Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Records 1 - 20 / 73

  • help
  • print

    Print search results

  • export

    Export search results

  • alert
    We will mail you new results for this query: q=Mishra
Check title to add to marked list
Total Fermented Dairy Food Intake Is Inversely Associated with Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Women
Buziau, Amée M. ; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S. ; Geleijnse, Johanna M. ; Mishra, Gita D. - \ 2019
The Journal of Nutrition 149 (2019)10. - ISSN 0022-3166 - p. 1797 - 1804.
Australia - cardiovascular disease - cheese - coronary heart disease - dairy - fermented dairy - stroke - type 2 diabetes mellitus - women's health - yogurt

BACKGROUND: The relation between fermented dairy consumption and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in an Australian population remains to be established. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the association between fermented dairy consumption and T2DM and CVD risk. METHODS: The Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health included Australian women (aged 45-50 y) at baseline in 2001, who were followed up through 5 surveys until 2016. Dietary intake was assessed through the use of a validated 101-item FFQ at baseline. Main study outcomes were self-reported physician-diagnosed T2DM and CVD. Logistic regression models adjusted for sociodemographic and lifestyle factors were used to estimate the association between dairy intake and T2DM and CVD risk. RESULTS: Of 7633 women free of diabetes at baseline, 701 (9.2%) developed T2DM during a maximum 15-y follow-up period. Women in the highest tertile of yogurt intake had lower adjusted odds of T2DM than those in the lowest tertile (OR: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.67, 0.99; P = 0.041). This relation became nonsignificant after adjustment for dietary variables and total energy intake (OR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.71, 1.08; P = 0.21). Of 7679 women free of CVD at baseline, 835 (10.9%) cases of CVD were reported during follow-up. High intake of yogurt and total fermented dairy was associated with lower CVD risk (OR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.00; P = 0.05, 0.80; 0.67, 0.96; 0.017, respectively) than observed in the lowest tertile of dairy product intake. Additional adjustment attenuated the relation (OR: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.72, 1.04; P = 0.13, 0.83; 0.69, 1.00; 0.048, for yogurt and total fermented dairy, respectively). No associations were found with other dairy groups. CONCLUSION: The findings from this population-based study of Australian women suggest an inverse association between total fermented dairy intake and CVD risk, which may partly be accounted for by other dietary components.

Interim findings Civil society advocacy collaborations in India
Wessel, M.G.J. van; Balasubramanian, Rajeshwari ; Naz, Farhat ; Mishra, Yogesh ; Katyaini, Superana ; Sahoo, Sarbeswar ; Syal, Reetika ; Manchanda, Rita ; Deo, Nandini - \ 2019
Leiden : INCLUDE, knowledge platform on inclusive development policies - 3 p.
Discovery of Salmonella trehalose phospholipids reveals functional convergence with mycobacteria
Reinink, Peter ; Buter, Jeffrey ; Mishra, Vivek K. ; Ishikawa, Eri ; Cheng, Tan Yun ; Willemsen, Peter T.J. ; Porwollik, Steffen ; Brennan, Patrick J. ; Heinz, Eva ; Mayfield, Jacob A. ; Dougan, Gordon ; Els, Cécile A. van; Cerundolo, Vincenzo ; Napolitani, Giorgio ; Yamasaki, Sho ; Minnaard, Adriaan J. ; McClelland, Michael ; Moody, D.B. ; Rhijn, Ildiko Van - \ 2019
Journal of Experimental Medicine 216 (2019)4. - ISSN 0022-1007 - p. 757 - 771.

Salmonella species are among the world's most prevalent pathogens. Because the cell wall interfaces with the host, we designed a lipidomics approach to reveal pathogen-specific cell wall compounds. Among the molecules differentially expressed between Salmonella Paratyphi and S. Typhi, we focused on lipids that are enriched in S. Typhi, because it causes typhoid fever. We discovered a previously unknown family of trehalose phospholipids, 6,6'-diphosphatidyltrehalose (diPT) and 6-phosphatidyltrehalose (PT). Cardiolipin synthase B (ClsB) is essential for PT and diPT but not for cardiolipin biosynthesis. Chemotyping outperformed clsB homology analysis in evaluating synthesis of diPT. DiPT is restricted to a subset of Gram-negative bacteria: large amounts are produced by S. Typhi, lower amounts by other pathogens, and variable amounts by Escherichia coli strains. DiPT activates Mincle, a macrophage activating receptor that also recognizes mycobacterial cord factor (6,6'-trehalose dimycolate). Thus, Gram-negative bacteria show convergent function with mycobacteria. Overall, we discovered a previously unknown immunostimulant that is selectively expressed among medically important bacterial species.

