Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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Timing and duration of primary molt in Northern Hemisphere skuas and jaegers
Bemmelen, Rob S.A. van; Clarke, Rohan H. ; Pyle, Peter ; Camphuysen, Kees - \ 2018
The Auk : a quarterly journal of ornithology 135 (2018)4. - ISSN 0004-8038 - p. 1043 - 1054.
annual cycles - molt-migration overlap - primary molt - Stercorariidae
We compared the primary molt of the 4 species of skuas and jaegers (Stercorariidae) that breed in the Northern Hemisphere: Long-tailed Jaeger (Stercorarius longicaudus), Parasitic Jaeger (S. parasiticus), Pomarine Jaeger (S.
pomarinus), and Great Skua (S. skua). We analyzed primary molt data of 1,573 individuals of multiple age classes, mostly collected from photographs taken at sea but also from museum specimens and beached individuals. Whereas molt duration generally increased with species’ size, molt duration in Parasitic and Pomarine jaegers was surprisingly similar given their size difference. Larger species started primary molt earlier and showed more overlap with postbreeding migration, such that there was complete overlap in Great Skua but no overlap in Long-tailed Jaeger. Within jaeger species, the first primary molt cycle took longer than later molt cycles. We suggest that, unlike birds in their first primary molt cycle, birds in their second or subsequent primary molt cycles are time-constrained to complete primary molt before the onset of prebreeding long-distance migration. By contrast, molt duration did not differ between age classes of Great Skuas. Adult Great Skuas may have overcome the time constraint by completely overlapping molt and postbreeding migration. Molt-migration overlap is generally rare in birds but may be feasible for Great Skuas given their shorter migration distance and low migration speed.
Atmospheric Boundary Layers: Modeling and Parameterization
Holtslag, A.A.M. - \ 2015
In: Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences 2nd Edition / Pyle, J., Zhang, F., Elsevier - ISBN 9780123822253 - p. 265 - 273.
In this contribution we deal with the representation of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for modeling studies of weather, climate, and air quality. As such we review the major characteristics of the ABL, and summarize the basic parameterizations for the description of atmospheric turbulence and the surface fluxes, where we emphasize the modeling and parameterization of turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer over land without clouds. The modeling principles are illustrated with the outcome of single-column and mesoscale models for a variety of conditions using field data and fine-scale model results. For readers not familiar with atmospheric turbulence and meteorology, some background and basic definitions are also given.
Quantifying the morphology of bread crusts
Tromp, R.H. ; Primo Martin, C. ; Zedde, H.J. van de; Koenderink, N.J.J.P. - \ 2008
In: Bubbles in food 2 : novelty, health and luxery / Campbell, G.M., Scanlon, M.G., Pyle, D.L., St. Paul : AACC - ISBN 9781891127595
Multimodel ensemble simulations of present-day and near-future tropospheric ozone
Stevenson, D.S. ; Dentener, F.J. ; Schultz, M.G. ; Ellingsen, K. ; Noije, T.P.C. van; Wild, O. ; Zeng, G. ; Amann, M. ; Atherton, C.S. ; Bell, N. ; Bergmann, D.J. ; Bey, I. ; Butler, T. ; Cofala, J. ; Collins, W.J. ; Derwent, R.G. ; Doherty, R.M. ; Drevet, J. ; Eskes, H.J. ; Fiore, A.M. ; Gauss, M. ; Hauglustaine, D.A. ; Horowitz, L.W. ; Isaksen, I.S.A. ; Krol, M.C. ; Lamarque, J.F. ; Lawrence, M.G. ; Montanaro, V. ; Muller, J.F. ; Pitari, G. ; Prather, M.J. ; Pyle, J.A. ; Rast, S. ; Rodriguez, J.M. ; Sanderson, M.G. ; Savage, N.H. ; Shindell, D.T. ; Strahan, S.E. ; Sudo, K. ; Szopa, S. - \ 2006
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 111 (2006). - ISSN 2169-897X - p. D08301 - D08301.
