Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Records 1 - 11 / 11

  • help
  • print

    Print search results

  • export

    Export search results

  • alert
    We will mail you new results for this query: q=Nissen
Check title to add to marked list
Cattle affect regeneration of the palm species Attalea princeps in a Bolivian forest–savanna mosaic
Hordijk, Iris ; Meijer, Fabian ; Nissen, Esther ; Boorsma, Tjalle ; Poorter, Lourens - \ 2019
Biotropica 51 (2019)1. - ISSN 0006-3606 - p. 28 - 38.
Beni savanna - Bolivia - landscape mosaic - Llanos de Moxos - Motacú palm

Attalea princeps is an important palm species that shapes the forest–savanna mosaic in Beni, Bolivia, as it dominates the two principal forest landscape elements (forest islands and gallery forest), and provides a vital microhabitat, food, and nesting source for numerous plant and animal species. The forest–savanna mosaic is used for extensive grazing, and the palm population is declining on the forest islands due to a low regeneration rate, which threatens the maintenance of this landscape. We therefore examined the (a)biotic factors that influence the population structure of Attalea in the centers and edges of forest islands and gallery forests. Ninety-one 0.1-ha plots were established, and 500 palm adults and 3,700 juveniles were measured for their size, health condition, and fire damage. For each plot, habitat characteristics, such as landscape position, grazing pressure, and soil conditions, were measured. Attalea population density was significantly lower on the forest islands than in the gallery forests, especially in the juvenile life stage. A structural equation model showed that juvenile density is positively related to the health condition of juveniles and amount of fruits present, where the amount of fruits is positively affected by the condition of adults. Juvenile density is negatively influenced by grazing, affecting the health condition of the juvenile, as well as organic matter and phosphate availability in the soil. Therefore, it is recommended to decrease the grazing pressure by decreasing livestock densities, fencing off vulnerable forest islands, or by rotating cattle.Abstract in Spanish is available with online material.