Pre-pregnancy dietary micronutrient adequacy is associated with lower risk of developing gestational diabetes in Australian women
Looman, Moniek ; Schoenaker, Danielle A.J.M. ; Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S. ; Mishra, Gita D. ; Geelen, Anouk ; Feskens, Edith J.M. - \ 2019
Nutrition Research 62 (2019). - ISSN 0271-5317 - p. 32 - 40.
Diet - Gestational diabetes - Human - Micronutrient - Pregnant

Evidence on pre-pregnancy dietary micronutrient intake in relation to gestational diabetes (GDM) development is limited. Therefore, we examined the prevalence of inadequate micronutrient intake before pregnancy and the association between pre-pregnancy dietary micronutrient adequacy, i.e. meeting micronutrient intake recommendations for a range of micronutrients, and risk of developing GDM in an Australian population. We hypothesized that women with an overall higher micronutrient adequacy would have a lower risk of developing GDM. We used data from the prospective Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health cohort, in which 3607 women, aged 25–30 years at baseline in 2003 and without diabetes, were followed-up until 2015. Diet was assessed with a validated 101-item food frequency questionnaire. The Micronutrient Adequacy Ratio (MAR) was calculated as the micronutrient intake divided by its recommended dietary intake averaged over 13 micronutrients. Multivariable regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). In 6263 pregnancies, 285 cases of GDM were documented (4.6%). High prevalences of inadequate dietary micronutrient intake were observed for calcium (47.9%), folate (80.8%), magnesium (52.5%), potassium (63.8%) and vitamin E (78.6%), indicating suboptimal pre-pregnancy micronutrient intakes. Inadequate intakes of individual micronutrients were not associated with risk of developing GDM. However, women in the highest quartile of the MAR had a 39% lower risk of developing GDM compared to women in the lowest quartile (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.43–0.86, p for trend 0.01). These results highlight the importance of adequate pre-pregnancy micronutrient intake.

Gene expression polymorphism underpins evasion of host immunity in an asexual lineage of the Irish potato famine pathogen
Pais, Marina ; Yoshida, Kentaro ; Giannakopoulou, Artemis ; Pel, M. ; Cano, Liliana M. ; Oliva, Ricardo F. ; Witek, Kamil ; Lindqvist-Kreuze, Hannele ; Vleeshouwers, V.G.A.A. ; Kamoun, Sophien - \ 2018
asexual reproduction - clonal lineage - Phytophthora infestans - emergent pathogen - evolution - immunity - phenotypic plasticity - expression polymorphism - structural variation - copy number variation - loss of heterozygosity
Background Outbreaks caused by asexual lineages of fungal and oomycete pathogens are a continuing threat to crops, wild animals and natural ecosystems (Fisher MC, Henk DA, Briggs CJ, Brownstein JS, Madoff LC, McCraw SL, Gurr SJ, Nature 484:186–194, 2012; Kupferschmidt K, Science 337:636–638, 2012). However, the mechanisms underlying genome evolution and phenotypic plasticity in asexual eukaryotic microbes remain poorly understood (Seidl MF, Thomma BP, BioEssays 36:335–345, 2014). Ever since the 19th century Irish famine, the oomycete Phytophthora infestans has caused recurrent outbreaks on potato and tomato crops that have been primarily caused by the successive rise and migration of pandemic asexual lineages (Goodwin SB, Cohen BA, Fry WE, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 91:11591–11595, 1994; Yoshida K, Burbano HA, Krause J, Thines M, Weigel D, Kamoun S, PLoS Pathog 10:e1004028, 2014; Yoshida K, Schuenemann VJ, Cano LM, Pais M, Mishra B, Sharma R, Lanz C, Martin FN, Kamoun S, Krause J, et al. eLife 2:e00731, 2013; Cooke DEL, Cano LM, Raffaele S, Bain RA, Cooke LR, Etherington GJ, Deahl KL, Farrer RA, Gilroy EM, Goss EM, et al. PLoS Pathog 8:e1002940, 2012). However, the dynamics of genome evolution within these clonal lineages have not been determined. The objective of this study was to use a comparative genomics and transcriptomics approach to determine the molecular mechanisms that underpin phenotypic variation within a clonal lineage of P. infestans. Results Here, we reveal patterns of genomic and gene expression variation within a P. infestans asexual lineage by comparing strains belonging to the South American EC-1 clone that has dominated Andean populations since the 1990s (Yoshida K, Burbano HA, Krause J, Thines M, Weigel D, Kamoun S, PLoS Pathog 10e1004028, 2014; Yoshida K, Schuenemann VJ, Cano LM, Pais M, Mishra B, Sharma R, Lanz C, Martin FN, Kamoun S, Krause J, et al. eLife 2:e00731, 2013; Delgado RA, Monteros-Altamirano AR, Li Y, Visser RGF, van der Lee TAJ, Vosman B, Plant Pathol 62:1081–1088, 2013; Forbes GA, Escobar XC, Ayala CC, Revelo J, Ordonez ME, Fry BA, Doucett K, Fry WE, Phytopathology 87:375–380, 1997; Oyarzun PJ, Pozo A, Ordonez ME, Doucett K, Forbes GA, Phytopathology 88:265–271, 1998). We detected numerous examples of structural variation, nucleotide polymorphisms and loss of heterozygosity within the EC-1 clone. Remarkably, 17 genes are not expressed in one of the two EC-1 isolates despite apparent absence of sequence polymorphisms. Among these, silencing of an effector gene was associated with evasion of disease resistance conferred by a potato immune receptor. Conclusions Our findings highlight the molecular changes underpinning the exceptional genetic and phenotypic plasticity associated with host adaptation in a pandemic clonal lineage of a eukaryotic plant pathogen. We observed that the asexual P. infestans lineage EC-1 can exhibit phenotypic plasticity in the absence of apparent genetic mutations resulting in virulence on a potato carrying the Rpi-vnt1.1 gene. Such variant alleles may be epialleles that arose through epigenetic changes in the underlying genes.
Navigating possibilities of collaboration : How representative roles of diverse CSOs take shape: a literature review
Wessel, M.G.J. van; Rajeswari, S. ; Naz, Farhat ; Mishra, Yogesh ; Katyaini, Suparana ; Sahoo, Sarbeswar ; Syal, Reetika ; Deo, Nandini - \ 2018
Wageningen/Delhi : Wageningen University & Research - 90 p.
Gene expression polymorphism underpins evasion of host immunity in an asexual lineage of the Irish potato famine pathogen
Pais, Marina ; Yoshida, Kentaro ; Giannakopoulou, Artemis ; Pel, Mathieu A. ; Cano, Liliana M. ; Oliva, Ricardo F. ; Witek, Kamil ; Lindqvist-Kreuze, Hannele ; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G.A.A. ; Kamoun, Sophien - \ 2018
BMC Evolutionary Biology 18 (2018)1. - ISSN 1471-2148
Asexual reproduction - Clonal lineage - Copy number variation - Emergent pathogen - Evolution - Expression polymorphism - Immunity - Loss of heterozygosity - Phenotypic plasticity - Phytophthora infestans - Structural variation

