphane ; Andrew, Nigel ; Arlettaz, Raphaël ; Barbaro, Luc ; Barsoum, Nadia ; Bartonova, Alena ; Belskaya, Elena ; Bonada, Núria ; Brind’Amour, Anik ; Carvalho, Rodrigo ; Castro, Helena ; Chmura, Damian ; Choler, Philippe ; Chong-Seng, Karen ; Cleary, Daniel ; Cormont, Anouk ; Cornwell, William ; Campos, Ramiro de; Voogd, Nicole de; Doledec, Sylvain ; Drew, Joshua ; Dziock, Frank ; Eallonardo, Anthony ; Edgar, Melanie J. ; Farneda, Fábio ; Hernandez, Domingo Flores ; Frenette-Dussault, Cédric ; Fried, Guillaume ; Gallardo, Belinda ; Gibb, Heloise ; Gonçalves-Souza, Thiago ; Higuti, Janet ; Humbert, Jean Yves ; Krasnov, Boris R. ; Saux, Eric Le ; Lindo, Zoe ; Lopez-Baucells, Adria ; Lowe, Elizabeth ; Marteinsdottir, Bryndis ; Martens, Koen ; Meffert, Peter ; Mellado-Díaz, Andres ; Menz, Myles H.M. ; Meyer, Christoph F.J. ; Miranda, Julia Ramos ; Mouillot, David ; Ossola, Alessandro ; Pakeman, Robin ; Pavoine, Sandrine ; Pekin, Burak ; Pino, Joan ; Pocheville, Arnaud ; Pomati, Francesco ; Poschlod, Peter ; Prentice, Honor C. ; Purschke, Oliver ; Raevel, Valerie ; Reitalu, Triin ; Renema, Willem ; Ribera, Ignacio ; Robinson, Natalie ; Robroek, Bjorn ; Rocha, Ricardo ; Shieh, Sen Her ; Spake, Rebecca ; Staniaszek-Kik, Monika ; Stanko, Michal ; Tejerina-Garro, Francisco Leonardo ; Braak, Cajo ter; Urban, Mark C. ; Klink, Roel van; Villéger, Sébastien ; Wegman, Ruut ; Westgate, Martin J. ; Wolff, Jonas ; Żarnowiec, Jan ; Zolotarev, Maxim ; Chase, Jonathan M. - \ 2020
Scientific Data 7 (2020)1. - ISSN 2052-4463

The use of functional information in the form of species traits plays an important role in explaining biodiversity patterns and responses to environmental changes. Although relationships between species composition, their traits, and the environment have been extensively studied on a case-by-case basis, results are variable, and it remains unclear how generalizable these relationships are across ecosystems, taxa and spatial scales. To address this gap, we collated 80 datasets from trait-based studies into a global database for metaCommunity Ecology: Species, Traits, Environment and Space; “CESTES”. Each dataset includes four matrices: species community abundances or presences/absences across multiple sites, species trait information, environmental variables and spatial coordinates of the sampling sites. The CESTES database is a live database: it will be maintained and expanded in the future as new datasets become available. By its harmonized structure, and the diversity of ecosystem types, taxonomic groups, and spatial scales it covers, the CESTES database provides an important opportunity for synthetic trait-based research in community ecology.

