Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

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Association between plasma phospholipid saturated fatty acids and metabolic markers of lipid, hepatic, inflammation and glycaemic pathways in eight European countries: a cross-sectional analysis in the EPIC-InterAct study
Zheng, Ju-Sheng ; Sharp, Stephen J. ; Imamura, Fumiaki ; Koulman, Albert ; Schulze, Matthias B. ; Ye, Zheng ; Griffin, Jules ; Guevara, Marcela ; Huerta, José María ; Kröger, Janine ; Sluijs, Ivonne ; Agudo, Antonio ; Barricarte, Aurelio ; Boeing, Heiner ; Colorado-Yohar, Sandra ; Dow, Courtney ; Dorronsoro, Miren ; Dinesen, Pia T. ; Fagherazzi, Guy ; Franks, Paul W. ; Feskens, Edith J.M. ; Kühn, Tilman ; Katzke, Verena Andrea ; Key, Timothy J. ; Khaw, Kay-Tee ; Magistris, Maria Santucci De; Mancini, Francesca Romana ; Molina-Portillo, Elena ; Nilsson, Peter M. ; Olsen, Anja ; Overvad, Kim ; Palli, Domenico ; Quirós, Jose Ramón ; Rolandsson, Olov ; Ricceri, Fulvio ; Spijkerman, Annemieke M.W. ; Slimani, Nadia ; Tagliabue, Giovanna ; Tjonneland, Anne ; Tumino, Rosario ; Schouw, Yvonne T. Van Der; Langenberg, Claudia ; Riboli, Elio ; Forouhi, Nita G. ; Wareham, Nicholas J. - \ 2017
BMC Medicine 15 (2017)1. - ISSN 1741-7015
Background
Accumulating evidence suggests that individual circulating saturated fatty acids (SFAs) are heterogeneous in their associations with cardio-metabolic diseases, but evidence about associations of SFAs with metabolic markers of different pathogenic pathways is limited. We aimed to examine the associations between plasma phospholipid SFAs and the metabolic markers of lipid, hepatic, glycaemic and inflammation pathways.
Methods
We measured nine individual plasma phospholipid SFAs and derived three SFA groups (odd-chain: C15:0 + C17:0, even-chain: C14:0 + C16:0 + C18:0, and very-long-chain: C20:0 + C22:0 + C23:0 + C24:0) in individuals from the subcohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-InterAct case-cohort study across eight European countries. Using linear regression in 15,919 subcohort members, adjusted for potential confounders and corrected for multiple testing, we examined cross-sectional associations of SFAs with 13 metabolic markers. Multiplicative interactions of the three SFA groups with pre-specified factors, including body mass index (BMI) and alcohol consumption, were tested.
Results
Higher levels of odd-chain SFA group were associated with lower levels of major lipids (total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, apolipoprotein A-1 (ApoA1), apolipoprotein B (ApoB)) and hepatic markers (alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT)). Higher even-chain SFA group levels were associated with higher levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), TC/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio, triglycerides, ApoB, ApoB/A1 ratio, ALT, AST, GGT and CRP, and lower levels of HDL-C and ApoA1. Very-long-chain SFA group levels showed inverse associations with triglycerides, ApoA1 and GGT, and positive associations with TC, LDL-C, TC/HDL-C, ApoB and ApoB/A1. Associations were generally stronger at higher levels of BMI or alcohol consumption.
Conclusions
Subtypes of SFAs are associated in a differential way with metabolic markers of lipid metabolism, liver function and chronic inflammation, suggesting that odd-chain SFAs are associated with lower metabolic risk and even-chain SFAs with adverse metabolic risk, whereas mixed findings were obtained for very-long-chain SFAs. The clinical and biochemical implications of these findings may vary by adiposity and alcohol intake.
Lifestyle factors and mortality risk in individuals with diabetes mellitus: are the associations different from those in individuals without diabetes?
Sluik, D. ; Boeing, H. ; Li, K. ; Fons Johnsen, N. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Arriola, L. ; Barricarte, A. ; Masala, G. ; Grioni, S. ; Tumino, R. ; Ricceri, F. ; Matiello, A. ; Spijkerman, A.M.W. ; A, D.L. van der; Sluijs, I. van der - \ 2014
Diabetologia 57 (2014)1. - ISSN 0012-186X - p. 63 - 72.
food frequency questionnaire - american-heart-association - cardiovascular-disease - multiple imputation - relative validity - physical-activity - clinical-research - missing data - dietary-fat - cancer
Aims/hypothesis Thus far, it is unclear whether lifestyle recommendations for people with diabetes should be different from those for the general public. We investigated whether the associations between lifestyle factors and mortality risk differ between individuals with and without diabetes. Methods Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), a cohort was formed of 6,384 persons with diabetes and 258,911 EPIC participants without known diabetes. Joint Cox proportional hazard regression models of people with and without diabetes were built for the following lifestyle factors in relation to overall mortality risk: BMI, waist/height ratio, 26 food groups, alcohol consumption, leisure-time physical activity, smoking. Likelihood ratio tests for heterogeneity assessed statistical differences in regression coefficients. Results Multivariable adjusted mortality risk among individuals with diabetes compared with those without was increased, with an HR of 1.62 (95% CI 1.51, 1.75). Intake of fruit, legumes, nuts, seeds, pasta, poultry and vegetable oil was related to a lower mortality risk, and intake of butter and margarine was related to an increased mortality risk. These associations were significantly different in magnitude from those in diabetes-free individuals, but directions were similar. No differences between people with and without diabetes were detected for the other lifestyle factors. Conclusions/interpretation Diabetes status did not substantially influence the associations between lifestyle and mortality risk. People with diabetes may benefit more from a healthy diet, but the directions of association were similar. Thus, our study suggests that lifestyle advice with respect to mortality for patients with diabetes should not differ from recommendations for the general population.