Background: Outbreaks caused by asexual lineages of fungal and oomycete pathogens are a continuing threat to crops, wild animals and natural ecosystems (Fisher MC, Henk DA, Briggs CJ, Brownstein JS, Madoff LC, McCraw SL, Gurr SJ, Nature 484:186-194, 2012; Kupferschmidt K, Science 337:636-638, 2012). However, the mechanisms underlying genome evolution and phenotypic plasticity in asexual eukaryotic microbes remain poorly understood (Seidl MF, Thomma BP, BioEssays 36:335-345, 2014). Ever since the 19th century Irish famine, the oomycete Phytophthora infestans has caused recurrent outbreaks on potato and tomato crops that have been primarily caused by the successive rise and migration of pandemic asexual lineages (Goodwin SB, Cohen BA, Fry WE, Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 91:11591-11595, 1994; Yoshida K, Burbano HA, Krause J, Thines M, Weigel D, Kamoun S, PLoS Pathog 10:e1004028, 2014; Yoshida K, Schuenemann VJ, Cano LM, Pais M, Mishra B, Sharma R, Lanz C, Martin FN, Kamoun S, Krause J, et al. eLife 2:e00731, 2013; Cooke DEL, Cano LM, Raffaele S, Bain RA, Cooke LR, Etherington GJ, Deahl KL, Farrer RA, Gilroy EM, Goss EM, et al. PLoS Pathog 8:e1002940, 2012). However, the dynamics of genome evolution within these clonal lineages have not been determined. The objective of this study was to use a comparative genomics and transcriptomics approach to determine the molecular mechanisms that underpin phenotypic variation within a clonal lineage of P. infestans. Results: Here, we reveal patterns of genomic and gene expression variation within a P. infestans asexual lineage by comparing strains belonging to the South American EC-1 clone that has dominated Andean populations since the 1990s (Yoshida K, Burbano HA, Krause J, Thines M, Weigel D, Kamoun S, PLoS Pathog 10e1004028, 2014; Yoshida K, Schuenemann VJ, Cano LM, Pais M, Mishra B, Sharma R, Lanz C, Martin FN, Kamoun S, Krause J, et al. eLife 2:e00731, 2013; Delgado RA, Monteros-Altamirano AR, Li Y, Visser RGF, van der Lee TAJ, Vosman B, Plant Pathol 62:1081-1088, 2013; Forbes GA, Escobar XC, Ayala CC, Revelo J, Ordonez ME, Fry BA, Doucett K, Fry WE, Phytopathology 87:375-380, 1997; Oyarzun PJ, Pozo A, Ordonez ME, Doucett K, Forbes GA, Phytopathology 88:265-271, 1998). We detected numerous examples of structural variation, nucleotide polymorphisms and loss of heterozygosity within the EC-1 clone. Remarkably, 17 genes are not expressed in one of the two EC-1 isolates despite apparent absence of sequence polymorphisms. Among these, silencing of an effector gene was associated with evasion of disease resistance conferred by a potato immune receptor. Conclusions: Our findings highlight the molecular changes underpinning the exceptional genetic and phenotypic plasticity associated with host adaptation in a pandemic clonal lineage of a eukaryotic plant pathogen. We observed that the asexual P. infestans lineage EC-1 can exhibit phenotypic plasticity in the absence of apparent genetic mutations resulting in virulence on a potato carrying the Rpi-vnt1.1 gene. Such variant alleles may be epialleles that arose through epigenetic changes in the underlying genes.

