Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Macrophage-Specific NF-κB Activation Dynamics Can Segregate Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients
Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia ; Burkitt, Michael D. ; Bergey, François ; England, Hazel ; Hough, Rachael ; Schmidt, Lorraine ; Spiller, David G. ; White, Michael H.R. ; Paszek, Pawel ; Jackson, Dean A. ; Martins Dos Santos, Vitor A.P. ; Sellge, Gernot ; Pritchard, D.M. ; Campbell, Barry J. ; Müller, Werner ; Probert, Chris S. - \ 2019
Frontiers in Immunology 10 (2019). - ISSN 1664-3224 - 11 p.
The heterogeneous nature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presents challenges, particularly when choosing therapy. Activation of the NF-κB transcription factor is a highly regulated, dynamic event in IBD pathogenesis. Using a lentivirus approach, NF-κB-regulated luciferase was expressed in patient macrophages, isolated from frozen peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. Following activation, samples could be segregated into three clusters based on the NF-κB-regulated luciferase response. The ulcerative colitis (UC) samples appeared only in the hypo-responsive Cluster 1, and in Cluster 2. Conversely, Crohn's disease (CD) patients appeared in all Clusters with their percentage being higher in the hyper-responsive Cluster 3. A positive correlation was seen between NF-κB-induced luciferase activity and the concentrations of cytokines released into medium from stimulated macrophages, but not with serum or biopsy cytokine levels. Confocal imaging of lentivirally-expressed p65 activation revealed that a higher proportion of macrophages from CD patients responded to endotoxin lipid A compared to controls. In contrast, cells from UC patients exhibited a shorter duration of NF-κB p65 subunit nuclear localization compared to healthy controls, and CD donors. Analysis of macrophage cytokine responses and patient metadata revealed a strong correlation between CD patients who smoked and hyper-activation of p65. These in vitro dynamic assays of NF-κB activation in blood-derived macrophages have the potential to segregate IBD patients into groups with different phenotypes and may therefore help determine response to therapy.
Implications of horizontal and vertical relationships on farmers performance in the Brazilian pork industry
Martins, Franco Müller ; Trienekens, Jacques ; Omta, Onno - \ 2019
Livestock Science 228 (2019). - ISSN 1871-1413 - p. 161 - 169.
Brazil - Contracts - Performance - Pork supply chain - Relationship characteristics

According to the literature, vertical and horizontal relationships are of key importance to farmer performance. However, most studies have examined these relationships using distinct models. This paper contributes with new insights to the supply chain management and network theories by using a single model to analyse how horizontal relationships impact on vertical relationships and how these jointly affect the performance of Brazilian pig farmers. Data were obtained from 269 farmers delivering pigs through contracts and spot markets in southern Brazil. The results demonstrate that both vertical and horizontal relationships can improve farmer performance. Moreover, horizontal relationships positively influence vertical relationships by improving the exchange of information between farmers and buyers. Furthermore, the findings suggest that these relationships are sensitive to the context (spot market or contracted production) in which the transactions are executed. The study draws relevant management implications for pig farmers, buyers and farmer associations.

Nitrogen and phosphorus constrain the CO2 fertilization of global plant biomass
Terrer, César ; Jackson, Robert B. ; Prentice, I.C. ; Keenan, Trevor F. ; Kaiser, Christina ; Vicca, Sara ; Fisher, Joshua B. ; Reich, Peter B. ; Stocker, Benjamin D. ; Hungate, Bruce A. ; Peñuelas, Josep ; McCallum, Ian ; Soudzilovskaia, Nadejda A. ; Cernusak, Lucas A. ; Talhelm, Alan F. ; Sundert, Kevin Van; Piao, Shilong ; Newton, Paul C.D. ; Hovenden, Mark J. ; Blumenthal, Dana M. ; Liu, Yi Y. ; Müller, Christoph ; Winter, Klaus ; Field, Christopher B. ; Viechtbauer, Wolfgang ; Lissa, Caspar J. Van; Hoosbeek, Marcel R. ; Watanabe, Makoto ; Koike, Takayoshi ; Leshyk, Victor O. ; Polley, H.W. ; Franklin, Oskar - \ 2019
Nature Climate Change 9 (2019). - ISSN 1758-678X - p. 684 - 689.

Elevated CO2 (eCO2) experiments provide critical information to quantify the effects of rising CO2 on vegetation1–6. Many eCO2 experiments suggest that nutrient limitations modulate the local magnitude of the eCO2 effect on plant biomass1,3,5, but the global extent of these limitations has not been empirically quantified, complicating projections of the capacity of plants to take up CO2 7,8. Here, we present a data-driven global quantification of the eCO2 effect on biomass based on 138 eCO2 experiments. The strength of CO2 fertilization is primarily driven by nitrogen (N) in ~65% of global vegetation and by phosphorus (P) in ~25% of global vegetation, with N- or P-limitation modulated by mycorrhizal association. Our approach suggests that CO2 levels expected by 2100 can potentially enhance plant biomass by 12 ± 3% above current values, equivalent to 59 ± 13 PgC. The global-scale response to eCO2 we derive from experiments is similar to past changes in greenness9 and biomass10 with rising CO2, suggesting that CO2 will continue to stimulate plant biomass in the future despite the constraining effect of soil nutrients. Our research reconciles conflicting evidence on CO2 fertilization across scales and provides an empirical estimate of the biomass sensitivity to eCO2 that may help to constrain climate projections.

