Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Eindrapportage monitoring- en onderzoeksprogramma Natuurcompensatie Voordelta (PMR-NCV)
    Prins, Theo ; Meer, Jaap van der; Herman, Peter ; Spek, Ad van der; Chen, Chun ; Wymenga, Eddy ; Zee, Els van der; Stienen, Eric ; Aarts, Geert ; Meijer-Holzhauer, Harriëtte ; Adema, Jeroen ; Craeymeersch, Johan ; Wolfshaar, Karen van; Bolle, Loes ; Poot, Martin ; Hintzen, Niels ; Horssen, Peter van; Fijn, Ruben ; Glorius, Sander ; Beier, Ulrika ; Courtens, Wouter ; Neitzel, Sophie ; Hoof, Luc van - \ 2020
    Den Helder : Wageningen Marine Research (Wageningen Marine Research rapport C053/20) - 183
    Effects and moderators of coping skills training on symptoms of depression and anxiety in patients with cancer : Aggregate data and individual patient data meta-analyses
    Buffart, L.M. ; Schreurs, M.A.C. ; Abrahams, H.J.G. ; Kalter, J. ; Aaronson, N.K. ; Jacobsen, P.B. ; Newton, R.U. ; Courneya, K.S. ; Armes, J. ; Arving, C. ; Braamse, A.M. ; Brandberg, Y. ; Dekker, J. ; Ferguson, R.J. ; Gielissen, M.F. ; Glimelius, B. ; Goedendorp, M.M. ; Graves, K.D. ; Heiney, S.P. ; Horne, R. ; Hunter, M.S. ; Johansson, B. ; Northouse, L.L. ; Oldenburg, H.S. ; Prins, J.B. ; Savard, J. ; Beurden, M. van; Berg, S.W. van den; Brug, J. ; Knoop, H. ; Verdonck-de Leeuw, I.M. - \ 2020
    Clinical Psychology Review 80 (2020). - ISSN 0272-7358
    (individual patient data) meta-analysis - Anxiety - Coping skills training - Depression - Neoplasm - Psychosocial care

    Purpose: This study evaluated the effects of coping skills training (CST) on symptoms of depression and anxiety in cancer patients, and investigated moderators of the effects. Methods: Overall effects and intervention-related moderators were studied in meta-analyses of pooled aggregate data from 38 randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Patient-related moderators were examined using linear mixed-effect models with interaction tests on pooled individual patient data (n = 1953) from 15 of the RCTs. Results: CST had a statistically significant but small effect on depression (g = −0.31,95% confidence interval (CI) = −0.40;-0.22) and anxiety (g = −0.32,95%CI = -0.41;-0.24) symptoms. Effects on depression symptoms were significantly larger for interventions delivered face-to-face (p =.003), led by a psychologist (p =.02) and targeted to patients with psychological distress (p =.002). Significantly larger reductions in anxiety symptoms were found in younger patients (pinteraction < 0.025), with the largest reductions in patients <50 years (β = −0.31,95%CI = -0.44;-0.18) and no significant effects in patients ≥70 years. Effects of CST on depression (β = −0.16,95%CI = -0.25;-0.07) and anxiety (β = −0.24,95%CI = -0.33;-0.14) symptoms were significant in patients who received chemotherapy but not in patients who did not (pinteraction < 0.05). Conclusions: CST significantly reduced symptoms of depression and anxiety in cancer patients, and particularly when delivered face-to-face, provided by a psychologist, targeted to patients with psychological distress, and given to patients who were younger and received chemotherapy.