From the core to the periphery : Conflicts and cooperation over land and water in periurban Gurgaon, India
Vij, Sumit ; Narain, Vishal ; Karpouzoglou, Timothy ; Mishra, Patik - \ 2018
Land Use Policy 76 (2018). - ISSN 0264-8377 - p. 382 - 390.
Conflicts and cooperation - Gurgaon - India - Periurban - Urban political ecology

Recent studies that emphasize the contested nature of resource allocation address the politics of periurban development. However, the issue of conflicts and cooperation in periurban contexts continues to remain weakly studied. Based on the study of periurban Gurgaon in North-West India, this paper unravels the different types of conflicts and cooperation that have emerged around land and water, drawing insights from conflict/cooperation studies and urban political ecology. We focus on how changes in land-use bring about changes in water use, access and practices in periurban Gurgaon, giving rise to new forms of conflicts, conflicts of interest and cooperation. Conflicts over land and water are linked to the changing characteristics of land and water appropriation that has occurred in the aftermath of neoliberal reforms. Drawing insights from urban political ecolog perspective, we show how periurban areas are systematically undermined through the acquisition of land and water to serve urban expansion and growth. We conclude that periurban conflicts are rooted in the issue of land-use change and are fundamentally tied to the politics of urbanization and its impact on periurban areas. These processes give rise to conflicts of interest and explicit conflicts, whilst creating new forms of cooperation. Cooperation is exemplified by emerging forms of collective action over the use of wastewater and groundwater. The paper distinguishes between conflict and cooperation but concludes that these are in fact not mutually exclusive; rather points along a continuum.

