Staff Publications

Staff Publications

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    'Staff publications' is the digital repository of Wageningen University & Research

    'Staff publications' contains references to publications authored by Wageningen University staff from 1976 onward.

    Publications authored by the staff of the Research Institutes are available from 1995 onwards.

    Full text documents are added when available. The database is updated daily and currently holds about 240,000 items, of which 72,000 in open access.

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    Guide to evaluation of quality of surface water in coffee river basins of Colombia
    Rodríguez Valencia, Nelson ; Quintero Yepes, Laura Vanessa ; Gómez Zuluaga, Gustavo Adolfo ; Bohórquez Zapata, Viviana Lorena ; González Durán, Cristy Mayerly ; Osorio Ocampo, Andrés Felipe ; Miguel García, Ángel de; Harmsen, Joop ; Wolters, W. ; Miguel Ayala, L. - \ 2018
    Bogota : APC Columbia - 206
    Integrated model of coffee river basin management in Colombia - Manos al Agua experience
    Calderón Correa, Rodrigo ; Rodríguez Valencia, Nelson ; Wolters, W. ; Miguel Ayala, L. - \ 2018
    Bogota : APC Columbia - 196
    Apppropriate technologies for water treatment on coffee farms
    Rodríguez Valencia, Nelson ; Quintero Yepes, Laura Vanessa ; Osorio Ocampo, Andrés Felipe ; Castañeda, Samuel Antonio ; Miguel García, Ángel de; Harmsen, Joop ; Bisschops, Iemke ; Wolters, W. ; Miguel Ayala, L. - \ 2018
    Bogota : APC Columbia - 130
    Guía para la evaluación de la calidad del agua superficial en microcuencas cafeteras de Colombia
    Rodríguez Valencia, Nelson ; Quintero Yepes, Laura Vanessa ; Gómez Zuluaga, Gustavo Adolfo ; Bohórquez Zapata, Viviana Lorena ; González Durán, Cristy Mayerly ; Osorio Ocampo, Andrés Felipe ; Miguel García, Ángel de; Harmsen, Joop ; Wolters, W. ; Miguel Ayala, L. - \ 2018
    Bogota : APC Columbia - ISBN 9789588490304 - 206
    Modelo integral de manejo de microcuencas cafeteras en Colombia : Experiencia "Manos al Agua"
    Calderón Correa, Rodrigo ; Rodríguez Valencia, Nelson ; Wolters, W. ; Miguel Ayala, L. - \ 2018
    Bogota : APC Columbia - ISBN 9789588490236 - 196
    Tecnologías apropiadas para el tratamiento de aguas en fincas cafeteras
    Rodríguez Valencia, Nelson ; Quintero Yepes, Laura Vanessa ; Osorio Ocampo, Andrés Felipe ; Castañeda, Samuel Antonio ; Miguel García, Ángel de; Harmsen, Joop ; Bisschops, Iemke ; Wolters, W. ; Miguel Ayala, L. - \ 2018
    Bogota : APC Columbia - ISBN 9789588490274 - 130
    Detection and mapping of burnt areas from time series of MODIS-derived NDVI data in a Mediterranean region
    García, Miguel A. ; Alloza, José A. ; Mayor, Ángeles G. ; Bautista, Susana ; Rodríguez, Francisco - \ 2014
    Central European Journal of Geosciences 6 (2014)1. - ISSN 2081-9900 - p. 112 - 120.
    Burnt area mapping - Mediterranean Basin - MODIS-NDVI - Remote sensing - Wildfire

    Moderate resolution remote sensing data, as provided by MODIS, can be used to detect and map active or past wildfires from daily records of suitable combinations of reflectance bands. The objective of the present work was to develop and test simple algorithms and variations for automatic or semiautomatic detection of burnt areas from time series data of MODIS biweekly vegetation indices for a Mediterranean region. MODIS-derived NDVI 250m time series data for the Valencia region, East Spain, were subjected to a two-step process for the detection of candidate burnt areas, and the results compared with available fire event records from the Valencia Regional Government. For each pixel and date in the data series, a model was fitted to both the previous and posterior time series data. Combining drops between two consecutive points and 1-year average drops, we used discrepancies or jumps between the pre and post models to identify seed pixels, and then delimitated fire scars for each potential wildfire using an extension algorithm from the seed pixels. The resulting maps of the detected burnt areas showed a very good agreement with the perimeters registered in the database of fire records used as reference. Overall accuracies and indices of agreement were very high, and omission and commission errors were similar or lower than in previous studies that used automatic or semiautomatic fire scar detection based on remote sensing. This supports the effectiveness of the method for detecting and mapping burnt areas in the Mediterranean region.