Data from: Cattle affect regeneration of the palm species Attalea princeps in a Bolivian forest-savanna mosaic
Hordijk, Iris ; Meijer, Fabian ; Nissen, Esther ; Boorsma, Tjalle ; Poorter, L. - \ 2018
landscape mosaic - Motacú palm - Attalea princeps
Attalea princeps is an important palm species that shapes the forest-savanna mosaic in Beni, Bolivia, because it dominates and shapes the two principal forest landscape elements (forest islands and gallery forest), and it provides a vital microhabitat, food and nesting source for numerous plant and animal species. The forest-savanna mosaic is used for extensive grazing, and the palm population is declining on the forest islands due to a low regeneration rate, which threatens the maintenance of this landscape. We therefore examined the (a)biotic factors that influence the population structure of Attalea in the centers and edges of forest islands and gallery forests. Ninety-one 0.1 ha plots were established and 500 palm adults and 3700 juveniles were measured for their size, health condition and fire damage. For each plot habitat characteristics, such as landscape position, grazing pressure, and soil conditions were measured. Attalea population density was significantly lower on the forest islands than in the gallery forests, especially in the juvenile life stage. A structural equation model showed that juvenile density is positively related to the health condition of the juveniles and amount of fruits present, where the amount of fruits is positively affected by the condition of the adults. Juvenile density is negatively influenced by grazing, affecting the health condition of the juvenile, as well as organic matter and phosphate availability in the soil. Therefore, it is recommended to decrease the grazing pressure by decreasing livestock densities, fencing off vulnerable forest islands, or by rotating cattle.
Advances in research on the prenatal development of skeletal muscle in animals in relation to the quality of muscle-based food. I - Regulation of myogenesis and environmental impact
Rehfeldt, C. ; Pas, M.F.W. te; Wimmers, K. ; Brameld, J.M. ; Nissen, P.M. ; Berri, C. ; Valente, L.M.P. ; Power, D.M. ; Picard, B. ; Stickland, N.C. ; Oksbjerg, N. - \ 2011
Animal 5 (2011)5. - ISSN 1751-7311 - p. 703 - 717.
trout oncorhynchus-mykiss - receptor signal-transduction - seabream pagellus-bogaraveo - in-situ hybridization - gilthead sea bream - salmon salmo-salar - rainbow-trout - birth-weight - meat quality - igf-i
Skeletal muscle development in vertebrates – also termed myogenesis – is a highly integrated process. Evidence to date indicates that the processes are very similar across mammals, poultry and fish, although the timings of the various steps differ considerably. Myogenesis is regulated by the myogenic regulatory factors and consists of two to three distinct phases when different fibre populations appear. The critical times when myogenesis is prone to hormonal or environmental influences depend largely on the developmental stage. One of the main mechanisms for both genetic and environmental effects on muscle fibre development is via the direct action of the growth hormone–insulin-like growth factor (GH–IGF) axis. In mammals and poultry, postnatal growth and function of muscles relate mainly to the hypertrophy of the fibres formed during myogenesis and to their fibre-type composition in terms of metabolic and contractile properties, whereas in fish hyperplasia still plays a major role. Candidate genes that are important in skeletal muscle development, for instance, encode for IGFs and IGF-binding proteins, myosin heavy chain isoforms, troponin T, myosin light chain and others have been identified. In mammals, nutritional supply in utero affects myogenesis and the GH–IGF axis may have an indirect action through the partitioning of nutrients towards the gravid uterus. Impaired myogenesis resulting in low skeletal myofibre numbers is considered one of the main reasons for negative long-term consequences of intrauterine growth retardation. Severe undernutrition in utero due to natural variation in litter or twin-bearing species or insufficient maternal nutrient supply may impair myogenesis and adversely affect carcass quality later in terms of reduced lean and increased fat deposition in the progeny. On the other hand, increases in maternal feed intake above standard requirement seem to have no beneficial effects on the growth of the progeny with myogenesis not or only slightly affected. Initial studies on low and high maternal protein feeding are published. Although there are only a few studies, first results also reveal an influence of nutrition on skeletal muscle development in fish and poultry. Finally, environmental temperature has been identified as a critical factor for growth and development of skeletal muscle in both fish and poultry.
Advances in research on the prenatal development of skeletal muscle in animals in relation to the quality of muscle-based food. II -Genetic factors related to animal performance and advances in methodology
Rehfeldt, C. ; Pas, M.F.W. te; Wimmers, K. ; Brameld, J.M. ; Nissen, P.M. ; Berri, C. ; Valente, L.M.P. ; Power, D.M. ; Picard, B. ; Stickland, N.C. ; Oksbjerg, N. - \ 2011
Animal 5 (2011)05. - ISSN 1751-7311 - p. 718 - 730.
trout oncorhynchus-mykiss - growth-factor-i - receptor signal-transduction - charr salvelinus-alpinus - breast meat quality - salmon salmo-salar - heavy-chain genes - igf-i - fiber types - rainbow-trout