Pre-pregnancy dietary carbohydrate quantity and quality, and risk of developing gestational diabetes: the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health
Looman, M. ; Schoenaker, D.A.J.M. ; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S. ; Geelen, M.M.E.E. ; Feskens, E.J.M. ; Mishra, G.D. - \ 2018
The British journal of nutrition 120 (2018)4. - ISSN 0007-1145 - p. 435 - 444.
Carbohydrate quantity and quality affect postprandial glucose response, glucose metabolism and risk of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to examine the association of pre-pregnancy dietary carbohydrate quantity and quality with the risk of developing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We used data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health that included 3607 women aged 25–30 years without diabetes who were followed up between 2003 and 2015. We examined carbohydrate quantity (total carbohydrate intake and a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) score) and carbohydrate subtypes indicating quality (fibre, total sugar intake, glycaemic index, glycaemic load and intake of carbohydrate-rich food groups). Relative risks (RR) for development of GDM were estimated using multivariable regression models with generalised estimating equations. During 12 years of follow-up, 285 cases of GDM were documented in 6263 pregnancies (4·6 %). The LCD score, reflecting relatively high fat and protein intake and low carbohydrate intake, was positively associated with GDM risk (RR 1·54; 95 % CI 1·10, 2·15), highest quartile v. lowest quartile). Women in the quartile with highest fibre intake had a 33 % lower risk of GDM (RR 0·67; 95 % CI 0·45, 0·96)). Higher intakes of fruit (0·95 per 50 g/d; 95 % CI 0·90, 0·99) and fruit juice (0·89 per 100 g/d; 95 % CI 0·80, 1·00)) were inversely associated with GDM, whereas cereal intake was associated with a higher risk of GDM (RR 1·05 per 20 g/d; 95 % CI 1·01, 1·07)). Thus, a relatively low carbohydrate and high fat and protein intake may increase the risk of GDM, whereas higher fibre intake could decrease the risk of GDM. It is especially important to take the source of carbohydrates into account.
Empirical analysis of change metrics for software fault prediction
Choudhary, Garvit Rajesh ; Kumar, Sandeep ; Kumar, Kuldeep ; Mishra, Alok ; Catal, Cagatay - \ 2018
Computers and Electrical Engineering 67 (2018). - ISSN 0045-7906 - p. 15 - 24.
Change log - Defect prediction - Eclipse - Metrics - Software fault prediction - Software quality
A quality assurance activity, known as software fault prediction, can reduce development costs and improve software quality. The objective of this study is to investigate change metrics in conjunction with code metrics to improve the performance of fault prediction models. Experimental studies are performed on different versions of Eclipse projects and change metrics are extracted from the GIT repositories. In addition to the existing change metrics, several new change metrics are defined and collected from the Eclipse project repository. Machine learning algorithms are applied in conjunction with the change and source code metrics to build fault prediction models. The classification model with new change metrics performs better than the models using existing change metrics. In this work, the experimental results demonstrate that change metrics have a positive impact on the performance of fault prediction models, and high-performance models can be built with several change metrics.
Land markets in Europe : Institutions and market outcomes
Ciaian, P. ; Kancs, D.A. ; Drabik, D. - \ 2018
In: Public Policy in Agriculture / Mishra, Ashok K., Viaggi, Davide, Gomez y Paloma, Sergio, New York : Routledge Taylor & Francis Group (Routledge Studies in Agricultural Economics ) - ISBN 9781138652125 - p. 232 - 259.