    Characterization of volatile and non-volatile compounds of fresh pepper (Capsicum annuum)
    Eggink, P.M. ; Haanstra, J.P.W. ; Tikunov, Y.M. ; Bovy, A.G. ; Visser, R.G.F. - \ 2010
    In: Proceedings of the XIVth EUCARPIA Meeting on Genetics and Breeding of Capsicum & Eggplant, Valencia, Spain. - Universidad Politécnica de Valencia - ISBN 9788469341391 - p. 251 - 259.
    In this study volatile and non-volatile compounds and several agronomical important parameters were measured in mature fruits of elite sweet pepper breeding lines and hybrids and several genebank accessions from different Capsicum species. The sweet pepper breeding lines and hybrids were chosen to roughly represent the expected variation in flavor of Capsicum annuum in the Rijk Zwaan germplasm. The genebank accessions were either chosen because they were expected to have unique combinations of aromas and flavors, according to experience and/or literature, or were parents of mapping populations. The biochemical profiling allowed visualization of between- and within-species metabolic variation and stability during the year. In general, total soluble solids content (Brix) was genotype-dependent and fluctuated only slightly throughout the growing season, with uncultivated genotypes showing the largest changes. The species C. chinense, C. baccatum var. pendulum and C. annuum could be clearly separated by principle component analysis based on profiles of 391 volatile compounds. Especially for breeding purposes it seems to be interesting to study this variation in more detail, trying to unravel the complex genetics of the different pepper flavor aspects.
    Exploratory QTL analyses of some pepper physiological traits in two environments
    Alimi, N.A. ; Bink, M.C.A.M. ; Dieleman, J.A. ; Sage-Palloix, A.M. ; Voorrips, R.E. ; Lefebvre, V. ; Palloix, A. ; Eeuwijk, F.A. van - \ 2010
    In: Advances in Genetics and Breeding of Capsicum and Eggplant : Proceedings of the XIVth EUCARPIA Meeting on genetics and breeding of Capsicum and Eggplant. - Valencia, Spain : Editorial Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Valencia, Spain - ISBN 9788469341391 - p. 295 - 300.
    behind phenotypic differences and led to selection of genotypes having favourable traits. Continuous monitoring of environmental conditions has also become an accessible option. Rather than single trait evaluation, we would prefer smarter approaches capable of evaluating multiple, often correlated and time dependent traits simultaneously as a function of genes (QTLs) and environmental inputs, where we would The use of molecular breeding techniques has increased insight into the genetics like to include intermediate genomic information as well. In this paper, an exploratory QTL analysis over two environments was undertaken using available genetic and phenotypic data from segregating recombinant inbred lines (RIL) of pepper (Capsicum annuum). We focused on vegetative traits, e.g. stem length, speed of stem development, number of internodes etc. We seek to improve the estimation of allelic values of these traits under the two environments and determine possible QTL x E interaction. Almost identical QTLs are detected for each trait under the two environments but with varying LOD scores. No clear evidence was found for presence of QTL by environment interactions, despite differences in phenotypes and in magnitude of QTLs expression. Within the EU project SPICY (Voorrips et al., 2010 this issue), a larger number of environments will be studied and more advanced statistical analysis tools will be considered. The correlation between the traits will also be modelled. The identification of markers for the important QTL (Nicolaï et al., 2010 this issue) will improve the speed and accuracy of genomic prediction of these complex phenotypes
    Crop growth models for the -omics era: the EU-SPICY project
    Voorrips, R.E. ; Palloix, A. ; Dieleman, J.A. ; Bink, M.C.A.M. ; Heuvelink, E. ; Heijden, G.W.A.M. van der; Vuylsteke, M. ; Glasbey, C. ; Barócsi, A. ; Magán, J. ; Eeuwijk, F.A. van - \ 2010
    In: Advances in Genetics and Breeding of Capsicum and Eggplant : Proceedings of the XIVth EUCARPIA Meeting on genetics and breeding of Capsicum and Eggplant. - Valencia, Spain : Editorial Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Valencia, Spain - ISBN 9788469341391 - p. 315 - 321.
    The prediction of phenotypic responses from genetic and environmental information is an area of active research in genetics, physiology and statistics. Rapidly increasing amounts of phenotypic information become available as a consequence of high throughput phenotyping techniques, while more and cheaper genotypic data follow from the development of new genotyping platforms. , A wide array of -omics data can be generated linking genotype and phenotype. Continuous monitoring of environmental conditions has become an accessible option. This wealth of data requires a drastic rethinking of the traditional quantitative genetic approach to modeling phenotypic variation in terms of genetic and environmental differences. Where in the past a single phenotypic trait was partitioned in a genetic and environmental component by analysis of variance techniques, nowadays we desire to model multiple, interrelated and often time dependent, phenotypic traits as a function of genes (QTLs) and environmental inputs, while we would like to include transcription information as well. The EU project 'Smart tools for Prediction and Improvement of Crop Yield' (KBBE-2008-211347), or SPICY, aims at the development of genotype-to-phenotype models that fully integrate genetic, genomic, physiological and environmental information to achieve accurate phenotypic predictions across a wide variety of genetic and environmental configurations. Pepper (Capsicum annuum) is chosen as the model crop, because of the availability of genetically characterized populations and of generic models for continuous crop growth and greenhouse production. In the presentation the objectives and structure of SPICY as well as its philosophy will be discussed.
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