    Will legal international rhino horn trade save wild rhino populations?
    Eikelboom, Jasper A.J. ; Nuijten, Rascha J.M. ; Wang, Yingying X.G. ; Schroder, Bradley ; Heitkönig, Ignas M.A. ; Mooij, Wolf M. ; Langevelde, Frank van; Prins, Herbert H.T. - \ 2020
    Global Ecology and Conservation 23 (2020). - ISSN 2351-9894
    CITES - Conservation - Socioeconomics - South Africa - Traditional Chinese medicine - Wildlife crime

    Wild vertebrate populations all over the globe are in decline, with poaching being the second-most-important cause. The high poaching rate of rhinoceros may drive these species into extinction within the coming decades. Some stakeholders argue to lift the ban on international rhino horn trade to potentially benefit rhino conservation, as current interventions appear to be insufficient. We reviewed scientific and grey literature to scrutinize the validity of reasoning behind the potential benefit of legal horn trade for wild rhino populations. We identified four mechanisms through which legal trade would impact wild rhino populations, of which only the increased revenue for rhino farmers could potentially benefit rhino conservation. Conversely, the global demand for rhino horn is likely to increase to a level that cannot be met solely by legal supply. Moreover, corruption is omnipresent in countries along the trade routes, which has the potential to negatively affect rhino conservation. Finally, programmes aimed at reducing rhino horn demand will be counteracted through trade legalization by removing the stigma on consuming rhino horn. Combining these insights and comparing them with criteria for sustainable wildlife farming, we conclude that legalizing rhino horn trade will likely negatively impact the remaining wild rhino populations. To preserve rhino species, we suggest to prioritize reducing corruption within rhino horn trade, increasing the rhino population within well-protected ’safe havens’ and implementing educational programmes and law enforcement targeted at rhino horn consumers.

    Effects of migration network configuration and migration synchrony on infection prevalence in geese
    Yin, Shenglai ; Knegt, Henrik J. de; Jong, Mart C.M. de; Si, Yali ; Prins, Herbert H.T. ; Huang, Zheng Y.X. ; Boer, Willem F. de - \ 2020
    Journal of Theoretical Biology 502 (2020). - ISSN 0022-5193
    Avian influenza - Cumulative infection - Environmental transmission - SIR model - Stopover site

    Migration can influence dynamics of pathogen-host interactions. However, it is not clearly known how migration pattern, in terms of the configuration of the migration network and the synchrony of migration, affects infection prevalence. We therefore applied a discrete-time SIR model, integrating environmental transmission and migration, to various migration networks, including networks with serial, parallel, or both serial and parallel stopover sites, and with various levels of migration synchrony. We applied the model to the infection of avian influenza virus in a migratory geese population. In a network with only serial stopover sites, increasing the number of stopover sites reduced infection prevalence, because with every new stopover site, the amount of virus in the environment was lower than that in the previous stopover site, thereby reducing the exposure of the migratory population. In a network with parallel stopover sites, both increasing the number and earlier appearance of the stopover sites led to an earlier peak of infection prevalence in the migratory population, because the migratory population is exposed to larger total amount of virus in the environment, speeding-up the infection accumulation. Furthermore, higher migration synchrony reduced the average number of cumulative infection, because the majority of the population can fly to a new stopover site where the amount of virus is still relatively low and has not been increased due to virus shedding of infected birds. Our simulations indicate that a migration pattern with multiple serial stopover sites and with highly synchronized migration reduces the infection prevalence.

    Spatial geochemistry influences the home range of elephants
    Sach, Fiona ; Yon, Lisa ; Henley, Michelle D. ; Bedetti, Anka ; Buss, Peter ; Boer, Willem Frederik de; Dierenfeld, Ellen S. ; Gardner, Amanda ; Langley-Evans, Simon C. ; Hamilton, Elliott ; Lark, Murray ; Prins, Herbert H.T. ; Swemmer, Anthony M. ; Watts, Michael J. - \ 2020
    Science of the Total Environment 729 (2020). - ISSN 0048-9697
    Elephant movement - Loxodonta africana - Minerals - Mining - Potentially toxic elements