Editorial introduction to the special issue risk management in agriculture
Lupton, Sylvie ; Meuwissen, Miranda ; Ingrand, Stéphane - \ 2020
Agricultural Systems 178 (2020). - ISSN 0308-521X
Health and welfare of rabbits farmed in different production systems
Saxmose Nielsen, Søren ; Alvarez, Julio ; Bicout, Dominique Joseph ; Calistri, Paolo ; Depner, Klaus ; Drewe, Julian Ashley ; Garin‐bastuji, Bruno ; Gonzales Rojas, Jose Luis ; Gortázar Schmidt, Christian ; Michel, Virginie ; Miranda Chueca, Miguel Ángel ; Roberts, Helen Clare ; Sihvonen, Liisa Helena ; Spoolder, Hans ; Stahl, Karl ; Velarde Calvo, Antonio ; Viltrop, Arvo ; Buijs, Stephanie ; Edwards, Sandra ; Candiani, Denise ; Mosbach‐schulz, Olaf ; Stede, Yves Van Der; Winckler, Christoph - \ 2019
EFSA Journal 18 (2019)1. - ISSN 1831-4732 - 96 p.
animal welfare - animal production - rabbits - animal housing - animal behaviour - animal health
The AGRI committee of the European Parliament requested EFSA to assess the welfare of rabbits farmed in different production systems, including organic production, and to update its 2005 scientific opinion about the health and welfare of rabbits kept for meat production. Considering reproducing does, kits and growing rabbits, this scientific opinion focusses on six different housing systems, namely conventional cages, structurally enriched cages, elevated pens, floor pens, outdoor/partially outdoor systems and organic systems. To compare the level of welfare in the different housing systems and rabbit categories, welfare impact scores for 20 welfare consequences identified from the literature were calculated, taking their occurrence, duration and severity into account. Based on the overall welfare impact score (sum of scores for the single welfare consequences), obtained via a 2-step expert knowledge elicitation process, the welfare of reproducing does is likely (certainty 66–90%) to be lower in conventional cages compared to the five other housing systems. In addition, it is likely to extremely likely (certainty 66–99%) that the welfare of kits is lower in outdoor systems compared to the other systems and that the welfare is higher in elevated pens than in the other systems. Finally, it is likely to extremely likely (certainty 66–99%) that the welfare of growing rabbits is lower in conventional cages compared to the other systems and that the welfare is higher in elevated pens than in the other systems. Ranking of the welfare consequences allowed an analysis of the main welfare consequences within each system and rabbit category. It was concluded that for reproducing does, as well as growing rabbits, welfare consequences related to behavioural restrictions were more prominent in conventional cages, elevated pens and enriched cages, whereas those related to health problems were more important in floor pens, outdoor and organic systems. Housing in organic rabbit farming is diverse, which can result in different welfare consequences, but the overall welfare impact scores suggest that welfare in organic systems is generally good.
Changes in muscle micro-environment and energy homeostasis underlying cancer-induced muscle wasting
Ende, Miranda van der - \ 2019
Changes in muscle micro-environment and energy homeostasis underlying cancer-induced muscle wasting
Ende, Miranda van der - \ 2019
The role of group-based contracts for risk-sharing; what are the opportunities to cover catastrophic risk?
Meuwissen, Miranda ; Bottema, Mariska ; Ho, Lien ; Chamsai, Sawitree ; Manjur, Kedebe ; Mey, Y. de - \ 2019
Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 41 (2019). - ISSN 1877-3435 - p. 80 - 84.
Group-based contracts are stimulated by food and agricultural
development programs as powerful tools for risk-sharing. In
successful groups social capital serves as a catalyst for risk
prevention and knowledge sharing. It is however difficult to deal
with catastrophic risk. In this paper we ask whether and how
group-based contracts have been innovated to include
catastrophic risk? The review shows that, albeit at early stage,
innovations emerge from linking up to formal finance markets,
negotiating better risk-sharing deals with upstream and
downstream value chain actors, and upscaling of publicprivate
improvement projects to joint calamity funds. These
changes to group-based contracts are expected to enhance
inclusion. We also identify a research agenda for risk-sharing
via groups.
Inclusive environmental performance through ‘beyond-farm’ aquaculture governance
Bush, Simon R. ; Oosterveer, Peter ; Bottema, Mariska ; Meuwissen, Miranda ; Mey, Yann de; Chamsai, Sawitree ; Lien, Ho Hong ; Chadag, Mohan - \ 2019
Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 41 (2019). - ISSN 1877-3435 - p. 49 - 55.

This paper examines the potential for improved environmental performance of smallholder aquaculture production through ‘beyond-farm’ governance. Smallholder aquaculture farmers face a range of systemic environmental risks related to disease and water quality that extend beyond the boundary of their farms. Yet most governance arrangements aimed at mitigating risks, such as certification, finance and insurance, are focused on the farm-level rather than the wider landscape within which farming takes place. In this paper we propose an integrated approach to area-based management of aquaculture risks that integrates collective action, risk assurance and transfer, and inclusive value chains. In doing so, we set a new research agenda for the integrated governance of mitigating production risks and producer vulnerability in global food production.

