Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Understanding spatial patterns of soils for sustainable agriculture in northern Ethiopia’s tropical mountains
Nyssen, Jan ; Tielens, Sander ; Gebreyohannes, Tesfamichael ; Araya, Tigist ; Teka, Kassa ; Wauw, Johan van de; Degeyndt, Karen ; Descheemaeker, Katrien ; Amare, Kassa ; Haile, Mitiku ; Zenebe, Amanuel ; Munro, Neil ; Walraevens, Kristine ; Gebrehiwot, Kindeya ; Poesen, Jean ; Frankl, Amaury ; Tsegay, Alemtsehay ; Deckers, Jozef - \ 2019
PLoS ONE 14 (2019)10. - ISSN 1932-6203

Knowledge of the geographical distribution of soils is indispensable for policy and decision makers to achieve the goal of increasing agricultural production and reduce poverty, particularly in the Global South. A study was conducted to better understand the soilscapes of the Giba catchment (900–3300 m a.s.l.; 5133 km2) in northern Ethiopia, so as to sustain soil use and management. To characterise the chemical and physical properties of the different benchmark soils and to classify them in line with the World Reference Base of Soil Resources, 141 soil profile pits and 1381 soil augerings at representative sites were analysed. The dominant soil units identified are Leptosol and bare rock (19% coverage), Vertic Cambisol (14%), Regosol and Cambisol (10%), Skeletic/Leptic Cambisol and Regosol (9%), Rendzic Leptosol (7%), Calcaric/Calcic Vertisol (6%), Chromic Luvisol (6%) and Chromic/Pellic Vertisol (5%). Together these eight soil units cover almost 75% of the catchment. Topography and parent material are the major influencing factors that explain the soil distribution. Besides these two factors, land cover that is strongly impacted by human activities, may not be overlooked. Our soil suitability study shows that currently, after thousands of years of agricultural land use, a new dynamic equilibrium has come into existence in the soilscape, in which ca. 40% of the catchment is very suitable, and 25% is moderately suitable for agricultural production. In view of such large suitable areas, the Giba catchment has a good agricultural potential if soil erosion rates can be controlled, soil fertility (particularly nitrogen) increased, available water optimally used, and henceforth crop yields increased.

Hydrological Context of Water Scarcity and Storage on the Mountain Ridges in Dogu’a Tembien
Walraevens, Kristine ; Camp, Marc Van; Vandecasteele, Ine ; Clymans, W. ; Moeyersons, J. ; Frankl, A. ; Guyassa, Etefa ; Zenebe, A. ; Poesen, J. ; Descheemaeker, K.K.E. ; Nyssen, J. - \ 2019
In: Geo-trekking in Ethiopia’s Tropical Mountains / Nyssen, J., Miro, A., Frankl, A., Springer Nature Switzerland (GeoGuide ) - ISBN 9783030049546 - p. 197 - 213.
A highly seasonal and erratic rainfall pattern (Chap. 3) provokes general water scarcity in Dogu’a Tembien for eight months a year. This chapter shortly describes the hydrogeological context and hydrodynamics of actual surface and groundwater flow of the mountain catchments around Hagere Selam. Further, some positive effects of water harvesting techniques on the water availability are shown.
Remote sensing and signaling in kidney proximal tubules stimulates gut microbiome-derived organic anion secretion
Jansen, Jitske ; Jansen, Katja ; Neven, Ellen ; Poesen, Ruben ; Othman, Amr ; Mil, Alain van; Sluijter, Joost ; Torano, Javier Sastre ; Zaal, Esther A. ; Berkers, Celia R. ; Esser, Diederik ; Wichers, Harry J. ; Ede, Karin van; Duursen, Majorie van; Burtey, Stéphane ; Verhaar, Marianne C. ; Meijers, Björn ; Masereeuw, Rosalinde - \ 2019
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 116 (2019)32. - ISSN 0027-8424 - p. 16105 - 16110.