    The unique geochemistry surrounding the Palabora Mining Company (PMC) land may act as a micronutrient hotspot, attracting elephants to the area. The PMC produces refined copper and extracts phosphates and other minerals. Understanding the spatial influence of geochemistry on the home range size of African elephants is important for elephant population management and conservation. The home ranges of collared elephants surrounding the PMC were significantly smaller (P = 0.001) than conspecifics in surrounding reserves, suggesting that their resource needs were met within these smaller areas. Environmental samples (soil, water and plants) were analysed from the mine area and along six transects radiating from the mine centre. Tail hair and faecal samples from elephants at the PMC, and conspecifics within the surrounding area were analysed. All samples were analysed for minerals essential to health and potentially toxic elements (PTEs; As, Ca, Cd, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, Pb, Se, U, V and Zn). Results show that the geochemistry at the PMC is different compared to surrounding areas, with significant elevations seen in all analysed minerals and PTEs in soil closer to the mine, thereby drawing the elephants to the area. Additionally significant elevations were seen in elements analysed in water and vegetation samples. Elephant tail hair from elephants at the mine was significantly greater in Cd, whilst Mg, P, Cu, As, Cd, Pb and U concentrations were significantly greater in elephant faecal samples at the mine compared to the non-mine samples. When micronutrient hotspots overlap with human activity (such as mining), this can lead to poor human-elephant coexistence and thus conflict. When managing elephant populations, the influence of mineral provision on elephant movement must be considered. Such detailed resource information can inform conservation efforts for coordinated programmes (UN SDGs 15 and 17) and underpin sustainable economic activity (UN SDG 8, 11 and 12).

    Recognizing peripheral ecosystems in marine protected : A case study of golden jellyfish lakes in Raja Ampat, Indonesia
    Maas, Diede L. ; Capriati, Agustin ; Ahmad, Awaludinnoer ; Erdmann, Mark V. ; Lamers, Machiel ; Leeuw, Christiaan A. de; Prins, Luca ; Purwanto, ; Putri, Amanda P. ; Tapilatu, Ricardo F. ; Becking, Leontine E. - \ 2020
    Marine Pollution Bulletin 151 (2020). - ISSN 0025-326X
    Anchialine ecosystems - Customary tenure - Mastigias papua - Morphometrics - Population genetics - Tourism

    Peripheral marine ecosystems can harbor endemic diversity and attract tourism attention, yet are generally not included in conservation management plans due to their remoteness or inland positioning. A case study in Raja Ampat of seven landlocked marine lakes containing golden jellyfish (Mastigias spp.) was conducted to address the lack of fundamental insights into evolutionary, ecological and social contexts of these ecosystems. An interdisciplinary approach was taken towards identifying the jellyfish lakes as distinct management units in order to incorporate them into existing Marine Protected Areas. Mastigias papua populations showed strong genetic (ϕST: 0.30–0.86) and morphological (F = 28.62, p-value = 0.001) structure among lakes, with putative new subspecies. Risks arising from rapid increase in tourism to Raja Ampat (30-fold since 2007) warrant restrictions on jellyfish lake use. Recommendations are provided for adaptive management and science-based conservation policies for jellyfish lakes across Indonesia.

    Disturbance regulates the density–body mass relationship of soil fauna
    Langevelde, Frank van; Comor, Vincent ; Bie, Steven de; Prins, Herbert H.T. ; Thakur, Madhav P. - \ 2020
    Ecological Applications 30 (2020)1. - ISSN 1051-0761
    Theory on the density‐body mass (DBM) relationship predicts that the density of animal species decreases by the power of −0.75 per unit increase in their body mass, or by the power of −1 when taxa across trophic levels are studied. This relationship is, however, largely debated as the slope often deviates from the theoretical predictions. Here, we tested the ability of the DBM relationship to reflect changes in the structure of communities subjected to an anthropogenic disturbance. The slope would become less steep if smaller animals were more impacted by the disturbance than the larger ones, whereas the slope would become steeper if larger animals were more affected than the smaller ones. We tested the changes in the DBM relationship by sampling soil fauna, i.e. nematodes, Collembola and larger arthropods, from a semi‐arid grassland before and after spraying diesel fuel as disturbance. We applied three different treatments: a control, a light disturbance and an intense disturbance. We found that the slopes of the DBM relationships before the disturbance were around −1 as predicted by theory. The slope became more positive (i.e. less steep) just after the disturbance, especially after the intense disturbance as smaller fauna suffered the most and early colonizers had larger body mass. Interestingly, we observed that the slopes converged back to −1 in two months post‐disturbance. Our findings show that the response of soil fauna communities to anthropogenic disturbances could explain the large variation in observed slopes of the DBM relationships. We experimentally demonstrate that an animal community, when disturbed, shows a temporal pattern of DBM relationships ranging from deviations from the predicted slope to convergence to the predicted slope with time. We recommend that deviations in the DBM relationships after disturbances can provide insights in the trajectory community recovery, and hence could be used for biomonitoring.
    A network approach to prioritize conservation efforts for migratory birds
    Xu, Yanjie ; Si, Yali ; Takekawa, John ; Liu, Qiang ; Prins, Herbert H.T. ; Yin, Shenglai ; Prosser, Diann J. ; Gong, Peng ; Boer, Willem F. de - \ 2020
    Conservation Biology 34 (2020)2. - ISSN 0888-8892 - p. 416 - 426.
    bird migration - connectivity - conservation designation - habitat loss - network

