Staff Publications

Staff Publications

  • external user (warningwarning)
  • Log in as
  • language uk
  • About

    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

    We have a manual that explains all the features 

Records 1 - 20 / 36

  • help
  • print

    Print search results

  • export

    Export search results

  • alert
    We will mail you new results for this query: q=Pineda
Check title to add to marked list
Data from: Modulation of plant-mediated interactions between herbivores of different feeding guilds: effects of parasitism and belowground interactions
Vaello, Teresa ; Sarde, Sandeep ; Marcos-García, Mª Ángeles ; Boer, J.G. de; Pineda, Ana - \ 2018
plant soil feedback - herbivory - plant defense - insect - parasitism - gene expression
Herbivory affects subsequent herbivores, mainly regulated by the phytohormones jasmonic (JA) and salicylic acid (SA). Additionally, organisms such as soil microbes belowground or parasitoids that develop inside their herbivorous hosts aboveground, can change plant responses to herbivory. However, it is not yet well known how organisms of trophic levels other than herbivores, below- and above-ground, alter the interactions between insect species sharing a host plant. Here, we investigated whether the parasitoid Aphidius colemani and different soil microbial communities (created through plant-soil feedbacks) affect the JA and SA signalling pathways in response to the aphid Myzus persicae and the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis, as well as subsequent thrips performance. Our results show that the expression of the JA-responsive gene CaPINII in sweet pepper was more suppressed by aphids than by parasitised aphids. However, parasitism did not affect the expression of CaPAL1, a biosynthetic gene of SA. Furthermore, aphid feeding enhanced thrips performance compared with uninfested plants, but this was not observed when aphids were parasitised. Soils where different plant species were previously grown, did not affect plant responses or the interaction between herbivores. Our study shows that members of the third trophic level can modify herbivore interactions by altering plant physiology.
Erratum to: The sponge microbiome project
Moitinho-Silva, Lucas ; Nielsen, Shaun ; Amir, Amnon ; Gonzalez, Antonio ; Ackermann, Gail L. ; Cerrano, Carlo ; Astudillo-Garcia, Carmen ; Easson, Cole ; Sipkema, Detmer ; Liu, Fang ; Steinert, Georg ; Kotoulas, Giorgos ; McCormack, Grace P. ; Feng, Guofang ; Bell, James J. ; Vicente, Jan ; Björk, Johannes R. ; Montoya, Jose M. ; Olson, Julie B. ; Reveillaud, Julie ; Steindler, Laura ; Pineda, Mari Carmen ; Marra, Maria V. ; Ilan, Micha ; Taylor, Michael W. ; Polymenakou, Paraskevi ; Erwin, Patrick M. ; Schupp, Peter J. ; Simister, Rachel L. ; Knight, Rob ; Thacker, Robert W. ; Costa, Rodrigo ; Hill, Russell T. ; Lopez-Legentil, Susanna ; Dailianis, Thanos ; Ravasi, Timothy ; Hentschel, Ute ; Li, Zhiyong ; Webster, Nicole S. ; Thomas, Torsten - \ 2018
GigaScience 7 (2018)12. - ISSN 2047-217X
Performance of the Black Soldier Fly (Diptera : Stratiomyidae) on Vegetable Residue-Based Diets Formulated Based on Protein and Carbohydrate Contents
Barragán-Fonseca, Karol ; Pineda-Mejia, Julián ; Dicke, Marcel ; Loon, Joop J.A. van - \ 2018
Journal of Economic Entomology 111 (2018)6. - ISSN 0022-0493 - p. 2676 - 2683.

The black soldier fly [Hermetia illucens L. (Diptera: Stratiomyidae)] can be sustainably reared on organic waste streams and thereby provide a novel animal protein source for animal feed. Black soldier fly's performance and body composition depend to a large extent on the nutrient composition of the waste stream. Black soldier fly larvae were fed on four diets consisting of vegetable by-products from the food industry. All four diets contained dried distiller's grains with solubles plus one or two other main ingredients; for diet 1 the additional ingredient was grape pulp; diet 2: potato peels; diet 3: bean seeds; and diet 4: cabbage leaves plus old bread. The diets were formulated based on an optimal summed protein and carbohydrate (P+C) concentration resulting from previous experiments and a 1:2 protein:carbohydrate (P:C) ratio. We quantified both larval and adult performance. Diet 4 was the best performing vegetable waste-based diet. In a follow-up experiment, we re-formulated diet 4 to have P:C ratios of 1:2 or 1:3 and 40 or 47% dry matter of P+C. In the first experiment, although there were differences in larval performance among the diets, all diets supported a higher larval performance than reported previously, with diet 4 having 47% P+C being the best performing diet. We infer that not only total macronutrient content but also nutritional quality of proteins and carbohydrates affected performance. In the second experiment, the two vegetable residue-based larval diets resulted in similar larval and adult performance. High dietary protein resulted in increases in larval crude fat content.