Indoxyl sulfate - Kidney proximal tubule - Organic anion transporter 1 - Remote sensing and signaling

Membrane transporters and receptors are responsible for balancing nutrient and metabolite levels to aid body homeostasis. Here, we report that proximal tubule cells in kidneys sense elevated endogenous, gut microbiome-derived, metabolite levels through EGF receptors and downstream signaling to induce their secretion by up-regulating the organic anion transporter-1 (OAT1). Remote metabolite sensing and signaling was observed in kidneys from healthy volunteers and rats in vivo, leading to induced OAT1 expression and increased removal of indoxyl sulfate, a prototypical microbiome-derived metabolite and uremic toxin. Using 2D and 3D human proximal tubule cell models, we show that indoxyl sulfate induces OAT1 via AhR and EGFR signaling, controlled by miR-223. Concomitantly produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) control OAT1 activity and are balanced by the glutathione pathway, as confirmed by cellular metabolomic profiling. Collectively, we demonstrate remote metabolite sensing and signaling as an effective OAT1 regulation mechanism to maintain plasma metabolite levels by controlling their secretion.

Opportunities for soil sustainability in Europe
Putten, W.H. van der; Ramirez, Kelly S. ; Poesen, Jean ; Winding, A. ; Lemanceau, Philippe ; Lisa, Lenka ; Simek, Miloslaw ; Moora, M. ; Setala, Heikki ; Zaitsev, A. ; Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria ; Hornung, E. ; Wall, David ; Angelis, P. de; Lipiec, Jerzy ; Briones, M.J.I. ; Hedlund, Katarina ; Heijden, M. ; Six, Johan ; Bardgett, Richard D. ; Powlson, D. ; Goulding, K. ; Norton, Michael - \ 2018
European Academies Science Advisory Council (EASAC) (EASAC policy report 36) - ISBN 9783804738980 - 48 p.
Development and analysis of the Soil Water Infiltration Global database
Rahmati, Mehdi ; Weihermüller, Lutz ; Vanderborght, Jan ; Pachepsky, Yakov A. ; Mao, Lili ; Sadeghi, Seyed Hamidreza ; Moosavi, Niloofar ; Kheirfam, Hossein ; Montzka, Carsten ; Looy, Kris Van; Toth, Brigitta ; Hazbavi, Zeinab ; Yamani, Wafa Al; Albalasmeh, Ammar A. ; Alghzawi, M.Z. ; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael ; Antonino, Antônio Celso Dantas ; Arampatzis, George ; Armindo, Robson André ; Asadi, Hossein ; Bamutaze, Yazidhi ; Batlle-Aguilar, Jordi ; Béchet, Béatrice ; Becker, Fabian ; Blöschl, Günter ; Bohne, Klaus ; Braud, Isabelle ; Castellano, Clara ; Cerdà, Artemi ; Chalhoub, Maha ; Cichota, Rogerio ; Císlerová, Milena ; Clothier, Brent ; Coquet, Yves ; Cornelis, Wim ; Corradini, Corrado ; Coutinho, Artur Paiva ; Oliveira, Muriel Bastista De; Macedo, José Ronaldo De; Durães, Matheus Fonseca ; Emami, Hojat ; Eskandari, Iraj ; Farajnia, Asghar ; Flammini, Alessia ; Fodor, Nándor ; Gharaibeh, Mamoun ; Ghavimipanah, Mohamad Hossein ; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A. ; Giertz, Simone ; Hatzigiannakis, Evangelos G. ; Horn, Rainer ; Jiménez, Juan José ; Jacques, Diederik ; Keesstra, Saskia Deborah ; Kelishadi, Hamid ; Kiani-Harchegani, Mahboobeh ; Kouselou, Mehdi ; Jha, Madan Kumar ; Lassabatere, Laurent ; Li, Xiaoyan ; Liebig, Mark A. ; Lichner, Lubomír ; López, María Victoria ; Machiwal, Deepesh ; Mallants, Dirk ; Mallmann, Micael Stolben ; Oliveira Marques, Jean Dalmo De; Marshall, Miles R. ; Mertens, Jan ; Meunier, Félicien ; Mohammadi, Mohammad Hossein ; Mohanty, Binayak P. ; Pulido-Moncada, Mansonia ; Montenegro, Suzana ; Morbidelli, Renato ; Moret-Fernández, David ; Moosavi, Ali Akbar ; Mosaddeghi, Mohammad Reza ; Mousavi, Seyed Bahman ; Mozaffari, Hasan ; Nabiollahi, Kamal ; Neyshabouri, Mohammad Reza ; Ottoni, Marta Vasconcelos ; Ottoni Filho, Theophilo Benedicto ; Pahlavan-Rad, Mohammad Reza ; Panagopoulos, Andreas ; Peth, Stephan ; Peyneau, Pierre Emmanuel ; Picciafuoco, Tommaso ; Poesen, Jean ; Pulido, Manuel ; Reinert, Dalvan José ; Reinsch, Sabine ; Rezaei, Meisam ; Roberts, Francis Parry ; Robinson, David ; Rodrigo-Comino, Jesüs ; Rotunno Filho, Otto Corrêa ; Saito, Tadaomi ; Suganuma, Hideki ; Saltalippi, Carla ; Sándor, Renáta ; Schütt, Brigitta ; Seeger, Manuel ; Sepehrnia, Nasrollah ; Sharifi Moghaddam, Ehsan ; Shukla, Manoj ; Shutaro, Shiraki ; Sorando, Ricardo ; Stanley, Ajayi Asishana ; Strauss, Peter ; Su, Zhongbo ; Taghizadeh-Mehrjardi, Ruhollah ; Taguas, Encarnación ; Teixeira, Wenceslau Geraldes ; Vaezi, Ali Reza ; Vafakhah, Mehdi ; Vogel, Tomas ; Vogeler, Iris ; Votrubova, Jana ; Werner, Steffen ; Winarski, Thierry ; Yilmaz, Deniz ; Young, Michael H. ; Zacharias, Steffen ; Zeng, Yijian ; Zhao, Ying ; Zhao, Hong ; Vereecken, Harry - \ 2018
Earth System Science Data 10 (2018)3. - ISSN 1866-3508 - p. 1237 - 1263.

In this paper, we present and analyze a novel global database of soil infiltration measurements, the Soil Water Infiltration Global (SWIG) database. In total, 5023 infiltration curves were collected across all continents in the SWIG database. These data were either provided and quality checked by the scientists who performed the experiments or they were digitized from published articles. Data from 54 different countries were included in the database with major contributions from Iran, China, and the USA. In addition to its extensive geographical coverage, the collected infiltration curves cover research from 1976 to late 2017. Basic information on measurement location and method, soil properties, and land use was gathered along with the infiltration data, making the database valuable for the development of pedotransfer functions (PTFs) for estimating soil hydraulic properties, for the evaluation of infiltration measurement methods, and for developing and validating infiltration models. Soil textural information (clay, silt, and sand content) is available for 3842 out of 5023 infiltration measurements (∼76%) covering nearly all soil USDA textural classes except for the sandy clay and silt classes. Information on land use is available for 76ĝ€% of the experimental sites with agricultural land use as the dominant type (∼40%). We are convinced that the SWIG database will allow for a better parameterization of the infiltration process in land surface models and for testing infiltration models. All collected data and related soil characteristics are provided online in ∗.xlsx and ∗.csv formats for reference, and we add a disclaimer that the database is for public domain use only and can be copied freely by referencing it. Supplementary data are available at https://doi.org/10.1594/PANGAEA.885492 (Rahmati et al., 2018). Data quality assessment is strongly advised prior to any use of this database. Finally, we would like to encourage scientists to extend and update the SWIG database by uploading new data to it.