Global, regional, and national burden of neurological disorders during 1990–2015: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2015
Feigin, V.L. ; Krishnamurthi, R.V. ; Theadom, A.M. ; Abajobir, A.A. ; Mishra, S.R. ; Ahmed, M.B. ; Abate, K.H. ; Mengistie, M.A. ; Wakayo, T. ; Abd-Allah, F. ; Abdulle, A.M. ; Abera, S.F. ; Mohammed, K.E. ; Abyu, G.Y. ; Asgedom, S.W. ; Atey, T.M. ; Betsu, B.D. ; Mezgebe, H.B. ; Tuem, K.B. ; Woldu, M.A. ; Aichour, A.N. ; Aichour, I. ; Aichour, M.T. ; Akinyemi, R.O. ; Alabed, S. ; Al-Raddadi, R. ; Alvis-Guzman, N. ; Amare, A.T. ; Ansari, H. ; Anwari, P. ; Ärnlöv, J. ; Fereshtehnejad, S. ; Weiderpass, E. ; Havmoeller, R. ; Asayesh, H. ; Avila-Burgos, L. ; Avokpaho, E.F.G.A. ; Afrique, L.E.R.A.S. ; Azarpazhooh, M.R. ; Barac, A. ; Barboza, M. ; Barker-Collo, S.L. ; Bärnighausen, T. ; Farvid, M.S. ; Mohammed, S. ; Bedi, N. ; Beghi, E. ; Giussani, G. ; Bennett, D.A. ; Hay, S.I. ; Goulart, A.C. ; Santos, I.S. ; Bensenor, I.M. ; Lotufo, P.A. ; Berhane, A. ; Jeemon, P. ; Bhaumik, S. ; Dandona, L. ; Dandona, R. ; Kumar, G.A. ; Birlik, S.M. ; Biryukov, S. ; Casey, D. ; Foreman, K.J. ; Goldberg, E.M. ; Khalil, I.A. ; Kyu, H.H. ; Manhertz, T. ; Mokdad, A.H. ; Naghavi, M. ; Nguyen, G. ; Nichols, E. ; Smith, M. ; Carabin, H. ; Roth, G.A. ; Stanaway, J.D. ; Vos, T. ; Ellenbogen, R.G. ; Jakovljevic, M.B. ; Tirschwell, D.L. ; Zunt, J.R. ; Boneya, D.J. ; Hambisa, M. ; Bulto, L.N.B. ; Carabin, H. ; Castañeda-Orjuela, C.A. ; Catalá-López, F. ; Tabarés-Seisdedos, R. ; Chen, H. ; Chitheer, A.A. ; Chowdhury, R. ; Christensen, H. ; Deveber, G.A. ; Dharmaratne, S.D. ; Do, H.P. ; Nguyen, C.T. ; Nguyen, Q.L. ; Nguyen, T.H. ; Nong, V.M. ; Sheth, K.N. ; Dorsey, E.R. ; Eskandarieh, S. ; Fischer, F. ; Majeed, A. ; Steiner, T.J. ; Rawaf, S. ; Shakir, R. ; Shoman, H. ; Geleijnse, J.M. ; Gillum, R.F. ; Gona, P.N. ; Gugnani, H.C. ; Gupta, R. ; Hachinski, V. ; Hamadeh, R.R. ; Hankey, G.J. ; Hareri, H.A. ; Heydarpour, P. ; Sahraian, M.A. ; Kasaeian, A. ; Malekzadeh, R. ; Roshandel, G. ; Sepanlou, S.G. ; Hotez, P.J. ; Javanbakht, M. ; Jonas, J.B. ; Kalkonde, Y. ; Kandel, A. ; Karch, A. ; Kastor, A. ; Rahman, M.H.U. ; Keiyoro, P.N. ; Khader, Y.S. ; Khan, E.A. ; Khang, Y. ; Khoja, A.T.A. ; Tran, B.X. ; Khubchandani, J. ; Kim, D. ; Kim, Y.J. ; Kivimaki, M. ; Kokubo, Y. ; Kosen, S. ; Kravchenko, M. ; Piradov, M.A. ; Varakin, Y.Y. ; Defo, B.K. ; Kulkarni, C. ; Kumar, R. ; Larsson, A. ; Lavados, P.M. ; Li, Y. ; Liang, X. ; Liben, M.L. ; Lo, W.D. ; Logroscino, G. ; Loy, C.T. ; Mackay, M.T. ; Meretoja, A. ; Szoeke, C.E.I. ; Abd El Razek, H.M. ; Mantovani, L.G. ; Massano, J. ; Mazidi, M. ; McAlinden, C. ; Mehata, S. ; Mehndiratta, M.M. ; Memish, Z.A. ; Mendoza, W. ; Mensah, G.A. ; Wijeratne, T. ; Miller, T.R. ; Mohamed Ibrahim, N. ; Mohammadi, A. ; Moradi-Lakeh, M. ; Velasquez, I.M. ; Musa, K.I. ; Ngunjiri, J.W. ; Ningrum, D.N.A. ; Norrving, B. ; Stein, D.J. ; Noubiap, J.J.N. ; Ogbo, F.A. ; Renzaho, A.M.N. ; Owolabi, M.O. ; Pandian, J.D. ; Parmar, P.G. ; Pereira, D.M. ; Petzold, M. ; Phillips, M.R. ; Poulton, R.G. ; Pourmalek, F. ; Qorbani, M. ; Rafay, A. ; Rai, R.K. ; Rajsic, S. ; Ranta, A. ; Rezai, M.S. ; Rubagotti, E. ; Sachdev, P. ; Safiri, S. ; Sahathevan, R. ; Samy, A.M. ; Santalucia, P. ; Sartorius, B. ; Satpathy, M. ; Sawhney, M. ; Saylan, M.I. ; Shaikh, M.A. ; Shamsizadeh, M. ; Sheth, K.N. ; Shigematsu, M. ; Silva, D.A.S. ; Sobngwi, E. ; Sposato, L.A. ; Stovner, L.J. ; Suliankatchi Abdulkader, R. ; Tanne, D. ; Thrift, A.G. ; Topor-Madry, R. ; Truelsen, T. ; Ukwaja, K.N. ; Uthman, O.A. ; Yonemoto, N. ; Venketasubramanian, N. ; Vlassov, V.V. ; Wadilo, F. ; Wallin, M.T. ; Westerman, R. ; Wiysonge, C.S. ; Wolfe, C.D. ; Xavier, D. ; Xu, G. ; Yano, Y. ; Yimam, H.H. ; Yonemoto, N. ; Yu, C. ; Zaidi, Z. ; Zaki, M.E. - \ 2017
The Lancet Neurology 16 (2017)11. - ISSN 1474-4422 - p. 877 - 897.