Upcycling food leftovers and grass recources through farm animals
Hal, O. van; Boer, I.J.M. de; Muller, A. ; Vries, S. de; Erb, K. ; Schader, Christian ; Zanten, H.H.E. van - \ 2019
In: Book of Abstracts of the 70th Annual Meeting of the European Federation of Animal Science. - Wageningen Academic Publishers (EAAP book of abstracts ) - ISBN 9789086863396 - p. 316 - 316.
Astin C Production by the Endophytic Fungus Cyanodermella asteris in Planktonic and Immobilized Culture Conditions
Vassaux, Antoine ; Tarayre, Cédric ; Arguëlles-Arias, Anthony ; Compère, Philippe ; Delvigne, Frank ; Fickers, Patrick ; Jahn, Linda ; Lang, Alexander ; Leclère, Valérie ; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta ; Ongena, Marc ; Schafhauser, Thomas ; Telek, Samuel ; Théatre, Ariane ; Berkel, Willem J.H. van; Vandenbol, Micheline ; Pée, Karl Heinz van; Willems, Luc ; Wohlleben, Wolfgang ; Jacques, Philippe - \ 2019
Biotechnology Journal 14 (2019)8. - ISSN 1860-6768
astin C - biofilms - Cyanodermella asteris - immobilized-cell cultures - secondary metabolites

The fungal endophyte Cyanodermella asteris (C. asteris) has been recently isolated from the medicinal plant Aster tataricus (A. tataricus). This fungus produces astin C, a cyclic pentapeptide with anticancer and anti-inflammatory properties. The production of this secondary metabolite is compared in immobilized and planktonic conditions. For immobilized cultures, a stainless steel packing immersed in the culture broth is used as a support. In these conditions, the fungus exclusively grows on the packing, which provides a considerable advantage for astin C recovery and purification. C. asteris metabolism is different according to the culture conditions in terms of substrate consumption rate, cell growth, and astin C production. Immobilized-cell cultures yield a 30% increase of astin C production, associated with a 39% increase in biomass. The inoculum type as spores rather than hyphae, and a pre-inoculation washing procedure with sodium hydroxide, turns out to be beneficial both for astin C production and fungus development onto the support. Finally, the influence of culture parameters such as pH and medium composition on astin C production is evaluated. With optimized culture conditions, astin C yield is further improved reaching a five times higher final specific yield compared to the value reported with astin C extraction from A. tataricus (0.89 mg g−1 and 0.16 mg g−1 respectively).