    Habitat loss can trigger migration network collapse by isolating migratory bird breeding grounds from nonbreeding grounds. Theoretically, habitat loss can have vastly different impacts depending on the site's importance within the migratory corridor. However, migration-network connectivity and the impacts of site loss are not completely understood. We used GPS tracking data on 4 bird species in the Asian flyways to construct migration networks and proposed a framework for assessing network connectivity for migratory species. We used a node-removal process to identify stopover sites with the highest impact on connectivity. In general, migration networks with fewer stopover sites were more vulnerable to habitat loss. Node removal in order from the highest to lowest degree of habitat loss yielded an increase of network resistance similar to random removal. In contrast, resistance increased more rapidly when removing nodes in order from the highest to lowest betweenness value (quantified by the number of shortest paths passing through the specific node). We quantified the risk of migration network collapse and identified crucial sites by first selecting sites with large contributions to network connectivity and then identifying which of those sites were likely to be removed from the network (i.e., sites with habitat loss). Among these crucial sites, 42% were not designated as protected areas. Setting priorities for site protection should account for a site's position in the migration network, rather than only site-specific characteristics. Our framework for assessing migration-network connectivity enables site prioritization for conservation of migratory species.

    De afzetmarkt van schubvis uit het IJssel- en Markermeer
    Zaalmink, W. ; Prins, H. - \ 2019
    Wageningen Economic Research (Wageningen Economic Research 2019-068) - 2 p.
    Preserving nature: Artificial Intelligence against Green Violence
    Prins, Herbert H.T. - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Wageningen University & Research - ISBN 9789463953153 - 36
    Farewell address upon retiring as Professor of Resource Ecology (formerly Nature Conservation in the Tropics and Vertebrate Ecology) at Wageningen University &Research on 31 October 2019
    Meerkosten biodiversiteitsmaatregelen voor melkvee- en akkerbouwbedrijven
    Beldman, Alfons ; Polman, Nico ; Kager, Harry ; Doornewaard, Gerben ; Greijdanus, Auke ; Prins, Henri ; Dijkshoorn, Marijke ; Koppenjan, Judy - \ 2019
    Wageningen : Wageningen Economic Research (Wageningen Economic Research rapport 2019-105) - ISBN 9789463951432 - 51
    The aim of this study is to provide insight into the additional costs of biodiversity measures for dairyfarms and arable farms on the basis of an integral better score on indicators from the biodiversitymonitor. The costs for intensive dairy farms, extensive dairy farms and farms on peat are € 1.95,€ 2.18 and € 3.08 per 100 kg of milk respectively. Weighted over the three types of farms in the dairyfarming sector, the additional costs are € 2.21 per 100 kg of milk and € 417 per hectare. Theestimated additional costs for arable farms on clay with a cultivation plan with potatoes forconsumption or on sand with a cultivation plan with potatoes for starch are 324 and 185 per hectarerespectively. Both dairy farming and arable farming require a wide range of measures to achieve abetter score.
    Landbouwpraktijk en waterkwaliteit op landbouwbedrijven aangemeld voor derogatie in 2017
    Lukács, S. ; Blokland, P.W. ; Prins, H. ; Vrijhoef, A. ; Fraters, D. ; Daatselaar, C.H.G. - \ 2019
    Bilthoven : Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieu (RIVM rapport 2019-0025) - 111
    n Nederland mogen agrarische bedrijven die aan specifieke randvoorwaarden voldoen, meer dierlijke mest op hun land gebruiken dan in de algemene norm van de Nitraatrichtlijn is voorgeschreven. Deze verruiming wordt derogatie genoemd. Het RIVM en WageningenEconomic Research monitoren de gevolgen van deze derogatie voor de waterkwaliteit op driehonderd bedrijven. Dit rapport beschrijft de monitoringsresultaten voor derogatiebedrijven in het jaar 2017 en de trend vanaf 2006. Op basis van deze resultaten concluderen we dat de derogatie geen negatieve effecten heeft op de waterkwaliteit.
    Genome-edited organisms listed in the EUginius database
    Prins, Theo - \ 2019
    Implementation and evaluation of an antimicrobial stewardship programme in companion animal clinics: A stepped-wedge design intervention study
    Hopman, Nonke E.M. ; Portengen, Lützen ; Hulscher, Marlies E.J.L. ; Heederik, Dick J.J. ; Verheij, T.J.M. ; Wagenaar, Jaap A. ; Prins, Jan M. ; Bosje, Tjerk ; Schipper, Louska ; Geijlswijk, Ingeborg M. Van; Broens, Els M. - \ 2019
    PLoS ONE 14 (2019)11. - ISSN 1932-6203