Modulation of plant-mediated interactions between herbivores of different feeding guilds: Effects of parasitism and belowground interactions
Vaello, Teresa ; Sarde, Sandeep J. ; Marcos-García, Mª Ángeles ; Boer, Jetske G. de; Pineda, Ana - \ 2018
Scientific Reports 8 (2018)1. - ISSN 2045-2322

Herbivory affects subsequent herbivores, mainly regulated by the phytohormones jasmonic (JA) and salicylic acid (SA). Additionally, organisms such as soil microbes belowground or parasitoids that develop inside their herbivorous hosts aboveground, can change plant responses to herbivory. However, it is not yet well known how organisms of trophic levels other than herbivores, below- and above-ground, alter the interactions between insect species sharing a host plant. Here, we investigated whether the parasitoid Aphidius colemani and different soil microbial communities (created through plant-soil feedbacks) affect the JA and SA signalling pathways in response to the aphid Myzus persicae and the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis, as well as subsequent thrips performance. Our results show that the expression of the JA-responsive gene CaPINII in sweet pepper was more suppressed by aphids than by parasitised aphids. However, parasitism did not affect the expression of CaPAL1, a biosynthetic gene of SA. Furthermore, aphid feeding enhanced thrips performance compared with uninfested plants, but this was not observed when aphids were parasitised. Soils where different plant species were previously grown, did not affect plant responses or the interaction between herbivores. Our study shows that members of the third trophic level can modify herbivore interactions by altering plant physiology.