Maritime Futures 2035: The Arctic Region : Workshop Report & Technical Documentation
Blair, Berill ; Muller-Stoffels, Marc - \ 2019
- 88 p.
Maritime - Arctic - scenario development - sustainability indicators - forecasts - climate-change/ - sea ice
What kind of forecast information is needed for safe and sustainable Arctic maritime activities now and through 2035? Building on the SALIENSEAS project’s platform for coproduction of climate services for maritime sectors active in European Arctic waters, a group of experts were brought together to develop
scenarios for safe and sustainable maritime operations by the year 2035. Starting with the focal question “What information is needed to successfully respond to changes impacting Arctic maritime activities now and through 2035?” participants deliberated the most influential drivers of change that will impact the need for metocean and sea ice services to reduce uncertainties in maritime operational and tactical planning
Twenty-three unsolved problems in hydrology (UPH)–a community perspective
Blöschl, Günter ; Bierkens, Marc F.P. ; Chambel, Antonio ; Cudennec, Christophe ; Destouni, Georgia ; Fiori, Aldo ; Kirchner, James W. ; McDonnell, Jeffrey J. ; Savenije, Hubert H.G. ; Sivapalan, Murugesu ; Stumpp, Christine ; Toth, Elena ; Volpi, Elena ; Carr, Gemma ; Lupton, Claire ; Salinas, Josè ; Széles, Borbála ; Viglione, Alberto ; Aksoy, Hafzullah ; Allen, Scott T. ; Amin, Anam ; Andréassian, Vazken ; Arheimer, Berit ; Aryal, Santosh K. ; Baker, Victor ; Bardsley, Earl ; Barendrecht, Marlies H. ; Bartosova, Alena ; Batelaan, Okke ; Berghuijs, Wouter R. ; Beven, Keith ; Blume, Theresa ; Bogaard, Thom ; Borges de Amorim, Pablo ; Böttcher, Michael E. ; Boulet, Gilles ; Breinl, Korbinian ; Brilly, Mitja ; Brocca, Luca ; Buytaert, Wouter ; Castellarin, Attilio ; Castelletti, Andrea ; Chen, Xiaohong ; Chen, Yangbo ; Chen, Yuanfang ; Chifflard, Peter ; Claps, Pierluigi ; Clark, Martyn P. ; Collins, Adrian L. ; Croke, Barry ; Dathe, Annette ; David, Paula C. ; Barros, Felipe P.J. de; Rooij, Gerrit de; Baldassarre, Giuliano Di; Driscoll, Jessica M. ; Duethmann, Doris ; Dwivedi, Ravindra ; Eris, Ebru ; Farmer, William H. ; Feiccabrino, James ; Ferguson, Grant ; Ferrari, Ennio ; Ferraris, Stefano ; Fersch, Benjamin ; Finger, David ; Foglia, Laura ; Fowler, Keirnan ; Gartsman, Boris ; Gascoin, Simon ; Gaume, Eric ; Gelfan, Alexander ; Geris, Josie ; Gharari, Shervan ; Gleeson, Tom ; Glendell, Miriam ; Gonzalez Bevacqua, Alena ; González-Dugo, María P. ; Grimaldi, Salvatore ; Gupta, A.B. ; Guse, Björn ; Han, Dawei ; Hannah, David ; Harpold, Adrian ; Haun, Stefan ; Heal, Kate ; Helfricht, Kay ; Herrnegger, Mathew ; Hipsey, Matthew ; Hlaváčiková, Hana ; Hohmann, Clara ; Holko, Ladislav ; Hopkinson, Christopher ; Hrachowitz, Markus ; Illangasekare, Tissa H. ; Inam, Azhar ; Innocente, Camyla ; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan ; Jarihani, Ben ; Kalantari, Zahra ; Kalvans, Andis ; Khanal, Sonu ; Khatami, Sina ; Kiesel, Jens ; Kirkby, Mike ; Knoben, Wouter ; Kochanek, Krzysztof ; Kohnová, Silvia ; Kolechkina, Alla ; Krause, Stefan ; Kreamer, David ; Kreibich, Heidi ; Kunstmann, Harald ; Lange, Holger ; Liberato, Margarida L.R. ; Lindquist, Eric ; Link, Timothy ; Liu, Junguo ; Loucks, Daniel Peter ; Luce, Charles ; Mahé, Gil ; Makarieva, Olga ; Malard, Julien ; Mashtayeva, Shamshagul ; Maskey, Shreedhar ; Mas-Pla, Josep ; Mavrova-Guirguinova, Maria ; Mazzoleni, Maurizio ; Mernild, Sebastian ; Misstear, Bruce Dudley ; Montanari, Alberto ; Müller-Thomy, Hannes ; Nabizadeh, Alireza ; Nardi, Fernando ; Neale, Christopher ; Nesterova, Nataliia ; Nurtaev, Bakhram ; Odongo, Vincent O. ; Panda, Subhabrata ; Pande, Saket ; Pang, Zhonghe ; Papacharalampous, Georgia ; Perrin, Charles ; Pfister, Laurent ; Pimentel, Rafael ; Polo, María J. ; Post, David ; Prieto Sierra, Cristina ; Ramos, Maria Helena ; Renner, Maik ; Reynolds, José Eduardo ; Ridolfi, Elena ; Rigon, Riccardo ; Riva, Monica ; Robertson, David E. ; Rosso, Renzo ; Roy, Tirthankar ; Sá, João H.M. ; Salvadori, Gianfausto ; Sandells, Mel ; Schaefli, Bettina ; Schumann, Andreas ; Scolobig, Anna ; Seibert, Jan ; Servat, Eric ; Shafiei, Mojtaba ; Sharma, Ashish ; Sidibe, Moussa ; Sidle, Roy C. ; Skaugen, Thomas ; Smith, Hugh ; Spiessl, Sabine M. ; Stein, Lina ; Steinsland, Ingelin ; Strasser, Ulrich ; Su, Bob ; Szolgay, Jan ; Tarboton, David ; Tauro, Flavia ; Thirel, Guillaume ; Tian, Fuqiang ; Tong, Rui ; Tussupova, Kamshat ; Tyralis, Hristos ; Uijlenhoet, Remko ; Beek, Rens van; Ent, Ruud J. van der; Ploeg, Martine van der; Loon, Anne F. Van; Meerveld, Ilja van; Nooijen, Ronald van; Oel, Pieter R. van; Vidal, Jean Philippe ; Freyberg, Jana von; Vorogushyn, Sergiy ; Wachniew, Przemyslaw ; Wade, Andrew J. ; Ward, Philip ; Westerberg, Ida K. ; White, Christopher ; Wood, Eric F. ; Woods, Ross ; Xu, Zongxue ; Yilmaz, Koray K. ; Zhang, Yongqiang - \ 2019
Hydrological Sciences Journal 64 (2019)10. - ISSN 0262-6667 - p. 1141 - 1158.
hydrology - interdisciplinary - knowledge gaps - research agenda - science questions

This paper is the outcome of a community initiative to identify major unsolved scientific problems in hydrology motivated by a need for stronger harmonisation of research efforts. The procedure involved a public consultation through online media, followed by two workshops through which a large number of potential science questions were collated, prioritised, and synthesised. In spite of the diversity of the participants (230 scientists in total), the process revealed much about community priorities and the state of our science: a preference for continuity in research questions rather than radical departures or redirections from past and current work. Questions remain focused on the process-based understanding of hydrological variability and causality at all space and time scales. Increased attention to environmental change drives a new emphasis on understanding how change propagates across interfaces within the hydrological system and across disciplinary boundaries. In particular, the expansion of the human footprint raises a new set of questions related to human interactions with nature and water cycle feedbacks in the context of complex water management problems. We hope that this reflection and synthesis of the 23 unsolved problems in hydrology will help guide research efforts for some years to come.