Erratum to: Bias in protein and potassium intake collected with 24-h recalls (EPIC-Soft) is rather comparable across European populations
Crispim, Sandra P. ; Geelen, Anouk ; Vries, Jeanne H.M. De; Freisling, Heinz ; Souverein, Olga W. ; Hulshof, Paul J.M. ; Ocke, Marga C. ; Boshuizen, Hendriek ; Andersen, Lene F. ; Ruprich, Jiri ; Keyzer, Willem De; Huybrechts, Inge ; Lafay, Lionel ; Magistris, Maria S. De; Ricceri, Fulvio ; Tumino, Rosario ; Krogh, Vittorio ; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H.B. ; Beulens, Joline W.J. ; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine ; Naska, Androniki ; Crowe, Francesca L. ; Boeing, Heiner ; McTaggart, Alison ; Kaaks, Rudolf ; Veer, Pieter van 't; Slimani, Nadia - \ 2013
European Journal of Nutrition 52 (2013)2. - ISSN 1436-6207 - p. 857 - 858.
Smoking and the risk of prostate cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition
Rohrmann, S. ; Linseisen, J. ; Allen, N. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B. ; Johnsen, N.F. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Overvad, K. ; Kaaks, R. ; Teucher, B. ; Boeing, H. ; Pischon, T. ; Lagiou, P. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Trichopoulos, D. ; Palli, D. ; Krogh, V. ; Tunnino, R. ; Ricceri, F. ; Suarez, M.V.A. ; Agudo, A. ; Sanchez, M.J. ; Chirlaque, M.D. ; Barricarte, A. ; Larranaga, N. ; Boshuizen, H.C. ; Kranen, H.J. ; Stettin, P. ; Johansson, M. ; Bjartell, A. ; Ulmert, D. ; Khaw, K.T. ; Wareham, N.J. ; Ferrari, P. ; Romieux, I. ; Gunter, M.J.R. ; Riboli, E. ; Key, T.J. - \ 2013
British Journal of Cancer 108 (2013)3. - ISSN 0007-0920 - p. 708 - 714.
cigarette-smoking - follow-up - health-professionals - prospective us - tobacco use - cohort - men - recurrence - association - mortality
Background: Smoking is not associated with prostate cancer incidence in most studies, but associations between smoking and fatal prostate cancer have been reported. Methods: During 1992 and 2000, lifestyle information was assessed via questionnaires and personal interview in a cohort of 145112 European men. Until 2009, 4623 incident cases of prostate cancer were identified, including 1517 cases of low-grade, 396 cases of high grade, 1516 cases of localised, 808 cases of advanced disease, and 432 fatal cases. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to examine the association of smoking status, smoking intensity, and smoking duration with the risk of incident and fatal prostate cancer. Results: Compared with never smokers, current smokers had a reduced risk of prostate cancer (RR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.83-0.97), which was statistically significant for localised and low-grade disease, but not for advanced or high-grade disease. In contrast, heavy smokers (25+ cigarettes per day) and men who had smoked for a long time (40+ years) had a higher risk of prostate cancer death (RR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.11-2.93; RR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.01-1.87, respectively). Conclusion: The observation of an increased prostate cancer mortality among heavy smokers confirms the results of previous prospective studies.
Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of aggressive and non-aggressive urothelial cell carcinomas in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition
Ros, M. ; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B. ; Kampman, E. ; Büchner, F.L. ; Aben, K.K. ; Egevad, L. ; Overvad, K. ; Tjonneland, A. ; Roswall, N. ; Clavel-Chapelon, F. ; Boutron-Ruault, M.C. ; Moiros, S. ; Kaaks, R. ; Teucher, B. ; Weikert, S. ; Ruesten, A.V. ; Trichopoulou, A. ; Naska, A. ; Benetou, V. ; Saieva, C. ; Pala, V. ; Ricceri, F. ; Tumino, R. ; Mattiello, A. ; Peeters, P.H.M. ; Gils, C.H. van; Gram, I.T. ; Engeset, D. ; Chirlaque, M.D. ; Ardanazx, E. ; Rodriguez, L. - \ 2012
European Journal of Cancer 48 (2012)17. - ISSN 0959-8049 - p. 3267 - 3277.