Data from: Soil microbial species loss affects plant biomass and survival of an introduced bacterial strain, but not inducible plant defences
Kurm, V. ; Putten, W.H. van der; Pineda, Ana ; Hol, G.W.H. - \ 2018
induced systemic resistence - low abundant soil microbes - PGPR - Arabidopsis thaliana - Myzus persicae - Pseudomonas fluorescens
Background and Aims: Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains can influence plant-insect interactions. However, little is known about the effect of changes in the soil bacterial community in general and especially the loss of rare soil microbes on these interactions. Here, the influence of rare soil microbe-reduction on induced systemic resistance (ISR) in a wild ecotype of Arabidopsis thaliana against the aphid Myzus persicae was investigated. - Methods: To create a gradient of microbial abundances, soil was inoculated with a serial dilution of a microbial community and responses of Arabidopsis plants that originated from the same site as the soil microbes were tested. Plant biomass, transcription of genes involved in plant defences, and insect performance were measured. In addition, the effects of the PGPR strain Pseudomonas fluorescens SS101 on plant and insect performance were tested under influence of the various soil dilution treatments. - Key Results: Plant biomass showed a hump-shaped relationship with soil microbial community dilution, independent of aphid or Pseudomonas treatments. Both aphid infestation and inoculation with Pseudomonas reduced plant biomass, and led to downregulation of PR1 (salicylic acid-responsive gene) and CYP79B3 (involved in synthesis of glucosinolates). Aphid performance and gene transcription were unaffected by soil dilution. - Conclusions: Neither the loss of rare microbial species, as caused by soil dilution, nor Pseudomonas, affect the resistance of A. thaliana against M. persicae. However, both Pseudomonas survival and plant biomass respond to rare species loss. Thus, loss of rare soil microbial species can have a significant impact on both above- and belowground organisms.
Soil microbial species loss affects plant biomass and survival of an introduced bacterial strain, but not inducible plant defences
Kurm, Viola ; Putten, Wim H. van der; Pineda, Ana ; Hol, G.W.H. - \ 2018
Annals of Botany 121 (2018)2. - ISSN 0305-7364 - p. 311 - 319.
Arabidopsis thaliana - induced systemic resistance - low-abundance soil microbes - Myzus persicae - PGPR
Background and Aims: Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) strains can influence plant-insect interactions. However, little is known about the effect of changes in the soil bacterial community in general and especially the loss of rare soil microbes on these interactions. Here, the influence of rare soil microbe reduction on induced systemic resistance (ISR) in a wild ecotype of Arabidopsis thaliana against the aphid Myzus persicae was investigated. Methods: To create a gradient of microbial abundances, soil was inoculated with a serial dilution of a microbial community and responses of Arabidopsis plants that originated from the same site as the soil microbes were tested. Plant biomass, transcription of genes involved in plant defences, and insect performance were measured. In addition, the effects of the PGPR strain Pseudomonas fluorescens SS101 on plant and insect performance were tested under the influence of the various soil dilution treatments. Key Results: Plant biomass showed a hump-shaped relationship with soil microbial community dilution, independent of aphid or Pseudomonas treatments. Both aphid infestation and inoculation with Pseudomonas reduced plant biomass, and led to downregulation of PR1 (salicylic acid-responsive gene) and CYP79B3 (involved in synthesis of glucosinolates). Aphid performance and gene transcription were unaffected by soil dilution. Conclusions: Neither the loss of rare microbial species, as caused by soil dilution, nor Pseudomonas affect the resistance of A. Thaliana against M. persicae. However, both Pseudomonas survival and plant biomass respond to rare species loss. Thus, loss of rare soil microbial species can have a significant impact on both above- and belowground organisms.
Olfactory response of the predatory bug Orius laevigatus (Hemiptera: Anthocoridae) to the aggregation pheromone of its prey, Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae)
Vaello, T. ; Casas, J.L. ; Pineda Gomez, A.M. ; Alfonso, I. de; Marcos-García, M.A. - \ 2017
Environmental Entomology 46 (2017)5. - ISSN 0046-225X - p. 1115 - 1119.
017-4037
Herbivore natural enemies base their foraging decision on information cues from different trophic levels but mainly from plant odors. However, the second trophic level (i.e., the herbivorous prey) may also provide reliable infochemical cues for their natural enemies. We have evaluated the role of the aggregation pheromone from Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) as a potential kairomone for its natural enemy, the predatory bug Orius laevigatus (Fieber). For this purpose, we have analyzed the response of O. laevigatus to (R)-lavandulyl acetate and neryl (S)-2-methylbutanoate, the two major components of the thrips aggregation pheromone. These compounds have been offered to O. laevigatus adult females and nymphs of the predatory bugs both in separate and as specific (1:1 or 1:2.3) blends, in experiments involving a dual choice Y-tube olfactometer. None of the compounds attracted adults or nymphs when they were individually supplied. Conversely, they were significantly attracted to both adults and nymphs when offered as a blend. A 1:2.3 (R)-lavandulyl acetate:neryl (S)-2-methylbutanoate blend was attractive to both nymphs and adults, while a 1:1 blend elicited response only in nymphs. These results suggest that specific blends of these compounds from the aggregation pheromone may be used as an attractant to O. laevigatus. The results of this work highlight the importance of studying olfactory responses of natural enemies for a better understanding of their foraging behavior. Potential uses of these results in future studies are discussed.
Soil microbial species loss affects plant biomass and survival of an introduced bacterial strain, but not inducible plant defences
Kurm, V. ; Putten, W.H. van der; Pineda Gomez, A.M. ; Hol, Gera - \ 2017
The sponge microbiome project
Moitinho-Silva, Lucas ; Nielsen, Shaun ; Amir, Amnon ; Gonzalez, Antonio ; Ackermann, Gail L. ; Cerrano, Carlo ; Astudillo-Garcia, Carmen ; Easson, Cole ; Sipkema, Detmer ; Liu, Fang ; Steinert, Georg ; Kotoulas, Giorgos ; McCormack, Grace P. ; Feng, Guofang ; Bell, James J. ; Vicente, Jan ; Björk, Johannes R. ; Montoya, Jose M. ; Olson, Julie B. ; Reveillaud, Julie ; Steindler, Laura ; Pineda, Mari Carmen ; Marra, Maria V. ; Ilan, Micha ; Taylor, Michael W. ; Polymenakou, Paraskevi ; Erwin, Patrick M. ; Schupp, Peter J. ; Simister, Rachel L. ; Knight, Rob ; Thacker, Robert W. ; Costa, Rodrigo ; Hill, Russell T. ; Lopez-Legentil, Susanna ; Dailianis, Thanos ; Ravasi, Timothy ; Hentschel, Ute ; Li, Zhiyong ; Webster, Nicole S. ; Thomas, Torsten - \ 2017
GigaScience 6 (2017)10. - ISSN 2047-217X
16S rRNA gene - Archaea - Bacteria - Marine sponges - Microbial diversity - Microbiome - Symbiosis
Marine sponges (phylum Porifera) are a diverse, phylogenetically deep-branching clade known for forming intimate partnerships with complex communities of microorganisms. To date, 16S rRNA gene sequencing studies have largely utilised different extraction and amplification methodologies to target the microbial communities of a limited number of sponge species, severely limiting comparative analyses of sponge microbial diversity and structure. Here, we provide an extensive and standardised dataset that will facilitate sponge microbiome comparisons across large spatial, temporal, and environmental scales. Samples from marine sponges (n = 3569 specimens), seawater (n = 370), marine sediments (n = 65) and other environments (n = 29) were collected from different locations across the globe. This dataset incorporates at least 268 different sponge species, including several yet unidentified taxa. The V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced from extracted DNA using standardised procedures. Raw sequences (total of 1.1 billion sequences) were processed and clustered with (i) a standard protocol using QIIME closed-reference picking resulting in 39 543 operational taxonomic units (OTU) at 97% sequence identity, (ii) a de novo clustering using Mothur resulting in 518 246 OTUs, and (iii) a new high-resolution Deblur protocol resulting in 83 908 unique bacterial sequences. Abundance tables, representative sequences, taxonomic classifications, and metadata are provided. This dataset represents a comprehensive resource of sponge-associated microbial communities based on 16S rRNA gene sequences that can be used to address overarching hypotheses regarding host-associated prokaryotes, including host specificity, convergent evolution, environmental drivers of microbiome structure, and the sponge-associated rare biosphere.
Does drought stress modify the effects of plant-growth promoting rhizobacteria on an aboveground chewing herbivore?
Bobadilla, Maite Fernández de; Friman, Julia ; Pangesti, Nurmi ; Dicke, Marcel ; Loon, Joop J.A. van; Pineda Gomez, Ana - \ 2017
Insect Science 24 (2017)6. - ISSN 1672-9609 - p. 1034 - 1044.
Abiotic stress - Abscisic acid - Crosstalk - Induced systemic resistance - Jasmonic acid - Pseudomonas simiae