European mushroom assemblages are darker in cold climates
Krah, Franz Sebastian ; Büntgen, Ulf ; Schaefer, Hanno ; Müller, Jörg ; Andrew, Carrie ; Boddy, Lynne ; Diez, Jeffrey ; Egli, Simon ; Freckleton, Robert ; Gange, Alan C. ; Halvorsen, Rune ; Heegaard, Einar ; Heideroth, Antje ; Heibl, Christoph ; Heilmann-Clausen, Jacob ; Høiland, Klaus ; Kar, Ritwika ; Kauserud, Håvard ; Kirk, Paul M. ; Kuyper, Thomas W. ; Krisai-Greilhuber, Irmgard ; Norden, Jenni ; Papastefanou, Phillip ; Senn-Irlet, Beatrice ; Bässler, Claus - \ 2019
Nature Communications 10 (2019). - ISSN 2041-1723

Thermal melanism theory states that dark-colored ectotherm organisms are at an advantage at low temperature due to increased warming. This theory is generally supported for ectotherm animals, however, the function of colors in the fungal kingdom is largely unknown. Here, we test whether the color lightness of mushroom assemblages is related to climate using a dataset of 3.2 million observations of 3,054 species across Europe. Consistent with the thermal melanism theory, mushroom assemblages are significantly darker in areas with cold climates. We further show differences in color phenotype between fungal lifestyles and a lifestyle differentiated response to seasonality. These results indicate a more complex ecological role of mushroom colors and suggest functions beyond thermal adaption. Because fungi play a crucial role in terrestrial carbon and nutrient cycles, understanding the links between the thermal environment, functional coloration and species’ geographical distributions will be critical in predicting ecosystem responses to global warming.

Simulating the effect of tillage practices with the global ecosystem model LPJmL (version 5.0-tillage)
Lutz, Femke ; Herzfeld, Tobias ; Heinke, Jens ; Rolinski, Susanne ; Schaphoff, Sibyll ; Bloh, Werner Von; Stoorvogel, Jetse J. ; Müller, Christoph - \ 2019
Geoscientific Model Development 12 (2019)6. - ISSN 1991-959X - p. 2419 - 2440.

The effects of tillage on soil properties, crop productivity, and global greenhouse gas emissions have been discussed in the last decades. Global ecosystem models have limited capacity to simulate the various effects of tillage. With respect to the decomposition of soil organic matter, they either assume a constant increase due to tillage or they ignore the effects of tillage. Hence, they do not allow for analysing the effects of tillage and cannot evaluate, for example, reduced tillage or no tillage (referred to here as "no-till") practises as mitigation practices for climate change. In this paper, we describe the implementation of tillage-related practices in the global ecosystem model LPJmL. The extended model is evaluated against reported differences between tillage and no-till management on several soil properties. To this end, simulation results are compared with published meta-analyses on tillage effects. In general, the model is able to reproduce observed tillage effects on global, as well as regional, patterns of carbon and water fluxes. However, modelled N fluxes deviate from the literature values and need further study. The addition of the tillage module to LPJmL5 opens up opportunities to assess the impact of agricultural soil management practices under different scenarios with implications for agricultural productivity, carbon sequestration, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental indicators.

The Cdk1/Cdk2 homolog CDKA;1 controls the recombination landscape in Arabidopsis
Wijnker, Erik ; Harashima, Hirofumi ; Müller, Katja ; Parra-Nuñez, Pablo ; Bastiaan de Snoo, C. ; Belt, Jose van de; Dissmeyer, Nico ; Bayer, Martin ; Pradillo, Monica ; Schnittger, Arp - \ 2019
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116 (2019)25. - ISSN 0027-8424 - p. 12534 - 12539.
Class - Cross-over interference - Crossovers - Cyclin-dependent kinase - Meiosis - Meiotic recombination

Little is known how patterns of cross-over (CO) numbers and distribution during meiosis are established. Here, we reveal that cyclin-dependent kinase A;1 (CDKA;1), the homolog of human Cdk1 and Cdk2, is a major regulator of meiotic recombination in Arabidopsis. Arabidopsis plants with reduced CDKA;1 activity experienced a decrease of class I COs, especially lowering recombination rates in centromere-proximal regions. Interestingly, this reduction of type I CO did not affect CO assurance, a mechanism by which each chromosome receives at least one CO, resulting in all chromosomes exhibiting similar genetic lengths in weak loss-of-function cdka;1 mutants. Conversely, an increase of CDKA;1 activity resulted in elevated recombination frequencies. Thus, modulation of CDKA;1 kinase activity affects the number and placement of COs along the chromosome axis in a dose-dependent manner.

Preface-ISPRS workshop hyperspectral sensing meets machine learning and pattern analysis (hypermlpa 2019)
Weinmann, M. ; Müller, R. ; Reulke, R. ; Honkavaara, E. ; Tuia, D. ; Keller, S. - \ 2019
In: ISPRS Geospatial Week 2019, 10–14 June 2019, Enschede, The Netherlands. - ISPRS (International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences - ISPRS Archives ) - p. 1825 - 1826.
Preface - hyperspectral sensing meets machine learning and pattern analysis (Hyper MLPA 2019)
Weinmann, M. ; Müller, R. ; Reulke, R. ; Honkavaara, E. ; Tuia, D. ; Keller, S. - \ 2019
In: ISPRS Geospatial Week 2019, 10–14 June 2019, Enschede, The Netherlands. - ISPRS (ISPRS Annals of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences ) - p. 607 - 608.
Live cell imaging of meiosis in Arabidopsis thaliana
Prusicki, Maria A. ; Keizer, Emma M. ; Rosmalen, Rik P. van; Komaki, Shinichiro ; Seifert, Felix ; Müller, Katja ; Wijnker, Erik ; Fleck, Christian ; Schnittger, Arp - \ 2019
eLife 8 (2019). - ISSN 2050-084X
A. thaliana - cell biology - cyclin - development - meiosis - phragmoplast - plant biology - reproduction - spindle