chemistry transport models - general-circulation model - biogenic nox emissions - global chemical-model - aircraft mozaic data - climate-change - nonmethane hydrocarbons - methane emissions - surface ozone - atmospheric chemistry
Global tropospheric ozone distributions, budgets, and radiative forcings from an ensemble of 26 state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry models have been intercompared and synthesized as part of a wider study into both the air quality and climate roles of ozone. Results from three 2030 emissions scenarios, broadly representing “optimistic,” “likely,” and “pessimistic” options, are compared to a base year 2000 simulation. This base case realistically represents the current global distribution of tropospheric ozone. A further set of simulations considers the influence of climate change over the same time period by forcing the central emissions scenario with a surface warming of around 0.7K. The use of a large multimodel ensemble allows us to identify key areas of uncertainty and improves the robustness of the results. Ensemble mean changes in tropospheric ozone burden between 2000 and 2030 for the 3 scenarios range from a 5% decrease, through a 6% increase, to a 15% increase. The intermodel uncertainty (±1 standard deviation) associated with these values is about ±25%. Model outliers have no significant influence on the ensemble mean results. Combining ozone and methane changes, the three scenarios produce radiative forcings of -50, 180, and 300 mW m-2, compared to a CO2 forcing over the same time period of 800–1100 mW m-2. These values indicate the importance of air pollution emissions in short- to medium-term climate forcing and the potential for stringent/lax control measures to improve/worsen future climate forcing. The model sensitivity of ozone to imposed climate change varies between models but modulates zonal mean mixing ratios by ±5 ppbv via a variety of feedback mechanisms, in particular those involving water vapor and stratosphere-troposphere exchange. This level of climate change also reduces the methane lifetime by around 4%. The ensemble mean year 2000 tropospheric ozone budget indicates chemical production, chemical destruction, dry deposition and stratospheric input fluxes of 5100, 4650, 1000, and 550 Tg(O3) yr-1, respectively. These values are significantly different to the mean budget documented by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Assessment Report (TAR). The mean ozone burden (340 Tg(O3)) is 10% larger than the IPCC TAR estimate, while the mean ozone lifetime (22 days) is 10% shorter. Results from individual models show a correlation between ozone burden and lifetime, and each model's ozone burden and lifetime respond in similar ways across the emissions scenarios. The response to climate change is much less consistent. Models show more variability in the tropics compared to midlatitudes. Some of the most uncertain areas of the models include treatments of deep tropical convection, including lightning NO x production; isoprene emissions from vegetation and isoprene's degradation chemistry; stratosphere-troposphere exchange; biomass burning; and water vapor concentrations.
Multi-model ensemble simulations of troposheric NO2 compared with GOME retrievals for the year 2000
Noije, T.P.C. van; Eskes, H.J. ; Dentener, F.J. ; Stevenson, D.S. ; Ellingsen, K. ; Schultz, M.G. ; Wild, O. ; Amann, M. ; Atherton, C.S. ; Bergmann, D. ; Bey, I. ; Boersma, K.F. ; Butler, T. ; Cofala, J. ; Drevet, J. ; Fiore, A.M. ; Gauss, M. ; Hauglustaine, D.A. ; Horowitz, L.W. ; Isaksen, I.S.A. ; Krol, M.C. ; Lamarque, J.F. ; Lawrence, M.G. ; Martin, R.V. ; Montanaro, V. ; Muller, J.F. ; Pitari, G. ; Prather, M.J. ; Pyle, J.A. ; Richter, A. ; Rodriguez, J.M. ; Savage, N.H. ; Strahan, S.E. ; Sudo, K. ; Szopa, S. ; Roozendael, M. van - \ 2006
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics 6 (2006)10. - ISSN 1680-7316 - p. 2943 - 2979.