Soil microbes have important effects on the interactions of plants with their environment, by promoting plant growth, inducing resistance to pests or by conferring tolerance to abiotic stress. However, their effects are variable and the factors responsible for this variation are mainly unknown. Our aim was to assess how drought stress modifies the effect of the nonpathogenic rhizobacterium Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r on plant growth and resistance against the generalist leaf-chewing caterpillar Mamestra brassicae. We studied Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 plants, as well as mutants altered in the biosynthesis of the phytohormones jasmonic acid (JA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Caterpillars did not prefer rhizobacteria-treated plants, independently of drought stress. Rhizobacteria colonization had a variable effect on caterpillar performance, which ranged from positive in one experiment to neutral in a second one. Drought had a consistent negative effect on herbivore performance; however, it did not modify the effect of rhizobacteria on herbivore performance. The effect of drought on herbivore performance was JA-mediated (confirmed with the use of the dde2-2 mutant), but it was still present in the ABA-deficient mutant aba2-1. Plant biomass was reduced by both drought and herbivory but it was enhanced by rhizobacterial colonization. Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r is able to promote plant growth even when plants are suffering herbivory. Nevertheless, the microbial effect on the herbivore is variable, independently of drought stress. To get the best possible outcome from the rhizobacteria-plant mutualism it is important to understand which other factors may be responsible for its context-dependency.

Antagonism between two root-associated beneficial Pseudomonas strains does not affect plant growth promotion and induced resistance against a leaf-chewing herbivore
Pangesti, Nurmi ; Vandenbrande, Simon ; Pineda, Ana ; Dicke, Marcel ; Raaijmakers, Jos M. ; Loon, Joop J.A. van - \ 2017
FEMS microbiology ecology 93 (2017)4. - ISSN 0168-6496
Arabidopsis thaliana - Mamestra brassicae, roots - microbe–plant–insect interactions - microbial antagonism