Data from: Relative importance of competition and plant-soil feedback, their synergy, context dependency and implications for coexistence
Lekberg, Ylva ; Bever, James D. ; Bunn, Rebecca A. ; Callaway, Ragan M. ; Hart, Miranda M. ; Kivlin, Stephanie N. ; Klironomos, John ; Larkin, Beau G. ; Maron, John L. ; Reinhart, Kurt O. ; Remke, Michael ; Putten, Wim van der - \ 2019
University of Montana
Plants interact simultaneously with each other and with soil biota, yet the relative importance of competition versus plant soil feedback (PSF) on plant performance is poorly understood. Using a meta-analysis of 38 published studies and 150 plant species, we show that effects of interspecific competition (either growing plants with a competitor or singly, or comparing inter- vs. intraspecific competition) and PSF (comparing home vs. away soil, live vs. sterile soil, or control vs. fungicide-treated soil) depended on treatments but were predominantly negative, broadly comparable in magnitude, and additive or synergistic. Stronger competitors experienced more negative PSF than weaker competitors when controlling for density (inter- to intraspecific competition), suggesting that PSF could prevent competitive dominance and promote coexistence. When competition was measured against plants growing singly, the strength of competition overwhelmed PSF, indicating that the relative importance of PSF may depend not only on neighbor identity but also density. We evaluate how competition and PSFs might interact across resource gradients; PSF will likely strengthen competitive interactions in high resource environments and enhance facilitative interactions in low resource environments. Finally, we provide a framework for filling key knowledge gaps and advancing our understanding of how these biotic interactions influence community structure.
Rarity of monodominance in hyperdiverse Amazonian forests
Steege, Hans Ter; Henkel, Terry W. ; Helal, Nora ; Marimon, Beatriz S. ; Marimon-Junior, Ben Hur ; Huth, Andreas ; Groeneveld, Jürgen ; Sabatier, Daniel ; Souza Coelho, Luiz de; Andrade Lima Filho, Diogenes de; Salomão, Rafael P. ; Amaral, Iêda Leão ; Almeida Matos, Francisca Dionízia de; Castilho, Carolina V. ; Phillips, Oliver L. ; Guevara, Juan Ernesto ; Jesus Veiga Carim, Marcelo de; Cárdenas López, Dairon ; Magnusson, William E. ; Wittmann, Florian ; Irume, Mariana Victória ; Martins, Maria Pires ; Silva Guimarães, José Renan da; Molino, Jean François ; Bánki, Olaf S. ; Piedade, Maria Teresa Fernandez ; Pitman, Nigel C.A. ; Mendoza, Abel Monteagudo ; Ramos, José Ferreira ; Luize, Bruno Garcia ; Moraes de Leão Novo, Evlyn Márcia ; Núñez Vargas, Percy ; Silva, Thiago Sanna Freire ; Venticinque, Eduardo Martins ; Manzatto, Angelo Gilberto ; Reis, Neidiane Farias Costa ; Terborgh, John ; Casula, Katia Regina ; Honorio Coronado, Euridice N. ; Montero, Juan Carlos ; Feldpausch, Ted R. ; Duque, Alvaro ; Costa, Flávia R.C. ; Arboleda, Nicolás Castaño ; Schöngart, Jochen ; Killeen, Timothy J. ; Vasquez, Rodolfo ; Mostacedo, Bonifacio ; Demarchi, Layon O. ; Assis, Rafael L. ; Baraloto, Chris ; Engel, Julien ; Petronelli, Pascal ; Castellanos, Hernán ; Medeiros, Marcelo Brilhante de; Quaresma, Adriano ; Simon, Marcelo Fragomeni ; Andrade, Ana ; Camargo, José Luís ; Laurance, Susan G.W. ; Laurance, William F. ; Rincón, Lorena M. ; Schietti, Juliana ; Sousa, Thaiane R. ; Sousa