Determining RUSLE P- and C-factors for stone bunds and trenches in rangeland and cropland, North Ethiopia
Taye, Gebeyehu ; Vanmaercke, Matthias ; Poesen, Jean ; Wesemael, Bas Van; Tesfaye, Samuale ; Teka, Daniel ; Nyssen, Jan ; Deckers, Jozef ; Haregeweyn, Nigussie - \ 2018
Land Degradation and Development 29 (2018)3. - ISSN 1085-3278 - p. 812 - 824.
Ethiopian Highlands - land use - RUSLE - soil and water conservation - soil erosion
The implementation of soil and water conservation (SWC) measures in the Ethiopian Highlands is a top priority to reduce soil erosion rates. However, the effectiveness of these measures for different hillslope gradients and land use conditions remains poorly understood. This study addresses this knowledge gap by determining support practice (P) and cover-management (C) factors of the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation for commonly used SWC structures in semi-arid environments. The factor values were calculated on the basis of soil loss data collected with 21 large runoff plots installed in rangeland and cropland sites. The P- and C-factors were calculated following the recommended procedures. Results show P-factors ranging from 0.32 to 0.74 for stone bunds, from 0.07 to 0.65 for trenches, and from 0.03 to 0.22 for stone bunds with trenches. Reduced storage capacities due to sediment deposition resulted in significant declines of the effectiveness of SWC structures over time. For example, the average P-factor value for trenches increased from 0.1 in the first year after installation to 0.51 after 3 years. C-factor values ranged from 0.23 to 0.82 in rangeland and from 0.03 to 0.35 in cropland. For rangeland, this large variability is due to vegetation cover changes caused by grazing. In cropland, C-factors vary with crop types and tillage practices. The results of this study not only aid in modelling and quantifying the short-term impacts of SWC structures on soil erosion rates but also highlight the importance of considering temporal variations of the effectiveness of SWC measures.
Response of woody plant species diversity and tree growth in exclosure to spate irrigation from gullies
Etefa Guyassa, Dinssa ; Frankl, Amaury ; Amanuel, Zenebe ; Abebe, Damtew ; Descheemaeker, K.K.E. ; Tolera, Motuma ; Poesen, J. ; Nyssen, J. - \ 2017
In: Book of abstracts European Conference of Tropical Ecology 2017. - German Society for Tropical Ecology - ISBN 9783000556319 - p. 204 - 204.
From runoff contributor to runoff absorber : spate irrigation on exclosures in Tigray, northern Ethiopia
Etefa Guyassa, ; Frankl, A. ; Abebe, Damtew ; Amanuel, Zenebe ; Jacob, M. ; Tolera, Motuma ; Abebe, Damtew ; Descheemaeker, K.K.E. ; Poesen, J. ; Nyssen, J. - \ 2017
Land Degradation in the Ethiopian Highlands
Nyssen, Jan ; Poesen, Jean ; Lanckriet, Sil ; Jacob, Miro ; Moeyersons, Jan ; Haile, Mitiku ; Haregeweyn, Nigussie ; Munro, R.N. ; Descheemaeker, Katrien ; Adgo, Enyew ; Frankl, Amaury ; Deckers, Jozef - \ 2015
In: World Geomorphological Landscapes / Billi, P., Dordrecht : Springer (World Geomorphological Landscapes ) - ISBN 9789401780254 - p. 369 - 385.
Desertification - Slope processes - Soil and water conservation - Soil erosion

The high soil erosion rates in the Ethiopian highlands find their causes in the combination of erosive rains, steep slopes due to the rapid tectonic uplift during the Pliocene and Pleistocene, and human impact by deforestation, overgrazing, agricultural systems where the open field dominates, impoverishment of the farmers, and stagnation of agricultural techniques. Travelling in the Ethiopian highlands, one can see many soil and water conservation structures. Indigenous knowledge and farmers’ initiatives are integrated with these introduced technologies at various degrees. This chapter addresses the status and drivers of land degradation in northern Ethiopia, including changes over the last century.