Plant growth-promoting microbes residing on the roots may cooperate or compete, thereby affecting their collective benefit to the host plant. Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r (formerly known as P. fluorescens WCS417r) and Pseudomonas fluorescens SS101 are well known for their ability to induce systemic resistance in Arabidopsis. Here, we evaluate how these species interact on the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 and how their co-inoculation affects plant defense to the leaf-chewing herbivore Mamestra brassicae and plant growth promotion. WCS417r and SS101, applied individually to root tips or at two different positions along the roots, established similar population densities on Arabidopsis roots. When co-inoculated at the same position on the roots, however, WCS417r established significantly higher population densities than SS101. Both upon single inoculation and co-inoculation, the two pseudomonads induced the same level of induced systemic resistance against the caterpillar M. brassicae and the same increase in plant biomass. These results suggest that combined inoculation of both Pseudomonas strains does not significantly modify the plant's defensive capacity compared to individual inoculation, resulting in a similar effect on performance of the generalist herbivore M. brassicae.

Plant-mediated species networks : The modulating role of herbivore density
Pineda, Ana ; Soler, Roxina ; Pastor, Victoria ; Li, Yehua ; Dicke, Marcel - \ 2017
Ecological Entomology 42 (2017)4. - ISSN 0307-6946 - p. 449 - 457.
Cross-talk - Facilitation - Multiple attack - Phytohormones - Plant defences - Plant-insect interactions
1. When herbivores of distinct feeding guilds, such as phloem feeders and leaf chewers, interact, the outcome of these interactions often shows facilitation. However, whether this facilitation turns into competition at stronger herbivory pressure remains unknown. 2. Using an integrative approach that links ecological processes (behavioural choices of insects) with physiological plant mechanisms (nutrient and phytohormone levels) for the wild crucifer Brassica nigra (L.) Koch., this study evaluates preferences of leaf chewers for plants previously infested with several densities of the specialist aphid Brevicoryne brassicae L. (Hemiptera, Aphididae). As leaf chewers, four species of caterpillars (Lepidoptera) were selected that differ in their degree of specialisation in crucifers. 3. These results show that, whereas at low and medium aphid densities caterpillars displayed a preference for aphid-infested plants or no preference, at high aphid infestation density, all four species of caterpillar preferred uninfested plants, with a significant difference for Pieris rapae and Mamestra brassicae. 4. In contrast to our expectation, the consistent preference for uninfested plants at a high aphid density could not be associated with a decrease in plant nutrition. However, while jasmonate concentrations [i.e. 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid and jasmonic acid (JA)] at medium aphid-density infestation decreased compared with low levels of infestation, at high infestation level, the jasmonates JA as well as JA conjugated with the amino acid isoleucine were present at higher levels compared with low-infestation treatments. 5. This work provides evidence that positive interactions observed in herbivore communities can be transient, leading to negative interactions mediated by changes in plant defences rather than in plant nutrition.
Groenten uit de stad
Valk, Arnold van der - \ 2016
urban agriculture - urban areas - health - social welfare - participation - volunteers

Stadslandbouw geeft niet alleen een krachtige impuls aan de leefbaarheid van de wijk, maar kan ook een positieve bijdrage leveren aan de gezondheid. Hoe komen buurtprojecten voor stadslandbouw tot stand en wanneer zijn ze succesvol? AGORA ging hierover in gesprek met onderzoekers Beatriz Pineda Revilla (Universiteit van Amsterdam) en Arnold van der Valk (Wageningen Universiteit.

Jasmonic Acid and Ethylene Signaling Pathways Regulate Glucosinolate Levels in Plants During Rhizobacteria-Induced Systemic Resistance Against a Leaf-Chewing Herbivore
Pangesti, Nurmi ; Reichelt, Michael ; Mortel, Judith E. van de; Kapsomenou, Elena ; Gershenzon, Jonathan ; Loon, Joop J.A. van; Dicke, Marcel ; Pineda Gomez, Ana - \ 2016
Journal of Chemical Ecology 42 (2016)12. - ISSN 0098-0331 - p. 1212 - 1225.
Camalexin - Glucosinolates - Induced systemic resistance - Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria - Signaling pathways - 016-3989