chemical-transport model - ozone monitoring experiment - radiative-transfer model - aircraft mozaic data - satellite-observations - nitrogen-dioxide - nonmethane hydrocarbons - surface reflectivity - global distributions - 3-dimensional model
We present a systematic comparison of tropospheric NO2 from 17 global atmospheric chemistry models with three state-of-the-art retrievals from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) for the year 2000. The models used constant anthropogenic emissions from IIASA/EDGAR3.2 and monthly emissions from biomass burning based on the 1997¿2002 average carbon emissions from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED). Model output is analyzed at 10:30 local time, close to the overpass time of the ERS-2 satellite, and collocated with the measurements to account for sampling biases due to incomplete spatiotemporal coverage of the instrument. We assessed the importance of different contributions to the sampling bias: correlations on seasonal time scale give rise to a positive bias of 30¿50% in the retrieved annual means over regions dominated by emissions from biomass burning. Over the industrial regions of the eastern United States, Europe and eastern China the retrieved annual means have a negative bias with significant contributions (between ¿25% and +10% of the NO2 column) resulting from correlations on time scales from a day to a month. We present global maps of modeled and retrieved annual mean NO2 column densities, together with the corresponding ensemble means and standard deviations for models and retrievals. The spatial correlation between the individual models and retrievals are high, typically in the range 0.81¿0.93 after smoothing the data to a common resolution. On average the models underestimate the retrievals in industrial regions, especially over eastern China and over the Highveld region of South Africa, and overestimate the retrievals in regions dominated by biomass burning during the dry season. The discrepancy over South America south of the Amazon disappears when we use the GFED emissions specific to the year 2000. The seasonal cycle is analyzed in detail for eight different continental regions. Over regions dominated by biomass burning, the timing of the seasonal cycle is generally well reproduced by the models. However, over Central Africa south of the Equator the models peak one to two months earlier than the retrievals. We further evaluate a recent proposal to reduce the NOx emission factors for savanna fires by 40% and find that this leads to an improvement of the amplitude of the seasonal cycle over the biomass burning regions of Northern and Central Africa. In these regions the models tend to underestimate the retrievals during the wet season, suggesting that the soil emissions are higher than assumed in the models. In general, the discrepancies between models and retrievals cannot be explained by a priori profile assumptions made in the retrievals, neither by diurnal variations in anthropogenic emissions, which lead to a marginal reduction of the NO2 abundance at 10:30 local time (by 2.5¿4.1% over Europe). Overall, there are significant differences among the various models and, in particular, among the three retrievals. The discrepancies among the retrievals (10¿50% in the annual mean over polluted regions) indicate that the previously estimated retrieval uncertainties have a large systematic component. Our findings imply that top-down estimations of NOx emissions from satellite retrievals of tropospheric NO2 are strongly dependent on the choice of model and retrieval.
The global atmospheric environment for the next generation
Dentener, F. ; Stevenson, D. ; Ellingsen, K. ; Noije, T. van; Schultz, M. ; Amann, M. ; Atherton, C. ; Bell, N. ; Bergmann, D. ; Bey, I. ; Bouwman, L. ; Butler, T. ; Cofala, J. ; Collins, B. ; Drevet, J. ; Doherty, R. ; Eickhout, B. ; Eskes, H. ; Fiore, A. ; Gauss, M. ; Hauglustaine, D. ; Horowitz, L. ; Isaksen, I.S.A. ; Josse, B. ; Lawrence, M. ; Krol, M.C. ; Lamarque, J.F. ; Montanaro, V. ; Müller, J.F. ; Peuch, V.H. ; Pitari, G. ; Pyle, J. ; Rast, S. ; Rodriguez, J. ; Sanderson, M. ; Savage, N.H. ; Shindell, D. ; Strahan, S. ; Szopa, S. ; Sudo, K. ; Dingenen, R. van; Wild, O. ; Zeng, G. - \ 2006
Environmental Science and Technology 40 (2006)11. - ISSN 0013-936X - p. 3586 - 3594.
nitrogen deposition - tropospheric ozone - surface ozone - impact - africa
Air quality, ecosystem exposure to nitrogen deposition, and climate change are intimately coupled problems: we assess changes in the global atmospheric environment between 2000 and 2030 using 26 state-of-the-art global atmospheric chemistry models and three different emissions scenarios. The first (CLE) scenario reflects implementation of current air quality legislation around the world, while the second (MFR) represents a more optimistic case in which all currently feasible technologies are applied to achieve maximum emission reductions. We contrast these scenarios with the more pessimistic IPCC SRES A2 scenario. Ensemble simulations for the year 2000 are consistent among models and show a reasonable agreement with surface ozone, wet deposition, and NO2 satellite observations. Large parts of the world are currently exposed to high ozone concentrations and high deposition of nitrogen to ecosystems. By 2030, global surface ozone is calculated to increase globally by 1.5 +/- 1.2 ppb (CLE) and 4.3 +/- 2.2 ppb (A2), using the ensemble mean model results and associated +/- 1 sigma standard deviations. Only the progressive MFR scenario will reduce ozone, by -2.3 +/- 1.1 ppb. Climate change is expected to modify surface ozone by -0.8 +/- 0.6 ppb, with larger decreases over sea than over land. Radiative forcing by ozone increases by 63 +/- 15 and 155 +/- 37 mW m(-2) for CLE and A2, respectively, and decreases by -45 +/- 15 mW m(-2) for MFR. We compute that at present 10.1% of the global natural terrestrial ecosystems are exposed to nitrogen deposition above a critical load of 1 g N m(-2) yr(-1). These percentages increase by 2030 to 15.8% (CLE), 10.5% (MFR), and 25% (A2). This study shows the importance of enforcing current worldwide air quality legislation and the major benefits of going further. Nonattainment of these air quality policy objectives, such as expressed by the SRES-A2 scenario, would further degrade the global atmospheric environment.