To follow the dynamics of meiosis in the model plant Arabidopsis, we have established a live cell imaging setup to observe male meiocytes. Our method is based on the concomitant visualization of microtubules (MTs) and a meiotic cohesin subunit that allows following five cellular parameters: cell shape, MT array, nucleus position, nucleolus position, and chromatin condensation. We find that the states of these parameters are not randomly associated and identify 11 cellular states, referred to as landmarks, which occur much more frequently than closely related ones, indicating that they are convergence points during meiotic progression. As a first application of our system, we revisited a previously identified mutant in the meiotic A-type cyclin TARDY ASYNCHRONOUS MEIOSIS (TAM). Our imaging system enabled us to reveal both qualitatively and quantitatively altered landmarks in tam, foremost the formation of previously not recognized ectopic spindle- or phragmoplast-like structures that arise without attachment to chromosomes.

Patterns of long‐term vegetation change vary between different types of semi‐natural grasslands in Western and Central Europe
Diekmann, Martin ; Andres, C. ; Becker, T. ; Bennie, J. ; Blüml, V. ; Culmsee, H. ; Fanigliulo, M. ; Hahn, A. ; Heinken, T. ; Leuschner, C. ; Luka, S. ; Meissner, J. ; Müller, J. ; Newton, A. ; Peppler-Lisbach, C. ; Rosenthal, G. ; Berg, L.J. van den; Vergeer, P. ; Wesche, K. - \ 2019
Journal of Vegetation Science 30 (2019)2. - ISSN 1100-9233 - p. 187 - 187.
Questions
Has plant species richness in semi‐natural grasslands changed over recent decades? Do the temporal trends of habitat specialists differ from those of habitat generalists? Has there been a homogenization of the grassland vegetation?
Location
Different regions in Germany and the UK.
Methods
We conducted a formal meta‐analysis of re‐survey vegetation studies of semi‐natural grasslands. In total, 23 data sets were compiled, spanning up to 75 years between the surveys, including 13 data sets from wet grasslands, six from dry grasslands and four from other grassland types. Edaphic conditions were assessed using mean Ellenberg indicator values for soil moisture, nitrogen and pH. Changes in species richness and environmental variables were evaluated using response ratios.
Results
In most wet grasslands, total species richness declined over time, while habitat specialists almost completely vanished. The number of species losses increased with increasing time between the surveys and were associated with a strong decrease in soil moisture and higher soil nutrient contents. Wet grasslands in nature reserves showed no such changes or even opposite trends. In dry grasslands and other grassland types, total species richness did not consistently change, but the number or proportions of habitat specialists declined. There were also considerable changes in species composition, especially in wet grasslands that often have been converted into intensively managed, highly productive meadows or pastures. We did not find a general homogenization of the vegetation in any of the grassland types.

Conclusions
The results document the widespread deterioration of semi‐natural grasslands, especially of those types that can easily be transformed to high production grasslands. The main causes for the loss of grassland specialists are changed management in combination with increased fertilization and nitrogen deposition. Dry grasslands are most resistant to change, but also show a long‐term trend towards an increase in more mesotrophic species.
Improved phosphoric acid recovery from sewage sludge ash using layer-by-layer modified membranes
Paltrinieri, Laura ; Remmen, Kirsten ; Müller, Barbara ; Chu, Liangyong ; Köser, Joachim ; Wintgens, Thomas ; Wessling, Matthias ; Smet, Louis C.P.M. de; Sudhölter, Ernst J.R. - \ 2019
Journal of Membrane Science 587 (2019). - ISSN 0376-7388
Layer-by-layer - Phosphate recovery - Polyelectrolyte - Sewage sludge ash - Water treatment

We report an advanced treatment method for phosphoric acid recovery from leached sewage sludge ash. Layer-by-layer (LbL) polyelectrolyte deposition has been used as a tool to modify and convert a hollow ultrafiltration membrane into a nanofiltration (NF) LbL membrane for H3PO4 recovery. To build the LbL membrane, poly(styrenesulfonate) PSS was chosen as polyanion, while three different polycations were used: a permanently charged polyelectrolyte, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride), PDADMAC; a pH-dependent charged polyelectrolyte poly(allylamine hydrochloride), PAH; and a PAH modified with guanidinium groups (PAH-Gu). Based on detailed surface characterizations (AFM, XPS and Zeta-potential) it was concluded that both charge density and pH-responsiveness of the polycations are key parameters to control the final membrane surface structure and transport properties. The surface properties of LbL-coated membranes were correlated with the membrane filtration performance, when exposed to the real leached sewage sludge ash solution. The highest permeability was recorded for (PDADMAC/PSS)6, a result that was rationalized on its loose, and possibly less interpenetrated, structure, followed by (PAH-Gu/PSS)6 characterized by a more dense, compact layer. H3PO4 recovery was the highest in the case of (PDADMAC/PSS)6, but the retention of multivalent metals (Fe3+ and Mg2+) was low, leading to a more contaminated permeate. The opposite trend was observed for (PAH-Gu/PSS)6, resulting in a less metal-contaminated, but also a less H3PO4-concentrated permeate. Our LbL-modified membranes were found to improve the permeability and H3PO4 recovery compared to a commercially available acid-resistant NF membrane.