Beneficial soil microbes can promote plant growth and induce systemic resistance (ISR) in aboveground tissues against pathogens and herbivorous insects. Despite the increasing interest in microbial-ISR against herbivores, the underlying molecular and chemical mechanisms of this phenomenon remain elusive. Using Arabidopsis thaliana and the rhizobacterium Pseudomonas simiae WCS417r (formerly known as P. fluorescens WCS417r), we here evaluate the role of the JA-regulated MYC2-branch and the JA/ET-regulated ORA59-branch in modulating rhizobacteria-ISR to Mamestra brassicae by combining gene transcriptional, phytochemical, and herbivore performance assays. Our data show a consistent negative effect of rhizobacteria-mediated ISR on the performance of M. brassicae. Functional JA- and ET-signaling pathways are required for this effect, as shown by investigating the knock-out mutants dde2-2 and ein2-1. Additionally, whereas herbivory mainly induces the MYC2-branch, rhizobacterial colonization alone or in combination with herbivore infestation induces the ORA59-branch of the JA signaling pathway. Rhizobacterial colonization enhances the synthesis of camalexin and aliphatic glucosinolates (GLS) compared to the control, while it suppresses the herbivore-induced levels of indole GLS. These changes are associated with modulation of the JA-/ET-signaling pathways. Our data show that the colonization of plant roots by rhizobacteria modulates plant-insect interactions by prioritizing the JA/ET-regulated ORA59-branch over the JA-regulated MYC2-branch. This study elucidates how microbial plant symbionts can modulate the plant immune system to mount an effective defense response against herbivorous plant attackers.

In Pursuit of a Participatory Society: The Role of the participatory agent
Pineda Revilla, Beatriz ; Valk, A.J.J. van der - \ 2016
Urban Agriculture Magazine 31 (2016). - ISSN 1571-6244 - p. 41 - 42.
urban areas - gardens - participation - stedelijke gebieden - tuinen - participatie
In the last decade, Dutch cities have witnessed a rise in the number of citizen-led initiatives-initiatives which have increasingly attracted the interest of science, the public and policy makers. This article focuses on the role of the "participatory agent", a civil servant whose main task is to bridge citizen and local government interests in a community garden in Amsterdam East.
Stadslandbouw in 'gastropool' New York
Pineda Revilla, Beatriz ; Valk, A.J.J. van der - \ 2016
Agora 32 (2016)2. - ISSN 1380-6319 - p. 36 - 39.
stedelijke gebieden - voedselconsumptie - gezondheid - onderwijs - sociale gebruiken - urban areas - food consumption - health - education - social customs
In de metropool New York draait het leven voor een belangrijk deel om eten. Voedsel wordt steeds vaker gezien als een verbindend element in het dagelijks leven. Het raakt aan uiteenlopende zaken als gezondheid, onderwijs, ontspanning en sociale cohesie.
Negative impact of drought stress on a generalist leaf chewer and a phloem feeder is associated with, but not explained by an increase in herbivore-induced indole glucosinolates
Pineda Gomez, A. ; Pangesti, N. ; Soler, R. ; Dam, N.M. van; Loon, J. van; Dicke, M. - \ 2016
Environmental and Experimental Botany 123 (2016). - ISSN 0098-8472 - p. 88 - 97.
Abiotic factor - Arabidopsis thaliana - Generalist herbivores - Indole glucosinolates - Plant-insect interactions - Water stress - 016-3905

Plants are constantly exposed to multiple biotic and abiotic stresses, such as drought and herbivory. However, plant responses to these stresses have usually been studied in isolation. Here, we take a multidisciplinary approach addressing ecological and chemical aspects of plant responses to generalist herbivores and several intensities of drought. We hypothesize that in brassicaceous plants, the effects of drought stress on herbivores can be explained by an increase in indole glucosinolates. Four-week-old Arabidopsis thaliana plants were drought stressed for one week or watered as normal. Three types of drought stress were compared: (1) no watering for 1 week and then rewatered to saturation (low drought); (2) no watering for 1 week and then rewatered to 60% of soil water content (high drought); (3) watering every other day to 60% of soil water content (continuous drought). All three types of drought stress negatively affected both the larval mass of the leaf chewer Mamestra brassicae and the population growth of the phloem feeder Myzus persicae. This was associated with increased levels of herbivore-induced indole glucosinolates compared to infested control plants. Interestingly, the levels of total indole glucosinolates did not change in uninfested plants, except for the indole 4-methoxy-glucobrassicin that was induced by continuous drought. Two-choice experiments also showed that caterpillars of M. brassicae, but not aphids, avoided drought-stressed plants only after feeding on them, but not by visual/olfactory cues. However, on a knockout mutant blocked in the production of indole glucosinolates (cyp79B2 cyp79B3), the effect of drought on herbivore performance was similar to that on wild-type plants. The results of this study show that drought stress induced higher levels of indole glucosinolates; however, these levels were not responsible for higher resistance to generalist herbivores in drought-stressed plants.