Farias, Emanuelle de; Lopes, Maria Aparecida ; Magalhães, José Leonardo Lima ; Mendonça Nascimento, Henrique Eduardo ; Lima de Queiroz, Helder ; Aymard C, Gerardo A. ; Brienen, Roel ; Revilla, Juan David Cardenas ; Vieira, Ima Célia Guimarães ; Cintra, Bruno Barçante Ladvocat ; Stevenson, Pablo R. ; Feitosa, Yuri Oliveira ; Duivenvoorden, Joost F. ; Mogollón, Hugo F. ; Araujo-Murakami, Alejandro ; Ferreira, Leandro Valle ; Lozada, José Rafael ; Comiskey, James A. ; Toledo, José Julio de; Damasco, Gabriel ; Dávila, Nállarett ; Draper, Freddie ; García-Villacorta, Roosevelt ; Lopes, Aline ; Vicentini, Alberto ; Alonso, Alfonso ; Dallmeier, Francisco ; Gomes, Vitor H.F. ; Lloyd, Jon ; Neill, David ; Aguiar, Daniel Praia Portela de; Arroyo, Luzmila ; Carvalho, Fernanda Antunes ; Souza, Fernanda Coelho de; Amaral, Dário Dantas do; Feeley, Kenneth J. ; Gribel, Rogerio ; Pansonato, Marcelo Petratti ; Barlow, Jos ; Berenguer, Erika ; Ferreira, Joice ; Fine, Paul V.A. ; Guedes, Marcelino Carneiro ; Jimenez, Eliana M. ; Licona, Juan Carlos ; Peñuela Mora, Maria Cristina ; Villa, Boris ; Cerón, Carlos ; Maas, Paul ; Silveira, Marcos ; Stropp, Juliana ; Thomas, Raquel ; Baker, Tim R. ; Daly, Doug ; Dexter, Kyle G. ; Huamantupa-Chuquimaco, Isau ; Milliken, William ; Pennington, Toby ; Ríos Paredes, Marcos ; Fuentes, Alfredo ; Klitgaard, Bente ; Pena, José Luis Marcelo ; Peres, Carlos A. ; Silman, Miles R. ; Tello, J.S. ; Chave, Jerome ; Cornejo Valverde, Fernando ; Fiore, Anthony Di; Hilário, Renato Richard ; Phillips, Juan Fernando ; Rivas-Torres, Gonzalo ; Andel, Tinde R. van; Hildebrand, Patricio von; Noronha, Janaína Costa ; Barbosa, Edelcilio Marques ; Barbosa, Flávia Rodrigues ; Matos Bonates, Luiz Carlos de; Sá Carpanedo, Rainiellen de; Dávila Doza, Hilda Paulette ; Fonty, Émile ; GómeZárate Z, Ricardo ; Gonzales, Therany ; Gallardo Gonzales, George Pepe ; Hoffman, Bruce ; Junqueira, André Braga ; Malhi, Yadvinder ; Andrade Miranda, Ires Paula de; Pinto, Linder Felipe Mozombite ; Prieto, Adriana ; Jesus Rodrigues, Domingos de; Rudas, Agustín ; Ruschel, Ademir R. ; Silva, Natalino ; Vela, César I.A. ; Vos, Vincent Antoine ; Zent, Egleé L. ; Zent, Stanford ; Weiss Albuquerque, Bianca ; Cano, Angela ; Carrero Márquez, Yrma Andreina ; Correa, Diego F. ; Costa, Janaina Barbosa Pedrosa ; Flores, Bernardo Monteiro ; Galbraith, David ; Holmgren, Milena ; Kalamandeen, Michelle ; Nascimento, Marcelo Trindade ; Oliveira, Alexandre A. ; Ramirez-Angulo, Hirma ; Rocha, Maira ; Scudeller, Veridiana Vizoni ; Sierra, Rodrigo ; Tirado, Milton ; Umaña Medina, Maria Natalia ; Heijden, Geertje van der; Vilanova Torre, Emilio ; Vriesendorp, Corine ; Wang, Ophelia ; Young, Kenneth R. ; Ahuite Reategui, Manuel Augusto ; Baider, Cláudia ; Balslev, Henrik ; Cárdenas, Sasha ; Casas, Luisa Fernanda ; Farfan-Rios, William ; Ferreira, Cid ; Linares-Palomino, Reynaldo ; Mendoza, Casimiro ; Mesones, Italo ; Torres-Lezama, Armando ; Giraldo, Ligia Estela Urrego ; Villarroel, Daniel ; Zagt, Roderick ; Alexiades, Miguel N. ; Oliveira, Edmar Almeida de; Garcia-Cabrera, Karina ; Hernandez, Lionel ; Palacios Cuenca, Walter ; Pansini, Susamar ; Pauletto, Daniela ; Ramirez Arevalo, Freddy ; Sampaio, Adeilza Felipe ; Valderrama Sandoval, Elvis H. ; Valenzuela Gamarra, Luis ; Levesley, Aurora ; Pickavance, Georgia ; Melgaço, Karina - \ 2019
Scientific Reports 9 (2019). - ISSN 2045-2322