Experimental and modeling evidence of carbon limitation of leaf appearance rate for spring and winter wheat
Baumont, Maeva ; Parent, Boris ; Manceau, Loïc ; Brown, Hamish E. ; Driever, Steven M. ; Muller, Bertrand ; Martre, Pierre - \ 2019
Journal of Experimental Botany 70 (2019)9. - ISSN 0022-0957 - p. 2449 - 2462.
SiriusQuality - Carbon - crop model - daylength - leaf appearance rate - photoperiod - photothermal quotient - phyllochron - temperature - wheat

Accurate predictions of the timing of physiological stages and the development rate are crucial for predicting crop performance under field conditions. Plant development is controlled by the leaf appearance rate (LAR) and our understanding of how LAR responds to environmental factors is still limited. Here, we tested the hypothesis that carbon availability may account for the effects of irradiance, photoperiod, atmospheric CO2 concentration, and ontogeny on LAR. We conducted three experiments in growth chambers to quantify and disentangle these effects for both winter and spring wheat cultivars. Variations of LAR observed between environmental scenarios were well explained by the supply/demand ratio for carbon, quantified using the photothermal quotient. We therefore developed an ecophysiological model based on the photothermal quotient that accounts for the effects of temperature, irradiance, photoperiod, and ontogeny on LAR. Comparisons of observed leaf stages and LAR with simulations from our model, from a linear thermal-time model, and from a segmented linear thermal-time model corrected for sowing date showed that our model can simulate the observed changes in LAR in the field with the lowest error. Our findings demonstrate that a hypothesis-driven approach that incorporates more physiology in specific processes of crop models can increase their predictive power under variable environments.

The Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison phase 1 simulation dataset
Müller, Christoph ; Elliott, Joshua ; Kelly, David ; Arneth, Almut ; Balkovic, Juraj ; Ciais, Philippe ; Deryng, Delphine ; Folberth, Christian ; Hoek, Steven ; Izaurralde, Roberto C. ; Jones, Curtis D. ; Khabarov, Nikolay ; Lawrence, Peter ; Liu, Wenfeng ; Olin, Stefan ; Pugh, Thomas A.M. ; Reddy, Ashwan ; Rosenzweig, Cynthia ; Ruane, Alex C. ; Sakurai, Gen ; Schmid, Erwin ; Skalsky, Rastislav ; Wang, Xuhui ; Wit, Allard de; Yang, Hong - \ 2019
Scientific Data 6 (2019). - ISSN 2052-4463 - 22 p.

The Global Gridded Crop Model Intercomparison (GGCMI) phase 1 dataset of the Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) provides an unprecedentedly large dataset of crop model simulations covering the global ice-free land surface. The dataset consists of annual data fields at a spatial resolution of 0.5 arc-degree longitude and latitude. Fourteen crop modeling groups provided output for up to 11 historical input datasets spanning 1901 to 2012, and for up to three different management harmonization levels. Each group submitted data for up to 15 different crops and for up to 14 output variables. All simulations were conducted for purely rainfed and near-perfectly irrigated conditions on all land areas irrespective of whether the crop or irrigation system is currently used there. With the publication of the GGCMI phase 1 dataset we aim to promote further analyses and understanding of crop model performance, potential relationships between productivity and environmental impacts, and insights on how to further improve global gridded crop model frameworks. We describe dataset characteristics and individual model setup narratives.