The northern Ethiopian highlands are greener than at any time in the last 145 years
Nyssen, J. ; Haile, M. ; Hurni, H. ; Descheemaeker, K.K.E. ; Ritler, A. ; Portner, B. ; Nievergelt, B. ; Moeyersons, J. ; Munro, N. ; Deckers, J. ; Poesen, J. ; Frankl, A. ; Billi, P. - \ 2014
Environmental conditions and human drivers for changes to North Ethiopian mountain landscapes over 145 years
Nyssen, J. ; Frankl, A. ; Haile, M. ; Hurni, H. ; Descheemaeker, K.K.E. ; Crummey, D. ; Ritler, A. ; Portner, B. ; Nievergelt, B. ; Moeyersons, J. ; Munro, N. ; Deckers, J. ; Billi, P. ; Poesen, J. - \ 2014
Science of the Total Environment 485-486 (2014). - ISSN 0048-9697 - p. 164 - 179.
land-use changes - tigray highlands - water conservation - cover dynamics - montane forest - soil-erosion - degradation - eucalyptus - rainfall - climate
As quantitative or spatially distributed studies of environmental change over truly long-term periods of more than 100 years are extremely rare, we re-photographed 361 landscapes that appear on historical photographs (1868–1994) within a 40,000 km2 study area in northern Ethiopia. Visible evidence of environmental changes apparent from the paired photographs was analyzed using an expert rating system. The conditions of the woody vegetation, soil and water conservation structures and land management were worse in the earlier periods compared to their present conditions. The cover by indigenous trees is a notable exception: it peaked in the 1930s, declined afterwards and then achieved a second peak in the early 21st century. Particularly in areas with greater population densities, there has been a significant increase in woody vegetation and soil and water conservation structures over the course of the study period. We conclude that except for an apparent upward movement of the upper tree limit, the direct human impacts on the environment are overriding the effects of climate change in the north Ethiopian highlands and that the northern Ethiopian highlands are currently greener than at any other time in the last 145 years.
Modelling landslide hazard, soil redistribution and sediment yield of landslides on the Ugandan footslopes of Mount Elgon
Claessens, L.F.G. ; Knapen, A. ; Kitutu, M.G. ; Poesen, J. ; Deckers, J.A. - \ 2011
In: Abstract Book of The Second World Landslide Forum, FAO, Rome, Italy, 3-9 October 2011. - Rome, Italy : ISPRA (Italian National Institute for Environmental Protection and Research) - ISBN 9788844805159 - p. 74 - 74.
The Second World Landslide Forum Abstracts WLF2 - 2011– 0107 Rome, 2011 Modelling landslide hazard, soil redistribution and sediment yield of landslides on the Ugandan footslopes of Mount Elgon Lieven Claessens, Anke Knapen, Mary Kitutu, Jean Poesen, and Jozef Deckers In this study, the LAPSUS-LS landslide model, together with a digital terrain analysis of topographic attributes, is used as a spatially explicit tool to simulate recent shallow landslides in Manjiya County on the Ugandan slopes of Mount Elgon. Manjiya County is a densely populated mountainous area where landslides have been reported since the beginning of the twentieth century. To better understand the causal factors of landsliding, 81 recent landslides have been mapped and investigated. Through statistical analysis it was shown that steep concave slopes, high rainfall, soil properties and layering as well as human interference were the main factors responsible for landslides in the study area. LAPSUS-LS is used to construct a landslide hazard map, and to confirm or reject the main factors for landsliding in the area. The model is specifically designed for the analysis of shallow landslide hazard by combining a steady state hydrologic model with a deterministic infinite slope stability model. In addition, soil redistribution algorithms can be applied, whereby erosion and sedimentation by landsliding can be visualized and quantified by applying a threshold critical rainfall scenario. The model is tested in the Manjiya study area for its ability to delineate zones that are prone to shallow landsliding in general and to group the recent landslides into a specific landslide hazard category. The digital terrain analysis confirms most of the causal topographic factors for shallow landsliding in the study area. In general, shallow landslides occur at a relatively large distance from the water divide, on the transition between steep concave and more gentle convex slope positions, which points to concentration of (sub)surface flow as the main hydrological triggering mechanism. In addition LAPSUS-LS is capable to group the recent shallow landslides in a specific landslide hazard class (critical rainfall values of 0.03-0.05 m day-1). By constructing a landslide hazard map and simulating future landslide scenarios with the model, slopes in Manjiya County can be identified as inherently unstable and volumes of soil redistribution can yield four times higher than currently observed. More than half of this quantity can end up in the stream network, possibly damming rivers and causing major damage to infrastructure or siltation and pollution of streams. The combination of a high population density, land shortage and a high vulnerability to landslides will likely continue to create a major sustainability problem.