Tropical forests are known for their high diversity. Yet, forest patches do occur in the tropics where a single tree species is dominant. Such "monodominant" forests are known from all of the main tropical regions. For Amazonia, we sampled the occurrence of monodominance in a massive, basin-wide database of forest-inventory plots from the Amazon Tree Diversity Network (ATDN). Utilizing a simple defining metric of at least half of the trees ≥ 10 cm diameter belonging to one species, we found only a few occurrences of monodominance in Amazonia, and the phenomenon was not significantly linked to previously hypothesized life history traits such wood density, seed mass, ectomycorrhizal associations, or Rhizobium nodulation. In our analysis, coppicing (the formation of sprouts at the base of the tree or on roots) was the only trait significantly linked to monodominance. While at specific locales coppicing or ectomycorrhizal associations may confer a considerable advantage to a tree species and lead to its monodominance, very few species have these traits. Mining of the ATDN dataset suggests that monodominance is quite rare in Amazonia, and may be linked primarily to edaphic factors.

The FAIR Funder pilot programme to make it easy for funders to require and for grantees to produce FAIR Data
Wittenburg, Peter ; Sustkova, Hana Pergl ; Montesanti, Annalisa ; Bloemers, Margreet ; Waard, S.H. de; Musen, Mark A. ; Graybeal, John ; Hettne, Kristina M. ; Jacobsen, Annika ; Pergl, Robert ; Hooft, Rob W.W. ; Staiger, Christine ; Gelder, Celia W.G. van; Knijnenburg, Sebastiaan L. ; Arkel, A.C. van; Meerman, Bert ; Wilkinson, Mark D. ; Sansone, S.A. ; Rocca-Serra, Philippe ; McQuilton, Peter ; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra N. ; Aben, G.J.C. ; Henning, P. ; Menezes Alencar, Maria Simone de; Ribeiro, C. ; Silva, C.R.L. ; Sayao, Luis ; Sales, Luana ; Veiga, Viviane ; Lima, Jefferson ; Dib, Simone ; Xavier dos Santos, Paula dos; Murtinho, R. ; Tendel, Jakob ; Schaap, B.F. ; Brouwer, P.M. ; Gavai, A.K. ; Bouzembrak, Yamine ; Marvin, Hans J.P. ; Mons, Albert ; Kuhn, Tobias ; Gambardella, A.A. ; Miranda Azevedo, Ricardo de; Muhonen, Vesa ; Naald, Mira van der; Smit, N.W. ; Buys, M.J. ; Bruin, Taco F. de; Schoots, Fieke ; Goodson, H.J.E. ; Rzepa, Henry S. ; Jeffery, Keith G. ; Shanahan, Hugh P. ; Axton, M. ; Tkachenko, Veniamin ; Deslattes Maya, Anne ; Meyers, Natalie ; Conlon, Michael ; Haak, Laurel L. ; Schultes, Erik - \ 2019
arXiv - 13 p.
There is a growing acknowledgement in the scientific community of the importance of making experimental data machine findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR). Recognizing that high quality metadata are essential to make datasets FAIR, members of the GO FAIR Initiative and the Research Data Alliance (RDA) have initiated a series of workshops to encourage the creation of Metadata for Machines (M4M), enabling any self-identified stakeholder to define and promote the reuse of standardized, comprehensive machine-actionable metadata. The funders of scientific research recognize that they have an important role to play in ensuring that experimental results are FAIR, and that high quality metadata and careful planning for FAIR data stewardship are central to these goals. We describe the outcome of a recent M4M workshop that has led to a pilot programme involving two national science funders, the Health Research Board of Ireland (HRB) and the Netherlands Organisation for Health Research and Development (ZonMW). These funding organizations will explore new technologies to define at the time that a request for proposals is issued the minimal set of machine-actionable metadata that they would like investigators to use to annotate their datasets, to enable investigators to create such metadata to help make their data FAIR, and to develop data-stewardship plans that ensure that experimental data will be managed appropriately abiding by the FAIR principles. The FAIR Funders design envisions a data-management workflow having seven essential stages, where solution providers are openly invited to participate. The initial pilot programme will launch using existing computer-based tools of those who attended the M4M Workshop.
A framework to assess the resilience of farming systems
Meuwissen, Miranda P.M. ; Feindt, Peter H. ; Spiegel, A. ; Termeer, Catrien J.A.M. ; Mathijs, Erik ; Mey, Yann de; Finger, Robert ; Balmann, Alfons ; Wauters, E. ; Urquhart, J. ; Vigani, M. ; Zawalińska, Katarzyna ; Herrera, Hugo ; Nicholas-Davies, Phillipa ; Hansson, Helena ; Paas, Wim ; Slijper, Thomas ; Coopmans, Isabeau ; Vroege, Willemijn ; Ciechomska, Anna ; Accatino, Francesco ; Kopainsky, Birgit ; Poortvliet, Marijn P. ; Candel, Jeroen J.L. ; Maye, Damian ; Severini, Simone ; Senni, Saverio ; Soriano, Bárbara ; Lagerkvist, Carl Johan ; Peneva, Mariya ; Gavrilescu, Camelia ; Reidsma, Pytrik - \ 2019
Agricultural Systems 176 (2019). - ISSN 0308-521X
Enabling environment - Farming systems - Long-term stresses - Private and public goods - Resilience capacities - Shocks