Wet and dry tropical forests show opposite successional pathways in wood density but converge over time
Poorter, L. ; Rozendaal, Danaë ; Bongers, F. ; Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S. ; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica María ; Álvarez, Francisco S. ; Andrade, José Luís ; Villa, Luis Felipe Arreola ; Balvanera, Patricia ; Becknell, Justin M. ; Bentos, Tony V. ; Bhaskar, Radika ; Boukili, Vanessa ; Brancalion, Pedro H.S. ; Broadbent, Eben N. ; César, Ricardo Gomes ; Chave, Jerome ; Chazdon, Robin L. ; Colletta, Gabriel Dalla ; Craven, Dylan ; Jong, Ben H.J. de; Denslow, Julie S. ; Dent, Daisy H. ; DeWalt, Saara J. ; García, Elisa Díaz ; Dupuy, Juan M. ; Durán, Sandra M. ; Espírito Santo, Mário Marcos ; Fandiño, María C. ; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson ; Finegan, Bryan ; Moser, Vanessa Granda ; Hall, Jefferson S. ; Hernández-Stefanoni, José Luis ; Jakovac, A.C. ; Junqueira, André B. ; Kennard, Deborah ; Lebrija-Trejos, Edwin ; Letcher, Susan G. ; Lohbeck, M.W.M. ; Lopez, Omar R. ; Marín-Spiotta, Erika ; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel ; Martins, Sebastião Venâncio ; Massoca, Paulo E.S. ; Meave, Jorge A. ; Mesquita, Rita ; Mora, Francisco ; Souza Moreno, Vanessa De; Müller, Sandra C. ; Muñoz, Rodrigo ; Muscarella, Robert ; Oliveira Neto, Silvio Nolasco De; Nunes, Yule Roberta Ferreira ; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana ; Paz, Horacio ; Pena Claros, M. ; Piotto, Daniel ; Ruíz, Jorge ; Sanaphre-Villanueva, Lucía ; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo ; Schwartz, Naomi B. ; Steininger, Marc K. ; Thomas, William Wayt ; Toledo, Marisol ; Uriarte, Maria ; Breugel, Michiel van; Wal, Hans van der - \ 2019
secondary succession - community assembly - community-weighted mean - wood density - Neotropics - tropical forest - Latin America
We analyse how community wood density (WD) recovers during secondary tropical forest succession. In wet forests succession proceeds from low to high WD, in dry forests from high to low WD, resulting in convergence of community WD of dry and wet forests over time, as vegetation cover builds up.
Wet and dry tropical forests show opposite successional pathways in wood density but converge over time
Poorter, Lourens ; Rozendaal, Danaë M.A. ; Bongers, Frans ; Almeida-Cortez, Jarcilene S. de; Almeyda Zambrano, Angélica María ; Álvarez, Francisco S. ; Andrade, José Luís ; Villa, Luis Felipe Arreola ; Balvanera, Patricia ; Becknell, Justin M. ; Bentos, Tony V. ; Bhaskar, Radika ; Boukili, Vanessa ; Brancalion, Pedro H.S. ; Broadbent, Eben N. ; César, Ricardo G. ; Chave, Jerome ; Chazdon, Robin L. ; Colletta, Gabriel Dalla ; Craven, Dylan ; Jong, Ben H.J. de; Denslow, Julie S. ; Dent, Daisy H. ; DeWalt, Saara J. ; García, Elisa Díaz ; Dupuy, Juan Manuel ; Durán, Sandra M. ; Espírito Santo, Mário M. ; Fandiño, María C. ; Fernandes, Geraldo Wilson ; Finegan, Bryan ; Moser, Vanessa Granda ; Hall, Jefferson S. ; Hernández-Stefanoni, José Luis ; Jakovac, Catarina C. ; Junqueira, André B. ; Kennard, Deborah ; Lebrija-Trejos, Edwin ; Letcher, Susan G. ; Lohbeck, Madelon ; Lopez, Omar R. ; Marín-Spiotta, Erika ; Martínez-Ramos, Miguel ; Martins, Sebastião V. ; Massoca, Paulo E.S. ; Meave, Jorge A. ; Mesquita, Rita ; Mora, Francisco ; Souza Moreno, Vanessa de; Müller, Sandra C. ; Muñoz, Rodrigo ; Muscarella, Robert ; Oliveira Neto, Silvio Nolasco de; Nunes, Yule R.F. ; Ochoa-Gaona, Susana ; Paz, Horacio ; Peña-Claros, Marielos ; Piotto, Daniel ; Ruíz, Jorge ; Sanaphre-Villanueva, Lucía ; Sanchez-Azofeifa, Arturo ; Schwartz, Naomi B. ; Steininger, Marc K. ; Thomas, William Wayt ; Toledo, Marisol ; Uriarte, Maria ; Utrera, Luis P. ; Breugel, Michiel van; Sande, Masha T. van der; Wal, Hans van der; Veloso, Maria D.M. ; Vester, Hans F.M. ; Vieira, Ima C.G. ; Villa, Pedro Manuel ; Williamson, G.B. ; Wright, S.J. ; Zanini, Kátia J. ; Zimmerman, Jess K. ; Westoby, Mark - \ 2019
Nature Ecology & Evolution 3 (2019). - ISSN 2397-334X - p. 928 - 934.

Tropical forests are converted at an alarming rate for agricultural use and pastureland, but also regrow naturally through secondary succession. For successful forest restoration, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of secondary succession. These mechanisms may vary across forest types, but analyses across broad spatial scales are lacking. Here, we analyse forest recovery using 1,403 plots that differ in age since agricultural abandonment from 50 sites across the Neotropics. We analyse changes in community composition using species-specific stem wood density (WD), which is a key trait for plant growth, survival and forest carbon storage. In wet forest, succession proceeds from low towards high community WD (acquisitive towards conservative trait values), in line with standard successional theory. However, in dry forest, succession proceeds from high towards low community WD (conservative towards acquisitive trait values), probably because high WD reflects drought tolerance in harsh early successional environments. Dry season intensity drives WD recovery by influencing the start and trajectory of succession, resulting in convergence of the community WD over time as vegetation cover builds up. These ecological insights can be used to improve species selection for reforestation. Reforestation species selected to establish a first protective canopy layer should, among other criteria, ideally have a similar WD to the early successional communities that dominate under the prevailing macroclimatic conditions.