Aligning corporate greenhouse-gas emissions targets with climate goals
Krabbe, Oskar ; Linthorst, Giel ; Blok, Kornelis ; Crijns-Graus, Wina ; Vuuren, Detlef P. Van; Höhne, Niklas ; Faria, Pedro ; Aden, Nate ; Pineda, Alberto Carrillo - \ 2015
Nature Climate Change 5 (2015)12. - ISSN 1758-678X - p. 1057 - 1060.

Corporate climate action is increasingly considered important in driving the transition towards a low-carbon economy. For this, it is critical to ensure translation of global goals to greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions reduction targets at company level. At the moment, however, there is a lack of clear methods to derive consistent corporate target setting that keeps cumulative corporate GHG emissions within a specific carbon budget (for example, 550-1,300GtCO2 between 2011 and 2050 for the 2°C target). Here we propose a method for corporate emissions target setting that derives carbon intensity pathways for companies based on sectoral pathways from existing mitigation scenarios: the Sectoral Decarbonization Approach (SDA). These company targets take activity growth and initial performance into account. Next to target setting on company level, the SDA can be used by companies, policymakers, investors or other stakeholders as a benchmark for tracking corporate climate performance and actions, providing a mechanism for corporate accountability.

Potentialities of practice-oriented sustainable food planning : An explorative ethnographic analysis of food related practices and the ways they impact land use in two urban gardens in Amsterdam and Berlin
Valk, A.J.J. van der; Pineda Revilla, Beatriz - \ 2015
Role of Large Cabbage White butterfly male-derived compounds in elicitation of direct and indirect egg-killing defenses in the black mustard
Fatouros, N.E. ; Voirol, L.R.P. ; Drizou, Fryni ; Doan, Quyen T. ; Pineda, Ana ; Frago, Enric ; Loon, J.J.A. van - \ 2015
Frontiers in Plant Science 6 (2015)SEPTEMBER. - ISSN 1664-462X - 9 p.
Accessory reproductive glands - Brassicaceae - Egg parasitoid - Hypersensitive response - Induced plant defenses - Oviposition-induced plant volatiles - Pieris - PR-1

To successfully exert defenses against herbivores and pathogens plants need to recognize reliable cues produced by their attackers. Up to now, few elicitors associated with herbivorous insects have been identified. We have previously shown that accessory reproductive gland secretions associated with eggs of Cabbage White butterflies (Pieris spp.) induce chemical changes in Brussels sprouts plants recruiting egg-killing parasitoids. Only secretions of mated female butterflies contain minute amounts of male-derived anti-aphrodisiac compounds that elicit this indirect plant defense. Here, we used the black mustard (Brassica nigra) to investigate how eggs of the Large Cabbage White butterfly (Pieris brassicae) induce, either an egg-killing direct [i.e., hypersensitive response (HR)-like necrosis] or indirect defense (i.e., oviposition-induced plant volatiles attracting Trichogramma egg parasitoids). Plants induced by P. brassicae egg-associated secretions expressed both traits and previous mating enhanced elicitation. Treatment with the anti-aphrodisiac compound of P. brassicae, benzyl cyanide (BC), induced stronger HR when compared to controls. Expression of the salicylic (SA) pathway- and HR-marker PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENE1 was induced only in plants showing an HR-like necrosis. Trichogramma wasps were attracted to volatiles induced by secretion of mated P. brassicae females but application of BC did not elicit the parasitoid-attracting volatiles. We conclude that egg-associated secretions of Pieris butterflies contain specific elicitors of the different plant defense traits against eggs in Brassica plants. While in Brussels sprouts plants anti-aphrodisiac compounds in Pieris egg-associated secretions were clearly shown to elicit indirect defense, the wild relative B. nigra, recognizes different herbivore cues that mediate the defensive responses. These results add another level of specificity to the mechanisms by which plants recognize their attackers.

Check title to add to marked list
<< previous | next >>

Show 20 50 100 records per page

 
Please log in to use this service. Login as Wageningen University & Research user or guest user in upper right hand corner of this page.