Agricultural systems in Europe face accumulating economic, ecological and societal challenges, raising concerns about their resilience to shocks and stresses. These resilience issues need to be addressed with a focus on the regional context in which farming systems operate because farms, farmers' organizations, service suppliers and supply chain actors are embedded in local environments and functions of agriculture. We define resilience of a farming system as its ability to ensure the provision of the system functions in the face of increasingly complex and accumulating economic, social, environmental and institutional shocks and stresses, through capacities of robustness, adaptability and transformability. We (i) develop a framework to assess the resilience of farming systems, and (ii) present a methodology to operationalize the framework with a view to Europe's diverse farming systems. The framework is designed to assess resilience to specific challenges (specified resilience) as well as a farming system's capacity to deal with the unknown, uncertainty and surprise (general resilience). The framework provides a heuristic to analyze system properties, challenges (shocks, long-term stresses), indicators to measure the performance of system functions, resilience capacities and resilience-enhancing attributes. Capacities and attributes refer to adaptive cycle processes of agricultural practices, farm demographics, governance and risk management. The novelty of the framework pertains to the focal scale of analysis, i.e. the farming system level, the consideration of accumulating challenges and various agricultural processes, and the consideration that farming systems provide multiple functions that can change over time. Furthermore, the distinction between three resilience capacities (robustness, adaptability, transformability) ensures that the framework goes beyond narrow definitions that limit resilience to robustness. The methodology deploys a mixed-methods approach: quantitative methods, such as statistics, econometrics and modelling, are used to identify underlying patterns, causal explanations and likely contributing factors; while qualitative methods, such as interviews, participatory approaches and stakeholder workshops, access experiential and contextual knowledge and provide more nuanced insights. More specifically, analysis along the framework explores multiple nested levels of farming systems (e.g. farm, farm household, supply chain, farming system) over a time horizon of 1–2 generations, thereby enabling reflection on potential temporal and scalar trade-offs across resilience attributes. The richness of the framework is illustrated for the arable farming system in Veenkoloniën, the Netherlands. The analysis reveals a relatively low capacity of this farming system to transform and farmers feeling distressed about transformation, while other members of their households have experienced many examples of transformation.

Rising rural body-mass index is the main driver of the global obesity epidemic in adults
Bixby, Honor ; Bentham, James ; Zhou, Bin ; Cesare, Mariachiara Di; Paciorek, Christopher J. ; Bennett, James E. ; Taddei, Cristina ; Stevens, Gretchen A. ; Rodriguez-Martinez, Andrea ; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M. ; Khang, Young Ho ; Sorić, Maroje ; Gregg, Edward W. ; Miranda, J.J. ; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A. ; Savin, Stefan ; Sophiea, Marisa K. ; Iurilli, Maria L.C. ; Solomon, Bethlehem D. ; Cowan, Melanie J. ; Riley, Leanne M. ; Danaei, Goodarz ; Bovet, Pascal ; Chirita-Emandi, Adela ; Hambleton, Ian R. ; Hayes, Alison J. ; Ikeda, Nayu ; Kengne, Andre P. ; Laxmaiah, Avula ; Li, Yanping ; McGarvey, Stephen T. ; Mostafa, Aya ; Neovius, Martin ; Starc, Gregor ; Zainuddin, Ahmad A. ; Abarca-Gómez, Leandra ; Abdeen, Ziad A. ; Abdrakhmanova, Shynar ; Abdul Ghaffar, Suhaila ; Abdul Hamid, Zargar ; Abubakar Garba, Jamila ; Ferrieres, Jean ; He, Yuna ; Jacobs, Jeremy M. ; Kromhout, Daan ; Ma, Guansheng ; Visser, Marjolein ; Wang, Qian ; Wang, Ya Xing ; Wang, Ying Wei - \ 2019
Nature 569 (2019)7755. - ISSN 0028-0836 - p. 260 - 264.