bladder-cancer - vitamin-c - prospective cohort - carotenoids - smoking - diet - carcinogenesis - prevention - nutrient - folate
Background - Many epidemiological studies have examined fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to the risk of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) of the bladder, but results are inconsistent. The association between fruit and vegetable consumption and UCC risk may vary by bladder tumour aggressiveness. Therefore, we examined the relation between fruit and vegetable consumption and the risk of aggressive and non-aggressive UCC in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods - After 8.9 years of follow-up, 947 UCC were diagnosed among 468,656 EPIC participants. Of these, 421 could be classified as aggressive UCC and 433 as non-aggressive UCC cases. At recruitment, fruit and vegetable consumption was assessed by validated dietary questionnaires. Multivariable hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression stratified by age, sex and center and adjusted for smoking status, duration and intensity of smoking, and energy intake. Results - Total consumption of fruits and vegetables was not associated with aggressive UCC nor with non-aggressive UCC. A 25 g/day increase in leafy vegetables and grapes consumption was associated with a reduced risk of non-aggressive UCC (hazard ratio (HR) 0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.78–1.00 and HR 0.87; 95% CI 0.77–0.98, respectively), while the intake of root vegetables was inversely associated with risk of aggressive UCC (HR 0.87; 95% CI 0.77–0.98). Conclusion - Our study did not confirm a protective effect of total fruit and/or vegetable consumption on aggressive or non-aggressive UCC. High consumption of certain types of vegetables and of fruits may reduce the risk of aggressive or non-aggressive UCC; however chance findings cannot be excluded.
Lower educational level is a predictor of incident type 2 diabetes in European countries: the EPIC-InterAct study
Sacerdote, C. ; Ricceri, F. ; Rolandsson, O. ; Baldi, I. ; Chirlaque, M.D. ; Feskens, E.J.M. - \ 2012
International Journal of Epidemiology 41 (2012)4. - ISSN 0300-5771 - p. 1162 - 1173.
course socioeconomic position - nutrition examination survey - 3rd national-health - life-style factors - of-the-literature - risk-factors - cardiovascular-disease - social-class - adult mortality - data-collection
Background Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide. In high-income countries, low socioeconomic status seems to be related to a high incidence of T2DM, but very little is known about the intermediate factors of this relationship. Method We performed a case-cohort study in eight Western European countries nested in the EPIC study (n¿=¿340¿234, 3.99 million person-years of follow-up). A random sub-cohort of 16¿835 individuals and a total of 12¿403 incident cases of T2DM were identified. Crude and multivariate-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for each country and pooled across countries using meta-analytical methods. Age-, gender- and country-specific relative indices of inequality (RII) were used as the measure of educational level and RII tertiles were analysed. Results Compared with participants with a high educational level (RII tertile 1), participants with a low educational level (RII tertile 3) had a higher risk of T2DM [HR: 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.69–1.85; P-trend¿
Bias in protein and potassium intake collected with 24-h recalls (EPIC-Soft) is rather comparable across European populations
Crispim, S.P. ; Geelen, A. ; Freisling, H. ; Souverein, O.W. ; Hulshof, P.J.M. ; Ocke, M.C. ; Boshuizen, H.C. ; Andersen, L.F. ; Ruprich, J. ; Keizer, W. de; Huybrechts, I. ; Lafay, L. ; DeMagistris, M.S. ; Ricceri, F. ; Tumino, R. ; Krogh, V. ; Bueono-de-Mesquita, H.B. ; Beulens, J.W.J. ; Boutron-Ruault, M.C. ; Naska, A. ; Crowe, F.L. ; Boeing, H. ; McTaggart, A.R. ; Kaaks, R. ; Veer, P. van 't; Slimani, N. - \ 2012
European Journal of Nutrition 51 (2012)8. - ISSN 1436-6207 - p. 997 - 1010.
consumption validation efcoval - diet recall - urinary nitrogen - nutrition - cancer - calibration - telephone - countries - biomarker - centers
Purpose: We investigated whether group-level bias of a 24-h recall estimate of protein and potassium intake, as compared to biomarkers, varied across European centers and whether this was influenced by characteristics of individuals or centers. Methods: The combined data from EFCOVAL and EPIC studies included 14 centers from 9 countries (n = 1,841). Dietary data were collected using a computerized 24-h recall (EPIC-Soft). Nitrogen and potassium in 24-h urine collections were used as reference method. Multilevel linear regression analysis was performed, including individual-level (e.g., BMI) and center-level (e.g., food pattern index) variables. Results: For protein intake, no between-center variation in bias was observed in men while it was 5.7% in women. For potassium intake, the between-center variation in bias was 8.9% in men and null in women. BMI was an important factor influencing the biases across centers (p <0.01 in all analyses). In addition, mode of administration (p = 0.06 in women) and day of the week (p = 0.03 in men and p = 0.06 in women) may have influenced the bias in protein intake across centers. After inclusion of these individual variables, between-center variation in bias in protein intake disappeared for women, whereas for potassium, it increased slightly in men (to 9.5%). Center-level variables did not influence the results. Conclusion: The results suggest that group-level bias in protein and potassium (for women) collected with 24-h recalls does not vary across centers and to a certain extent varies for potassium in men. BMI and study design aspects, rather than center-level characteristics, affected the biases across centers
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