    Background To curb increasing resistance rates, responsible antimicrobial use (AMU) is needed, both in human and veterinary medicine. In human healthcare, antimicrobial stewardship programmes (ASPs) have been implemented worldwide to improve appropriate AMU. No ASPs have been developed for and implemented in companion animal clinics yet. Objectives The objective of the present study was to implement and evaluate the effectiveness of an ASP in 44 Dutch companion animal clinics. The objectives of the ASP were to increase awareness on AMU, to decrease total AMU whenever possible and to shift AMU towards 1st choice antimicrobials, according to Dutch guidelines on veterinary AMU. Methods The study was designed as a prospective, stepped-wedge, intervention study, which was performed from March 2016 until March 2018. The multifaceted intervention was developed using previous qualitative and quantitative research on current prescribing behaviour in Dutch companion animal clinics. The number of Defined Daily Doses for Animal (DDDAs) per clinic (total, 1st, 2nd and 3rd choice AMU) was used to quantify systemic AMU. Monthly AMU data were described using a mixed effect time series model with auto-regression. The effect of the ASP was modelled using a step function and a change in the (linear) time trend. Results A statistically significant decrease of 15% (7%-22%) in total AMU, 15% (5%-24%) in 1st choice AMU and 26% (17%-34%) in 2nd choice AMU was attributed to participation in the ASP, on top of the already ongoing time trends. Use of 3rd choice AMs did not significantly decrease by participation in the ASP. The change in total AMU became more prominent over time, with a 16% (4%-26%) decrease in (linear) time trend per year. Conclusions This study shows that, although AMU in Dutch companion animal clinics was already decreasing and changing, AMU could be further optimised by participation in an antimicrobial stewardship programme.