Multimodel simulations of carbon monoxide: Comparison with observations and projected near-future changes
Shindell, D.T. ; Faluvegi, G. ; Stevenson, D.S. ; Krol, M.C. ; Emmons, L.K. ; Lamarque, J.F. ; Petron, G. ; Dentener, F.J. ; Ellingsen, K. ; Schultz, M.G. ; Wild, O. ; Amann, M. ; Atherton, C.S. ; Bergmann, D.J. ; Bey, I. ; Butler, T. ; Cofala, J. ; Collins, W.J. ; Derwent, R.G. ; Doherty, R.M. ; Drevet, J. ; Eskes, H.J. ; Fiore, A.M. ; Gauss, M. ; Hauglustaine, D.A. ; Horowitz, L.W. ; Isaksen, I.S.A. ; Lawrence, M.G. ; Montanaro, V. ; Muller, J.F. ; Pitari, G. ; Prather, M.J. ; Pyle, J.A. ; Rast, S. ; Rodriguez, J.M. ; Sanderson, M.G. ; Savage, N.H. ; Strahan, S.E. ; Sudo, K. ; Szopa, S. ; Unger, N. ; Noije, T.P.C. van; Zeng, G. - \ 2006
Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres 111 (2006). - ISSN 2169-897X - 24 p.
chemical-transport model - stratosphere-troposphere exchange - general-circulation model - aircraft mozaic data - nonmethane hydrocarbons - ozone simulations - methane emissions - western pacific - climate-change - 3-d models
We analyze present-day and future carbon monoxide (CO) simulations in 26 state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry models run to study future air quality and climate change. In comparison with near-global satellite observations from the MOPITT instrument and local surface measurements, the models show large underestimates of Northern Hemisphere (NH) extratropical CO, while typically performing reasonably well elsewhere. The results suggest that year-round emissions, probably from fossil fuel burning in east Asia and seasonal biomass burning emissions in south-central Africa, are greatly underestimated in current inventories such as IIASA and EDGAR3.2. Variability among models is large, likely resulting primarily from intermodel differences in representations and emissions of nonmethane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) and in hydrologic cycles, which affect OH and soluble hydrocarbon intermediates. Global mean projections of the 2030 CO response to emissions changes are quite robust. Global mean midtropospheric (500 hPa) CO increases by 12.6 +/- 3.5 ppbv (16%) for the high-emissions (A2) scenario, by 1.7 +/- 1.8 ppbv (2%) for the midrange (CLE) scenario, and decreases by 8.1 +/- 2.3 ppbv (11%) for the low-emissions (MFR) scenario. Projected 2030 climate changes decrease global 500 hPa CO by 1.4 +/- 1.4 ppbv. Local changes can be much larger. In response to climate change, substantial effects are seen in the tropics, but intermodel variability is quite large. The regional CO responses to emissions changes are robust across models, however. These range from decreases of 10-20 ppbv over much of the industrialized NH for the CLE scenario to CO increases worldwide and year-round under A2, with the largest changes over central Africa (20-30 ppbv), southern Brazil (20-35 ppbv) and south and east Asia (30-70 ppbv). The trajectory of future emissions thus has the potential to profoundly affect air quality over most of the world's populated areas.
Modelling and Parameterization
Holtslag, A.A.M. - \ 2002
In: Encyclopedia of Atmospheric Sciences / Holton, J.R., Pyle, J., Curry, J.A., Elsevier Academic Press - ISBN 9780122270901 - p. 253 - 261.
Influence of processing regime on certain characteristics of diffusionally extracted apple juice.
Leach, G. ; Schols, H.A. ; Pyle, L. ; Niranjan, K. - \ 1993
International Journal of Food Science and Technology 28 (1993). - ISSN 0950-5423 - p. 261 - 272.
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