Towards multidisciplinary and integrated methods to address interactions and feedback mechanisms in dynamic landscape-land use systems
Claessens, L. ; Antle, J.M. ; Deckers, J.A. ; Kitutu, M.G. ; Knapen, A. ; Poesen, J. ; Schoorl, J.M. ; Stoorvogel, J.J. ; Veldkamp, A. ; Verburg, P.H. - \ 2008
In: Myres III, Dynamic Interactions of Life and its Landscape, Tulane University, New Orleans, USA, 20-23 May 2008. - - p. 62 - 62.
Modelling landslide hazard, soil redistribution and sediment yield of landslides on the Ugandan footslopes of Mount Elgon
Claessens, L. ; Knapen, A. ; Kitutu, M.G. ; Poesen, J. ; Deckers, J.A. - \ 2007
In this study, the LAPSUS-LS landslide model, together with a digital terrain analysis of topographic attributes, is used as a spatially explicit tool to simulate recent shallow landslides in Manjiya County on the Ugandan slopes of Mount Elgon. Manjiya County is a densely populated mountainous area where landslides have been reported since the beginning of the twentieth century. To better understand the causal factors of landsliding, 81 recent landslides have been previously mapped and investigated. Through statistical analysis it was shown that steep concave slopes, high rainfall, soil properties and layering as well as human interference were the main factors responsible for landslides in the inherently unstable study area. LAPSUS-LS is used to construct a landslide hazard map, and to confirm or reject the main factors for landsliding in the area. The model is specifically designed for the analysis of shallow landslide hazard by combining a steady state hydrologic model with a deterministic infinite slope stability model. In addition, soil redistribution algorithms can be applied, whereby erosion and sedimentation by landsliding can be visualized and quantified by applying a threshold critical rainfall scenario. The model is tested in the Manjiya study area for its capability to delineate zones that are prone to shallow landsliding in general and to group the recent landslides into a specific landslide hazard category. The digital terrain analysis confirms most of the causal topographic factors for shallow landsliding in the study area. In general, shallow landslides occur at a relatively large distance from the water divide, on the transition between steep concave and more gentle convex slope positions, which points to concentration of (sub)surface flow as the main hydrological triggering mechanism. In addition LAPSUS-LS is capable to group the recent shallow landslides in a specific landslide hazard class (critical rainfall values of 0.03-0.05 m day¿1). By constructing a landslide hazard map and simulating future landslide scenarios with the model, slopes in Manjiya County can be identified as inherently unstable and volumes of soil redistribution can yield four times higher than currently observed. More than half of this quantity can end up in the stream network, possibly damming rivers and causing major damage to infrastructure or siltation and pollution of streams. The combination of a high population density, land shortage and a high vulnerability to landslides will likely continue to create a major sustainability problem
Modelling landslide hazard, soil redistribution and sediment yield of landslides on the Ugandan footslopes of Mount Elgon
Claessens, L. ; Knapen, A. ; Kitutu, M.G. ; Poesen, J. ; Deckers, J.A. - \ 2007
Geomorphology 90 (2007)1-2. - ISSN 0169-555X - p. 23 - 35.