Body-mass index (BMI) has increased steadily in most countries in parallel with a rise in the proportion of the population who live in cities 1,2 . This has led to a widely reported view that urbanization is one of the most important drivers of the global rise in obesity 3–6 . Here we use 2,009 population-based studies, with measurements of height and weight in more than 112 million adults, to report national, regional and global trends in mean BMI segregated by place of residence (a rural or urban area) from 1985 to 2017. We show that, contrary to the dominant paradigm, more than 55% of the global rise in mean BMI from 1985 to 2017—and more than 80% in some low- and middle-income regions—was due to increases in BMI in rural areas. This large contribution stems from the fact that, with the exception of women in sub-Saharan Africa, BMI is increasing at the same rate or faster in rural areas than in cities in low- and middle-income regions. These trends have in turn resulted in a closing—and in some countries reversal—of the gap in BMI between urban and rural areas in low- and middle-income countries, especially for women. In high-income and industrialized countries, we noted a persistently higher rural BMI, especially for women. There is an urgent need for an integrated approach to rural nutrition that enhances financial and physical access to healthy foods, to avoid replacing the rural undernutrition disadvantage in poor countries with a more general malnutrition disadvantage that entails excessive consumption of low-quality calories.

Dynamics of archaeal community in soil with application of composted tannery sludge
Miranda, Ana Roberta Lima ; Mendes, Lucas William ; Lemos, Leandro Nascimento ; Antunes, Jadson Emanuel Lopes ; Amorim, Marineide Rodrigues ; Melo, Vania Maria Maciel ; Melo, Wanderley Jose de; Brink, Paul J. van den; Araujo, Ademir Sergio Ferreira - \ 2019
Scientific Reports 9 (2019). - ISSN 2045-2322

Application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) could promote a shift in the structure of soil microbial communities. Although the effect of CTS on bacterial community has been studied, it is unclear how the composition and diversity of archaeal community respond to CTS amendment and which environmental factors drive the community over time. Here, we hypothesize that the Archaea structure and composition respond to CTS amendment over the time. CTS had been previously applied annually along 6 years and this assessment occurred for 180 days following the application in the 7 th year by using different rates (0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 ton ha −1 ). We used amplicon 16S rRNA sequencing to assess the changes in the structure of the archaeal community. Thaumarchaeota and Euryarchaeota were the most abundant phyla found in soils with application of CTS, with Thaumarchaeota dominating the sequences in all samples with relative abundances of >98%. We observed a decreasing trend on the archaeal diversity over the time with increasing CTS application rate, together with an increase in the community similarity. The redundancy analyses (RDA) explained 43% of the total variation in operational taxonomic units and identified Na, pH, Cr and P as the main drivers of the archaeal community over time after application of highest CTS rates. CTS application changes the structure of Archaea community, with significant increase of Thaumarchaeota and Aenigmarchaeota groups, which can be further explored for its biotechnological use in contaminated soils.

Exploring Ecosystem Network Analysis to Balance Resilience and Performance in Sustainable Supply Chain Design
Miranda de Souza, Vitor ; Bloemhof-Ruwaard, J.M. ; Borsato, Milton - \ 2019
International Journal of Advanced Operations Management 11 (2019)1/2. - ISSN 1758-938X - p. 26 - 45.
resilience - ecosystem network analysis - sustainable supply chain - multi-objective programming
Sustainable Supply Chain Design can be performed using optimization strategies for minimizing environmental impacts while maximizing profit. It is not clear how such strategies influence the resilience of a supply chain its ability to cope with disruptions without compromising its function. This research used the Ecosystem Network Analysis (ENA), a model from Ecological Economics, to evaluate the resilience during the design of a sugar beet supply chain. The Ɛ-constraint method was used to solve a multi-objective, mixed-integer linear programming model (MOMILP). Results showed that ENA results are compromised when the strategy of minimizing environmental impacts is used, due to the increased fragility of the configuration, compared with the configuration from the profit maximization strategy. Sensitivity analysis also revealed that, when the number of facilities is increased, ENA results improve while profit is decreased. ENA showed an interesting potential to support the pursuit of balance between resilience and performance, bringing insights during early design stages.
Taxonomy of the order Bunyavirales : second update 2018
Maes, Piet ; Adkins, Scott ; Alkhovsky, Sergey V. ; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana ; Ballinger, Matthew J. ; Bente, Dennis A. ; Beer, Martin ; Bergeron, Éric ; Blair, Carol D. ; Briese, Thomas ; Buchmeier, Michael J. ; Burt, Felicity J. ; Calisher, Charles H. ; Charrel, Rémi N. ; Choi, Il Ryong ; Clegg, J.C.S. ; Torre, Juan Carlos de la; Lamballerie, Xavier de; DeRisi, Joseph L. ; Digiaro, Michele ; Drebot, Mike ; Ebihara, Hideki ; Elbeaino, Toufic ; Ergünay, Koray ; Fulhorst, Charles F. ; Garrison, Aura R. ; Gāo, George Fú ; Gonzalez, Jean Paul J. ; Groschup, Martin H. ; Günther, Stephan ; Haenni, Anne Lise ; Hall, Roy A. ; Hewson, Roger ; Hughes, Holly R. ; Jain, Rakesh K. ; Jonson, Miranda Gilda ; Junglen, Sandra ; Klempa, Boris ; Klingström, Jonas ; Kormelink, Richard ; Lambert, Amy J. ; Langevin, Stanley A. ; Lukashevich, Igor S. ; Marklewitz, Marco ; Martelli, Giovanni P. ; Mielke-Ehret, Nicole ; Mirazimi, Ali ; Mühlbach, Hans Peter ; Naidu, Rayapati ; Zhang, Yong Zhen - \ 2019
Archives of Virology 164 (2019)3. - ISSN 0304-8608 - p. 927 - 941.