Selective breeding is an effective tool to improve livestock. Several selection experiments have been conducted to study direct selection responses as well as correlated responses in traits of skeletal muscle growth and function. Moreover, comparisons of domestic with wild-type species and of extreme breeds provide information on the genetic background of the skeletal muscle phenotype. Structural muscular components that differed with increasing distance in lean growth or meat quality in mammals were found to be myofibre number, myofibre size, proportions of fibre types as well as the numbers and proportions of secondary and primary fibres. Furthermore, markers of satellite cell proliferation, metabolic enzyme activities, glycogen and fat contents, the expression of myosin heavy chain isoforms, of activated AMPKa and other proteins in skeletal muscle tissue and circulating IGF1 and IGF-binding proteins have been identified to be involved in selection responses observed in pigs, cattle and/or chicken. The use of molecular methods for selective breeding of fish has only recently been adopted in aquaculture and studies of the genetic basis of growth and flesh quality traits are scarce. Some of the molecular markers of muscle structure/metabolism in livestock have also been identified in fish, but so far no studies have linked them with selection response. Genome scans have been applied to identify genomic regions exhibiting quantitative trait loci that control traits of interest, for example, muscle structure and meat quality in pigs and growth rate in chicken. As another approach, polymorphisms in candidate genes reveal the relationship between genetic variation and target traits. Thus, in large-scale studies with pigs’ associations of polymorphisms in the HMGA2, CA3, EPOR, NME1 and TTN genes with traits of carcass and meat quality were detected. Other studies revealed the significance of mutations in the IGF2 and RYR1 genes for carcass lean and muscle fibre traits in pigs. Mutations in the myostatin (MSTN) gene in fish were also examined. Advances in research of the genetic and environmental control of traits related to meat quality and growth have been made by the application of holistic ‘omics’ techniques that studied the whole muscle-specific genome, transcriptome and proteome in relation to muscle and meat traits, the development of new methods for muscle fibre typing and the adaptation of biophysical measures to develop parameters of muscle fibre traits as well as the application of in vitro studies. Finally, future research priorities in the field are defined.
The estimated accuracy of the EU reference dissection method for pig carcass classification
Nissen, P.M. ; Busk, H. ; Oksama, M. ; Seynaeve, M. ; Gispert, M. ; Walstra, P. ; Hansson, I. ; Olsen, E. - \ 2006
Meat Science 73 (2006)1. - ISSN 0309-1740 - p. 22 - 28.
This experiment was designed to describe the accuracy of the EU-reference dissection method, and to describe the types of factors influencing the accuracy and assess their size. The experiment was conducted in four different European countries at two abattoirs within each country. A total of 128 carcasses was selected according to carcass weight, fat class and sex, and 8 butchers from different countries dissected the carcasses. Due to the experimental design of the experiment a variation in pig type was found between countries. The accuracy was expressed by the repeatability and reproducibility standard deviation, which were found to be 0.87 and 1.10, respectively, and by the reliability, found to be 0.87. This indicates a high accuracy, although a significant effect was found on the estimation of lean meat percentage (LMP) of butcher, and also that jointing of the carcass was of overall importance to the accuracy of the EU-reference dissection method.
Timing of insemination relative to ovulation in pigs : effects on sex ration of offspring
Soede, N.M. ; Nissen, A.K. ; Kemp, B. - \ 2000
Theriogenology 53 (2000). - ISSN 0093-691X - p. 1003 - 1011.
The influence of time of insemination in relation to time of ovulation on farrowing rate and litter size in sows, investigated by ultrasonography.
Nissen, A.K. ; Soede, N.M. ; Hyttel, P. ; Schmidt, M. ; Hoore, L. D' - \ 1997
Theriogenology 47 (1997). - ISSN 0093-691X - p. 1571 - 1582.
Facility management of distribution centres for vegetables and fruits
Broekmeulen, R.A.C.M. - \ 1995
In: Evolutionary Algorithms in Management Applications / Biethahn, J., Nissen, V., - p. 199 - 210.
Comparison between 3-methylhistidine production and proteinase activity as measures of skeletal muscle breakdown in protein deficient growing barrows.
Hemel-Grooten, H.N.A. van den; Koohmaraie, M. ; Yen, J.T. ; Arbona, J.R. ; Rathmacher, J.A. ; Nissen, S.L. ; Fiorotto, M.L. ; Garssen, G.J. ; Verstegen, M.W.A. - \ 1995
Journal of Animal Science 73 (1995). - ISSN 0021-8812 - p. 2272 - 2281.
Relationship between proteinase activity and myofibrillar protein degradation in porcine muscles during protein deficiency.
Grooten, H.N.A. ; Koohmaraie, M. ; Yen, J.T. ; Arbona, J.R. ; Rathmacher, J.A. ; Nissen, S.L. ; Garssen, G.L. ; Verstegen, M.W.A. - \ 1993
In: Poster Int. Workshop Proteolysis and meat quality, Clermont-Ferrand (1993)
Pediocin PA-1, a bacteriocin from Pediococcus acidilactici PAC1.0, forms hydrophilic pores in the cytoplasmic membrane of target cells.
Chikindas, M.L. ; García-Garcerá, M.J. ; Driessen, A.J.M. ; Ledeboer, A.M. ; Nissen-Meyer, J. ; Nes, I.F. ; Abee, T. ; Konings, W.N. ; Venema, G. - \ 1993
Applied and Environmental Microbiology 59 (1993). - ISSN 0099-2240 - p. 3577 - 3584.
Check title to add to marked list

Show 20 50 100 records per page

 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.