physically-based model - spatial-distribution - drainage networks - dem resolution - elevation - topography - rwanda - impact
In this study, the LAPSUS-LS landslide model, together with a digital terrain analysis of topographic attributes, is used as a spatially explicit tool to simulate recent shallow landslides in Manjiya County on the Ugandan slopes of Mount Elgon. Manjiya County is a densely populated mountainous area where landslides have been reported since the beginning of the twentieth century. To better understand the causal factors of landsliding, 81 recent landslides have been mapped and investigated. Through statistical analysis it was shown that steep concave slopes, high rainfall, soil properties and layering as well as human interference were the main factors responsible for landslides in the study area. LAPSUS-LS is used to construct a landslide hazard map, and to confirm or reject the main factors for landsliding in the area. The model is specifically designed for the analysis of shallow landslide hazard by combining a steady state hydrologic model with a deterministic infinite slope stability model. In addition, soil redistribution algorithms can be applied, whereby erosion and sedimentation by landsliding can be visualized and quantified by applying a threshold critical rainfall scenario. The model is tested in the Manjiya study area for its ability to delineate zones that are prone to shallow landsliding in general and to group the recent landslides into a specific landslide hazard category. The digital terrain analysis confirms most of the causal topographic factors for shallow landsliding in the study area. In general, shallow landslides occur at a relatively large distance from the water divide, on the transition between steep concave and more gentle convex slope positions, which points to concentration of (sub)surface flow as the main hydrological triggering mechanism. In addition, LAPSUS-LS is capable to group the recent shallow landslides in a specific landslide hazard class (critical rainfall values of 0.03-0.05 m day-1). By constructing a landslide hazard map and simulating future landslide scenarios with the model, slopes in Manjiya County can be identified as inherently unstable and volumes of soil redistribution can yield four times higher than currently observed. More than half of this quantity can end up in the stream network, possibly damming rivers and causing major damage to infrastructure or siltation and pollution of streams. The combination of a high population density, land shortage and a high vulnerability to landslides will likely continue to create a major sustainability problem.
Modelling landslide hazard, soil redistribution and sediment yield of landslides on the Ugandan footslopes of Mount Elgon
Claessens, L. - \ 2006
In: Highland 2006 Conference: Environmental change, geomorphic processes, land degradation and rehabilitation in tropical and subtropical highlands, Mekelle, Ethiopia, 19-25 September 2006. - - p. 104 - 104.
Controlling vegetation patterns in deserts. The story of the Negev
Buis, E. ; Veldkamp, A. ; Breemen, N. van; Boeken, B. - \ 2006
In: Book of Abstracts. Highland Symposium on environmental change, geomorphic processes, land degradation and rehabilitation in tropical and subtropical highlands, Mekelle, Ethiopia, 19-25 September 2006. - Leuven/Mekelle, Ethiopia : KU Leuven/Zemenawi Printing Mekelle - p. 17 - 17.
Holocene erosion and sedimentation history of two valley fills in the Negev Desert of Israel
Buis, E. ; Blécourt, M. de; Geraedts, L. - \ 2006
In: Book of Abstracts. Highland Symposium on environmental change, geomorphic processes, land degradation and rehabilitation in tropical and subtropical highlands, Mekelle, Ethiopia, 19-25 September 2006. - Leuven/Mekelle, Ethiopia : KU Leuven/Zemenawi Printing Mekelle - p. 16 - 16.
Controls on Late Pleistocene landscape evolution of Okhombe valley in the Drakensberg footslopes, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa
Temme, A.J.A.M. ; Botha, G.A. ; Baartman, J.E.M. ; Veldkamp, A. - \ 2006
In: Book of Abstracts. Highland Symposium on environmental change, geomorphic processes, land degradation and rehabilitation in tropical and subtropical highlands. Mekelle, Ethiopia, 19-25 Sept. 2006. - Leuven : KU Leuven - p. 91 - 91.
Soil Erosion; processes, damages and counter measures
Govers, G. ; Poesen, J. ; Goossens, D. - \ 2004
In: Managing Soil Quality; challenges in modern agriculture / Schjonning, P., Elmholt, S., Christensen, B.T., CABI Publishing - ISBN 085199671X - p. 199 - 217.
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