sPlot – A new tool for global vegetation analyses
Bruelheide, Helge ; Dengler, Jürgen ; Jiménez-Alfaro, Borja ; Purschke, Oliver ; Hennekens, Stephan M. ; Chytrý, Milan ; Pillar, Valério D. ; Jansen, Florian ; Kattge, Jens ; Sandel, Brody ; Aubin, Isabelle ; Biurrun, Idoia ; Field, Richard ; Haider, Sylvia ; Jandt, Ute ; Lenoir, Jonathan ; Peet, Robert K. ; Peyre, Gwendolyn ; Sabatini, Francesco Maria ; Schmidt, Marco ; Schrodt, Franziska ; Winter, Marten ; Aćić, Svetlana ; Agrillo, Emiliano ; Alvarez, Miguel ; Ambarlı, Didem ; Angelini, Pierangela ; Apostolova, Iva ; Arfin Khan, Mohammed A.S. ; Arnst, Elise ; Attorre, Fabio ; Baraloto, Christopher ; Beckmann, Michael ; Berg, Christian ; Bergeron, Yves ; Bergmeier, Erwin ; Bjorkman, Anne D. ; Bondareva, Viktoria ; Borchardt, Peter ; Botta-Dukát, Zoltán ; Boyle, Brad ; Breen, Amy ; Brisse, Henry ; Byun, Chaeho ; Cabido, Marcelo R. ; Casella, Laura ; Cayuela, Luis ; Černý, Tomáš ; Chepinoga, Victor ; Csiky, János ; Curran, Michael ; Ćušterevska, Renata ; Dajić Stevanović, Zora ; Bie, Els De; Ruffray, Patrice de; Sanctis, Michele De; Dimopoulos, Panayotis ; Dressler, Stefan ; Ejrnæs, Rasmus ; El-Sheikh, Mohamed A.E.R.M. ; Enquist, Brian ; Ewald, Jörg ; Fagúndez, Jaime ; Finckh, Manfred ; Font, Xavier ; Forey, Estelle ; Fotiadis, Georgios ; García-Mijangos, Itziar ; Gasper, André Luis de; Golub, Valentin ; Gutierrez, Alvaro G. ; Hatim, Mohamed Z. ; He, Tianhua ; Higuchi, Pedro ; Holubová, Dana ; Hölzel, Norbert ; Homeier, Jürgen ; Indreica, Adrian ; Işık Gürsoy, Deniz ; Jansen, Steven ; Janssen, John ; Jedrzejek, Birgit ; Jiroušek, Martin ; Jürgens, Norbert ; Kącki, Zygmunt ; Kavgacı, Ali ; Kearsley, Elizabeth ; Kessler, Michael ; Knollová, Ilona ; Kolomiychuk, Vitaliy ; Korolyuk, Andrey ; Kozhevnikova, Maria ; Kozub, Łukasz ; Krstonošić, Daniel ; Kühl, Hjalmar ; Kühn, Ingolf ; Kuzemko, Anna ; Küzmič, Filip ; Landucci, Flavia ; Lee, Michael T. ; Levesley, Aurora ; Li, Ching Feng ; Liu, Hongyan ; Lopez-Gonzalez, Gabriela ; Lysenko, Tatiana ; Macanović, Armin ; Mahdavi, Parastoo ; Manning, Peter ; Marcenò, Corrado ; Martynenko, Vassiliy ; Mencuccini, Maurizio ; Minden, Vanessa ; Moeslund, Jesper Erenskjold ; Moretti, Marco ; Müller, Jonas V. ; Munzinger, Jérôme ; Niinemets, Ülo ; Nobis, Marcin ; Noroozi, Jalil ; Nowak, Arkadiusz ; Onyshchenko, Viktor ; Overbeck, Gerhard E. ; Ozinga, Wim A. ; Pauchard, Anibal ; Pedashenko, Hristo ; Peñuelas, Josep ; Pérez-Haase, Aaron ; Peterka, Tomáš ; Petřík, Petr ; Phillips, Oliver L. ; Prokhorov, Vadim ; Rašomavičius, Valerijus ; Revermann, Rasmus ; Rodwell, John ; Ruprecht, Eszter ; Rūsiņa, Solvita ; Samimi, Cyrus ; Schaminée, Joop H.J. ; Schmiedel, Ute ; Šibík, Jozef ; Šilc, Urban ; Škvorc, Željko ; Smyth, Anita ; Sop, Tenekwetche ; Sopotlieva, Desislava ; Sparrow, Ben ; Stančić, Zvjezdana ; Svenning, Jens Christian ; Swacha, Grzegorz ; Tang, Zhiyao ; Tsiripidis, Ioannis ; Turtureanu, Pavel Dan ; Uğurlu, Emin ; Uogintas, Domas ; Valachovič, Milan ; Vanselow, Kim André ; Vashenyak, Yulia ; Vassilev, Kiril ; Vélez-Martin, Eduardo ; Venanzoni, Roberto ; Vibrans, Alexander Christian ; Violle, Cyrille ; Virtanen, Risto ; Wehrden, Henrik von; Wagner, Viktoria ; Walker, Donald A. ; Wana, Desalegn ; Weiher, Evan ; Wesche, Karsten ; Whitfeld, Timothy ; Willner, Wolfgang ; Wiser, Susan ; Wohlgemuth, Thomas ; Yamalov, Sergey ; Zizka, Georg ; Zverev, Andrei - \ 2019
Journal of Vegetation Science 30 (2019)2. - ISSN 1100-9233 - p. 161 - 186.
biodiversity - community ecology - ecoinformatics - functional diversity - global scale - macroecology - phylogenetic diversity - plot database - sPlot - taxonomic diversity - vascular plant - vegetation relevé

Aims: Vegetation-plot records provide information on the presence and cover or abundance of plants co-occurring in the same community. Vegetation-plot data are spread across research groups, environmental agencies and biodiversity research centers and, thus, are rarely accessible at continental or global scales. Here we present the sPlot database, which collates vegetation plots worldwide to allow for the exploration of global patterns in taxonomic, functional and phylogenetic diversity at the plant community level. Results: sPlot version 2.1 contains records from 1,121,244 vegetation plots, which comprise 23,586,216 records of plant species and their relative cover or abundance in plots collected worldwide between 1885 and 2015. We complemented the information for each plot by retrieving climate and soil conditions and the biogeographic context (e.g., biomes) from external sources, and by calculating community-weighted means and variances of traits using gap-filled data from the global plant trait database TRY. Moreover, we created a phylogenetic tree for 50,167 out of the 54,519 species identified in the plots. We present the first maps of global patterns of community richness and community-weighted means of key traits. Conclusions: The availability of vegetation plot data in sPlot offers new avenues for vegetation analysis at the global scale.

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