Background Comparable data on the global and country-specific burden of neurological disorders and their trends are crucial for health-care planning and resource allocation. The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors (GBD) Study provides such information but does not routinely aggregate results that are of interest to clinicians specialising in neurological conditions. In this systematic analysis, we quantified the global disease burden due to neurological disorders in 2015 and its relationship with country development level. Methods We estimated global and country-specific prevalence, mortality, disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs), years of life lost (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) for various neurological disorders that in the GBD classification have been previously spread across multiple disease groupings. The more inclusive grouping of neurological disorders included stroke, meningitis, encephalitis, tetanus, Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, motor neuron disease, migraine, tension-type headache, medication overuse headache, brain and nervous system cancers, and a residual category of other neurological disorders. We also analysed results based on the Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a compound measure of income per capita, education, and fertility, to identify patterns associated with development and how countries fare against expected outcomes relative to their level of development. Findings Neurological disorders ranked as the leading cause group of DALYs in 2015 (250·7 [95% uncertainty interval (UI) 229·1 to 274·7] million, comprising 10·2% of global DALYs) and the second-leading cause group of deaths (9·4 [9·1 to 9·7] million], comprising 16·8% of global deaths). The most prevalent neurological disorders were tension-type headache (1505·9 [UI 1337·3 to 1681·6 million cases]), migraine (958·8 [872·1 to 1055·6] million), medication overuse headache (58·5 [50·8 to 67·4 million]), and Alzheimer's disease and other dementias (46·0 [40·2 to 52·7 million]). Between 1990 and 2015, the number of deaths from neurological disorders increased by 36·7%, and the number of DALYs by 7·4%. These increases occurred despite decreases in age-standardised rates of death and DALYs of 26·1% and 29·7%, respectively; stroke and communicable neurological disorders were responsible for most of these decreases. Communicable neurological disorders were the largest cause of DALYs in countries with low SDI. Stroke rates were highest at middle levels of SDI and lowest at the highest SDI. Most of the changes in DALY rates of neurological disorders with development were driven by changes in YLLs. Interpretation Neurological disorders are an important cause of disability and death worldwide. Globally, the burden of neurological disorders has increased substantially over the past 25 years because of expanding population numbers and ageing, despite substantial decreases in mortality rates from stroke and communicable neurological disorders. The number of patients who will need care by clinicians with expertise in neurological conditions will continue to grow in coming decades. Policy makers and health-care providers should be aware of these trends to provide adequate services. Funding Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Pedotransfer Functions in Earth System Science : Challenges and Perspectives
Looy, Kris Van; Bouma, Johan ; Herbst, Michael ; Koestel, John ; Minasny, Budiman ; Mishra, Umakant ; Montzka, Carsten ; Nemes, Attila ; Pachepsky, Yakov A. ; Padarian, José ; Schaap, Marcel G. ; Tóth, Brigitta ; Verhoef, Anne ; Vanderborght, Jan ; Ploeg, Martine J. van der; Weihermüller, Lutz ; Zacharias, Steffen ; Zhang, Yonggen ; Vereecken, Harry - \ 2017
Reviews of Geophysics 55 (2017)4. - ISSN 8755-1209 - p. 1199 - 1256.
Biogeochemical processes - Extrapolation - Heat flow - Hydraulic properties - Land surface model - Soil properties
Soil, through its various functions, plays a vital role in the Earth's ecosystems and provides multiple ecosystem services to humanity. Pedotransfer functions (PTFs) are simple to complex knowledge rules that relate available soil information to soil properties and variables that are needed to parameterize soil processes. In this paper, we review the existing PTFs and document the new generation of PTFs developed in the different disciplines of Earth system science. To meet the methodological challenges for a successful application in Earth system modeling, we emphasize that PTF development has to go hand in hand with suitable extrapolation and upscaling techniques such that the PTFs correctly represent the spatial heterogeneity of soils. PTFs should encompass the variability of the estimated soil property or process, in such a way that the estimation of parameters allows for validation and can also confidently provide for extrapolation and upscaling purposes capturing the spatial variation in soils. Most actively pursued recent developments are related to parameterizations of solute transport, heat exchange, soil respiration, and organic carbon content, root density, and vegetation water uptake. Further challenges are to be addressed in parameterization of soil erosivity and land use change impacts at multiple scales. We argue that a comprehensive set of PTFs can be applied throughout a wide range of disciplines of Earth system science, with emphasis on land surface models. Novel sensing techniques provide a true breakthrough for this, yet further improvements are necessary for methods to deal with uncertainty and to validate applications at global scale.
Emerging Trends in Competence-Based Extension Education Science
Mulder, M. - \ 2016
In: International Extension Education Conference on Education, Research and Services. - Varanasi : Banaras Hindu University - 7 p.
Fungal root endophytes of tomato from Kenya and their nematode biocontrol potential
Bogner, C.W. ; Kariuki, George M. ; Elashry, A. ; Sichtermann, Gisela ; Buch, Ann-Katrin ; Mishra, Bagdevi ; Thines, M. ; Grundler, F.M.W. ; Schouten, A. - \ 2016
Mycological Progress 15 (2016). - ISSN 1617-416X
The significance of fungal endophytes in African agriculture, particularly Kenya, has not been well investigated. Therefore, the objective of the present work was isolation, multi-gene phylogenetic characterization and biocontrol assessment of endophytic fungi harbored in tomato roots for nematode infection management. A survey was conducted in five different counties along the central and coastal regions of Kenya to determine the culturable endophytic mycobiota. A total of 76 fungal isolates were obtained and characterized into 40 operational taxonomic units based on the analysis of ITS, β-tubulin and tef1α gene sequence data. Among the fungal isolates recovered, the most prevalent species associated with tomato roots were members of the Fusarium oxysporum and F. solani species complexes. Of the three genes utilized for endophyte characterization, tef1α provided the best resolution. A combination of ITS, β-tubulin and tef1α resulted in a better resolution as compared to single gene analysis. Biotests demonstrated the ability of selected non-pathogenic fungal isolates to successfully reduce nematode penetration and subsequent galling as well as reproduction of the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Most Trichoderma asperellum and F. oxysporum species complex isolates reduced root-knot nematode egg densities by 35–46 % as compared to the non-fungal control and other isolates. This study provides first insights into the culturable endophytic mycobiota of tomato roots in Kenya and the potential of some isolates for use against the root-knot nematode M. incognita. The data can serve as a framework for fingerprinting potential beneficial endophytic fungal isolates which are optimized for abiotic and biotic environments and are useful in biocontrol strategies against nematode pests in Kenyan tomato cultivars. This information would therefore provide an alternative or complementary crop protection component.
Livestock Husbandry and Snow Leopard Conservation
Mohammad, Ghulam ; Mostafawi, Sayed Naqibullah ; Dadul, Jigmet ; Rosen, Tatjana ; Mishra, Charudutt ; Bhatnagar, Yash Veer ; Trivedi, Pranav ; Timbadia, Radhika ; Bijoor, Ajay ; Murali, Ranjini ; Sonam, Karma ; Thinley, Tanzin ; Namgail, Tsewang ; Prins, Herbert H.T. ; Nawaz, Muhammad Ali ; Ud Din, Jaffar ; Buzdar, Hafeez - \ 2016
In: Snow Leopards: Biodiversity of the World: Conservation from Genes to Landscapes / McCarthy, Thomas, Mallon, David, Nyhus, Philip J., Elsevier Inc. Academic Press - ISBN 9780128024966 - p. 179 - 195.
Capra ibex - Competition - Conflict mitigation - Depredation - Livestock vaccination - Local communities - Ovis - Predator-proof corral - Pseudois nayaur - Retaliatory killing