    Data from: Disturbance regulates the density–body mass relationship of soil fauna
    Langevelde, Frank van; Comor, Vincent ; Bie, Steven ; Prins, Herbert ; Thakur, Madhav P. - \ 2019
    Wageningen University & Research
    Theory on the density-body mass (DBM) relationship predicts that the density of animal species decreases by the power of −0.75 per unit increase in their body mass, or by the power of −1 when taxa across trophic levels are studied. This relationship is, however, largely debated as the slope often deviates from the theoretical predictions. Here, we tested the ability of the DBM relationship to reflect changes in the structure of communities subjected to an anthropogenic disturbance. The slope would become less steep if smaller animals were more impacted by the disturbance than the larger ones, whereas the slope would become steeper if larger animals were more affected than the smaller ones. We tested the changes in the DBM relationship by sampling soil fauna, i.e. nematodes, Collembola and larger arthropods, from a semi-arid grassland before and after spraying diesel fuel as disturbance. We applied three different treatments: a control, a light disturbance and an intense disturbance. We found that the slopes of the DBM relationships before the disturbance were around −1 as predicted by theory. The slope became more positive (i.e. less steep) just after the disturbance, especially after the intense disturbance as smaller fauna suffered the most and early colonizers had larger body mass. Interestingly, we observed that the slopes converged back to −1 in two months post-disturbance. Our findings show that the response of soil fauna communities to anthropogenic disturbances could explain the large variation in observed slopes of the DBM relationships. We experimentally demonstrate that an animal community, when disturbed, shows a temporal pattern of DBM relationships ranging from deviations from the predicted slope to convergence to the predicted slope with time. We recommend that deviations in the DBM relationships after disturbances can provide insights in the trajectory community recovery, and hence could be used for biomonitoring.
    Forest connectivity, host assemblage characteristics of local and neighboring counties, and temperature jointly shape the spatial expansion of lyme disease in United States
    Wang, Yingying X.G. ; Matson, Kevin D. ; Xu, Yanjie ; Prins, Herbert H.T. ; Huang, Zheng Y.X. ; Boer, Willem F. de - \ 2019
    Remote Sensing 11 (2019)20. - ISSN 2072-4292
    Assemblage similarity - Disease spread - Forest cover - Host assemblage composition - Infection intensity

    Understanding risk factors for the spread of infectious diseases over time and across the landscape is critical for managing disease risk. While habitat connectivity and characteristics of local and neighboring animal (i.e., host) assemblages are known to influence the spread of diseases, the interactions among these factors remain poorly understood. In this study, we conducted a county-level analysis to test the effects of forest connectivity, together with the suitability of local assemblage (measured by the similarity of local host assemblage with neighboring assemblages) and the infection intensity of neighboring counties on the spatial expansion of Lyme disease in the United States. Our results suggested that both the similarity of local host assemblage and the infection intensity of neighboring counties were positively correlated with the probability of disease spread. Moreover, we found that increasing forest connectivity could facilitate the positive effect of neighbor infection intensity. In contrast, the effect size of the host assemblage similarity decreased with increasing connectivity, suggesting that host assemblage similarity was less effective in well-connected habitats. Our results thus indicate that habitat connectivity can indirectly influence disease spread by mediating the effects of other risk factors.

    Some species are more equal than others: phylogenetic relatedness predicts disease pressure
    Wang, Yingying - \ 2019
    Wageningen University. Promotor(en): H.H.T. Prins; W.F. de Boer, co-promotor(en): K.D. Matson. - Wageningen : Wageningen University - ISBN 9789463950961 - 151

    Biodiversity is declining dramatically. Meanwhile, disease risk of infectious disease in human, wildlife and livestock is undergoing an increase. Several studies showed that a change in biodiversity can impact disease risk. One hypothesis, the dilution effect, suggests that a loss in species richness can increase disease risk as competent species are more likely to remain when incompetent species go locally extinct. However, the generality of the dilution effect is debated. For example, the direction of the relationship between disease risk and biodiversity depends on the different measurements of disease risk (e.g., infection prevalence and the density of infected animals), the spatial scale of observation, and the disease transmission type (i.e., density vs. frequency dependent).

    The objective of this thesis is to advance the understanding of the relationships between disease risk and biodiversity. My results give new insights into these relationships. My findings suggest that the commonly used species richness is not a good indicator of disease risk, and that assemblage composition (i.e., abundance and relative abundance of species) and structure of wildlife assemblages (i.e., functional diversity and phylogenetic diversity) are more important than species richness in affecting disease risk. I used species evenness to measure the assemblage composition, and showed that species evenness was a better indicator of disease risk than species richness, as evenness also contains information on the relative differences in species’ abundances, and these abundances are positively correlated with contact rates among hosts. My results also highlight the importance of the distribution of functional traits (e.g., body mass) in the species assemblage, as body mass can be correlated to the species’ competence to pathogens. I also studied the role of phylogenetic relatedness in the relationships between disease risk and biodiversity, and showed that if the species in an assemblage are closely related, especially among competent hosts species, the assemblage is expected to have a higher disease risk. So, phylogenetic relationships within local assemblages can help us to better understand why a loss in species richness can either positively or negatively affect disease risk. To conclude, my study highlights the importance of composition and structure of local assemblages (i.e., evenness, functional diversity, phylogenetic relatedness) on disease risk, and suggests that future studies should look beyond species richness when studying relationships between biodiversity and disease risk.