In October 2018, the order Bunyavirales was amended by inclusion of the family Arenaviridae, abolishment of three families, creation of three new families, 19 new genera, and 14 new species, and renaming of three genera and 22 species. This article presents the updated taxonomy of the order Bunyavirales as now accepted by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV).

Cyanobacteria dominance drives zooplankton functional dispersion
Josué, Iollanda I.P. ; Cardoso, Simone J. ; Miranda, Marcela ; Mucci, Maíra ; Ger, Kemal Ali ; Roland, Fabio ; Marinho, Marcelo Manzi - \ 2019
Hydrobiologia 831 (2019)1. - ISSN 0018-8158 - p. 149 - 161.
Biodiversity - Eutrophication - Freshwater - Microbial food quality - Plankton

Accelerated eutrophication reduces water quality and shifts plankton communities. However, its effects on the aquatic food web and ecosystem functions remain poorly understood. Within this context, functional ecology can provide valuable links relating community traits to ecosystem functioning. In this study, we assessed the effects of eutrophication and cyanobacteria blooms on zooplankton functional diversity in a tropical hypereutrophic lake. Phytoplankton and zooplankton communities and limnological characteristics of a tropical Brazilian Lake (Southeast, Brazil) were monitored monthly from April 2013 to October 2014. Lake eutrophication indicators were total phosphorus, total chlorophyll-a, and chlorophyll-a per group (blue, green, and brown). The variation of major phytoplankton taxonomic group biomass was calculated and used as a proxy for changes in phytoplankton composition. Zooplankton functional diversity was assessed through functional dispersion and the community-weighted mean trait value. Regressions were performed between the lake eutrophication indicators, the phytoplankton biomass variation, and zooplankton functional dispersion. Our results suggest that eutrophication and cyanobacterial dominance change the composition of zooplankton traits and reduce functional dispersion, leading to zooplankton niche overlap. These findings are important because they provide a meaningful view of phytoplankton-zooplankton trophic interactions and contribute to an improved understanding their functional effects on aquatic ecosystems.

Financial products undermine resilience farming regions
Meuwissen, Miranda - \ 2018
The European Food Safety Authority's risk assessment of vector-borne diseases: An example focusing on the risk of mosquite-borne viruses
Dhollander, S. ; Beltran-Beck, B. ; Bicout, D. ; Czwienczek, E. ; Koeijer, A.A. de; Vos-de Jong, C.J. de; Gogin, A. ; Miguel, Miranda ; Thulke, H.H. ; Stegeman, J. - \ 2018
In: Proceedings of the Annual Scientific Conference and the Annual General Meeting of the European College of Veterinary Public Health, 17-19 October 2018, University of Perugia, Italy. - Perugia : - p. 19 - 19.
Prospects for agricultural insurance in Europe
Meuwissen, Miranda ; Mey, Y. de; Asseldonk, M.A.P.M. van - \ 2018
Agricultural Finance Review 78 (2018)2. - ISSN 0002-1466 - p. 174 - 182.
BeechCOSTe52 Database
Robson, Matthew T. ; Garzón, Marta Benito ; Miranda, Ricardo Alia ; Bogdan, Saša ; Borovics, Attila ; Božič, Gregor ; Brendel, Oliver ; Clark, Jo ; Vries, S.M.G. de - \ 2018
University of Helsinki
genetic trial - European beech - tree height - leaf phenology - mortality - provenance test
The BeechCOSTe52 includes phenotypic trait measurements from individual trees measured in an international network of provenance tests compiled by the COST Action E52 (2006 – 2010). It comprises 39 trial sites and 217 provenances covering the distribution of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). The BeechCOSTe52 database provides individual tree phenotypic measurements of height, diameter at breast height, basal diameter, mortality, spring and autumn leaf phenology.
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