Livestock depredation is a key source of snow leopard mortality across much of the species' range. Snow leopards break into livestock corrals, killing many domestic animals and thereby inflicting substantial economic damage. Locals may retaliate by killing the cat and selling its parts. Predator-proofing of corrals has emerged as an important conflict-mitigation tool across many snow leopard range countries, including Afghanistan, India, Pakistan, and Tajikistan. Decline in wild ungulate populations due to competition from livestock is another threat to snow leopards. Village reserves are grazing set-asides created in partnership with local communities to enable the recovery of wild ungulate populations. A case study in India is applicable to additional range countries. In Pakistan, the Ecosystem Health Program enhances community tolerance toward snow leopards by establishing sustainable, community-managed livestock vaccination programs that improve community livelihoods. Program sites record at least 50% reduction in disease-caused mortalities that resulted in no killing of snow leopards.

Quantifying the mediating effect of body mass index in the relationship between a Mediterranean diet and development of maternal pregnancy complications: Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health
Schoenaker, D.A.J.M. ; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S. ; Mishra, G.D. - \ 2016
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 104 (2016)3. - ISSN 0002-9165 - p. 638 - 645.
Mediterranean diet - body mass index - gestational diabetes - gestational hypertension - mediation
Background: The contribution of body mass index (BMI) to the observed associations between dietary patterns and risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) remains unclear. Objective: The objective of this study was to formally quantify the mediating effect of prepregnancy BMI in these associations. Design: Women (aged 25–30 y) participating in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health were not pregnant at baseline in 2003 and reported ≥1 pregnancy up to 2012. GDM and HDP diagnoses were self-reported for each pregnancy and validated in a subset. A Mediterranean diet score was created by use of a baseline-validated food-frequency questionnaire and dichotomized to reflect low adherence (<25th percentile) and higher adherence (≥25th percentile). A causal inference framework for mediation analysis was used to estimate total, natural direct, and natural indirect effects of the prepregnancy Mediterranean diet on incident GDM and HDP and proportions mediated through prepregnancy BMI. Results: In 3378 women without a history of diabetes, 240 (7.1%) developed GDM. HDP was reported in 273 (8.6%) of 3167 women with no history of hypertension. Low adherence to the Mediterranean diet was associated with higher risk of GDM (OR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.02, 1.60) and HDP (OR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.18, 1.56), after adjustment for education, parity, polycystic ovary syndrome, energy intake, and physical activity. Proportions mediated through prepregnancy BMI (per 1-kg/m2 increase) were 32% and 22% for GDM and HDP, respectively. Conclusion: These findings suggest that prepregnancy BMI as a single mediator contributes substantially to the total effects of the prepregnancy Mediterranean diet on GDM and HDP risk.
The role of village reserves in revitalizing the natural prey base of the Snow Leopard
Mishra, C. ; Bhatnagar, Y.V. ; Trivedi, Pranav ; Timbadia, Radhika ; Bijoor, Ajay ; Murali, Ranjini ; Sonam, Karma ; Thinley, Tanzin ; Namgail, T. ; Prins, H.H.T. - \ 2016
In: Snow Leopards: Biodiversity of the world: Conservation from genes to landscapes / McCarthy, Thomas, Mallon, David, Amsterdam : Elsevier - ISBN 9780128022139 - p. 184 - 195.
Crop-specific seasonal estimates of irrigation-water demand in South Asia
Biemans, Hester ; Siderius, Christian ; Mishra, Ashok ; Ahmad, Bashir - \ 2016
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 20 (2016)5. - ISSN 1027-5606 - p. 1971 - 1982.

Especially in the Himalayan headwaters of the main rivers in South Asia, shifts in runoff are expected as a result of a rapidly changing climate. In recent years, our insight into these shifts and their impact on water availability has increased. However, a similar detailed understanding of the seasonal pattern in water demand is surprisingly absent. This hampers a proper assessment of water stress and ways to cope and adapt. In this study, the seasonal pattern of irrigation-water demand resulting from the typical practice of multiple cropping in South Asia was accounted for by introducing double cropping with monsoon-dependent planting dates in a hydrology and vegetation model. Crop yields were calibrated to the latest state-level statistics of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Nepal. The improvements in seasonal land use and cropping periods lead to lower estimates of irrigation-water demand compared to previous model-based studies, despite the net irrigated area being higher. Crop irrigation-water demand differs sharply between seasons and regions; in Pakistan, winter (rabi) and monsoon summer (kharif) irrigation demands are almost equal, whereas in Bangladesh the rabi demand is ∼ 100 times higher. Moreover, the relative importance of irrigation supply versus rain decreases sharply from west to east. Given the size and importance of South Asia improved regional estimates of food production and its irrigation-water demand will also affect global estimates. In models used for global water resources and food-security assessments, processes like multiple cropping and monsoon-dependent planting dates should not be ignored.

HsfA2 controls the activity of developmentally and stress-regulated heat stress protection mechanisms in tomato male reproductive tissues
Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios ; Mesihovic, Anida ; Simm, Stefan ; Paupière, Marine Josephine ; Hu, Yangjie ; Paul, Puneet ; Mishra, Shravan Kumar ; Tschiersch, Bettina ; Theres, Klaus ; Bovy, Arnaud ; Schleiff, Enrico ; Scharf, Klaus Dieter - \ 2016
Plant Physiology 170 (2016)4. - ISSN 0032-0889 - p. 2461 - 2477.

Male reproductive tissues are more sensitive to heat stress (HS) compared to vegetative tissues, but the basis of this phenomenon is poorly understood. Heat stress transcription factors (Hsfs) regulate the transcriptional changes required for protection from HS. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), HsfA2 acts as coactivator of HsfA1a and is one of the major Hsfs accumulating in response to elevated temperatures. The contribution of HsfA2 in heat stress response (HSR) and thermotolerance was investigated in different tissues of transgenic tomato plants with suppressed HsfA2 levels (A2AS). Global transcriptome analysis and immunodetection of two major Hsps in vegetative and reproductive tissues showed that HsfA2 regulates subsets of HS-induced genes in a tissue-specific manner. Accumulation of HsfA2 by a moderate HS treatment enhances the capacity of seedlings to cope with a subsequent severe HS, suggesting an important role for HsfA2 in regulating acquired thermotolerance. In pollen, HsfA2 is an important coactivator of HsfA1a during HSR. HsfA2 suppression reduces the viability and germination rate of pollen that received the stress during the stages of meiosis and microspore formation but had no effect onmore advanced stages. In general, pollenmeiocytes andmicrospores are characterized by increased susceptibility to HS due to their lower capacity to induce a strong HSR. This sensitivity is partially mitigated by the developmentally regulated expression of HsfA2 and several HS-responsive genes mediated by HsfA1a under nonstress conditions. Thereby, HsfA2 is an important factor for the priming process that sustains pollen thermotolerance during microsporogenesis.

Check title to add to marked list
<< previous | next >>

Show 20 50 100 records per page

 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.