    Loss of functional connectivity in migration networks induces population decline in migratory birds
    Xu, Yanjie ; Si, Yali ; Wang, Yingying ; Zhang, Yong ; Prins, Herbert H.T. ; Cao, Lei ; Boer, Willem F. de - \ 2019
    Ecological Applications 29 (2019)7. - ISSN 1051-0761 - p. e01960 - e01960.
    bird migration - habitat loss - life history - network robustness - population dynamics - species traits - wetland

    Migratory birds rely on a habitat network along their migration routes by temporarily occupying stopover sites between breeding and non-breeding grounds. Removal or degradation of stopover sites in a network might impede movement and thereby reduce migration success and survival. The extent to which the breakdown of migration networks, due to changes in land use, impacts the population sizes of migratory birds is poorly understood. We measured the functional connectivity of migration networks of waterfowl species that migrate over the East Asian-Australasian Flyway from 1992 to 2015. We analysed the relationship between changes in non-breeding population sizes and changes in functional connectivity, while taking into account other commonly considered species traits, using a phylogenetic linear mixed model. We found that population sizes significantly declined with a reduction in the functional connectivity of migration networks; no other variables were important. We conclude that the current decrease in functional connectivity, due to habitat loss and degradation in migration networks, can negatively and crucially impact population sizes of migratory birds. Our findings provide new insights into the underlying mechanisms that affect population trends of migratory birds under environmental changes. Establishment of international agreements leading to the creation of systematic conservation networks associated with migratory species' distributions and stopover sites may safeguard migratory bird populations.

    Land use change and the migration geography of Greater White-fronted geese in European Russia
    Grishchenko, Mikhail ; Prins, Herbert H.T. ; Ydenberg, Ronald C. ; Schaepman, Michael E. ; Boer, Willem F. de; Knegt, Henrik J. de - \ 2019
    Ecosphere 10 (2019)8. - ISSN 2150-8925
    agriculture - geese migration - land use change - political ecology - Russia - stopover sites

    Large areas of agricultural land have been abandoned in European Russia since 1991, triggering succession toward more wooded landscapes, especially in northern regions where conditions for agriculture are more challenging. We hypothesize that this process has contributed to a southward shift by migratory Atlantic Greater White-fronted geese, as stopover sites in northern Russia became progressively less suitable. To test this hypothesis, we located stopover sites from information contained in 2976 ring recoveries and sightings of neck-collared geese. These records were divided into three time periods, chosen to reflect major changes in the economy and land use of European Russia: 1960–1990, 1991–2000, and 2001–2013. We used a kernel density estimator grid to delineate areas surrounding 300 putative stopover sites, and statistically evaluated the effects of latitude, distance to nearest waterbody, settlement, and period on stopover site usage by geese. Our results show that over the three periods, usage of the stopover sites has shifted southward, indicating that Greater White-fronted geese have shifted their migration pathway, with the greatest shift in the most recent period. This shift was confirmed by a highly significant squared latitude term and significant interaction term between periods. The nearest settlements showed no significant effect on stopover site usage while the nearest waterbody term was negative, suggesting higher waterbody densities contributed to higher densities of stopover sites. We attribute the shift to the successional reforestation of the Russian landscape that has followed widespread land abandonment, especially that following the break-up of the former USSR.

    Derogatie niet nadelig voor waterkwaliteit
    Blokland, P.W. ; Prins, H. ; Daatselaar, C.H.G. - \ 2019
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